Arrested For Not Mowing Grass ?

This stuff is getting beyond absurd.

To give the municipal government a fair shake they are claiming the guy wasn’t arrested for failure to mow his grass; he was technically arrested because he failed to pay the fines levied for not mowing his grass.

…”The statement also made it clear [the municipal courts] would not arrest someone for not mowing their grass”…

They arrest people (issue warrants) for not paying the fines for not mowing their grass. See the difference?

Regardless, this stuff is dangerous and absurd – stop the slippery slope, I want to get off.

GRAND PRAIRIE (CBS 11 NEWS) – A showdown over high grass and city codes prompted a Grand Prairie man to take himself to jail.

“I didn’t know what else to do,” said 57 year old Rick Yoes.

Rick Yoes says he’s had trouble with the city before because his yard looked like this. In the past, he’s been able to bring it into compliance. But he says he was shocked to learn the city had issued warrants for six outstanding code violations he didn’t know about.

“I can’t really afford to pay a lawyer to fight it,” Yoes said. “I couldn’t really afford to pay them $1700 in fines that he said I owed him. I didn’t know what else to do I just turned myself in.”

After turning himself in, Yoes spent the weekend in jail before a friend payed off his fine.  (read more)

maximize_your_freedom_bumper_sticke

Enough

I’m sure people have a different opinion than me on this issue, but I find this governmental approach ridiculous in the extreme.  If the guy, or gal, want an unkempt lawn that’s his decision to make….  Leave people alone !

This entry was posted in A New America, Big Stupid Government, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

63 Responses to Arrested For Not Mowing Grass ?

  1. Father Paul Lemmen says:

    Reblogged this on A Conservative Christian Man.

    Like

  2. stella says:

    Amen!

    Liked by 2 people

    • stella says:

      I would be interested to hear what attorneys have to say about civil employees levying fines for infractions without recourse for a defense. It’s different with, for example, a traffic citation, where the ticketed person is given a court date where they can confront the police officer and present their side of the story and evidence, if any. It doesn’t seem to me that fines like these should be legally enforceable.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Shibbity Boo says:

        How do you feel about regulations that “spring into being” – no legislative action required, nor allowed – as long as the perpetrator gets a “day in court”?

        Like

      • BobNoxious says:

        You can request a trial on the issue of municipal fines; I’ve had to sit through one as a law clerk w/ a woman who insisted on representing herself. It was beyond painful and I wouldn’t wish it upon anyone. The woman would intentionally put the most obnoxious junk on her lawn just to be a pain and then claim it was her right to do so. She would put box springs, random pieces of metal, pretty much anything could find in a scrap yard would go on her lawn in direct violation of several municipal ordinances.

        The way it works is the city would first send multiples notices asking her to remove the items (which result in her placing more items out there) and only after multiple ignored warnings did they finally issue monetary fines. IIRC, it was after 18-24 months of not paying the fines or removing the items that she was finally dragged before a judge. She was eventually ordered to spend a weekend in jail for contempt for being disrespectful to the judge (she was a nasty old lady) and I believe fines were resolved by placing a lien on her house to be paid when it sold.

        Like

        • Chip Bennett says:

          cough property rights cough

          Liked by 3 people

          • BobNoxious says:

            Not sure what you’re coughing about. You don’t have unlimited rights to do whatever you want with your property to the point of affecting your neighbors property rights or violating ordinances, CCRs, etc. that the land was subject to prior to your purchasing it.

            Like

            • Chip Bennett says:

              Just because the government abuses its power to infringe on those rights doesn’t mean that you don’t rightfully have them.

              Like

              • BobNoxious says:

                I don’t see telling someone to not pile in trash in their front yard as violating anyone’s property rights; especially when it gets to the point of devaluing the neighbors property and/or interfering with the neighbors own property rights. The woman knew the rules when she bought the house and still made the decison to purchase it, so she needs to follow the rules. Nobody forced her to buy that house, in that neighborhood, as opposed to buying another property in different area w/ little to no ordinances and regulations.

                Like

                • Chip Bennett says:

                  If someone is creating a sanitation/health hazard issue, that’s one thing. Attracting critters that could then cause problems for the neighbors is something that legitimately could violate the neighbors’ own property rights.

                  Otherwise, if one doesn’t want the neighbor’s choices to impact his own property value adversely, one should probably buy somewhere with more land between houses. The “you’re impacting my property value” canard is pure communist crap.

