The FCC Has Approved “Net Neutrality”…

The FCC has approved “net neutrality” regulations and in effect now weaponized the internet. The foundation to make the internet a political weapon -to be used like the IRS- is now established. It will only be a matter of time before political opposition sites, defined by the Obama administration as “the enemy”, will be more difficult to access. 

I wonder if they will let us see the regulations now they have passed them?

FCC net neutrality

(Via Politico) The Federal Communications Commission voted along party lines Thursday to approve sweeping changes to how it regulates the Internet, capping more than a year of noisy debate that sparked millions of public comments and drew the attention of President Barack Obama and congressional leaders.

The agency’s three Democrats voted to approve Chairman Tom Wheeler’s net neutrality order, which would treat broadband like a utility to ensure all Web traffic is treated equally. The commission’s two GOP members, Republican lawmakers and the nation’s telecom giants oppose the rules, saying they will dampen innovation and investment. AT&T has already threatened a legal challenge.

“The Internet is the most powerful and pervasive platform on the planet. It’s simply too important to be left without rules and without a referee on the field,” Wheeler said at Thursday’s FCC’s meeting. “Today is a red-letter day for Internet freedom, for consumers who want to use the Internet on their terms, for innovators who want to reach consumers without the control of gatekeepers.” (read more)

obama count it

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This entry was posted in Big Stupid Government, Conspiracy ?, Dem Hypocrisy, media bias, Obama Research/Discovery, Occupy Type Moonbats, Professional Idiots, propaganda, Uncategorized, Valerie Jarrett, White House Coverup. Bookmark the permalink.

158 Responses to The FCC Has Approved “Net Neutrality”…

  1. stella says:

    Oh, bad word, bad word, bad word.

    ““The Internet is the most powerful and pervasive platform on the planet. It’s simply too important to be left without rules and without a referee on the field,” Wheeler said at Thursday’s FCC’s meeting.”

    Said like a true bureaucrat.

    Liked by 17 people

  2. John Denney says:

    I wasn’t aware of anything broken about the Internet that required a Fed fix.

    But now, the fix is in.

    Liked by 3 people

    • smiley says:

      who, exactly, ARE the gatekeepers ??
      WHEN will these rules be published ??
      TY soros.
      work is freedom, right?
      Germany 1930s

      Like

      • AdukeLAXobserver says:

        The rules will probably be made up as they go. Also winners and losers will chosen depending on what political persuasion one has. I sense a lot of internet companies donating to democrats for the next two years.

        Liked by 1 person

      • texan59 says:

        With headlines like this one, what do you think?

        “Soros, Ford Foundations ‘Lavish’ $196 Million to Push Internet Regulations”

        http://www.mrc.org/articles/soros-ford-foundations-lavish-196-million-push-internet-regulations

        Liked by 2 people

      • kittycat77 says:

        All of these people who think they are getting a free ride don’t understand communism. TPTB will allow it go to on for a while, all the time making them more dependent upon them, the gov. Then, wham, not enough people working for them, so the gov (TPTB) will tell them that they have to go to work for the greater good. Of course, no freedom. This nation right now is so totally stupid, just so dumb.

        Liked by 4 people

        • JudgyOnAWebsite says:

          So many misguided Millennials too……believing they need “Trigger Warnings”, and to be protected from “hate speech”. This goes right along w/ that (NOT, of course, meaning to malign anyone HERE who has young adult kids! From what I’ve read, y’all are installing some sense! Now, if only we’re not stopped from spreading it………).

          Like

          • robertnotsowise says:

            I know a guy who owns a bed sheet company that’s very successful and he was interviewing a millennial about a potential job and at the end of the interview the millennial said to him “now can I tell you what you did wrong during this interview?”

            not. kidding.

            Like

            • JudgyOnAWebsite says:

              Ohhhh, no, no, no, no no! Gross! (I totally believe you though).

              The thing I don’t get is, if their “special-snowflake”, false-trophy-won, self-esteem is THAT great, then why do they need Trigger Warnings, etc? Or is that why??

              Like

            • Fantasia says:

              Lol. My reply would have been, “If it’s anything besides telling me my mistake was interviewing you to begin with glances at watch I don’t have the time to listen to anything else you have to say. Oh, and you didn’t get the job. If you will excuse me.. ” as I exit the interview area.

              Like

    • Coast says:

      I’m from the Government….and I’m here to HELP.

      Like

  3. justfactsplz says:

    This is not good. Now conservatives will be targeted.

