Octoberfest Fun

From the link here we find some background and information about Octoberfest and how it got started.

Crown Prince Ludwig, later to become King Ludwig I, was married to Princess Therese of Saxony-Hildburghausen on 12th October 1810. The citizens of Munich were invited to attend the festivities held on the fields in front of the city gates to celebrate the happy royal event. The fields have been named Theresienwiese (“Theresa’s fields”) in honor of the Crown Princess ever since, although the locals have since abbreviated the name simply to the “Wies’n”.

Horse races in the presence of the Royal Family marked the close of the event that was celebrated as a festival for the whole of Bavaria. The decision to repeat the horse races in the subsequent year gave rise to the tradition of the Oktoberfest.

The Oktoberfest continues in 1811

In 1811 an added feature to the horse races was the first Agricultural Show, designed to boost Bavarian agriculture. The horse races, which were the oldest and – at one time – the most popular event of the festival are no longer held today. But the Agricultural Show is still held every three years during the Oktoberfest on the southern part of the festival grounds.

In the first few decades the choice of amusements was sparse. The first carousel and two swings were set up in 1818. Visitors were able to quench their thirst at small beer stands which grew rapidly in number. In 1896 the beer stands were replaced by the first beer tents and halls set up by enterprising landlords with the backing of the breweries.

The remainder of the festival site was taken up by a fun-fair. The range of carousels etc. on offer was already increasing rapidly in the 1870s as the fairground trade continued to grow and develop in Germany.

It is today the world’s largest Volksfest, beer festival, held in Munich every year from mid or late September to the first weekend in October. It is still often called the Weisn to locals. This year’s festival has ended, but you can make plans for next year, from September 21 to October 6, 2019.

I saw a display of German themed food in my local grocery store, featuring spaetzle noodles. I asked for tips or recipes over at Stella’s Place and czar was generous enough to give me some tips.

Today I made spaetzle for the first time, and it was a delicious dish. I made it in beef broth and served it with a small roast and the gravy it made in cooking. The noodles were not like any egg noodles I have had before, and I found them delicious and hearty.

If you are looking for a way to stretch food dollars, this would be a good one. I didn’t need much of the meat, I went after the noodles. I think you could add some vegetables to the mix if you wanted, or use them in a soup. Czar has some good tips for how to use the leftovers, and even how to make your own noodles.

I am starting us off with his tips and hope you guys will toss in a few of your own favorite German recipes as we finish the last little bit of October.

From czar:

Spaetzla is a noodle type that’s used all over Europe, cheap and easy – try this recipe:
https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/11793/german-spaetzle-dumplings/

What I do is to boil them in a STRONG broth, not water. Ugh. A day or more before Turkey Day I get wings/necks (try tossing a few smoked ones in) and make a strong broth and toss in onions (skin and all) garlic, carrots and celery. I let the broth cool, strain it and refrigerate it to make the fat rise to the top and solidify. When I remove it if the broth is gelatinous I’ll heat it up when I’m ready to boil the spaetzle and thin it with commercial turkey or chicken broth. Ditto the thinning as the dumplings absorb fluid as they cook.

I use whole milk as the fat tastes better, don’t be scared of the nutmeg or pepper – you can use more – and/or use garlic/om\onion powder too if you’d like – the flour literally soaks up flavor and makes it disappear. Get a spaetzle maker, they’re on Amazon, they last forever, aren’t expensive and you can use them year ’round. Make sure to wipe it down with some veg oil when you run the dough thru it, makes the process MUCH easier.

Now the fun part – you can use the broth left in making gravy or turkey soup/stew -or both, I’ve been known to put leftover gravy in my turkey gumbo. Cleaning the veggies left over from the broth you can toss’em, puree them for various uses or just heat and eat as a snack – my fav.

Don’t obsess over cooking them, they come to the surface when they’re ready, just scoop with a spider or slotted spoon. Undercooking is far worse than overcooking as you get that raw flour taste. their main benefit is how they swim in that gravy BUT leftover ones make SUPER mac-and-cheese using the spaetzle instead of mac. Mmmmmmmm….whole milk, cream, butter, sharp cheddar and Gruyere (2 cheddar to 1 Gruyere). And if there’s hot, leftover gravy…..baked spaetzla and cheese. Works well with extra garlic and onion powder in the mix too….

 

 

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

162 Responses to Octoberfest Fun

  1. guyinworld says:

    It is very interesting because “Octoberfest” is more and more a movement among regional groups all over europe. 10 years ago nobody was partying “octoberfest in Vienna” but now it is In. I think people try to recognize that their culture is fading away and try to reclaim it – something i like.

    On other side, since the degeneration of the people in the 90ies and 00, they have some s*x in the mids of “natural toilets” the people are using. The Munich police is managing this very well inclusive the terror treats by Islamists – they disappeared in 2016.

    Have fun and the goal is to drink one Mass in one time. One Mass is 1.5 liter beer (0.39 gallon?)

    Liked by 4 people

  2. Deplorable_Infidel says:

    OK. Posting some recipes I have for spaetzle is going to have to wait until later today. I have had a spaetzle maker for 18-20 years now.
    You can use water to cook them in, if you use heavy cream instead of water for the dough.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Ken Moore says:

      And you don’t need a spaetzle maker. Hold the dough in one hand and with the other, use a pair of scissors to snip off little bits of dough. Dunk the tip of the scissors each time in the boiling water and the dough comes free. Repeat. If the lumps look a little big after you cook them, chop chop with the big kitchen knife.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Cuppa Covfefe says:

        You need one of these (Spätleschaber):

        Or a Spätzlepresse:
        the original

        or one with a special template that makes spätzle just like Oma used to make 🙂

        Also serves as a potatp-ricer, or to make “Spaghetti-Eis” – press through vanilla ice-cream, and drizzle strawberry (or other) sauce on top…

        The authentic Swabisch Oma will use a knife and a (mini) wooden cutting board, cutting so quickly you almost can’t follow it. No matter how you make them, they’re deliciious. And as always, the best are home made!

        Liked by 4 people

      • Deplorable_Infidel says:

        “And you don’t need a spaetzle maker.”

        A colander with the right size holes would also work, using small amounts of the dough at a time, perhaps with some coaxing by a spatula.

        Like

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      ” use heavy cream instead of water for the dough”

      Spaetzle 2
      Combine 3 beaten eggs, 1/2 tsp. salt and 1 cup heavy cream. Stir in enough flour (about 2 cups) to make a thick batter which breaks from a spoon.

      Drop into boiling chicken stock (or water). Cook 5 minutes and drain. saute in 1/4 cup butter until light brown. – Recipe from Pat Koch about 20 years ago.

      At the top of this tattered, faded page I have written CIA (Culinary Institute of America – not the other one) – “American Family Cookbook”
      Lib/Cong 71-158818
      Int. St. Bk# 0-8326-0536-0

      So I don’t remember if these recipes are from there, or if that is a reference to something else back when i was taking cooking classes in the evenings (1998-2001).