                  Liked by 2 people

                • coeurdaleneman says:

                  I agree. One of the most noxious developments over that past few decades has been the invention of “stakeholder” rights, where every buttinski has been given official powers over their neighbors rights.

                  Like

                • Gabe says:

                  You are on the right track. Claims of nuisance revolve around whether a given activity is suitable for a given area, and whether that activity substantially interferes with the property rights of others. Simply put, you can’t keep a chinchilla farm or an apiary in you front yard if you live in an upscale city neighborhood, and you won’t get far complaining about noise if you move in next to an airport.

                  It may smack of communism, but this is ancient, English doctrine. FYI property law predates civil and criminal codes. It made for interesting reading during my 1L year. Check it out, I think you would enjoy yourself. Btw, great blog! It’s one of the few places on the Internet where you can have a civil debate and expect trolls to be ferreted out quickly.

                  Like

                • Anubis says:

                  If my neighbor has allergies does that mean I can’t plant flowers? If she has Ailurophobia – fear of cats- does this mean no kittens allowed on my property? New Yorkers are more bothered by cats killing vermin than shootings. Should I not be allowed to fly a flag because illegals would be offended? Should I not be allowed to paint my house white because it would have privilege? Since blacks moving in to a neighborhood drops home prices more than anything, can I fine the fat lady who let her black boyfriend move in?

                  Like

            • michellc says:

              The problem I have with this is violating ordinances.
              Way back when before cities had so many ordinances that in some cases it’s impossible to know or understand them all, things like this were worked out differently. Neighbors shamed the offensive party and in severe cases where they were disturbing the peace or had dangerous animals, etc. the police were called.
              Now cities must pay for police, then pay for a construction board, a code enforcement board, code enforcement officers and inspectors. It’s beyond ridiculous.
              I know a person who wanted to put a small fence in their front yard, they tried to follow the city ordinances and not build the fence any taller than 4 foot, made it out of approved materials, kept it the determined feet from the sidewalk. Then they came and told him he didn’t apply to the planning committee to get approval or proper permits and fined him $500. Then told him unless he paid for the $75 permit then the fence must come down. He paid the fine and the permit fee, then the inspector came out and turned down the fence and said it must be moved back two feet. He pulled out the ordinance and a tape measure and showed him he was in compliance with the ordinance. He was told either move it or he wouldn’t pass it and he had to pay for a reinspect fee of $25. He pulled up all the posts and rebuilt the fence, paid the reinspect fee and a different inspector came out and failed it again because one corner was 3″ above 4 feet. At this point he tore it down and planted hedges and went through another battle with them. This time he sued the city, the board and the inspector. Judge ruled he could only sue the city not individuals. He won in court but was harassed until he gave up and sold his house and moved outside city limits where he could do what he wanted on his own property.
              My personal opinion is individuals should be sued, if these idiots discovered that their personal assets could be gone after fewer of them would run around making life hell for citizens.

              Like

  3. cohibadad says:

    it’s like the knockout game. I didn’t kill you, I just sucker punched you in the face. The unconscious fall striking your head killed you. duh.

    Like

  4. This is really not new. Back in the 70’s, I cut the grass for a poor woman who was unable to cut her grass. Her grass had grown too tall and the neighbors were bi*ching about it. Of course they called the city about it, rather than help her, she had to get the grass cut so I did it.

    Liked by 5 people

  5. Shibbity Boo says:

    Lucky They didn’t accuse him of selling loosies.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. moogey says:

    Our municipality voted last summer to fine persons in the community who let their grass grow longer than eight inches. I decided to let my lawn go to see just how far they were willing to go. Yep, the board members were out in their cars daily, driving around the neighborhoods, and of course, they drove by my house daily for two weeks. Once my grass reached the eight inches, they stopped in front of my residence, wrote my address on their clipboards and departed. Between the time they did that, and the next day when they appeared to provide me with a ticket, I had mowed my lawn.

    Meanwhile, I took a trip around the town to check out apartment buildings that had two feet of grass growing & businesses that had 2 foot weeds growing, but they had/have never been approached. By the way, I had a Republican candidates sign in my front yard during the experiment & I do believe that had a lot to do with their little brown shirt ideals, that they were going to give warnings before fines. Of course, once the “fines” were voted into existence, warnings were not included In the written code.