    Liked by 6 people

  4. AdukeLAXobserver says:

    You should change the photo you are using to the one where the three rat commissioners are holding hands. It reminded me of when the rats past Obamacare and they made a big stink out of it with Pelosi walking around with that gavel and the rest of them holding hands. It was so in our face like what the FCC did today.

    Like

  5. stella says:

    This is better news – I hope.

    GOP finds its secret weapon

    http://thehill.com/regulation/legislation/229936-gop-finds-its-secret-weapon

    Republicans believe they have identified a potent weapon in their fight against President Obama’s regulatory agenda.

    GOP lawmakers plan to employ the seldom-used Congressional Review Act (CRA), which gives lawmakers the power to formally disapprove of major agency rules, as they seek to ratchet up their attacks on federal red tape.

    “It hasn’t been possible to use this in a divided Congress,” House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) told The Hill, “but now that it is, we certainly are interested in reviewing regulations to make sure they meet with congressional intent.”

    Liked by 9 people

  6. Sweep says:

    I believe FCC is required by law to post proposed regulations publicly for debate 30 days prior to a vote. They broke the law by keeping new regulations secret.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. It is basically like during the Revolution. They are coming for our Gutenbergs so we can’t produce and share papers and fliers. As we try to organize, they will block us. I hope everyone has their fall back plans in place.

    Liked by 1 person

    • JudgyOnAWebsite says:

      Seriously! Pretty sure the PTB are already aware of THIS site, but will the name be changed to WeLoveKingObama.com anytime soon, just in case? Do we all meet up on a distant hill somewhere?

      This crap is scary, & I’m not totally sure if I wish I understood more about it, or not. When does THIS become affected??

      Liked by 3 people

  8. michellc says:

    I’ve heard before that the NAZIs seized typewriters along with licensed typewriters. I guess this is our version of NAZIs seizing and licensing our typewriters.

    At first I was ticked off because our electric company is in the process of installing fiber optic lines to all of us and they were due to have it completed in our area by the beginning of next year at the latest and possibly as soon as this summer. I’m sure that progress will stop now, so no super fast speeds for me. Then it dawned on me they were seizing the internet so it really doesn’t matter.

    Like

    • auscitizenmom says:

      😦

      Like

    • bofh says:

      Don’t be in a hurry. More likely the fiber was for them to install “smart-meters” and other spy gear in your home.

      Liked by 2 people

      • michellc says:

        Too late we already have smart meters. I hate it but it’s either have them or not have electricity, we weren’t given a choice when they came out and changed them.

        The fiber optic though was nice, where I live you don’t have a lot of options, we have one company who provides wireless in our area and it’s fairly slow with a premium price or satellite. With the fiber optic we were going to get 10 times the speed for the same price. The people who have already received it love it and the company we have now is hurting because they’re losing all their customers. It’s working the way the market should work, they don’t want to provide a competitive service so they’re losing customers.

        Like

  9. kinthenorthwest says:

    For Any Facebook users it has been noticeable for months now that someone has its hand in Facebook censoring. Many of my friends have been put on suspension for making remarks against Obama. I am not talking about the ones that call him weird names or other such thing.

    Liked by 3 people

    • JudgyOnAWebsite says:

      OLD joke, but……..

      Q: “What’s the difference between Obama and God?”

      A: “God doesn’t think he’s Obama”.

      Wish there was a “new” Facebook. This one IS pretty Lefty, what w/ the multiple-gender-choices, etc, and it also seems to have gotten “progressively” more & more humblebraggish, IMO.

      Or maybe I just know a lot of super-obnoxious people…..?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Funny, I thought it was just my husband. He engages on the CNN Facebook page quite a bit and has been in Facebook Timeout on more than one occasion over the past year for simply disagreeing with Obama and this Administration.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I have one friend who three ids on there and only once that I saw did the comment seem to cross over the fence a bit. Every time he has gone into time out he would show all of us his crazy comments, and like said only once did I think it might have been a bit over the fence. Mostly it was just for disagreeing.
        There are many conservative sites that have gotten time out too…The one million bikers to DC lost their main side for a few days in the beginning.

        Like

  10. angie says:

    Did the committee get permission from Al Gore since he invented the internet?
    Seriously though, I hope the GOP can get rid of this act. It’s not as though we don’t have enough government spying on us already.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Dixie Darling says:

    Good news, bad news: It’s a vicious circle.

    “It’s an exercise in futility for Republicans, because the way the CRA works is Congress has to pass it, but then it has to be signed into law by the president, and it’s very unlikely the president would sign off on this,”………

    So the Republicans are just using it as a propaganda tool to try to make themselves look good.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. mazziflol says:

    Let me see if I got this straight in my head…there were 5, non-elected ‘officials’ deciding the fate of the internet for the entire country today? And they decided to give control to the government?

