Thailand: Four Boys Rescued in Part 1 Of Treacherous Operation Racing Against Time and Rain…

Four of the twelve Thai schoolboys were rescued by divers in part one of an exhaustive international effort. The remaining boys will have to wait until oxygen tanks are replaced and equipment resupplied along the underwater system for the next attempt.

According to local officials it is expected to take at least 10 hours to re-stage the rescue equipment before attempting round #2 of the rescue. Each rescue team takes another 6 hours to navigate and guide the boys through a 4,000 meter long underwater labyrinth. There are more than 90 divers working on the rescue mission including 50 international divers from around the world.

CHIANG RAI, Thailand (Reuters) – Four of 12 Thai schoolboys were rescued from a flooded cave on Sunday in a daring and dangerous operation to save the children and their soccer coach who have been trapped underground for more than two weeks.

The operation to rescue the remaining eight boys – some as young as 11 and weak swimmers – and the coach was called off at nightfall until Monday to give the divers time to replenish oxygen supplies and ensure all preparations were complete.

Thirteen foreign divers and five members of Thailand’s elite navy SEAL unit guided the boys to safety through narrow, submerged passageways that claimed the life of a former Thai navy diver on Friday.

“Today was the best day, the best situation in terms of the weather, the health of the boys, our water management for our rescue effort,” the head of the rescue operation, Narongsak Osottanakorn, told a news conference.

“Today we managed to rescue and send back four children to Chiang Rai Prachanukrua Hospital safely.”

The rescuers needed at least 10 hours to prepare for their next operation, involving about 90 divers in total, 50 of them from foreign countries, he said.

A helicopter flew the four boys to the nearby city of Chiang Rai, where they were taken by ambulance to the hospital. (read more)

Pictorial graphic of the challenge AVAILABLE HERE

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157 Responses to Thailand: Four Boys Rescued in Part 1 Of Treacherous Operation Racing Against Time and Rain…

  1. FofBW says:

    Does anyone know how the boys got to where they are trapped??

    Liked by 5 people

    • Stab, the unstoppable hero says:

      If there had only been a wall…

      Liked by 2 people

      • Grandma Covfefe says:

        UPDATE:
        Reporters have been told that the divers will be diving soon..no time frame yet.
        Supposed to have another press at 10 AM ( 11 PM ET)…not sure if the press is on.
        (Sorry to slip this in here–needed to alert everyone that it sounds like it may be a go soon)
        Ambulances already there. It was said the 4 weakest boys who were brought out–hope it’s true.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Grandma-thanks. Also, I am shocked that Drudge is NOT covering this story!

          Like

          • Grandma Covfefe says:

            i know! Most of MSM don’t even know how to do real reporting–sounds familar, huh?
            I have about 15-20 twitters set up to check–they are mostly south asian reporters and 4 live blogs. All are fair but better than MSM here. I will post here and then in Monday open thread, of updates. I was doing this in Today open thread this morning.
            Back to prayer mode.

            Liked by 1 person

    • kea says:

      FofBW I just asked the same thing. Was wondering as well.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ray F. says:

      Apparently, the route in was high and dry when they went in. Unfortunately, they chose to enter the cave right at the start of the rainy season, and the passage flooded too rapidly for them to escape. ='[.]’=

      Liked by 7 people

      • FofBW says:

        Thanks Ray!

        Liked by 1 person

      • They were not that deep into the cave but trapped once the entrance was flooded.
        Then they had to move deeper to escape the flooding that got closer to them.

        Liked by 8 people

      • MfM says:

        It’s also been mentioned that they may have gone to leave… And water had come in…. Driving them further in the cave. I’m sure we’ll find out eventually.

        Liked by 1 person

      • No doubt the power of the inflow of water – ACCELERATING through any narrowing passages – prohibited any attempt to get out as the water began to flow in.

        Perhaps the boys had progressed so far along the passage in the first place that they were unaware of any danger before it was too late.

        Like

      • margarite1 says:

        Even dry that’s a looongggg way to go in a dark skinny cave. I’d never do it but then I’m a girl.

        Liked by 4 people

        • Twinkletoes says:

          I’m a girl too, and just looking at the diagram makes me claustrophobic. Yikes! May God help them all get out alive. So sorry about the diver who died while trying to help.

          Liked by 9 people

          • Paprika says:

            And yet, many of our best and most qualified spelunkers are females!

            Liked by 5 people

            • piper567 says:

              paprika…there may be some advantage to the usual smaller size of women.
              If they are not Marxists, ha!

              Like

            • G. Combs says:

              Like Sarah Corey! I really enjoyed caving with Sarah.

              And yes caves can flood very rapidly. I have had a couple narrow escapes. I also lost a friend to cave diving. It is one of the most dangerous if not THE most dangerous sport.
              …..

              Prayers for the boys AND the divers. They need them.