    Liked by 3 people

    • lastConservinIllinois? says:

      Well done moogey.

      Nothing frosts me more than busy-body gov-types looking for something to do.

      Like

      • moogey says:

        I moved to this community less than three years ago. When I purchased my house, the trees along the street were rotted, decayed and needed to be cut. I was going to trim them, but the same officials warned me that I would be fined if I did so. When I asked if I could have a landscaper cut them, I was informed, that no, they too would face fines. After eight months of no service, our neighbor’s trees took down power lines, started three fires and burned up a transformer. The power company asked me why the trees were not maintained in the neighborhood and I informed them that the city won’t allow landscapers to trim them, the city fines citizens if they cut them and the city refuses to do the job themselves. The next day, the power company cut the trees in a two block wide area, because they were a fire hazard. The city had to go pound sand. Sometimes, you just have to shake your head.

        Liked by 4 people

        • Monroe says:

          Or you can go out in the middle of the night wearing a ski mask to cut the trees.

          Like

        • sundance says:

          Good grief, what a clear representative example of governmental moonbattery.

          Liked by 1 person

        • BobNoxious says:

          Were the trees located on subdivision common ground or utility easement? That becomes a problem in older neighborhoods where you have above ground utility lines and defunct homeowners associations and/or cheap utility companies that don’t want to spend the money to trims trees that grow around powerlines. You get stuck b/w a rock and a hard place b/c it’s trespassing for you to go do something yourself. It’s especially tough in the situation with land owned by a defunct HOA b/c there is often times no mechanism for re-activating the HOA and getting control of the common ground property.

          Like

          • moogey says:

            When the area was built up in the 1950’s, the city planted trees in what is a barren, desolate landscape. Pretty up the place, so to speak.
            No HOA’s, no utility easement., Our city declares that any property from the sidewalk, to the street belongs to them. However, the owner is responsible for the sidewalks and upkeep for the city property between the street and the sidewalk, with the exception of the trees. The property is also added on the homeowner’s tax list and we are taxed as the homeowner for the “City Improvement” as well as tax on the land itself, but the land belongs to the city.
            It is the magical circle of insanity, that is our government.

            Liked by 1 person

            • art tart says:

              moogey ~ that’s the way it is in my town also, between the sidewalk/street the property belongs to the city BUT I am responsible for keeping it mowed/edged. I was in a hurry last year & didn’t blow the sidewalk off & left some grass on it, I got a nasty letter that stated “sidewalks have to be free of dead grass & if it continued, I could be fined.” Some nasty neighbor complained, the city sent me a form letter stating I was in violation. I try to always comply BUT I’m not going to lose sleep over it.

              Like

        • mikayla825 says:

          Sounds like my city, or almost anyplace in California

          Liked by 1 person

        • TwoLaine says:

          NO JUSTICE!
          NO PEACE!

          My Dad was fined repeatedly for not maintaining a tree that was on city property next to his. The tree, and annual damage it causes has been reported so many times by everyone anywhere in the neighborhood, as it is on a corner. And he’s been fined for obstructing an alley that he had purchased some 35+ years prior. It’s rehash after rehash, one harassment after another. It’s Sad. Give these people a clipboard and they think they are God.

          However, in the real world, they work for us, and they are a SAD WASTE OF TAXPAYER DOLLARS. If we spent the money we spend on their cars, salary, pensions, etc, to clean up the neighborhood ourselves, DONE!

          When I was growing up, I remember going to people’s houses who were in need, to paint, roof, put on new windows, all sorts. Some I knew, some I didn’t. My Dad has always helped maintain our city streets in the snowy weather. Otherwise, no one could get in or out of the neighborhood. We were all on a big hill, with more big hills all around. My parents also ran the neighborhood patrols at a time when gang violence was the norm, and the recycling programs at our elementary school. Back when you didn’t have dumpsters ready made and left at your school for collection.

          How quickly we forget the pioneers who helped the neighborhoods to grow and flourish. Sadly, many never know who they are.

          Maybe we should nominate this man for a Yard Makeover. No muss, no fuss yard. Perhaps with really high walls and a MOAT! 🙂 🙂 🙂

          Like

  7. Jett Black says:

    This is a tough one, because seriously unkempt lawns can rapidly become rat and other vermin harborages, particularly in the semi-tropical south. What this story really highlights is the breakdown of neighborhoods and community, which is, at least in part a result of government taking over so much of our civil life. I’m pretty sure if this guy lived on my block, I’d offer to mow his lawn or discuss it with a few neighbors to get together to spread the burden. I’ve done it with houses that were unoccupied for a time and with elderly/injured neighbors. No biggee really (but then in my area, yards are pretty small).

