Barry Moves Onshore – Multiple Days of Flood Risk Remain Highest Concern…

After briefly increasing to hurricane strength Barry is now back to a strong tropical storm as it moves inland through southern Louisiana.  Barry is a very slow moving storm and the effects from rainfall are anticipated to produce extreme flood risks for Louisiana and Mississippi throughout the next three days.

If you are in the impacted region stay alert to warnings and advice from local officials. If you find yourself in need of assistance, you can reach out to CTH via the email address on the sidebar; or use the comment section below which will be monitored.

At 100 PM CDT (1800 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Barry was located near latitude 29.8 North, longitude 92.1 West. Barry is moving toward the northwest near 6 mph (9 km/h), and a turn toward the north-northwest is expected tonight, followed by a turn toward the north on Sunday. On the forecast track, the center of Barry will move through southern Louisiana this afternoon, into central Louisiana tonight, and into northern Louisiana on Sunday.

Maximum sustained winds are now near 70 mph (115 km/h) with higher gusts, and these winds are located over water to the southeast of the center. Weakening is expected as Barry moves farther inland, and it is forecast to weaken to a tropical depression on Sunday.

Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 175 miles (280 km) from the center. The National Ocean Service station at Eugene Island, Louisiana recently reported sustained winds of 61 mph and a wind gust of 72 mph. (more from NHS)

(NHS Link)

This entry was posted in FEMA, Uncategorized, Weather Events. Bookmark the permalink.

42 Responses to Barry Moves Onshore – Multiple Days of Flood Risk Remain Highest Concern…

  1. joeknuckles says:

    Am I the only one that thinks there must have been some ulterior motive to call it a hurricane when it hit shore? It had been weakening hours before and then, magically, the winds strengthened just enough to call it a hurricane right before it made landfall.

    Liked by 5 people

    • auscitizenmom says:

      No, I thought that was weird, too.

      Like

      • Aeyrie says:

        The “weather manipulators” can generate these things and kill them too. Any time they want to. Bastids. A new level of hell needs to be dug for them. Okay, I’m done spitting and fussing now. Praying for you all. We *only* have earthquakes in Cali. I think this is way worse. The effects are more lasting. Be safe.

        Liked by 1 person

        • David A says:

          It is very likely that, via technology, more hurricane flights vs very few and none in the relative recent path, satellite computer model estimates, and
          instrument drops into the eye wall, we get far higher readings and estimates for storms now, then what were obtained in the past for equal or stronger storms.

          Indeed, if one goes by ground based readings alone then all recent hurricanes would be reduced considerably. This is true despite the fact that we have more ground based wind readings then in the past.

          Current storms are monitored every minute of every hour. Also, as some have suggested, their may well be false elevation of storm strength due to political CAGW bias.

          Storm surge is much more difficult to fake, and numerous recent events have produced storm surge 30% to 50% below the official warning.

          Like

    • dayallaxeded says:

      Absolutely right–another hysterical, political, revenue-driven lie by another government agency gone rogue. This stupid thing probably never should’ve been named. It never organized and it’s split in two (I believe by the power of prayer!) directly over and protecting NOLA and its immediate environs (we don’t deserve it, but we’re praying and believing HARD, b/c man’s efforts and malfeasance have left us at rock bottom). To the extent that it now has more consistent circulation, it’s after landfall around Acadiana and certainly doesn’t merit hurrimakane designation.

      A quick tip for those who suffered flood damage from the floods before this was a named storm (like me)–be sure to make it clear to your insurers that the damages resulted from the floods of July 10 or the Mother’s Day flood, b/c once a storm is named, claims become subject to “named storm deductibles.”

      Like

    • sharon goodson says:

      Your Cajun Weather Authority! Let me know if you need a translator

      Liked by 6 people

  2. John Bosley says:

    Biggest problem with this storm is it is heading straight up the Mississippi River.
    When it’s done there is gonna be a wall of water flowing back down it overflowing the levees.
    When Katrina hit they should have abandoned it and let it refill with soil like all deltas do.
    They used to call that land bottom land, great for periodic farming.

    In six months from now , I can see food prices exploding.
    Stock up now.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Strange storm indeed. I am small town south of Lafayette LA. Nothing, so far, very little rain or wind.

