U.S Preppers: 3 Million and Counting – When Modern Society Collapses Unto Itself….

Most articles discussing “Prepper Motivation” focus on simplistic words like ‘Apocalypse’, and ‘The End of Civilization’ when they highlight information. In general the media portray ‘those who prepare’ as some kind of goof or wing-nut; That is profoundly unfair.

Think of those people in Long Island after Hurricane Sandy, do you think their lives would have been better if they were prepared to be totally self-sufficent for a month or more.

The example of anarchy in New Orleans should still be fresh on the minds of those who would ridicule or diminish such prudence, yet they do it anyway.

Having had personal experience in dealing with the total fracturing of societal rules of governance, along with the collapse of civil and moral rules on self-controlling behavior, I can tell you it ain’t pretty…. and most people have no idea how bad it can get – QUICKLY.

Prepper 1

(Daily Mail Article)  Imagine if suddenly, and completely without warning, the world experienced a total blackout – no electricity, no mobile phones, no banks, no internet, no TV, no emergency services. Nothing.

Highways quickly become jammed with cars that have ground to a halt; an aeroplane falls from the sky; a satellite view of the planet shows it rapidly plunging into darkness.

As it becomes apparent that the lights are never coming back on, nations are plunged into chaos, mass riots break out in major cities and, without electricity, governments are toppled. Into the vacuum step ad-hoc militias, armed and ready to enforce their own rule of law.

This is the apocalyptic premise of the hit American TV series Revolution, which begins on Sky 1 this week. In the first episode, viewers are pulled through this nightmarish chain of events.

So, what would you do? It’s a question that members of a burgeoning subculture known as ‘Preppers’ – people who are prepared for any kind of disaster – have been asking themselves for years.

Preppers look at the world around them and see all kinds of potential threats – economic collapse, global warming, terrorism, nuclear war, dwindling energy supplies, asteroid strikes and, yes, a prolonged blackout.

They’ve largely reached the same conclusion: the end of the world as we know it is just around the corner, and time is running out to gear up for the total collapse of society.

It’s estimated there are three million Preppers in the U.S. alone, and the number is rising.

Furthermore, the recession has seen ‘Prepping’ become a multibillion-dollar industry, with many American Preppers spending thousands every year stocking up on supplies to see them through the impending catastrophe.

Ron Douglas (pictured above, with his wife, six children and enough supplies to be self-sufficient for a year) has seen business boom in the past 12 months. A founder of the Red Shed Media Group in the States, he’s enjoying what might be described as the ‘profits of doom’.

Last year, Red Shed organised five Self Reliance Expos, which pulled in 40,000 punters at $10 a head, while its radio network has notched up over two million podcast downloads.

The company also owns the rights to a book called Making the Best of Basics, first published in 1974; it reportedly sold around 20,000 copies last year.

Douglas, in his late thirties, lives in Frederick, Colorado, around 30 miles from Denver. To stage the photograph to the left, it took 15 people over six hours to move all of his stockpile – mostly kept in his basement – out onto his front lawn.

If a disaster resulted in basic necessities such as food and water becoming scarce, the Douglas family would tough it out at home.

If they absolutely had to leave their house, they would get into a modified Chevy Suburban SUV equipped with emergency supplies that can do 850 miles before needing a refill.

Interest in what Douglas has to offer, as well as the Prepper movement as a whole, is growing, fuelled by the success of another TV programme, National Geographic’s Doomsday Preppers.

It’s the channel’s highest-rated show in America, and the second series has just started in the UK. One episode features Derek Price, who runs a Wild West theme park called Deadwood in Bear Grass, North Carolina.

The park doubles as his compound in the event of the power grid being knocked out by a solar flare. Within the grounds there’s a golf course that has a series of sniper positions set up behind the greens, from which he could take out any rioters.

During the episode, Haven, Price’s 11-year-old son, is seen being put through his paces as a nightwatchman, clutching a 9mm rifle (albeit with the safety catch on).

The show hasn’t met with broad approval within the Prepper community, perhaps because it sheds light on a more sinister side of the movement, one that generated headlines when it was reported that the mother of Sandy Hook killer Adam Lanza was a Prepper.

Nancy Lanza, Adam’s first victim, was shot four times before her son embarked on a killing spree at Sandy Hook Elementary School, murdering 20 schoolchildren and six teachers before taking his own life.

While there’s no evidence to prove that Nancy’s lifestyle directly contributed to the tragedy of Sandy Hook, it has prompted some commentators to suggest that Preppers are gun-toting, conspiracy-theorising, right-wing militia.