    Instead, complainers just complain and the city just cites and shuffles paperwork, and no one talks or really does anything about the real issue, until stuff hits that fan. Woulda been a whole lot cheaper than the $1700 fine to just cut the poor dude’s grass every once in a while. Anyway, that is what happens when goobermint takes over–it destroys charities with welfare, destroys self-reliance and self-defense with overwhelming police and draconian gun laws, it destroys education, with its lowest manageable, universal standards curricula. and it’s destroying medicine with its over-regulation and hiding it all using its over-reactive medical privacy laws. Goobermint–root of all evil. Worse than crab-grass, mosquitos, roaches, and burrs, all together.

    Liked by 3 people

    • sundance says:

      …”What this story really highlights is the breakdown of neighborhoods and community, which is, at least in part a result of government taking over so much of our civil life”…

      I couldn’t agree more. And I agree with your recommendation(s) completely. Actually, I’m heartened and appreciative to read your comment.

      We, the proverbial thoughtful and considerate society “we”, need to stop with A.) accepting the nonsense; and, B) contributing to the nonsense.

      How tough would it be to knock on the door and offer help. Seeking first to understand and without judgment presenting yourself as a willing aide to assist. Take a supportive approach and remove the confrontational aspect.

      “neighbors, and/or some insufferable regulatory agency, might take exception to your grass/yard, and I want to help”. “Would you allow me to coordinate some upkeep and maintenance as to avoid this becoming a larger issue for you”?

      Then going about solving the problem with a spirit of community. Seek first to understand, then to aid in reconciliation of any non-compliance. And, most importantly, do it with a genuine heart….

      We need more of that, and less of this other nonsense.

      My .02

      Liked by 4 people

      • imreek says:

        My elderly mother in law had this problem. I will state that she lived in a covenant covered community though. It was sorta strange that a neighbor would spend an hour with me telling all about the overgrown bushes and the bald spot in the lawn. I could see him not wanting to trim the shrubbery, it took me a day one weekend to get it all done. But I couldn’t get him to ‘volunteer’ to turn on the outside faucet to a soaker hose every once in a while on dry days for the re-seeding. If it hadn’t of been a very hot day he would have gone on for longer. I guess ‘rights’ and ‘obligations’ are not taught as co-existing anymore. Perhaps a new federal department in charge of doing for people is the answer ( sarc off ).

        Like

  8. jc says:

    GWW Growing while white!

    he should have his lawn sprayed repeatedly with the strongest veg killer available – on windy days, turn the whole neighborhood into a dead zone

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Socrates says:

    We have the same issue up north here where they will ticket ya if your walk is not shoveled promptly. but the ignore the bars and other businesses on Maine street.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Justice_099 says:

      or don’t keep the roads plowed. That’s the only thing saving you from a ticket most of the time. The cops can’t get down the roads either.

      Like

  10. Monroe says:

    Where does one go to obtain this type of information? I don’t know if this exists in my neighborhood. I’ll let the grass grow to pollinate the yard.

    What meetings would one attend in order to know and petition such junk laws.

    Like

  11. Monroe says:

    Nothing like the government kicking poor, elderly, or disabled individuals while they are down.
    I know someone who maintained a wonderful landscape. But it went downhill when he was in a car accident that made him a paraplegic. The yard would not been my first concern. Also it is hard to argue that if you buy a house you should have the means to maintain the yard.

    Like

    • Justice_099 says:

      I recall a story many years ago about the city wanting to take a man’s home to do some development, but he refused. He was an elderly man and became sick and ended up in the hospital for an extended stay. The city ended up taking his home due to abandonment code (30 days, I think it was) while he was in the hospital.

      I’ll have to find the story again.

      Like

  12. Chip Bennett says:

    When I lived in a municipality not far from Ferguson, some busybody OFWG from the city used to drive around in his truck, with a ruler. Grass too long? You get a nag sign in your yard. Same deal: cut it, or get fined. Pay the fine, or get a bench warrant.

    Nevermind the 3am drug deals one street over, or the daytime home invasion robberies a few blocks from us. By George, the city has lawn ordinances to enforce!