    I know overnight will be the rough part. Just hope it is not too rough and we keep power.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. bea12gle says:

    Too bad it is not Barry Obama headed to Gitmo

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Red Hatty says:

    Metairie, LA here. Absolute nothing burger. Hardly any rain, power still on, breezy.

    For the NOLA side, only the storm surge zone seems to be impacted & that was completely expected, it’s outside the levees.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Scott Lyddon says:

    Best of Luck and God Bless all in the path.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. just stevie says:

    For those interested…WWL TV Live broadcast on Barry.

    Like

  8. ElGato says:

    Don’t worry. This Barry will do a lot less damage to the US than the last Barry.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. dogsmaw says:

    Live coverage Lafayette New Iberia area:

    https://www.katc.com/live

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Lost our power about 8 pm. Grrrr.
    At least it is not miserable hot tonight. Sustained wind was around 47 and gust 60.

    Some rain. “They” are still saying the worst here will be during the night

    I have an electrical outlet with a red light on it that is beeping in intervals. Any ideas anyone ? And how is that, the power is out?
    It is not very loud, but of course it sounds like the back up beeps on a 18 wheeler, while I’m in bed in pitch black darkness (aside from light of cell phone). Heck, the dogs are looking at me like , are you gonna do somethin bout that or not!!???

    Like

  11. dogsmaw says:

    https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/text/refresh/MIATCPAT2+shtml/140240.shtml

    000
    WTNT32 KNHC 140240
    TCPAT2

    BULLETIN
    Tropical Storm Barry Advisory Number 15
    NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL AL022019
    1000 PM CDT Sat Jul 13 2019

    …DANGEROUS STORM SURGE AND WIND CONDITIONS CONTINUING ACROSS THE
    NORTH-CENTRAL GULF COAST…
    …HEAVY RAINS AND LIFE-THREATENING FLOODING EXPECTED TO SPREAD
    NORTHWARD ACROSS THE LOWER MISSISSIPPI VALLEY…

    SUMMARY OF 1000 PM CDT…0300 UTC…INFORMATION
    ———————————————–
    LOCATION…31.0N 93.0W
    ABOUT 35 MI…60 KM SW OF ALEXANDRIA LOUISIANA
    MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…50 MPH…85 KM/H
    PRESENT MOVEMENT…NNW OR 340 DEGREES AT 8 MPH…13 KM/H
    MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…1002 MB…29.59 INCHES

    WATCHES AND WARNINGS
    ——————–
    CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY…

    The Tropical Storm Warning from the Mouth of the Mississippi River
    to east of Grand Isle has been discontinued.

    SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT…

    A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for…
    * Grand Isle to Cameron
    * Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas including metropolitan New
    Orleans

    A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for…
    * Intracoastal City to Biloxi
    * Lake Pontchartrain

    A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are
    expected somewhere within the warning.

    A Storm Surge Warning means there is a danger of life-threatening
    inundation from rising water moving inland from the coastline in the
    indicated locations. For a depiction of areas at risk please see
    the National Weather Service Storm Surge Watch/Warning Graphic
    available at hurricanes.gov. This is a life-threatening situation.
    Persons located within these areas should take all necessary actions
    to protect life and property from rising water and the potential for
    other dangerous conditions. Promptly follow evacuation and other
    instructions from local officials.

    For storm information specific to your area, including possible
    inland watches and warnings, please monitor products issued by your
    local National Weather Service forecast office.

    DISCUSSION AND OUTLOOK
    ———————-
    At 1000 PM CDT (0300 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Barry was
    located near latitude 31.0 North, longitude 93.0 West. Barry is
    moving toward the north-northwest near 8 mph (13 km/h). A turn
    toward the north is expected on Sunday, and this general motion
    should continue through Monday. On the forecast track, the center
    of Barry will move across central Louisiana tonight, through
    northern Louisiana on Sunday, and over Arkansas Sunday night
    and Monday.

    Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 50 mph (85 km/h)
    with higher gusts, and these winds are occurring near the coast
    to the southeast of the center. Additional weakening is expected
    as the center moves farther inland, and Barry is forecast to weaken
    to a depression on Sunday.

    Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 205 miles (335 km)
    mainly over water to the southeast of the center.

    The estimated minimum central pressure is 1002 mb (29.59 inches).

    HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
    ———————-
    Key Messages for Barry can be found in the Tropical Cyclone
    Discussion under AWIPS header MIATCDAT2 and WMO header WTNT42 KNHC.

    STORM SURGE: The combination of a dangerous storm surge and the
    tide will cause normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by
    rising waters moving inland from the shoreline. The water could
    reach the following heights above ground somewhere in the indicated
    areas if the peak surge occurs at the time of high tide…

    Intracoastal City to Shell Beach…3 to 6 ft
    Shell Beach to Biloxi MS…3 to 5 ft
    Lake Pontchartrain…3 to 5 ft
    Biloxi MS to the Mississippi/Alabama border…1 to 3 ft
    Lake Maurepas…1 to 3 ft

    Surge-related flooding depends on the relative timing of the surge
    and the tidal cycle, and can vary greatly over short distances. For
    information specific to your area, please see products issued by
    your local National Weather Service forecast office.

    RAINFALL: Barry is expected to produce total rain accumulations of
    8 to 15 inches over south-central Louisiana and southwest
    Mississippi, with isolated maximum amounts of 20 inches. Across the
    remainder of the Lower Mississippi Valley, total rain accumulations
    of 4 to 8 inches are expected, with isolated maximum amounts of 12
    inches. This rainfall is expected to lead to dangerous, life-
    threatening flooding.

    WIND: Tropical storm conditions are occurring across portions of
    the Tropical Storm Warning area, and these conditions should persist
    into Sunday morning. Wind gusts to tropical-storm force in
    squalls are possible along portions of the coasts of Mississippi,
    Alabama, and the western Florida Panhandle through tonight.

    TORNADOES: A couple of tornadoes are possible through Sunday across
    portions of Louisiana, southern and western Mississippi, and
    southern and eastern Arkansas.

    NEXT ADVISORY
    ————-
    Next intermediate advisory at 100 AM CDT.
    Next complete advisory at 400 AM CDT.

    $$
    Forecaster Brown

    Like

  12. dogsmaw says:

    https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/text/refresh/MIATCPAT2+shtml/140549.shtml

    616
    WTNT32 KNHC 140549
    TCPAT2

    BULLETIN
    Tropical Storm Barry Intermediate Advisory Number 15A
    NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL AL022019
    100 AM CDT Sun Jul 14 2019

    …BARRY MOVING NORTH-NORTHWESTWARD OVER LOUISIANA…
    …DANGEROUS STORM SURGE AND LIFE-THREATENING FLOODING RAINS
    CONTINUE…

    SUMMARY OF 100 AM CDT…0600 UTC…INFORMATION
    ———————————————-
    LOCATION…31.0N 93.2W
    ABOUT 45 MI…75 KM WSW OF ALEXANDRIA LOUISIANA
    MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…45 MPH…75 KM/H
    PRESENT MOVEMENT…NNW OR 340 DEGREES AT 8 MPH…13 KM/H
    MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…1004 MB…29.65 INCHES

    WATCHES AND WARNINGS
    ——————–
    CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY…

    The Tropical Storm Warning from east of Morgan City to Grand Isle,
    including Lake Pontchartrain, Lake Maurepas, and metropolitan New
    Orleans has been discontinued.

    All Storm Surge Watches have been discontinued.

    The Storm Surge Warning from the Mouth of the Atchafalaya River to
    Biloxi MS, including Lake Pontchartrain has been discontinued.

    SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT…

    A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for…
    * Morgan City to Cameron

    A Storm Surge Warning is in effect for…
    * Intracoastal City to Biloxi
    * Lake Pontchartrain

    A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are
    expected somewhere within the warning.

    A Storm Surge Warning means there is a danger of life-threatening
    inundation from rising water moving inland from the coastline in the
    indicated locations. For a depiction of areas at risk please see
    the National Weather Service Storm Surge Watch/Warning Graphic
    available at hurricanes.gov. This is a life-threatening situation.
    Persons located within these areas should take all necessary actions
    to protect life and property from rising water and the potential for
    other dangerous conditions. Promptly follow evacuation and other
    instructions from local officials.

    For storm information specific to your area, including possible
    inland watches and warnings, please monitor products issued by your
    local National Weather Service forecast office.