      Like

      • Deplorable_Infidel says:

        “heavy cream instead of water”

        Here is one from WNY chef Bob Stalens that uses milk with optional herbs or spinach. I have used all these recipes I am posting.

        2 eggs, 1 TBSP. melted butter, 1 cup milk, 3/4 cup flour, pinch of salt.

        OPTIONAL : 1 ounce spinach (finely chopped) or 1 oz. assorted herbs of your choice.

        Drop into boiling salted water, cook briefly and chill in ice water, then drain.

        Reheat in butter, soup, other recipes.

        Like

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      “Posting some recipes”‘

      Spaetzle 1

      1 egg, slightly beaten, 1 cup water, 2 – 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, 1 tsp. salt, 1/4 cup melted butter.

      1) Mix egg & water in bowl, gradually add mixture of flour and salt, beating until smooth.

      2) Batter goes into boiling salted water – 2 qts. water and 2 tsp. salt
      Cook in one layer only – Do Not Crowd!

      3) After surfacing, boil gently 5-8 minutes or until soft. Remove w/ slotted spoon. Place in hot bowl.

      4) Toss with melted butter

      Like

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      “some recipes I have for spaetzle”

      This is the last one I am posting (my others are off the foodnetwork website from 2009, etc.)
      This one is the from the now defunct pentagonchannel.mil , a show called “The Grill Sergeants”

      My paternal uncle received the Connolly Award for excellence in food service for mess halls serving over 200 at a time (the other category is for smaller messes). This was for U.S. Army facilities worldwide. My maternal grandmother used to have a catering business, doing primarily Polish weddings.

      I guess cooking runs in the family. So does driving for a living.

      “German Cuisine” – Spaetzle

      1 cup flour 1/4 cup milk 2 eggs 1 tbsp. oil 1/2 tsp. nutmeg 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. white pepper 2 tbsp. butter 2 tbsp. parsley, chopped.

      1) Mix flour, salt, pepper and nutmeg

      2) Beat eggs well with milk and add to dry ingredients.

      3) Blend with hands until dough forms.

      4) Drop into boiling water for 5-8 minutes, and drain well.

      5) Saute in butter and parsley, and serve with schnitzel!

      *Cooking tip: Try adding fresh herbs to the dough!

      thegrillsergents@pentagonchannel.mil (defunct)

      I could not find the show on the replacement channel, but I did not try very hard.

      Like

    • Carrie2 says:

      This is something I always enjoyed when we visited my spouse’s family and friends but this recipe was not the one mostly used. So, I think I will ask my sister-in-law for the recipe. Perhaps it varies from city to city, I love it and I am not a pasta fan at all. AND I love the herring fest in Dec./Jan. because they sure know how to cook herring in many ways. Sad the last time we visited there we could not find the fantastic breads we used to get so I guess a lot of Vietnam influence, ditto great bockwurst. I drool when I think of so much of the great pastries too.

      Like

  3. Many of the attendees are tourists. Thousands of them. I guess this iconic event is safe from the m*s**m invasion if there’s alcohol involved. Let’s see.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Sunshine says:

    So, we can do that with almost any leftover poultry parts, Heavenly laden in cholesterol, that’s the problem but once a year, we can enjoy. I’ll pass it off to my friend, she’ll probably do it and give me a dish. Thanks.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. don welch says:

    I went to the Munich Octoberest in 1970 as a young lad of 22. Both my parents were born in the Stuttgart area then migrated to Michigan in the mid 30’s to flee the budding Third Reich…luckily for me.

    I still can’t get enough of Bavarian culture. Berchtesgaden is a must see for any of you European wannabe travelers.

    Heidelburg is the city of churches although I would suspect most are now empty tombs. Thanks for the great article.

    Liked by 11 people

    • Grandma Covfefe says:

      Thanks for sharing–brought back memories of my trip.

      Liked by 3 people

    • budklatsch says:

      Yes, Bavaria is a wonderful state to visit. Probably visited the Oktoberfest a dozen times over the years. Regrettably, like most of the ‘West’, the ‘public’ event has become too hedonistic particularly after the beer has been flowing well into the evening. Best to enjoy afternoons and leave right after dinner. The rural parts of Bavaria are like visiting Disneyworld, colorful and enchanting. The Passionplay in OberAmmergau every 10 years is a must.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Carrie2 says:

        Definitely OberAmmergau! Since my husband will not return to his home country due to the you know who, he misses his siblings. Last time there was 2007.

        Like

    • Janpt says:

      The great alternative to the Oktoberfest is the Gaubodenfest in Straubing, Bavaria. Almost no foreign tourists, and most come in “Tracht”, the folkloric costumes. A more earthy atmosphere, as the visitors are drawn from rural areas, no students, yuppies etc.
      But full. Almost as large. Cheaper.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Cuppa Covfefe says:

        There’s also one in Stuttgart, the second-largest in Germany. Lots of things to see nearby, as well: the Mercedes Museum, the Porsche Museum, and in Sinsheim and Speyer there are twin Auto and Technik Museums, one of which has both a Concorde and the Russian Imitation (“Konkordski”) mounted above the roof, so you can climb up the stairs and walk inside them. There are also lots of other sights to see nearby as well, not just geek-worthy things 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

        • The Tundra PA says:

          We lived in Heidelberg for 2 years when I was a child; my dad was stationed there. He went to the Porsche factory in Stuttgart in 1955 and bought a brand new white Speedster convertible for $2200. Probably worth $200 k today. Man, I wish he’d kept it in a garage all these years and still had it!

          Like

        • Carrie2 says:

          And don’t miss out on the Beer Fest and great sausage in Dresden!

          Like

    • blondegator says:

      I went there in October 1989, by happenstance, as I found a RT flight Miami/Frankfurt for $210, and my BFF Army wife pal from our stint in the Army was stationed there, and I was in my annual “boat show widow” mode at the time, so why not? While I was there, the Wall started tumbling down. Incredible, unplanned timing to history.

      My friend (now no longer with us, alas, RIP, Whit) was the hostess with the mostess, and we did a week’s tour of Bavaria. The food was divine! We went to Munich to a beer hall one afternoon, and sat at one of those huge tables. There was a drunk old Bavarian there, a little fellow in filthy leiderhosen, and he kept jumping up and lifting his full mug….and yelling “I LUFF RONALD REAGAN!”. That was an afternoon of a lifetime! I can still picture his pink cheeks, whiskers and all…”I LUFF RONALD REAGAN!”.

      It was pretty cold by the time I left to fly home, early November, and as my friend drove me to the train station to get back to Frankfurt, there was a full moon, pre-dawn, as we arrived at the entrance to the autobahn, eerily quiet, and beautiful. As we were on the ramp onto the highway, a tiny little East European vehicle, piled high with mattresses, suitcases, etc. and full to overflowing with people passed us. Then, as we passed them (they were putting along at maybe 30 mph), they hung out of the windows and waved…they’d seen the US plates on my friend’s car. What a send off!

      Thank you for the reminder of a wonderful trip. I don’t cook German food (which is silly, as my mother did!, and well), I think I’ll drag Mr. BG to our local German restaurant, I have a sudden urge for jaegerschnitzel, and I want him to try their specialty, scnweinhaxen.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Sepp says:

      Stuttgart!