    Liked by 4 people

    • TwoLaine says:

      I remember a young man named Matt Perry in the STL area, not long ago, who wasn’t allowed to park his restored truck in his own driveway. He fought the subdivision, they finally allowed him to park it, but didn’t change anything else.

      Matt’s truck is now up for sale.

      https://www.facebook.com/pages/Save-Matts-Truck/718832338141977

      Like

      • Old Hillbillt says:

        TwoLaine:

        Years ago, my nephew (who lived in a small town in southern Kansas) had an old Blazer that he was rebuilding the engine on (as time and scarce money allowed). It was in his back yard (that had a six-foot wooden fence around it). Not visible by ANYBODY but him and his family (unless someone trespassed in his LOCKED yard).
        He got a notice from the city code-enforcement officials that he COULD NOT have a non-operable vehicle on his property. They did not want to hear that he was rebuilding the engine. They just told him to get rid of it or get fined (severely).

        His reaction was to take the wheels off it and put it up on blocks, take the glass out of it and inform the city that it was now his kids’ jungle-gym (and since there was no city ordinance against jungle-gyms they could kindly GO POUND SAND)!

        Legally they could not do anything to him for it since it was now playground equipment!

        When he finished rebuilding the engine, he re-installed the engine, the glass and the wheels and drove it down to city hall to show off HIS playground equipment! I was always proud of him for his creativeness in sticking his finger in the eye of the local thought-police!

        Liked by 1 person

        • stella says:

          A number of years ago, my daughter (who was still living with me) bought a new car, and transferred the plate from her old one. The car was for sale, and parked in my driveway, sans plate. As soon as that plate was removed, the nosy neighbor across the street called the city to report a car without a plate parked in our driveway. He also used to report the person who lived in my house prior to me for working on his car in the backyard.

          Like

        • TwoLaine says:

          Reminds me of when I overhauled my 1st car, at age 16. 🙂

          Like

  13. doodahdaze says:

    He should get a Goat and see what they do next. Clearly they are insane.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. doodahdaze says:

    Never move to an area with an HOA or a city like this. If you are trapped in one get out and escape. They will eventually implode.

    Liked by 2 people

    • janc1955 says:

      You should see the areas of my city without HOAs, CCRs or any sort of property upkeep regulations. Lotsa luck if you bought a home in one of those ‘hoods in the last 2 dozen years.

      Like

    • CrankyinAZ says:

      I was waiting for someone to mention one these monstrosities (HOA). Dear God in Heaven!!! We moved into one of those neighborhoods – because in AZ that was all there was. 😦 Stupid neighbor behind us didn’t like our tree because once a year it spread pollen into his jacuzzi. Why he didn’t just put a cover on the thing, I don’t know. He ended up taking us through court over our tree! We ended up having to cut it down. I wanted to put in another Palo Verde that spread even more pollen but was on the “approved” list.. husband wouldn’t go for it though. Funny thing, growing up in AZ we didn’t have one of those stupid HOA’s and we all seemed to manage in our old neighborhood just fine. Guess with our new & Improved lifestyle changes we just can’t manage w/o someone telling us what to do, when to do it and how to do it… / sigh /

      Liked by 1 person

  15. mcfyre2012 says:

    So…

    Why doesn’t he mow his yard once in a while?

    Like

    • AdukeLAXobserver says:

      Apparently it isn’t just not mowing his lawn.

      http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/Long-grass-lands-Texas-man-in-jail-6181645.php

      “I can assure you our city would never simply place a citizen in jail for failing to mow their grass,” said Officer Mark Beseda with the Grand Prairie Police Department.

      He said city code enforcement officers, responding to neighbor complaints, had visited Yoes’ home 32 times since 1996, issuing 59 violations and six citations for the lawn. Officials with the City of Grand Prairie said citations are issued when grass and weeds exceed 12 inches and trees or shrubs obstruct sidewalks or streets. Photos taken by city officials show vines hanging from a tree, low enough to brush the windshield of a passing truck.

      “The complaints from neighbors to the city and our attempts to work with him have been generated from his neighbors in an effort to protect their neighborhood integrity and property values,” city officials said in a statement.

      Yoes’ violations since 1996 include “overhanging tree limbs,” “dilapidated wood fence,” “high grass,” “inoperable vehicle,” “junk in yard” and “swimming pool not maintained.”