Much like the Australian punters who last year bet on the world ending after our planet is ‘consumed by the Sun’ (in which case, how would they claim their winnings?), there are radical elements within the Prepper community.

But not all Preppers are armed and dangerous. Many are becoming self-reliant because they care about the environment and want to safeguard the future of the planet. Douglas insists he’s one of them. (read more)

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109 Responses to U.S Preppers: 3 Million and Counting – When Modern Society Collapses Unto Itself….

  1. Sharon says:

    I hate that they always have to frame it in such extremes. In Minnesota it’s called getting ready for a hard winter and not being stupid. When I was a kid, it was called being responsible and taking care of your own family. I’m so sick of being everybody’s target.

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    • Ah, but Sharon: the government will be there for you in a hard winter, right? The government will take care of your family! Don’t prep. Don’t stock up on anything. Just wait for the government to come and help. That’s what they’re there for! That and protection. The government will be there when you’re about to be robbed, beaten, killed and raped, so, of course, you don’t need weapons or ammunition, either! If you don’t put all your faith in government to bail you out in any crisis, well. You’re just nuts.

      (Sad and amazing, isn’t it, the amount of self-deception of which a society is capable?)

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  2. Sentenza says:

    The first rule about being a prepper is not to talk about it.

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  3. taqiyyologist says:

    If our government ever does decide to mass-murder its own citizens, who would they target first?

    That’s right — those who don’t put all their faith and hope in the government for all their needs, and all their desires.

    Not that it could ever happen here, of course, what President Jarret’s Favorite Philosopher did in China from 1958-1961. Forty million Chinese citizens, mass-murdered by their government.

    But no. Our government will always be there for us. They love us, each and every one. Black and yellow, red and white, they are precious in its sight.

    Cynicism sucks, but I can’t erase what I know of history and reality.

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  4. sundance says:

    Hurricane Andrew provided the first opportunity to see what the lack of modern conveniences, potable water, electricity, available food supplies, law enforcement, etc. etc. was my first experience with total devastation and what happens.

    We did not live there, but travelled to Homestead, FL to help a friend…. It was a jaw dropping experience. I can never forget…. No-one has ever written accurately about just how bad it was…

    ….. On the third day, an elderly woman had heard of our makeshift survival camp, she walked in wearing breadbags around her feet….. it was heartbreaking. At night we burned homes in the area just for the fire light so we could see the looters coming in the dark.

    People belittle those of us who forever after prepare for such situations.

    They have no idea. 😦

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    • boricuafudd says:

      Your analogy about Hurricanes is very appropriate, when I was little I lived in Puerto Rico for a few years with my great-grandmother, she had a hurricane shelter on her backyard. Months before the hurricane season started she would start hoarding water, batteries, can food and supplies just to be prepared. A hurricane strike could leave parts of the island without electricity or running water for months. Preparedness is what keeps casualties low, not the government. It was a lesson I learned early in life.

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    • stella says:

      I had relatives living in that area, and my mom used to winter in Homestead until just the year before Andrew, so she had many friends there too. My mom, aunt, and cousins had a double-wide in a big trailer park there; all that was left afterwards were the concrete steps and planters (she had a photo sent to them by a cousin). I have a National Geographic issue about the storm. One of the pics that impressed me – because it showed the power of the storm – is an aerial shot of a sailboat that has “sailed” inland, in a sea of grass.

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      • sundance says:

        Before the storm we were in contact with our friends who were stationed at Andrews AFB in Homestead. After the storm we got the call to haul a$$ down there via CB radio from my closest friend who was on base. We left at 5am with a trailer of supplies filled to capacity – from a list of stuff given to us by a 75 year old Hurricane Donna survivor.

        The entire trip was unreal. We saw a full sized giraffe walking, more like strolling, down I-95 (the Miami zoo was wiped out most animals walked out). At the entrance to the AFB (prior to storm) there were two full sized fighter jets on pedestals; after the storm passed through the jets were missing – one was found about a mile away, I don’t know where they may have found the 2nd.

        Looting was horrific beyond your wildest imaginings. Packs of young men/women desperate for “stuff”… Trucks hauling supplies were hijacked and looted, tools and building supplies were being targetted as well as food. It took the national guard 4 days before they could provide security for inbound shipments of supplies. We were all armed, but we had to hide everything.