    Liked by 10 people

  13. doodahdaze says:

    We will figure out the rules and overcome. No matter what. This will be litigated for a long time. If you want to get to Heaven, you got to raise a little Hell. Resist we much. 🙂

    Liked by 9 people

  14. Clownzilla says:

    Tom Wheeler – the epitome of a slimy, weaselly, bureaucrat…may you swim in a lake of fire

    Liked by 2 people

  15. Fed Up says:

    Tar and feathers.

    Like

  16. Michael Dixon says:

    The camel’s nose is under the tent. This is just the beginning. The talk about broadband is the shiny object to distract us. The objective is control of the Internet, and that means censorship of conservative blogs and videos. Control of the means of mass communication is a hallmark of totalitarian governments. Today the Internet, tomorrow talk radio. Once the nails are driven into the coffins of those remaining arenas of free speech, freedom of expression will be silenced. Anyone who defies the government will be labeled a dissident or an enemy of the State. Our free society will be history. Does anyone among our elected representatives in Congress perceive what is happening?

    Liked by 4 people

  17. striket1977 says:

    This is a bigger story than the MSM has made it out to be.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. striket1977 says:

    Why does the house and senate have no say on this matter?

    Like

    • doodahdaze says:

      Because they handed over the power to the executive branch to regulate it by agency control. Agencies run the country through the orders of the president because congress has delegated them the power to do so. This brings up what I was thinking about. I was watching C-Pac today on C-Span and was so impressed by Senator Mike Lee and Rep. Mia Love. They get it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • bofh says:

        Yep. Those laws are riddled with “…as the secretary shall determine”.

        I wish “The Bob’s” (from “Office Space”) were interviewing Congress critters for their own jobs: “So, what would ya say that you DO around here? Hmmm?”.

        Well, they don’t worry about the details – that’s all “as the secretary shall determine”. And they don’t read the bills, since they’re too big and complicated, and they claim that they’re all written by staffers, but actually they’re written by lobbyists, because, after all, who can be an expert on all of this stuff, anyway? But Staffers, Lawmakers, and Lobbyists are all running through the same rotating door anyway. We are so scroomed.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zylSNOd7TGU (starting at 1:55)

        Liked by 1 person

  19. F.D.R. in Hell says:

    Liked by 1 person

  20. czarowniczy says:

    “t’s simply too important to be left without rules and without a referee on the field…” and where have we heard this BS before? Yea verily yea tis truly us against them.

    Like

  21. Aslan's Girl says:

    Is there a way to support AT&T’s lawsuit? Good for them at any rate, since Congress is nothing to rely on. BTW, can Congress do anything about this?

    Like

  22. Aslan's Girl says:

    Change some “internet” to “1st Amendment/speech” to see how awful this is:

    “The 1st Amendment is the most powerful and pervasive platform on the planet. It’s simply too important to be left without rules and without a referee on the field,” Wheeler said at Thursday’s FCC’s meeting. “Today is a red-letter day for speech freedom, for consumers who want to use the speech on their terms, for innovators who want to reach consumers without the control of gatekeepers.”

    Liked by 1 person

    • JudgyOnAWebsite says:

      Bingo! That’s what they want……..like Europe (Brigitte Bardot is on trial AGAIN in France for speaking out against Muslims). (They tend to run quite counter to her pro-animal activism. I’m w/ her on this!).

      Liked by 3 people

  23. Sam says:

    The Internet is the safety valve that keeps a fed-up and angry population from doing something concrete about their grievances. If the government were smart, it would leave the Internet alone. Well, government just decided not to be smart and we will see what happens.

    Liked by 6 people

  24. F.D.R. in Hell says:

    These regulations moved out of the bowels of the White House.
    The FCC was ordered to put them into effect…and the FCC and the FEC will enforce them.
    What regulations, you ask? 300+ pages of them, covering a helluva lot more than broadband.
    👿

    Liked by 1 person

    • Les says:

      What is technically “the Internet” now? Does it cover home networks, wifi? What about phone messaging/data?

      Like

      • JudgyOnAWebsite says:

        I know, right?? Wish I was bright enough to figure out the “Dark Net” (I can’t even get the Taplika virus off my system tho–btw, anyone know about that?).

        Like

        • Les says:

          Try this: http://malwaretips.com/blogs/remove-taplika-virus/

          I use Malwarebytes, so I know it’s safe and does a good job. Haven’t used the AdwCleaner. If it works, let us know.