      Great-grandfather was from there.

      Relatives living there after WWII received food parcels / care packages from the family here in the States.

      Like

  6. cripto says:

    A Polish version is to mix an egg, flour and a bit of salt in a saucer. Then take a spoon and scape off bits by bits into boiling water. Only takes a minute to cook. Then in a pan put butter, add blackberries add the spatzle heat through. Delicious.

    Liked by 5 people

  7. cripto says:

    Global warmists are warning there will be no more beer. LOL.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. ZurichMike says:

    Pro tips:
    Add a splash of clear cherry liqueur (very Swabian) or vodka to the dough to make the spaetzele lighter in texture.
    Let the dough rest 30 minutes at least

    Oktoberfest is great fun. If you are ever in one of the big tents to eat and drink, bring silicone earplugs and USE THEM. Even the oompah-oompah music can shatter eardrums!

    What’s also fun is seeing people dressed in native costume for Oktoberfest: dirndles for the women and lederhosen and strickjacken with silver or horn buttons for the men. Very striking, especially if the woman has a “zaftig” figure and the man has nice legs! LOL!

    Liked by 14 people

    • cripto says:

      You made me laugh. I have a long-winded story, but a true one. One Brit ( an official in a company) who was interned in Shanghai by the Japanese as an enemy national, endured hardship, then towards the end of the war was taken on a slave labour ship to Japan. Finally repatriated. He said all the returnees were dreaming of having a British pint. When they disembarked, they spotted a pub, hearts pounding. In the window was a sign, ‘No more beer’.

      Liked by 8 people

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      “Add a splash of clear cherry liqueur (very Swabian) or vodka to the dough to make the spaetzele lighter in texture.”

      This is because the alcohol does not react with the flour to form gluten, which is what would happen if just water is used. This can also be done to other things, like the batter for fish and chips. It is best to use ordinary 80 proof vodka, for a PARTIAL substitution of the water in the recipe, not the high test 160 or 190 proof varieties. The higher proofs will not cook off. Trust me.

      Liked by 3 people

    • The Tundra PA says:

      Great to see ya, ZM! We miss you, here and next door at Stella’s.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Grandma Covfefe says:

    Wow–I didn’t know about the history. Thank you for sharing….brought back memories for me.

    Over 40 yrs ago, after using Eurail pass in 14 countries and living out of backpack/hostels for 2 months, we were heading to the airport for LAX, and stopped in Munich to visit Octoberfest.

    Because my best friend and I usually don’t drink, we had no idea what it was all about, except maybe a carnival. Ha! We saw huge long beer halls…so many of them, lined up in a row on one side and another row on the other side of a long paved street for pedestrians. Some halls were tented, others were wooden, but all had lots of long tables inside with a German band in the middle of the hall and a food bar along the side of the hall. It was pretty plain compared to the photo on this article.(I would not have recognized it except for the ‘long hall’ look)

    We wandered around one hall watching some dancing, but everyone else was singing, drinking and laughing in a very crowded hall. Strong, hefty waitresses in German dirndls were bustling around with their huge tray full of beer steins, serving customers at tables. We managed to find a seat and wiggled in between people at a table. We sat and looked around our table of 30 or so, then we laughed because everyone was acting so crazy, funny and jolly.

    A waitress came, we looked at each other, then said, “Oh, heck, let’s do it. We can “brag” about it at our church to shock them.” We laughed and ordered a small stein each. Obviously, due to language barrier, there was no small, med, Large, or X-large when she brought our two very large, Yuge beer steins filled with Heineken beer to the top. Shocked, we didn’t know what to do, Then the people at our table figured us out and started teasing and encouraging us to drink up.

    One and a half hours later found me dancing on the table with two other people while my poor friend was trying to keep her hands up to make sure I didn’t fall off the table and yet she couldn’t even stand up. That was the first and last time we got drunk, but we made lots of friend that night as they thought we were ‘good sport’ Americans.

    We were glad we visited it. No, not one waitress dropped her tray full of steins that night. Yes, those steins were very heavy. ceramic type.. No, we didn’t have seconds. No, we still don’t drink, not even beer. No, German Heineken is so good (Yum) than the Heineken sold in USA-yuck. Yes, we made it back to our room safely.but had to climb up to our room.since the front door of the hostel was locked.(another long story).Yes, we were at home with these people…like a beer hall full of wonderful fun-loving Treepers.

    Sorry this is long but had to share. Blessings to you all.

    Liked by 10 people

    • Great story! I’m sorry to tell you, but it sure wasn’t “Heineken”, which is brewed in Netherlands, but much stronger German beer.. No wonder you had that reaction 😀
      Heineken is sold all over Europe but the Germans shun it as they have a lot of pride in their local beer!

      Liked by 3 people

      • Kevin king says:

        They sell plenty if it around here in the Altstadt in Düsseldorf. Anything to pls the tourists. Nowadays there are more irish pubs than anything else here

        Like

      • Cuppa Covfefe says:

        With all the mergers and acquisitions in the beer world, sad to say, it’s hard to tell where many of the old brands (remember Grolsch and Oranjeboom?) come from. The important thing here is the Deutsches Reinheitsgebot, the German Purity Law, which specifies no additives or chemicals may be used.

        “Craft” brews are getting more an more popular (and more and more expensive 😦 ), and for the fan of American (or other) beer, it’s possible to mail order various beers. Even Anchor Steam (and the price makes me steam…). But our local beers are the best 🙂

        Kind of funny, we were visiting CA on vacation and went to a Trader Joe’s where Warsteiner was cheaper than it was over here. Maybe it’ll happen with “Steam” (heyyyy ALDI, are you listening??? ) (they own TJ’s)…

        Like

    • Tired Mom says:

      What a great story! I also was not (and still am not) a beer drinker when I visited Oktoberfest while in college. But when a tall, handsome German guy named Horst bought me a stein, I wasn’t about to insult him by refusing it. My friends and I had so much fun! Thank you for the hospitality, Horst, wherever you are!

      Liked by 2 people

    • YvonneMarie says:

      Nice story 🍺

      Like

    • Gil says:

      That sounds like a lot of fun, esp getting to go for 2 months. Good memories. 😁

      Like

    • Janpt says:

      Heiniken is what comes out after drinking German beer!
      Augustiner Bräu, Spaten-Franziskaner-Bräu, Hacker-Pschorr, Paulaner, Hofbräu and Löwenbräu are breweries with tents there.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Cuppa Covfefe says:

        I’ll take Schwaben-Bräu… at Stuttgarter Volksfest on the Cannstatter Wiesen 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • The Tundra PA says:

        In 2014, DH and I visited Heidelberg, where we met as children in 1955. My octogenarian dad was with us. I still remember our address on Holbeinring and our apartment is still there and looks pretty much the same. We went to a beer garden and were served a beer I loved and have never seen before or since. Kostritzer (with umlaut over the o) Schwarzbier. “Deusche braukunst” in raised letters on the glass bottle. I kept the bottle and brought it home, where it sits on our dining room table. I would so love to find it again. Anyone know if it is imported to this country?