        We set up quietly in the garage of my friend, a cul de sac home, 1/2 his home was blown away but part of the side with the garage still stood. We used the standing part of the house to form the basis for a massive tent using tarp and unloaded all the food, gear and water in the garage. Then set about helping his neighbors…

        About one out of six structures was still partially standing, the rest were rubble. We openly carried firearms everywhere and did not see the first police officer for around 6 days. Each night, beginning day two, we burned a home in succession beginning with every 6th home, then 5th, then 4th and so on… The people who lit the fires were the home owners – the fires were needed to keep the looters away (out of the neighborhood) at night; It was pitch black and scarey quiet except for the thugs who formed into packs of about 6 to 10 and were looking for anything.

        We slept in shifts.

        We could not tell people what we had, instead we went to them, found them, brought them back to our garage and then delivered those who could still live at home back with stuff to help. – everything was word of mouth – with recommendations and tips of who needed help (and where) coming from friends who were driving around locating people.

        This situation of total lawlessness lasted for about 10 days…. I have never seen anything like it – ever.

        The State of Florida learned from Andrew and systems were put into place to avoid anything like that again. Hence the year of Hurricanes Ivan, Frances, Jeanne etc was handled with much more preparation by the State, Locals, and then Gov. Jeb Bush.

        But the lessons from Andrew will never leave the minds of those who went through it, and not one-soul who experienced it would ever consider a “Prepper” extreme.

        Not.Even.Close.

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        • retire2005 says:

          Sundance, I guess the most memorable moment for me, when going to Mississippi to volunteer after Katrina, was a casino sitting in the middle of the interstate highway. I refused to go to New Orleans due to the total breakdown of society there; looking, murders, rioting, etc.

          I drove to Gulfport. Along the beach road, there were houses gone, with slabs standing at 45 degree angles. People digging through the rubble just to find a picture, a skillet, anything left of their lives that was taken from them. In Mississippi, unlike Lousiana, everyone seemed orderly with the churches coming out in full force.

          When I first got there, it was neighbor helping neighbor, but two years later the situation was reduced to people clammoring for more and more government handouts. Personal responsibility and neighbor helping neighbor had been wiped out by the nanny government. It was in Mississippi I lost respect for my fellow Americans.

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    • michellc says:

      What made me start preparing was an ice storm. We were on a well at the time and although we thought we were prepared, we soon found out how unprepared we were. We of course because we are on a well, filled the bathtub with water and all the sinks with water before the storm started and had about five gallons of drinking water. We soon found out how quickly you go through water just by flushing the toilet with 3 small kids. We lived way out in the country on a gravel road with a very large hill to cross to get to our house.
      We were lucky and our phone worked the first two days until the phones went out as well. We had no generator. I’ve always been big into candles, so we had that going for us. A friend with a tractor brought us some more water, but a tractor was the only thing that could get to us and even it couldn’t get up the hill, so we had to walk down the hill and carry the water back up in the ice slipping and falling and spilling precious water. For a week there was no getting out or getting in and even as the ice started melting the road was blocked with large tree branches broken by the ice. So that took half a day for us to get all the trees off the road once we could get out.
      We were without electricity for two weeks. We lived in basically two rooms because that was all our gas stove would heat and the rest of the house was blocked off.
      Since then we’ve experienced more ice storms and power outages, but we’ve been much more prepared, with a generator, several gallons of gas and plenty of stored water. We also learned us rural folks were the last on the priority list of getting electric restored and roads cleared.
      That one experience gave us a glimpse into how bad it could be and we just won’t be unprepared ever again. We have wood heat now, we have a large supply of batteries and candles. But we took it farther because what if those 2 weeks turned into 2 months or 2 years?
      So I guess you could say we were preppers before prepping was cool.

      Like

    • Lou says:

      I went down to Homestead with a couple of buds. we brought down about a hundred canned goods during Andrew. we also saw some looters stealing generators (yes, they were African Americans). We wanted to chase them, but the friend who was driving said he wasn’t going to get shot. We were pissed, but Andrew showed me what people can do, especially the AA community.

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      • sundance says:

        In My Opinion – Miami and Homestead via “Andrew” exist as the most pertinent visible example of what can happen when structured society collapses and people get desperate. It only takes about 18 hours before survival instincts kick in and people do things they would not have done before.

        Hurricane Katrina (New Orleans) provided a more recent example, however in that example communication (phones etc) was better *in general* than Andrew which occurred before cell phones, satellite signals, and 24 hour media.