    DISCUSSION AND OUTLOOK
    ———————-
    At 100 AM CDT (0600 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Barry was
    located near latitude 31.0 North, longitude 93.2 West. Barry is
    moving toward the north-northwest near 8 mph (13 km/h). A turn
    toward the north is expected later today, and this general motion
    should continue through Monday. On the forecast track, the center
    of Barry will move across central and northern Louisiana today, and
    over Arkansas tonight and Monday.

    Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 45 mph (75 km/h)
    with higher gusts, and these winds are occurring near the coast to
    the southeast of the center. Additional weakening is expected as
    the center moves farther inland, and Barry is forecast to weaken to
    a tropical depression later today.

    Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 205 miles (335 km)
    mainly over water to the southeast of the center.

    The estimated minimum central pressure based on surface observations
    is 1004 mb (29.65 inches).

    HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
    ———————-
    Key Messages for Barry can be found in the Tropical Cyclone
    Discussion under AWIPS header MIATCDAT2 and WMO header WTNT42 KNHC.

    STORM SURGE: The combination of a dangerous storm surge and the
    tide will cause normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by
    rising waters moving inland from the shoreline. The water could
    reach the following heights above ground somewhere in the indicated
    areas if the peak surge occurs at the time of high tide…

    Intracoastal City to the Mouth of the Atchafalaya River…3 to 6 ft
    Mouth of the Atchafalaya River to Biloxi MS, including Lake
    Pontchartrain…Water levels are decreasing to normal levels as
    the storm moves inland.

    Surge-related flooding depends on the relative timing of the surge
    and the tidal cycle, and can vary greatly over short distances. For
    information specific to your area, please see products issued by
    your local National Weather Service forecast office.

    RAINFALL: Barry is expected to produce total rain accumulations of
    8 to 15 inches over south-central Louisiana and southwest
    Mississippi, with isolated maximum amounts of 20 inches. Across the
    remainder of the Lower Mississippi Valley, total rain accumulations
    of 4 to 8 inches are expected, with isolated maximum amounts of 12
    inches. This rainfall is expected to lead to dangerous, life-
    threatening flooding.

    WIND: Tropical storm conditions are occurring across portions of
    the Tropical Storm Warning area, and these conditions should persist
    through the morning. Wind gusts to tropical-storm force in
    squalls are possible along portions of the coasts of Mississippi,
    Alabama, and the western Florida Panhandle during the next few
    hours.

    TORNADOES: A couple of tornadoes are possible today across
    portions of Louisiana, southern and western Mississippi, and
    southern and eastern Arkansas.

    NEXT ADVISORY
    ————-
    Next complete advisory at 400 AM CDT.

    $$
    Forecaster Cangialosi

    Like

  13. Milo Moran says:

    Anyone who read the report that Military planes flying through the storm a day or so ago saw a Rainbow, which in my opinion was a good sign from a much higher power. May I urge everyone with any belief system to Pray for the diminishing storm to disappear and then a prayer of thanks.
    Praise the Lord. Psalm 91

    Like

  14. dogsmaw says:

    https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/text/refresh/MIATCPAT2+shtml/140839.shtml

    000
    WTNT32 KNHC 140839
    TCPAT2

    BULLETIN
    Tropical Storm Barry Advisory Number 16
    NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL AL022019
    400 AM CDT Sun Jul 14 2019

    …BARRY MOVING NORTH-NORTHWESTWARD OVER WESTERN LOUISIANA…
    …LIFE-THREATENING FLOODING RAINS THE PRIMARY THREAT…

    SUMMARY OF 400 AM CDT…0900 UTC…INFORMATION
    ———————————————-
    LOCATION…31.4N 93.4W
    ABOUT 80 MI…125 KM SSE OF SHREVEPORT LOUISIANA
    MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…45 MPH…75 KM/H
    PRESENT MOVEMENT…NNW OR 335 DEGREES AT 8 MPH…13 KM/H
    MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…1005 MB…29.68 INCHES

    WATCHES AND WARNINGS
    ——————–
    CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY…

    None.

    NEXT ADVISORY
    ————-
    Next intermediate advisory at 700 AM CDT.
    Next complete advisory at 1000 AM CDT.

    $$
    Forecaster Cangialosi

    Like

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