        Like

        • Cuppa Covfefe says:

          Yep, that’s great dark beer. Schwabenbräu has a dark beer somewhat like it, and there used to be an English beer called “Stingo” as well, indeed so dark that it seemed like it had bits of pitch floating in it 🙂

          I’d imagine that “Beverages and More” (an offshoot of Safeway) would have it, or perhaps a nearby or mail-order German foods store. Köstritzer is good stuff! Prost!

          Liked by 1 person

          • The Tundra PA says:

            Yes, that’s the bottle I saved! None of us spoke German, so we just asked for a dark beer and that’s what the server brought us. I’m in Alaska, no German food stores here that I know of. I’ve never been to an Oktoberfest but would surely love to go some day.

            Like

    • Pyrthroes says:

      Couldn’t have been Heineken– for all its virtues, that’s a Hollander Dutch brew dating from 1864. Due to wife’s connection, we had dinner with scion Freddie Heineken, who designed the modern logo, in his Amsterdam hotel some twenty years ago.

      Served three years in USAF at Darmstadt, BRD, when dinosaurs roamed the earth. Hosteling in Amsterdam, we’d tool our classic Austin-Healey Sprite southwest down the autobahns at 110 mph, driving 825 miles to Munchen’s Oktoberfest in just eight hours.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Cuppa Covfefe says:

        I stayed many times in Eindhoven, and the Holiday Inn there had beer in the vending machines alonside the various colas, etc. Kind of shocked me the first time I saw it…

        I used to live and work near Darmstadt, lots of interesting things there, and of course Frankfurt itself with all its skyscrapers (and the hot-rod road A5 near the airport)…

        Like

  10. Lady in Red says:

    Great history. Thanks Sundance!

    Liked by 2 people

  11. southernmom19 says:

    This is so exciting. My husband & I love spaetzle and wanted to make some for Thanksgiving. I can’t believe you posted this recipe.

    Liked by 6 people

  12. pawatcher says:

    I’m sorry, but events that began by celebrating and bowing to royalty loses a lot in translation for me, puts my hair up really. All of the monarchies and their pageantry are not something I can get into.
    Especially when We American citizens are slandered over the slavery issue at every turn: it was royalty that had slaves- English, Dutch, and German royalty here on American soil-> they had slaves, not my great, great’s toiling the soil farmer families. The aristocrats were granted lands and slaves both in Europe and in every country they decided to take, including many beautiful islands.
    The religious and ordinary pioneer settlers to America DID NOT bring slaves: that was done by aristrocats alone. William Penn owned and then sold three slaves on American soil as he created Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey on the lands granted from a king. I do give him credit though, he kneeled to The King in his established states.
    That being said, celebrations are great and fun if they are not celebrating royalty IMHO: give me the 4th of July, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, and personal celebrations to roll out the barrel. All it had to be was a Friday night for my Grandma and Grandpa to get out the fiddle and we’d dance.

    Like

    • kirgistan says:

      sorry but the Kings had no slaves. Servants was something different.

      And by the way, bavaria was always catholic and so there was a separation between church and state – not so in protestant countries.

      The Kings where beloved in Bavaria, Ludvig II an entrepreneur and visionaire.

      Castle Neuschwanstein is the first european Building with steel and concrete. The Swan cave he let build contained the first light bulb ever in europe. He even dreamed about a big swan Gondel over rhe lake from Neuswanstein down to the second palace.

      And for Americans: You cant even handle ONE border in the south – the influx makes a national crisis.. Imagine you have 6 Borders and from all sides there is a constant influx and pressure. Then you have to structure your society different – and you got leaders who had to defend. That is what Kings did. US culture is big and powerfull because you got the essence of 2500 years of cultural fight and development of solutions for surviving with zero border problems, massive ressources, bug oceans who separate you from Asia and Africa (!) and tons of people willing to work coming to you.

      Liked by 1 person

      • pawatcher says:

        Servants to royalty were not slaves? “The kings were beloved, Ludvig ll was a visionary”-> they were lucky to be born to the right bloodlines to become great: wrong bloodlines no chance at all.
        Kings not only had all the peoples of THEIR lands to defend borders (they didn’t have a choice), they could borrow from their other relative kings to supply protection for their kingdoms.
        The USA military, Border Guards, are all volunteers who apply for jobs to secure the USA.
        They do not bow down to any bloodline: they defend all.
        And there are no oceanS; there is only one ocean with different sectional names.
        Can’t abide to bow to any bloodlines past or present.

        Like

        • Cuppa Covfefe says:

          Guess you never heard of the draft, eh?

          And there haven’t been any real Kings or Queens with absolute power since WWI, where the globalists took out the Monarchies. Although you’re welcome to go to the Middle East and “enjoy” the monarchies there.

          I suggest you read a bit more European History than the revisionist drivel you’ve probably been fed in the Dewey-Mann polluted school system.

          I’d take many of the former monarchs over Øbozo and Hill-the-BEAST any day!

          Like

          • Deplorable_Infidel says:

            “the revisionist drivel you’ve probably been fed in the Dewey-Mann polluted school system.”

            I hear that revisionist drivel American history is not even being taught in schools today (my youngest is 28). Instead, they are teaching revisionist drivel Asian and African history to American children (white man BAD).

            Like

      • Dora says:

        Thank you kirgistan for explaining it so well.

        My grandparents, on my Dad’s side, were born in Bavaria. Yes, they were good Catholics until the day they died.

        Unfortunately, I’ve only been able to visit the area two times in my life. But I did take a tour of the Castle Neuschwanstein. What an unbelievable place!

        I enjoyed every minute and learned a lot about Ludwig II. I even saw the lake where he drowned so mysteriously, When I returned from my trip, I bought a biography of him so that I could learn more.

        Ah, you have gotten my memory started up again. 🙂

        Thanks.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Alligator Gar says:

        Yeah, Crazy King Ludwig II with his orgies. Tell us all about him. I have actually studied the history, not a glossy bit of propaganda. And do not presume where America is concerned. Your tone is NOT appreciated.

        And kings most certainly DID have slaved, darling. They were called serfs. They were chattel and tied to the land. They could not leave. Something called the Black Plague liberated them from their Catholic Overlords solely because labor became so scarce the serfs could command wages for the first time ever. Welcome to Economic History 101.

        Like

        • Jeff C-C says:

          Welcome to the treehouse! We’re happy to be your sanctuary from the unhappiness in the liberal camp. Have a beer and enjoy your freedom!

          Like

        • Cuppa Covfefe says:

          Got an axe to grind there against Catholics, it seems. WIthout the civilizing influence of the Church, most folks would be busy cooking each other for dinner or killing everyone they could.

          Your grasp of history is as faulty as your grasp of the Church.

          Like

    • Kaco says:

      Ludwig II was also called the “Mad King” and was on the way to bankrupting Bavaria with his grandiose buildings. Falkenstein was never built but that was the next one. Neuschwanstein is still unfinished, but it is beautiful and his castles are still top tourist attractions, I’ve seen three of them, so for that, we can appreciate all his madness.