        People who subsist on the assistance of government for their livlihoods, or those who lack self-sufficiency because they think *FEMA* is their personal security blanket, are the first to panic when government is overwhelmed. That panic lights the fuse….

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        • Lou says:

          I noticed all the regular local stations only showed white people buying stolen stuff. That’s when I knew the MSM was biased.

          Like

        • retire2005 says:

          Sundance, sorry to disagree, but cell phone service after Katrina was either totally non-existant or spotty, at best. Land lines were gone. Telephone polls as far as 60 miles inland were laying on the ground, wire broken. One of the things that made Katrina so bad in Mississippi were the tornadoes that followed immediately afterward.

          No, I don’t think we have ever seen a society break down as badly as it did in New Orleans. And New Orleans didn’t get the brunt of the storm. Even today, six years after Katrina, we still have people living in FEMA trailers because they are too lazy to get a job.

          After Katrina, anyone who had radio service had it because they were using battery operated radios. TV was gone. No one really knew what was going on, and word of mouth was used to relay public service messages received on battery operated radios.

          Like

  5. Never fear: Lucifer has a well-stocked 10th Circle for “All Ye Who Enter Here” 👿

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  6. elvischupacabra says:

    I won’t buy all that stuff ahead of time. Why? When things come apart, the well-armed amongst us will either sell protection to the well-supplied or, if they can’t see the reason behind our proposal, we’ll take it. Hey, if you are going to slide back, go allllllllll the way back!👿

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    • elvischupacabra says:

      Actually, I have a nice, year-round spring in a hidden valley on some land near the Big Bend National Park. We stumbled onto it about five years after my father bought the land, and that was only because we were looking for a lost mother cow, part of a herd a man was paying my father to winter down there. It’s hard to get to and can’t be seen until you’re right on top of it.

      There are a couple of caves near the entrance to the little valley from which you can see a long way. There are even a few rock paintings inside, so I know people have done this before. There is plenty of game around the water and some room to grow some vegetables and maybe a little weed. I can easily go back to the way my ancestors lived, so long as people don’t go too far back into that clump of mesas and arroyos looking for me.😆

      Like

  7. lovemygirl says:

    Even if you don’t believe in an “apocalyptic event” coming soon, getting a bit off the grid helps.
    We lost electricity for awhile, and that knocked out quite a bit, including the gas heat (you need it to start the furnace and run the fans). Thank God I had plenty of firewood.

    Like

    • stella says:

      Heat is my biggest worry. I do have a gas range (oven has an electric igniter, so it shuts down without power) and an old gas fireplace in my basement that I have never used, as there is no venting down there. I imagine it works, but don’t know for sure. Of course, I have outdoor grills (gas and charcoal) for cooking, if necessary.

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      • cajunkelly says:

        Stella,
        A small generator can be purchased for 3 or 4 hundred dollars…that would power enough small electric heaters to keep you warm and might even power your oven.

        It’s important to buy generators in the off season. Don’t wait until storms are predicted…price gouging is common.

        There’s one company that sells solar powered generators (don’t remember the brand) and they often hold skent and dent sales…new generators, just dinged a bit.

        Our bug-out location has a “whole facililty” generator…power goes out…go throw the main breaker for the building and the generator kicks in. That location also has a beautiful clear water spring…free flowing from underground, filtered through lots of sandstone. But, we’re investing in a couple of water purifiers just in case. That land also has a deep water well, but it’s not been used in years.

        A store near us had a sale this week…one gallon bottles of water..$1.00 each. We dang near bought ’em out. 🙂

        A water source that many don’t think of is your water heater. Most homes have at least a 40 gallon water heater…bingo.

        Like

        • stella says:

          Thanks, kelly! A small generator would be a good investment – keeps the frig cold during the summer, too. I have city water, so most of the time that’s not a problem. You are right about the water heater, though. I think mine is 50 gallons, and pretty new, so not too much sludge would come out of the drain! I really should check that basement gas insert to see if it works, just in case, or replace it. Since I have natural gas, that’s my best bet, and it would keep pipes from freezing in the winter if the basement temp can be kept up.

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          • yankeeintx says:

            I was told that in a major power outage, the city will lose it’s water pumping capabilities. You may only have water from you faucets for a day and a half.

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            • stella says:

              That’s why I said that “most of the time” that’s not a problem. We had that major power outage here a few years ago in the summer, and the first day our water pressure was low. Even though I have “city” water bought from our major city, my local community still has a water tank. We were drinking bottled water for a day or so. I keep water on hand, but probably not enough.