      Liked by 1 person

      • janc1955 says:

        The thing is, if enough of this type of “pride of ownership” is allowed to go unaddressed, you end up with a run down ‘hood into which undesirables move. Think Ferguson. I have no problem with CCRs and the like. I do think we should try to watch out for one another, and when a neighbor needs a hand with something, we should offer it. But let’s face it, there are a lot of folks who live like pigs, and when their pen expands to the outside of their home and starts taking property values down, it should be addressed.

        Like

        • AdukeLAXobserver says:

          I don’t think this is a case of a man needing a hand. Apparently it has been going on since he was like 38.

          I got a guy like this living behind me right now. Grass is already pretty tall in the back. He has two out buildings. But still has junk under a small carport and junk in his lawn. When I moved in I had to fix a big hole in the chain link fence on the back line. I couldn’t stretch the fence because the grass on his side was so grown up and he rusty junk over there too. Just had to do a chicken wire fix. The guy has a nice car. Don’t think it is a money issue. He has an American flag flying in his front yard. Every time I see it think about a episode of hoarders were one hoarder started to sing God Bless America when forced to clean his property. My other two neighbors are real winners too.

          Like

          • janc1955 says:

            For some reason I’m reminded of that piece of filth, Philip Garrido, who kidnapped Jaycee Lee Dugard in Lake Tahoe and held her captive in his hot mess of a backyard for 18 years. Raped her repeatedly (she was like 11 or 12 when he grabbed her), and fathered two children by her. He had shacks and tents in his backyard for decades, and kids living in them for heaven’s sake, and nothing was ever done about it. Rules governing property upkeep aren’t all bad, in my opinion.

            Like

  16. One year I was in the Florida Keys during/after a particularly messy hurricane. One would think the code enforcement would have work to do at their own homes/yards?? They were out giving warnings the DAY AFTER the hurricane passed through!

    Longer grass develop longer roots and are hardier during droughts and water restrictions.

    Like

  17. Amy says:

    This happened to my husband before we got married. Interesting.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. czarowniczy says:

    Not a problem here – local home owner’s association members all have four or more legs and tall grass is all good to them.

    Like

  19. dginga says:

    I didn’t realize municipalities did this. I thought it was just neighborhoods with HOAs. That said, if you are a homeowner who lives in an area with these rules, and you do not feel inclined to comply, you should move out to the country where you can let your property look as bad as you want and nobody will bother you. Sounds like this particular homeowner was not disabled in any way, he is just an a–hole who doesn’t want to go along with community standards. He is probably a crappy neighbor too.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. texan59 says:

    I don’t think y’all will let me post what I want to. So I won’t………..yet. 😉

    Like

  21. TexasDude says:

    Municipal code violations in Texas are technically criminal offenses just like the state ticket offenses such as speeding, running red lights, etc. Also, in Texas while the punishment for any ticketable offense is just a fine, you can be hauled off to jail for not signing the ticket, aka the promise to appear. Likewise, if you fail to pay the fine, a warrant for arrest is issued.

    Like

  22. akathesob says:

    Priority’s have all but gone out the window.

    Like

  23. kadar2012 says:

    I got a ordinance for you that is beyond absurd. Read the wording carefully and you will see why I call it the take a dump permit.

    “Chapter 98: MOVING PERMITS
    § 98-1. Permit required. [Amended 6-28-1976 by Ord. No. 76-4]

    On and after the effective date of this chapter, no person, firm or corporation shall move into, move within or remove from, or cause his or its personal property to be so moved into, within or removed from, any house, dwelling or other building within hilltown Township without first having obtained a permit therefor, as hereinafter provided.”

    This ordinance is still on the books although some things have changed.
    No longer does it cost you $35 and you have to go in person to the police chief just to obtain the form. The township no longer has their ordinances posted online. They yanked them from the ecode website after a newspaper ran an article about this permit. Now you have to go in person to read the one and only copy of the “rules” that they have available to the public or you can purchase your own for $200.

    Like

  24. Sweet Baby Ray says:

    Ah, yes, “community standards” and “property values” – “I paid for this dainty little morsel, over here, now if you all don’t give me free run of the buffet, and print me moar money, then you (yes you, not me) will force me to hire someone to shoot you in the face. You’re fault, not mine.”

    It’s The American Way(TM)! (Oh – and ISIS sucks.)

    Like

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