      Like

  13. amwick says:

    There is a small touristy town near here, Helen, that is Bavarian in style, the whole town. Yeah, it is kinda corny, but fun, and people come from all over for their Oktoberfest. We were there Sunday, it was packed and many people proudly wore their German Alpine hats, with those medals from other cities. I was sitting next to an older man who had a Munchen Oktoberfest t shirt. Today, we are going to explore Oktoberfest in Gatlinburg, Ober Gatlingurg. Beer may happen!

    Liked by 5 people

    • amwick says:

      Ty Menagerie, fun topic. I am going to try spaetzle when we get home. One of our favorite sides is kartofflelkloesse, potato balls. As with spaetzle, you drop them into boiking liquid and they magically float when they are done.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Menagerie says:

      I like to visit Helen. The drive alone, through the mountains that look like no man has ever been there, except for the road, is worth it. Helen is smaller, but I usually like it better than Gatlinburg.

      Liked by 3 people

      • kiskiminetas says:

        We have gone to Oktoberfest in Helen. The wife and I have danced both polka and waltz there. They wanted us to do the Chicken Dance I politely declined. Had asked them to sing the Strip Polka but Queeny did not dance!

        Liked by 1 person

      • amwick says:

        Yes, I like it too. We live pretty close to Helen, we pop down there for lunch. There are a bunch of really nice forest service roads that end up there, great with our jeep.

        Liked by 1 person

        • JTR says:

          We live about 15 miles from Helen! DH and I went October 7th to see Mollie B and The Squeezebox. It was lots of fun, and we spent the night at The Heidi Hotel so we could drink lots of good beer! I actually got to meet Mollie B and talk with her for a while. She’s really talented.

          I asked her if there was any instrument she CAN’T play. She said she was crap at strings, but still had to learn to play them. She has a PHD in music!

          Liked by 2 people

      • The Tundra PA says:

        Sounds like a place I must see.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Cuppa Covfefe says:

      There’s a town in Texas, “Fritzburg” (Friedrichsburg) that is German-styled (I think it’s near Houston, not sure). There is also a Danish town started in 1910 by real Danes near Santa Barbara CA, called Solvang. It’s been marred somewhat by traffic on SR 246 going to and from a Casino recently built there, but it’s still well worth a visit.

      Another thing to note is that one in four Americans (maybe even Fauxcahontas 🙂 ) is of German descent, something that struck fear in the hearts of some bureaucrats here when they relaxed the repatriation laws of Germany to let the “Russlandsdeutsche” return as German citizens…

      On another note, there is a whole city somewhere in China that is a brick-by-brick replica of a German city, complete with an Oktoberfest of sorts…

      Liked by 2 people

  14. Slowkid says:

    1990! The year i went. Hopped a party train at 4am. From wildflecken .With a bunch of my army buddies. First last and only time,i was drunk three times in one day. That was the first Oktoberfest after the wall fell. Drinks included with price of the ticket. They poured us out of the train at 8 am . Fun times.

    Liked by 4 people

  15. Howie says:

    Here we have The Stone Crab Jam…Music, Beer, and STONE CRABS!!!

    Liked by 6 people

    • MIKE says:

      That’s a little heaven on a plate, right there. These suckers are magnifique, and that’s coming from a guy in the land of pleasant living and the Callinectes Sapidus, the Chesapeake bay blue crab.
      As for the topic at hand; I just might invent pumpkin spice Natty Bo beer in honor of Octoberfest !

      Liked by 1 person

    • Alligator Gar says:

      Michael canceled our Stone Crab festival at St. Marks this year. I hate hurricanes.

      Like

  16. talker2u says:

    And while you’re in Germany, don’t forget to visit the Medieval Crime Museum in Rothenburg!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Slowkid says:

      Oh my. More memories. My unit went there. Historical trip. Our criminal justice system is definitely different. Those thumb screws.

      Like

      • Cuppa Covfefe says:

        They have them and other “tools” in the “Chamber of Horrors” beneath the Tower of London. Something you’re not likely to forget, whether or not you actually have them applied…

        Like

    • blondegator says:

      Or the Katie Wolfhardt Christmas store! Favorite Nutcracker ever is from that store, plus all of the amazing wood and glass ornaments you’d ever want (you can now order them online at the website, but where’s the fun in that?).

      Like

    • Kaco says:

      Rothenburg was a favorite, just beautiful. I have an almost finished painting of one of its houses with flowering vines all up the front of it. The crime museum was real cool.

      Like

  17. daughnworks247 says:

    The Loomis family were proud Germans. Wilma and Elton had grown children and no grandchildren. Elton made beer in the basement, tumbled rocks, and was a chemist for Dow. Mrs. Loomis cooked and gardened.
    Living in the NW burbs of Chicago, we walked home from elementary school for lunch. In the winter, it was cold and snowy. Mom took a part time job at Dispensa’s toy castle for the Christmas rush, so I would go to Mrs. Loomis’ house for lunch, and after school. She was like having another grandma.
    Lunch was an event with Mrs. Loomis.
    At my house, lunch was a warmed up can of Spaghetti-O’s. Lunch with Mrs. Loomis was homemade sausages, chicken soup with homemade noodles (the noodles would hang to dry all over the kitchen), wiener schnitzel, homemade applesauce, beef and noodles, and spaetzle. OMG, the spaetzle, completely foreign to me but I loved it. Her puddings and pies were like works of art. She made yeast rolls, cookies, and candied fruit, that I would stuff into my pockets for the long walk back to school.
    In the afternoon, we would talk about what we had for lunch and sometimes, I would share a cookie with a friend, a special treasure for a 3rd grader.
    For my best friend’s birthday, I invited her back to Mrs. Loomis’ house for lunch. Lunch was terrific but she made a plum cake that was just our size. Mrs. Loomis let us eat in the dining room on real china. What a special day.
    At school, we talked about the lunch so much, the next day, I brought 5 kids to lunch. In retrospect, Mrs. Loomis was kind of surprised to see us all. Her house was the last one in the valley and we had to walk farther and hustle back to school but her lunch was worth it. She fed us all and smiled. It only occurred to me, about 30 years later, that we probably ate her family’s dinner.
    Nothing like home and hearth.., comfort food and traditions.

    Liked by 15 people

    • Menagerie says:

      What an awesome story! A nice memory to share and treasure. I wish that world wasn’t gone.

      Liked by 8 people

    • piper567 says:

      daughn, thanks for blessing us with that sweet little story.
      My Mother had an Aunt who was the last of her family to come to America from Switzerland.
      For a time in my childhood, Aunt Mary was within a reasonable driving distance from us, and our visits with her were similarly laden with all manner of wonderful treats which were unique to our experience.
      Also remember talking ab the food all the way home.
      Fond memories indeed.

      Liked by 3 people

  18. Jeff says:

    One of the small towns in which I do business is Muenster, Texas, settled in the late 1800’s by German immigrants. The people there are very proud of their heritage; even the cop cars are labeled “Muenster Polizei.”