          Liked by 1 person

          • JudgyOnAWebsite says:

            Thanks, Les!! I really appreciate that! (If I throw this durn laptop out the window, as I’m tempted to, I won’t be able to check my favorite commenters here).

            Like

          • angie says:

            I use both. Run one and then the other. Sometimes malware will be missed by say adwcleaner but malware bytes will catch it and vice versa.

            Judgy, as for dark internet, one site I sometimes go to has changed their from
            http ( HyperText Transfer Protocol) to the more secure https (Secure HyperText Transfer Protocol ) for privacy.

            Like

            • JudgyOnAWebsite says:

              Thank you, m’dear. I owe you one! 🙂

              Like

              • angie says:

                No problem. I worry especially on sites like this one where Sundance and the gang bring truth to light. People who aren’t happy about it might plant links with malware. Last week, malware Bytes found a Trojan pup. Some of those are keystroke loggers which are terrible. Not saying that it came from here but I believe in better safe than sorry. I run both daily and if I follow links, I run them more than once a day.

                Like

                • JudgyOnAWebsite says:

                  I worry too. Sundance is TOO good. They must HATE him…….(shiver).

                  (Btw, to the unsophisticated folk like me, a “Trojan pup” sounds kinda cute………).

                  Like

      • F.D.R. in Hell says:

        Any and every interface device that accesses the World Wide Web…
        VoIP, “smart” devices (meters, phones, TVs, etc), WiFi, e.v.e.r.y.t.h.i.n.g. that I used to read about in my Hugo Gernsback Sci-Fi magazines in the 1930s. 😉

        Like

  25. Les says:

    Always have a sticker over your camera “eye.”
    $%^$

    Liked by 4 people

  26. kittycat77 says:

    I guess it’s time that we learn a new language, or at least a coded language that only we might know. So do you think this would bother them?

    Like

  27. kittycat77 says:

    My whole thought is this, why is all these so-called important guys, whoever they may be, are bowing to their king? Think about it. They act like they are doing a king’s wishes.

    Like

  28. Michael Dixon says:

    Like

  29. lnvaderzee says:

    The ironic thing here is that the whole debate was completely based off of misunderstanding. The fact of the matter is that so called “fast lanes” already exist. Big internet companies like Google and Netflix pay the cable companies to have their servers at the cable companies locations, therefore bypassing the ISP’s altogether. The concept of the fast lanes had absolutely nothing to do with consumers and more to do with start-ups having a fair shot against the already established companies.
    Big internet companies like Netflix consume so much bandwidth it has become impossible for them to go through ISPs without experiencing a bottleneck, so they bypass by paying money to the cable companies. Start up companies do not have the ability to do this, and can easily get out muscled by the others. These fast lanes are in speeds upwards of 100Gb/s, 1,000 times faster than anyone has available in their homes.
    Essentially, whether you want to watch cable or Netflix, the cable companies have dominant control over it, the fact that the existing infrastructure is proprietary only diminishes competition between cable providers, add the fact that big companies like Netflix are paying the cable companies, and you see that your choice really is also diminished, the cable companies have their fingers in all of it.
    The idea behind fast lanes was sponsored by Verizon and others because they see the lack competitive opportunity, and they are losing money by not having all the popular traffic stream through the internet. So now Verizon and AT&T are starting their own Cable Service Providing wings (FiOS and uVerse) so that they can remedy the situation, the more people go to FiOS, the more Google and Netflix traffic they will get, and these fast lanes were supposed to support that. Now, without these lanes, the traffic from the heavy loaded companies like Netflix and other streaming video sites will bog down slightly, and be slower, which will negatively affect FiOS, which will negatively affect the competition in Cable Service Providers.
    Wired magazine had a great article on this.
    On top of that, their is a portion in the bill which allows the Cable Service providers to throttle down bandwidth from sites they see as dangerous or having a negative effect on their servers, and it doesn’t get any more specific than that. Rather than freeing the internet, this whole bill just gave the entire industry to cable service providers on a platter, expecting them to leave a backdoor escrow for the government to use on all of their encryption standards.
    So now the government has control of the internet, the cable companies in their back pocket, and the golden key to view any and all communications between citizens. Good job, FCC.
    Remember, Tom Wheeler was a lobbyist for Comcast, the largest cable provider in the country. So large, in fact, that in order to purchase Time Warner they have to hand of some of their territory to another company.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. shirley49 says:

    I hope there will be lawsuits. This is illegal. Bet Judicial Watch is already working on it.

    Like

  31. angie says:

    Love this from Ron Paul. He nails it.