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              • yankeeintx says:

                Here in Texas water is a big issue. It makes me wonder with Gov. Perry inviting everyone to move to Texas, how he plans to find water for them all. We have city water that is pumped in from a reservior, but by August it actually smells coming out of the faucet. We have a water filtration system on the house, and a seperate one for the kitchen sink, otherwise I wouldn’t want to drink it.

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        • You are so right about buying generators in the off-season. My brother-in-law and his wife lived in Hampton, VA when Isabelle hit. They had two chest freezers full of food that they worried about, but couldn’t find a generator at any price in the entire state. We live in NC, and my husband bought one, and drove up to meet them halfway, so that they could have it to save their supplies. After it was all over, then returned it to us, and bought their own. That generator has helped us out many times over the years.

          A lot of people think of preppers as being….odd. And, of course, some are. But as I explained to a friend who noticed all the prepper links I post on FB, it’s just like preparing for a hurricane, and isn’t it better to have all that stuff BEFORE an emergency looms, rather than having to go fight someone for a lousy loaf of bread at the time?

          My husband, about three years ago, said he thinks society will collapse within a ten year period. I poo-pooed him at the time, but now I’m not so sure. When the gov’t starts to consider people who are growing their own food, in their own yards, and who wish to keep more than two weeks worth of food on hand, extremists that bear watching, you have to wonder.

          Still, the benefits of prepping should be obvious to ANYONE who lives where natural disasters can interrupt the power and emergency services.

          Like

      • Dr. Bogus Pachysandra says:

        Stella (Star),
        My gas range/oven has electric spark igniters on the burners and in the oven. Last time I lost power, I was able to light the burners with a lighter. One of those long ones for lighting a furnace or water heater pilot light. Might work for you too.
        Bogie

        Like

  8. libby says:

    Last Monday, Fox broadcasting aired a ‘Bones’ episodes highly mocking preppers (I am not into prepping much, but I was real surprised to see how nasty they were to those who feel the need to be prepared for events that are beyond our control (My favorite disasters are asteroids & meteors and my least favorite is global alarmism since it happens to slowly – a good asteroid would wipe most of us out in minutes not decades or centuries).
    The part I found most disconcerting is when they found the need to describe all preppers as wackjobs (most disconcerting since the show pretends to be about objective science).
    (what should I have expected, thre show was among the biggest man haters shows for years – keep in mind boreanz was on the show buffy the man hater for quite some time)

    Like

  9. libby says:

    In Cali, they tell everyone to get an earthquake kit for your house/apartment. In Florida, they say you need a hurricane kit (they are nearly identical kits).
    In New orleans, they tell you the government will always be there to help you, just be as dependent as possible while whining all the time

    Like

  10. cajunkelly says:

    The general contempt for independent preparedness reminds me of a topic Rush touched on.

    If you are one who started with nothing and *worked* your way to success you are now smirked at and scorned.

    I also relate it to the school in Ipswich, MA that *cancelled* Honors Night because it was “unfair” and “it could be ‘devastating’ to the students who worked hard, but fell short of the grades.”

    It’s all about attacking invidivualism and accountability. Nyet, can’t have that crap in a socialist society yanno. 👿

    Like

    • stella says:

      Pretty amusing, I think. My great grandfather came to Michigan in the 1870’s, and cleared 80 acres of woods in order to farm. Of course, had to dig a well, build a house and barn, then plow for planting (with horses, of course). No electricity, no automobiles, no store around the corner. Lots of people today will just die.

      Here’s my great grandma, Ellen. She was born in 1841, and died in 1923.

       photo 5bb98e05-db82-44d5-8fc6-a64334fd80bd.jpg

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      • Sharon says:

        I love that photo, stella. DH’s sister’s family has a similar one of their great-grandma dressed in a similar way, sitting by a hot fire (outdoors on the ground) and stirring in a big kettle–it was soapmaking day when the photo was made.

        Like

        • stella says:

          I love it too, Sharon. It was probably taken not that many years before she died. She lived on the farm, at the end with her unmarried son, the rest of her life.

          Like

  11. yankeeintx says:

    I think it is just common sense to be prepared. There is a comfort in knowing that you can be self reliant if need be. So many skills and knowledge have been lost, and the younger generations don’t have a clue. Canning, knitting, sewing, and weaving are lost arts. How many people are going to be able to survive if they can’t run to Google to find out how. It is simple, it is better to be safe than sorry.
    I have a friend in NJ who is a prepper. After superstorm Sandy, when he was finally able to get back on Facebook, he posted a message: To all my friends and neighbors who teased me, you owe me an apology!