    Liked by 6 people

  19. FofBW says:

    Thanks again Menagerie. You brought back some fond memories when I lived in Germany back in the early 70’s.

    Was fortunate enough to have visited King Ludwig’s fairy tale castle in Bavaria and experience spatzle mit berg kasse und bier! smeckt gut!!! MMMMMMM!!!!

    Liked by 4 people

  20. Joe says:

    My ex Munich wife is/was a phenomenal cook…but she could rock the dirndl like NO OTHER.

    Melania-esque beauty, maybe even more beautiful if possible. Same age.

    That one was hard to get over!

    Liked by 5 people

  21. Lanna says:

    I’m making cabbage burgers today — bierok (pronounced beer-rock). It’s a mixture of browned ground beef, chopped onions and chopped cabbage cooked together, then 1/2 cup portions are wrapped in a yeast dough and baked. If you’re in Nebraska you might know them as runza. I learned to make them years ago, from a friend’s mom, and as a caterer I’ve sold thousands of them. A few years ago I made 500 for a huge German funeral. Family and friends also love receiving them as gifts, they freeze well and are a quick meal.

    I’m not German, but the area I live in has deep German roots and my family includes Germans by marriage. Spaetzle isn’t all that popular here, but noodles are a staple. I’ll be making chicken noodle soup with butterballs (budeglace, pronounced buddah-glaze), for a birthday in a couple of weeks. The noodles will be homemade, the soup made from whole chickens. The butterballs are ground up stale bread (I freeze it to save), mixed with beaten eggs, melted butter and allspice, rolled into small balls. They’re dropped into the simmering soup, basically a bread crumb dumpling. I’ll also make kasenoodle, (cheese dumplings) for that party. That’s a soft noodle dough, rolled out and cut into small squares, filled with a mixture of drained cottage cheese, sauteed onions and buttered, browned breadcrumbs. Then dropped into boiling water, drained and baked in a sour cream sauce and topped with more buttered, browned breadcrumbs.

    What In really enjoy making are the German and old world baked goods. The strudels — love apple but also make cabbage strudel or cheese strudel. The kuge or kuchen (coffee cake), time consuming but it was made on bread baking day with a portion of the bread dough, fruit, then a topping of egg yolks, sugar and butter, beaten egg whites folded in and then topped with rival (crumbs made of butter, sugar and flour). Used to be able to get sugar beet syrup in this area and using that instead of fruit is real old time kuchen, but the sugar factory is closed and the sugar beet growers are gone. I saw some in a German restaurant shop recently (was doing a beer flight with my sister, great German beer!) but it was more expensive than top maple syrup. Kids used to pick up the beets that fell off the trucks, take them to grandma and she’d turn them into syrup.

    And now my cabbage burger dough is ready . . .

    Liked by 8 people

    • Janpt says:

      In Meckenheim near Bonn there is still the beetroot sugar syrup factory. Grafschafter Zuckerrübensyrup. I would send you some, but postage is extortionate! The waxpaper sealed cup with 500g costs about 1.4-2 euros, iirc.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Lanna says:

        That may well be where the syrup I saw in the German shop is from. I decided I’d splurge and buy some for kuchen at Christmas.

        The shop was so much fun to browse through, and when I go to buy the syrup I can take my sister along and do another beer flight too. Only problem is, the beer is so filling (6 German beers, almost 2 liters) and comes with big soft pretzels with whole grain mustard (both made by the restaurant) that we were too full to try any of the items on their extensive menu. Next time we’ll just have to order something to go.

        Like

    • stella says:

      You can buy sugar beet syrup at Walmart – on line, at least:

      https://www.walmart.com/ip/Sugar-Beet-Syrup-16oz-Glass-or-450g-Paper/125969536

      In Michigan we still produce a lot of beet sugar. That’s all I use in my kitchen.

      Liked by 2 people

    • blondegator says:

      I was intrigued by your description of bierocks. I looked them up on YouTube, it seems to be very straightforward to do, sounds delicious, and I think they’d make a fabulous addition to any football Saturday.

      Thank you! I’m always looking for something fun and different, and beirocks are on my list of things to try.

      Like

    • The Tundra PA says:

      Lanna, bierok sounds wonderful! Can you give us an idea of proportions? How much chopped cabbage to how much ground beef? Do you use green cabbage or red? Thanks for your lovely comment.

      Like

    • Menagerie says:

      Last time I visited family in Nebraska they introduced me to runza. I loved it, had it several times. I sure wish it was popular here in the South. Guess I’ll just have to make some.

      Like

  22. F.D.R. in Hell says:

    Liked by 7 people

  23. Dora says:

    Pick up a beer and let’s dance. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  24. 7delta says:

    Great post, Menagerie. Love the festival, food and drink history. Suddenly…made me wonder if the German immigrants brought Oktoberfest’s festival and agriculture show to the colonies/States, and it became the genesis of, or at least, a significant influence, on our County and State Fair/Agricultural Shows?

    Well, duh, 7deltas of dense. I don’t think I’ve ever heard our local fairs are the descendants of Oktoberfest…or come to think of it, much about the history of local fairs, at all…maybe it was the cotton candy overload…but I definitely remember German themed rides, banners, etc. Even knew the German engineering involved in manufacturing rides, but the “obvious?”  Bless my heart. I must be the last American to figure that one out. Really enjoyed the post. Thanks. 

    Liked by 2 people

  25. Sepp says:

    Grüß Gott!

    The month of October is
    German-American Heritage Month.

    October 6th is German-American Day.

    Presidents from Reagan through Trump have signed proclamations regarding German-American Day. The White House website has the texts of those annual proclamations.

    Throughout the Upper Mississippi River Valley region and the entire Midwest there are many versions of Octoberfest held each year.

    One of the most comprehensive websites with links to a huge number of resources on German-Americans is below.

    http://www.mrshea.com/germusa/index.html

    The magazine “German Life” is quite good at covering cultural, historical, food, and travel topics on Germany, Switzerland, Austria, and German-America.

    http://www.germanlife.com

    Wikipedia has a good section on German Americans.

    Liked by 3 people

  26. missilemom says:

    My 25 year old daughter went to Octoberfest for the first time this year . She and her friends had a fabulous time; met people from all over the world; dressed in the local costumes and felt safe.
    She is already planning her trip back for the next year. Thanks for all of the information.

    Liked by 4 people

  27. CrewDog says:

    For Oktoberfest!

    Happy October …. & Vote Early 😉

    Liked by 2 people

  28. stella says:

    Thanks, Menagerie! I haven’t tried the spaetzle yet, but I plan to. What did you use to make yours, if you don’t have a spaetzle maker? I have a metal colander with large holes, so I thought I might use that for a first attempt.

    I did have bratwurst and sauerkraut with caraway (Bavarian style) for dinner last night, along with baked butternut squash. Delicious! I drained the sauerkraut well, added a bit of cider and cider vinegar, brown sugar and caraway seeds.

    As I mentioned to you once, my dad used to make baked egg noodles with breadcrumbs and lots of butter and onions. It’s a dish he learned from his German grandmother, and they make a similar dish in Italy. Some people add garlic, and you could add mushrooms.