    “Ron Paul

    Internet, RIP?
    by Ron Paul

    Today the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), a non-elected federal government agency, voted three-to-two to reclassify broadband Internet as a common carrier service under Title II of the Communications Act. This means that – without the vote of Congress, the peoples’ branch of government – a federal agency now claims the power to regulate the Internet. I am surprised that even among civil liberties groups some claim the federal government increasing regulation of the Internet somehow increases our freedom and liberty.

    The truth is very different. The adoption of these FCC rules on the Internet represents the largest regulatory power grab in recent history. The FCC’s newly adopted rule takes the most dynamic means of communication and imposes the regulatory structure designed for public utilities. Federal regulation could also open the door to de facto censorship of ideas perceived as threatening to the political class – ideas like the troops should be brought home, the PATRIOT Act should be repealed, military spending and corporate welfare should be cut, and the Federal Reserve should be audited and ended.

    The one bright spot in this otherwise disastrous move is that federal regulations making it more difficult to use the Internet will cause more Americans to join our movement for liberty, peace, and prosperity. The federal government should keep its hands off of the Internet!”

    Like

  32. anonbob says:

    if all it was to do is prevent price fixing by ISPs and prevent traffic shaping ‘fast lanes’ for cash then I PROBABLY wouldn’t have a problem with that.

    But there’s NO WAY that 0bama and his cronies aren’t going to use it for political gain.

    I guarantee you that eliminating Drudge is going to be on page one of their hit list, probably on the top half.

    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. Get your VPNs lined up and learn TOR. We’re going to need some internet speakeasys sooner rather than later.

    Like

  33. labrat says:

    Can anyone point me to a coherent article on this because I’m so confused. I’m not too ashamed to admit that I don’t understand this issue at all. I have tried. I’ve yet to read anything that explains this issue in comprehensible english.

    Like

    • Josh says:

      As I understand it, the vote puts the internet under Title II of the Communications Act (see Ron Paul above). That’s all it is AT THIS TIME. Of course, it can be assumed that, additional rules and regulations will be forthcoming. So, to understand, you might begin with learning about the Communications Act of 1934 and then stay tuned…

      Also, there are several articles and videos by knowledgeable people regarding this vote. This will not end pretty 😦

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communications_Act_of_1934

      Like

  34. Brett says:

    We will need to be on an e-mail contact list soon…no images, just info. And by the way, it has been observed many times in the past; the Founders of our country ‘would be shooting by now’. FDR in Hell stated that, “It is easier to resist at the beginning than at the end.” When the government has clamped down on internet, talk radio, cell phone usage, and probably two-way radio contact, it will be impossible to communicate except by mirrors.

    Like

    • Josh says:

      There’s also smoke signals. And two cans connected by string.

      Like

      • Brett says:

        Yeah, I guess that there will still be carrier pigeons, as well. My fears are unfounded…

        Like

        • JudgyOnAWebsite says:

          We make up a code, a la the Zodiac Killer? A cipher? (Uhh……not even sure if I’m completely kidding. Weirding me out they may have marked our email/ ISP addesses already too). I’m crossing into “Coast to Coast”/ Art Bell territory, and starting to feel quite certifiable (but yay……I’d probably be covered under Obummercare).

          You’re not paranoid when they ARE after you, right?

          We still have a little time, don’t we? Carrier pigeons indeed……….how ’bout FALCONS??

          Can’t help but feel some of this stems sheerly from Stompy’s own pettiness; his sputtering outrage at those who fail to grasp how WONDERFUL he is, and the vengeful glee of a dictator w/ the emotions of a two-year-old. Maybe just as much a factor as ValJar’s thirst for control? It is truly crazy-making.

          Like

      • taqiyyologist says:

        There’s also semaphore.

        Like

  35. nativeversusnatural says:

    This is Operation Choke Point applied to the First Amendment.

    Internet is a medium by which every one may publish to every one. Regulating that medium is no different than regulating which newspapers receive paper and ink, when, and how much.

    The FCC now demands that ISPs operate “in the public interest”. They will be able to claim that the “critical information needs” of this or that “community” is not being served “properly”, that this or that website is “biased”, that an ISP must provide “balance” in the websites made available over their network. etc.

    If you doubt this you need only look at the Critical Information Needs study that the FCC conducted in 2014. They wanted to embed government “researchers” in media organizations to question television and radio broadcasters about “the process by which stories are selected” and how often stations cover “critical information needs” of various “communities” along with “perceived station bias” and “perceived responsiveness to underserved populations.”

    The FCC has demonstrated their mindset and intention and it is tyrannical. Internet is “the tyrant’s foe, and the people’s friend”

    Like

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