    Like

    • stella says:

      Well, I know how to sew and can (putting up preserves, my grandmother called it), so there’s that. Also have a canning kettle, jars, and some lids (could use more of those). Might consider getting a pressure cooker too.

      Like

      • WeeWeed says:

        The vacuum sealers are great, too, for just about anything including freezing.

        Like

        • cajunkelly says:

          LOL I thought I’d burned mine out last night Weed. Local grocery had a great sale on pork roasts…good LORD they were huge. I bought a couple and downsized ’em…vacuum packed ’em into eight separate roasts (shared a couple with widow neighbor), then vacuumed a few other meat items they had on sale, stew meat, stir fry meat, etc.

          Just make sure you buy the thicker vacuum bag rolls…especially when sealing chicken…the bones will penetrate the thin ones.

          Like

        • stella says:

          I keep forgetting about that, Weed. Have to put it on a list (written) or I will forget to look next time I’m at Costco or Sam’s. Maybe I’ll look on Amazon too, since I have the free shipping.

          Like

          • Sharon says:

            We picked one up at Costco a couple of months back–priced at $75, with immediate rebate of $25. I was concerned it wouldn’t “do the job.” It has been just great. Salmon fishing starts in a couple of weeks, and that was the big reason for having it. DS has one that still “works” if you know how to tweak it just right. Since I had not used one before, I didn’t know how to tweak it just right!

            I’m thinking that as Americans, we should get bartering going asap, for the practice if nothing else. We buy flour in bulk at Costco as well, and I need to figure out if I can use the vacuum bag for that without having flour all over the kitchen! Maybe it’s just not possible to use it with flour. Remember the old Slinky toy? That unbreakable toy? When my older brother came home from the Marines when I was in 5th grade, he brought me one of those as a surprise. I had it destroyed within 30 minutes, because I was trying to get it to do something it wasn’t designed to do. The story of my life.

            BTW, keep in mind re generators–if you can’t get fuel, generators won’t do much good. I’ve always been leery of spending much money on them for that reason. In real knockdown dragout mess (economy or otherwise) fuel will very quickly become unavailable. And once it’s not available, theft is the next issue…I wouldn’t want to be advertising that I’ve got food to protect in a freezer or whatever by running a generator.

            There is a point where it does literally become”back to basic bacis” and there is a limit to preparation for that. Then it gets down to knowing which mushrooms and berries are safe to eat. (And the platitude of the day becomes “Ain’t none of us gettin’ out of here alive!”)

            Well. My work here is done— 😉 Sorry. (And STOP THROWING THINGS!!!!)😯

            Eventually, you know, (speaking to the mamas here now) this is all to feel very much like being 9 months and 14 days pregnant, and we’re gonna be screaming, “Bring it ON, already–let’s get this over with!!” I think I sort of feel that way already.😉

            Like

            • cajunkelly says:

              Hmmm maybe I’ll try to vacuum bag some flour. Maybe it should be done the way you seal “wet meat”…by placing a folded paper towel just inside the seal line.

              Or, use the vacuum plastic cannisters you can buy to go with the vacuum unit….uses a tub attached to the top of the cannister.

              I’ma go try it…brb….

              GOIN’ IN! 🙂

              Like

              • cajunkelly says:

                Well hellz bellz…that worked GREAT! Granted I only filled the bag halfway full….put about 4 cups of flour in.
                It’ll draw some of the flour a little ways up toward the seal line, but NOT ONE speck of flour puffed out!

                LOL, it’s hard as a brick now, with all the air pulled out. Just like salt, sugar and rice.

                DUDE! That was quick and SO easy! I was thinking I’d vacuum it by putting the small three pound bags into the vacuun bag,,,but newp,,,it works great loose!

                Like

              • Sharon says:

                I have the attachments for the cannisters, but not any of the cannisters. I figured that would be a little spendy for any quantities. Trying to figure a way with the bags….

                Like

      • yankeeintx says:

        I wonder how many people who have always lived in a major urban area (like NYC) have ever had a vegetable garden? I had cousins from Boston that didn’t know blueberries grew on bushes, and wouldn’t have a clue about “putting up preserves”. You know that type that asks “why hunt innocent animals when you can buy meat at a store?”.