    Another similar dish is made by my SIL’s mother. It is egg noodles with butter, mushrooms and rinsed and cooked sauerkraut. Unusual, but a good potluck dish.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Cuppa Covfefe says:

      The Dutch have a “warms-the-cockles-of-yer-‘eart” stew called Hachee. I had it in a restaurant in Holland where it was on the “hidden menu” known only to the locals, who always had it in winter, as it’s really warming and comforting, as well as tasting great (tastes great, more filling).

      Here’s a cooking site that I found with the recipe, with pictures: http://www.kayotic.nl/blog/hachee

      Just the thing for a cold winter’s day (when it’s too cold to barbecue 🙂 )…

      And spätzle goes well with it, even as a substitute for the mashed potatoes (save a little bit for the applesauce, though).

      Liked by 1 person

    • Kathy says:

      Greetings, Stella and Menagerie … Below is a cousin’s recipe for creamy sauerkraut — made with bacon, onions, and applesauce — that goes nicely with either bratwurst or sauerbraten. People who don’t like the strong bite of raw sauerkraut often do enjoy this version.

      CREAMY SAUERKRAUT … In a moderate saucepan with lid, fry 8 slices of thick bacon until crisp. Leave grease in pan; drain bacon, crumble and set aside. Saute 1 medium onion (chopped) in the grease just until tender. Add 2-lbs. raw (or 1 large can) sauerkraut; mix thoroughly. Add in 1 quart jar of plain unsweetened applesauce. Add in the crumbled bacon and stir well. Bring to a simmer; then cover and simmer all day — at least 4 hours — the longer the creamier. Serve warm (although my cousin also enjoys it cold).

      In recent years, I’ve been asked to make a triple batch for our annual neighborhood Octoberfest, which I’ve found easier to do in a crock pot. I fry the bacon and onions on the HIGH setting, turn the temp to LOW, add in the sauerkraut and applesauce, then let it bake overnight.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Kaco says:

      I used one of those flat large hole graters and a spoon for a while. Recently picked up at “spaetzle maker” from Goodwill for a couple of bucks that is like a flat grater but with a slider. I think they sell them at Bed Bath and Beyond.

      Like

    • Menagerie says:

      I bought noodles. They were excellent!

      Like

  29. alligatriot says:

    Menagerie, thank you for sparking some magnificent memories!

    Our first German fest was in a relatively small town in northeast Bavaria. It was a relatively quiet affair but the locals were so incredibly friendly that it made us feel at home. How amazing to visit other bierfests and discover each was a little different. Some had carnival games and rides, others had lots of music and dancing and some were apparently for “serious” drinkers and had no music or games at all.

    We finally made it to the “real” Oktoberfest in Munchen and it was almost overwhelming, due to the enormous crowds. But a lot of fun!

    Now I shall go about my day thinking of slices of white radish with salt, giant pretzels, Nurnberger wurst on a hard roll with spicy mustard, oompah music and the chicken dance.

    Danke!!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Cuppa Covfefe says:

      Lots of places in the US have “Schuhplattler Vereine” where they do the Bavarian folk dances (my niece and nephew in the US were in one many moons ago). Even for tolks who don’t do the dancing (or join the choral groups, if they have them), it’s very entertaining. There’s at least one group in the SF Bay Area, as well as a huge group in LA (the Phoenix Group – just looked them up, they’re on YouTube!). Lots of fun.

      Liked by 1 person

  30. Barbara Willams says:

    Gee, no photos? How do we KNOW you really made this dish? Let’s see evidence, Dr. Ford.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Fools Gold says:

    Thank you!

    Like

  32. 6x47 says:

    My wife (who is half German and half Polish) and myself (a quarter German/ a quarter Polish) plan to celebrate our 20th wedding anniversary in 2023 at Oktoberfest in Munich.

    I only hope it isn’t completely overrun with Muzzies by then.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. 4EDouglas says:

    Love the people who can enjoy this, but My Cherokee blood over wrote the Scots-Irish German, Swiss, blood and can’t touch a drop haven’t for about 20 years..
    Enjoyed the post though. Thanks..

    Liked by 1 person

    • Cuppa Covfefe says:

      There are some Non-Alcoholic beers here that are as good or better than those with alcohol. Darmstädter Plsner NA was great. Kind of funny to think that it would be that good, but it was. They also have NA wine and champagne (I think Kalifornistan is the leader in that research, but Germany and Europe are catching up).

      They serve alcohol-free beer at Oktoberfest, and one of the TV stations actually did a test where three people, unbeknownst to them, were served alcohol-free beer. One fellow said that after his third Maß (litre) he was starting to feel the effects ( 🙂 ) but was otherwise OK.
      For those who understand German (or just want to watch folks having a good time) the video is here: https://www.sat1.de/ratgeber/oktoberfest/oktoberfest-essen/wiesn-alkoholfrei-clip

      Liked by 2 people

  34. tonyE says:

    Oktoberfest…. The only time/place of the year when/where I don’t feel guilty about drinking beer before noon on a Sunday.

    I avoid the carbs in flour… but a meal of roasted oxen with boiled cabbage and a good liter of Pilsner (OK, those are the good carbs) is one of God’s pleasures on earth. And we’re not even Germans! 😉

    Liked by 2 people

  35. amwick says:

    Husband and I drove up the mountain to Ober Gatlingurg and totally enjoyed their Octoberfest. We agreed to plan on it for next year. I did get a boot of beer, it was German, and delicious. They had so much German food, it was great.

    Like

  36. reverence1 says:

    As a german I find it hear-warming, that you celebrate german heritage.
    I love Spätzle. They are very much featured in the south-west of Germany where I live (also in Bavaria, but mostly here). When I was a kid, our nanny showed me, how to do hand-made Spätzle (prepare the dough and scrape them into boiling water with a knife from a wooden board). I loved it and still love it.
    Oktoberfest I visited a few times in my student days, but now I am not into alcohol any more.. Still I cherish, that Baravia is at the heart of german conservatism (not so much the big cities like Munich though). And I think the conservative change will to a large extend come through the bavarian CSU as a revolt against their “rinos”.

    Liked by 2 people

  37. Julia Adams says:

    With all due respect, why is this post up all day and has yet to be cycled through, especially with all other noteworthy news events of the day?

    Although it’s an interesting post with many insightful, thoughtful and amusing comments, its placement and timing seem to me, well, as odd and a bit out of sorts. What’s the point?

    Like

  38. WSB says:

    LOVE the recipe, Menagerie!!!!!

    Like

  39. Paco Loco says:

    We need some good Polka music to go with the pils and spatzel.

    Liked by 1 person

  40. Kaco says:

    My father in law is from Germany, my husband still has cousins there. We went in the summer and not during Oktoberfest, but it doesn’t matter, they are always celebrating something!, Enjoyed a lot of Bavaraia, The Romantic Road, some of the Luther trail, and did visit Hofbrauhaus and the Glockenspiel in Munich. When we went to Dinkelsbuhl, they had some fest, when we went to Rothenburg, there was some fest, and Fussen had a fest when we went there, too.