        A friend of my husband said we are crazy for owning weapons. He said if SHTF, he’ll survive by looting. DH explained that he will be competing against people w/weapons. He said if he needed a weapon, he could take one off a dead body. DH explained that w/o a weapon, that he would end up being that dead body. It just amazes me that so many people don’t even have a clue about the basics. The gov’t suggest having a 3 day survival plan, but what if it is 3 wks, 3 months, or 3 years?

        Like

        • stella says:

          We always had a garden when I was growing up, and I have myself, most years. I want to experiment with vertical gardening this year – maybe against the garage wall.

          Like

          • yankeeintx says:

            We always had a huge garden growing up, but I only have a small one now due to limited space. Verticle gardening might be the answer for me and it looks fun too!

            Like

        • Sharon says:

          Some years back we had a guest from CA who wanted to know where the potato trees were. Last summer, visiting a large working farm/nursery here in the Willamette Valley, OR, we learned from the operators of it that they that they had been requested by the Portland School District to please stop telling the children’s tours where eggs come from. The parents got upset when the children stopped eating eggs. So the solution: IGNORANCE!! Let’s hear it for IGNORANCE.

          Like

          • stella says:

            Apparently your CA visitors didn’t speak French, or they would know that potatoes are “pomme de terre”, the emphasis on the “terre” part.

            Like

          • yankeeintx says:

            City kids and farms are always entertaining. Teaching them to milk a cow is always fun. Just don’t explain to them where veal comes from, or how you need rennet to make the milk into cheese. (Thankfully, rennet is now available in tablet form).

            Like

            • cajunkelly says:

              LOL when I was very young (too young to have seen Mom milk her cows) I spent a week with an old maid aunt. 😯 THAT’s where milk comes from?????

              Never would drink milk after that, except for chocolate milk. No one could convince me chocolate milk came from there, even my evil brother who said chocolate milk comes from brown cows.
              To this day I only drink cocolate milk as a beverage. I’ll use it in cereal, but drink it from a glass? uh uh…ain’t happenin, unless it’s got chocolate in it.

              Like

            • aliashubbatch says:

              Actually, I’d like to learn that stuff.

              Like

    • We bought a pressure cooker a couple of years ago, and taught ourselves about canning, and preserving fruits and veggies. We grow a good bit, and buy from farmer’s markets as well. Also herbs for some basic home remedies. We’re all learning new skills, sewing (I’m ashamed to admit at 50 that I was clueless until a couple of years ago) knitting, crocheting. The kids even bought me a small starter loom last Mother’s Day, and I’m teaching myself to weave. Hubby bought himself a book on making looms and spinning wheels, though he hasn’t begun to teach himself yet. I’ve saved many DIY pages to my computer, then printed them off, and placed them in binders. In the next year, we’re planning on the whole family learning to make dyes, candles and soap, and MAYBE spinning our own yarn/thread. We’ll see about that🙂 Also on the agenda is archery practice to go with the gun safety/practice we do currently. Only a couple of us have hunted, so we all need to learn. My oldest daughter says she won’t hunt, but will instead learn to butcher🙂 She took a class in Permaculture Design, and is ready, as soon as we find the right land, to put much of that into practice. Where we are now is not a good place for most of it. But we’re doing what we can in the meantime.

      Like

  12. cajunkelly says:

    (chuckle) I enlarged and read the legend for all the supplies in that picture and realized I have a true teasure in the attic….

    My aunt (dad’s only surviving sibling) gave me her five *gallon* hot water bath/pressure canner! She is the only person I’ve ever known to can meat…not pork, but deer, beef, etc.

    Saw a couple of other items I want to add as well, honey (never goes bad) and canned olive oil.

    I bought one of these:
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=171003271876

    It works GREAT! We tried it out on lamps, etc. Small size makes it easy to pack in your bug out (get the helloutta dodge) bag.

    DH also bought a “wind up” radio.

    There’s a alternate (solar) power product called “My Power Buddy” that I think is over rated and over priced.

    Over on wirecutter’s blog something was mentioned that many don’t think about: fishing line, hooks, etc. Gotta be able to fish! Think I’ll check out those little “pocket fishing poles” just for starters. Of course, having lived in FL we have those HUGE salt water fishing rigs as well. Those would be a witch to pack up and haul it outta here with.

    Like

    • stella says:

      My daughter bought me a wind-up radio a few years ago. I bought my big water bath canner at a garage sale for fifty cents (includes the can rack). It’s beat up a little, but works great.

      P.S.: That little hand generator is pretty neat.