    My father in law was a part of the Maennerchor in the area where we live and German culture has been a big part of my husband’s family. One of his sisters married into another musical family a part of a German band that plays at the Oktoberfests and such.

    There’s a few German restaurants around here, too just ate at one a week ago, had Jaeger Schnitzel with spaetzle and red cabbage. Yum! I have occasionally made this stuff at home.

    If no one wants to make the spaetzle, Aldi sometimes sells the spaetzle noodles. I’ve done both. I do think homemade is better.

    Liked by 1 person

  41. Sepp says:

    “Mia san mia”
    Stefanie und Marina

    Two girls sing song in Bavarian dialect.

    Hope this works.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Tundra PA says:

      Wonder what the lyrics mean. The audience clearly gets the joke(s).

      Like

      • Sepp says:

        To the best of my ability and I hope someone can correct me, the general theme is that each one is singing about her own attributes, personality qualities, etc., as being very different from each other and yet they are close to or share affection for one another despite their differences. The older one is smarter, the younger one not so much, and so on. The attributes the younger girl sings of herself are kind of a silly mismatch of what she really is. So, that is why or how she endears herself to the audience.

        Liked by 1 person

  42. B Woodward says:

    I remember going to Oktoberfest in the big tents, drinking Wurzburger Hofbrau, and eating bratwursts. And my friend throwing up in the back of the Mercedes taxi. But that was long ago and far away.

    https://ibb.co/hHRLTA

    Like

  43. Sepp says:

    Hopefully, this will work.

    The video is of an elderly lady singing parts of what is now a children’s song in Schwäbisch (sorry to stray from the Bavarian theme).

    “Grandma sings funny German Children’sHit Folksong: Auf De Schwaeb’sche Eisenbahn”

    Like

    • czarowniczy says:

      VERDAMMT! Bolshewistisischer mul has blocked it! Yet another song sung by drunken revelers in the tents…the ability to remember the lyrics and sing them with some level of comprehension being a measure of both the singer’s and singee’s levels of sobriety…or lack there of”:

      Like

      • czarowniczy says:

        “mull” – I owe you one ‘l’ and an umlaut. Don’t know where the &^%$# Google Chrome hid the diacritical marks. Sorta puts me in a vowel mood.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sepp says:

          Thanks for the other video there. Almost posted this one. Fun!

          Like

        • Cuppa Covfefe says:

          You can always get a German keyboard 🙂 they have ß ü Ü ä Ä ö Ö µ € § and other interesting characters … or copy and paste into word (which is what I do for other symbols when MS Wurst isn’t being helpful). (And I always seem to find the odd characters by mistake…).

          Trulla trulla trul la la…. famous song around here, often sung with improvised words (kind of like “I’ve got a little list” from the Mikado, in that respect).

          Liked by 2 people

          • czarowniczy says:

            I’m about ready to take my Chromebook and make a Youtube video of me drilling holes in it at 100 yards – main thing stopping me is I can’t decide which gun to use.
            I’m stuck with it as we don’t have 21st century internet access to internet, we only have one cell provider and their wifi sucks so we’re at about – oh – 1995.
            We use our cells as hotspots so if I use Windows it takes me all day to upload the huge dumps MS sends on a regular basis. Also I despise the sea of useless bells, whistles and assorted crap MS put on Windows to make you feel as if you actually have some involvement and control of your Windows life. Hey, try removing Cortana.
            We do appreciate the $2-billion-plus that y’all taxpayers have dumped into the USDA and FCC to get us rural bumpkins access to late 20th century internet access – we now have AT&T fiberoptics running by the house, buried some 8 years ago with no one hooked up to it – thanks agin’ y’all.
            Thanks for the chance to vent – TMI, I know, so double thanks.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Cuppa Covfefe says:

              I live in West Germany, where we’ve been rebuilding the former East Germany via the “Solidaritätszuschlage” (tax on tax, 10% or so). So, we get cobbled-together vectoring, or even hybrid with LTE from Deutsche Telekom, while the Ossis get fibre-to-the-door.

              Something is very, VERY wrong here. We’re paying for the Marxists’ mistakes. Hmmm. Sounds familiar, eh?

              Friends don’t let friends use Windows 10 (or Windows 1 0, as some wag put it). Another bad thing about Windoze10 and their PTP update process is your bandwidth often gets sucked up updating your neighbour’s PC(s). And then, just a few weeks ago, was the “disappearing directory” bug. Seems some “programmer” messed up in a date routine…

              Never want to be an alpha tester for Micro$lop’s garbage code. They used to have some good stuff (MSDN, the early certs, etc.) but since Nadella, they’ve gone down the plughole…

              And yep, we have lots of dark fibre too. I worked for a company that had millions invested in T&M equipment and R&D for fibre, but due to mismanagement and poor timing, they shut down that business due to dark fibre, which only a few years later got “lit”. But the other companies (Fluke, et. al.) were the only ones to benefit.

              Where I grew up, we gearheads had a saying about fancy, chrome-decorated, snazzy-looking cars that looked good, but weren’t reliable at all: “Chrome don’t get ya home”.
              I guess that applies to PCs/tablets/etc. from Google, too… “Four thousand holes in Blackburm, Lancashire” 🙂

              Liked by 2 people

              • czarowniczy says:

                Yeah, I lived in Kaiserslautern area for four years back in the early 60s when it was 4-marks-10 to the dollar…and dinosaurs roamed the autobahn.
                We got our property in the East back under reunification but had to pay back property taxes to 1945…that ate up a chunk of the sales price.
                Rather than use/sell it the new German government demiled millions of rounds of ammunition and under German environmental rules it ran about a dollar for each destroyed round in costs. Ditto the older tanks left over, cost a bundle to clean each one and cut them up. They could have made a mint selling them to African nations but their morality prevented them from doing so – that’s OK though, the Russians sold the Africans their excess.
                I do miss rollmops.

                Liked by 1 person

  44. czarowniczy says:

    My aunt had an apartment just a few blocks from the Theresienwiese so in the early to mid-60s that was our base. I collect (stole) about a hundred beer ‘steins’ and about that many glasses and I still have some clay massen as well as the latter unmarked glass Oktoberfest massen headknockers. I understand now they’ve gone to ones drunks are likely to do much less damage with – bolshevik wussies.

    I can remember being slightly more looser than tight, sitting in the big tents on the last night singling the below, bemoaning the fate of, for the next 11 months, having the ability to be equally as drunk but not in such a large a group of good company

    Like

  45. Trump Fan says:

    Thanks a lot for this great artikel.
    And thanks a lot too all the Commentators for there lovly writing.
    Iam a German woman and my hard is going wait open by so much good
    friendship between us.
    I live in Germany, but I never been to Oktoberfest in Bavaria. I was in New Hempshire
    in an restaurant with Oktoberfest. Is this funny? Ha.

    By the way. I love America so much. Be happy to all that you can livining in America.

    Many greetings from Germany to America

    Like

  46. Plowboy says:

    OK and tell me again why I am supposed to care? I don’t like anything about Germany or their beer.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s