      Like

      • Allfal says:

        Don’t use a water bath canner to can meat or fish, it’s not safe. You need a pressure canner. Even the current FDA websites have recommendations for amount of pressure for how many hours. They also recommend a shelf life of 1 year. I am still using home canned turkey from a Thanksgiving sale of .39 a pound that I bought a bunch of over 2 years ago. It’s a great way to keep meat long term with no refrigeration.

        Like

        • stella says:

          I know that, Allfal. I use a water bath canner for tomatoes, pickles, jam. I never can meat, myself. I’ll probably get a pressure canner, if I decide to can other, less acid, foods.

          Like

  13. Knuckledraggingwino says:

    The demonization of preppers is all the more frightening given the current administration’s philosophy as wealth redistribution as racial retribution.

    Focusing public fear on preppers is an effective tactic to distract the citizens from the overwhelming number of homicides and other crimes that are committed by Blacks. We have an ongoing, low intensity race war in this country waged by Blacks against Whites and our dead leader and his minions don’t want us to recognize it.

    When the feces impacts the rotating air circulation device, predominantly White preppers most of whom are politically incorrect, heterosexual married couples with children, will be demonized for hoarding. They will then be targeted to have their “ilgotten” supplies confiscated.

    Like

  14. cajunkelly says:

    Unless I’m just missing it, this guy has no dried fruits. I’ve got six gallon buckets of dried fruit in packets. If you have a dehydrator you can do this yourself, then use the oxygen remover packets and seal it in vacuum bags. Strawberries and bananas are the easiest for me.

    Dehydrators can be bought very reasonably on ebay.

    In reading through all these posts, it’s obvious we’re birds of a feather….coming from salt of the earth stock. Growing up, we kids had to work a 2 acre garden every spring/summer. We grew all our own meat, veggies and fruit. About the only things Mom “went to town” for was staples…rice, flour, salt, pepper, sugar, etc.

    This will be a telling question/answer;
    How many of you ever washed (or saw your mom wash) clothes on a wringer washer?

    Like

    • goodkathie says:

      I helped my grandmother on one in Wichita Falls, TX

      Like

    • Sharon says:

      Childhood duty. That’s all we had until 1962.

      What’s funny about all this is that the old people (% wise) who know how to do (or can easily learn because they aw it done) all this stuff are going to be the go-to people. Even some of the looters (Ayn Rand def) will figure out fairly quickly that if they send us all to the FEMA camps, they won’t have any food or heat or clothing or blankets. So guess what!? Whether it’s barter or new money, we’re gonna be the ones making money again, as the society learns to crawl….we’ll be the only ones who have anything. Again.

      Of course, it’ll make ’em mad all over again, but if they don’t behave, we won’t sell bread to them. So there. (and then they’ll kill us for sure, I know…I do know that…it’s just kind of funny in a macabre kind of way….forgive me….I had a rough night….need me some diet coke….)

      Like

    • stella says:

      I actually had a wringer washer in the 1970’s and did my laundry at the kitchen sink. Hung laundry outside in the summer. In the winter, I usually used the laundromat.

      Like

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  17. cajunkelly says:

    I never understood the use for those little stacker washer/dryer units. It’d take me 4 days non stop to do my Sunday laundry…and there’s just 2 of us!

    And those washer/dryer thingies in England look wild….the one machine does both functions…front load…wash…then switch to dry, usually installed under a kitchen countertop.

    Like

  18. stella says:

    This is appropriate for this thread, I think, if anyone has the money.

    In the market for a fixer-upper? Concrete bomb shelter fixer-upper featuring air-intake tunnels and decontamination showers goes on sale for $500,000

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2298297/Bomb-shelter-fixer-upper-featuring-air-intake-tunnels-decontamination-showers-goes-sale-500k.html

    “With the fear of meteor crashes rising, people looking for cover might just be in luck.

    A concrete bomb shelter in South Florida is going up for sale for a cool $499,500, for anyone looking for a place to prepare for the apocalypse.”

    Lots of pictures.

    Like

  19. mtnwolf63 says:

    Reblogged this on mtnwolf63 and commented:
    There are only Preppers and Victims after a disaster!!!

    Like

  20. Bob says:

    Preppers are just persons who want to survive with their love ones. You can find bad persons everywhere. When a bad thing will happen, if you love yourself, your love ones and United States and/or your country, you have to be prepared.
    Your blog is great by the way, thank you and keep up the good job.

    Like

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