              Like

          • JC says:

            Yes, Twink. Praying for the diver’s family, and for the boys, their coach, the rescuers and all families.

            Lord God, I pray specifically for:
            •Guidance, wisdom and stamina for the divers and other rescuers.
            •Strength for the weak boys.
            •Peace for each person swimming the hideous passageway – such a long way, Lord; please replace panic with peace.
            •Peace for those who must wait their turn for rescue.
            •Perfect equipment performance.
            •Accurate triage.
            •Safe and speedy transport to the hospital.
            •Wisdom for medical staff.
            •May all involved know of Your mercy and grace, and for those who do not know You, may they seek You and find You.
            Thank You so very much that the team was found, that willing and capable volunteers have arrived, and four boys are safely rescued. Please cover them with our prayers and Your great love.

            In the Holy, beautiful, beloved and brilliant name of the Lord Jesus Christ of Nazareth, to Whom all worship and praise is due – Amen.

            Liked by 25 people

          • Abster says:

            I’m with you guys. Wow, having survived that long in a cold wet, dark cave is a miracle in itself. May God be with these young men and guide all those involved in this frightening rescue. Prayers for the family of the brave diver who lost his life earlier this week.

            Liked by 4 people

          • yy4u says:

            Twinkletoes — I am not in any way claustophobic,but there is absolutely no way I would go into that long skinny cave. My fear would not be of closed spaces, it would be of getting stuck in there which is exactly what happened.

            Like

        • Newhere says:

          Girl or boy, when the option is to follow the dark skinny cave toward another breath, or follow it toward a black engulfing flood with no hope as to where the water ends or whether you can turn around in time to beat it back to air — survival kicks in. We’d all do what they did.

          Reminds me of Touching the Void — the autobiography of Joe Simpson who miraculously survived a horrific climbing accident. At one point he’d dropped hundreds of feet and landed on a ledge deep within an ice crevice, sustaining broken bones and already frostbitten. He called out for hours hoping hoping for an answer from his partner, who, also in grave peril, believed him dead and carried on without him. Finally facing reality, he had to decide whether to cling to his ledge of “safety” with his condition rapidly deteriorating–or to take his remaining rope and supplies and lower himself off the ledge, deeper into the ice crevice, into complete darkness, likely surrendering any possibility of getting out the way he came in. He literally had no idea what awaited beneath him or reversing the decision. But he had the wits to realize on the ledge he’d die. And by moving, trying, maybe he’d discover an opening. So he lowered himself into the void.

          He ended up surviving. It’s an amazing story, and one I think of often when I think about courage, and hope, and how quickly the human mind (or some human minds) can process reality and accept that the irrational has become the only thing rational. Don’t know if I could have moved off the ledge.

          But I do know I sure as hell would run toward air and away from the rising water.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Theresa Keys says:

        And they were driven further and further in by the rising flood waters.

        Like

      • Carrie2 says:

        Ray F: An idiot coach in an oncoming monsoon coming takes these children deep into a very unlikely place to even be even as an expert. God bless all those divers there to do the best to rescue all and hopefully their lives saved. Fire the coach and perhaps make sure he understands that he is the problem and caused this. I feel sure the parents will never ever allow this coach around their children ever again. Choosing this when weather is well known makes me wonder about the “coach”.

        Liked by 2 people

    • dizzymissl says:

      Flash flood. The monsoon season wasn’t supposed to start for a couple of weeks–it started today.

      Like

      • FofBW says:

        Thank you dizzy

        Liked by 1 person

      • Carrie2 says:

        dizzymissl, nevertheless the coach supposedly knew how dangerous this was and how close to the monsoon season which can come at variable times. Had the coach already gone on his own to check out the difficulty for inexperienced children to attempt this? I would think he didn’t stop to think about anything.

        Like

    • Grandma Covfefe says:

      They were hiking after their soccer practice. They rode bikes there. There were comments that they were going to carve their name on the wall, then they got caught in a flash flood, maybe running down further to avoid it and thinking they’ll find a high spot to climb up. These are assumptions but would make sense.

      You’ll notice on the map that Sundance posted, “flooded entrance”,…it’s an another channel that brought more water into the cave. I understand that has been plugged up as best as they can. They didn’t say at the entrance or inside at the “Y”. I hope both.

      They just went in at a bad time…actually there was a sign in front warning not to go in during monsoon season (May to Oct)

      Liked by 2 people

      • MfM says:

        Nice to know they were able to block some of the water coming in. There was also talk about widening some of the narrowest parts.

        Like

        • Grandma Covfefe says:

          The first stage operation was so successful that they are all happy and ready to continue the 2nd stage operation which may happen Monday at 8 AM (9 PM ET tonight) at the earliest but may hold off for up to another 10 hours, depending on weather. They had a press conference 9 PM (10 AM ET this morning) announcing 4 boys were rescued and in hospital…well, right when they started the press, it rain hard :/ It’s good it didn’t happened during he 1st rescue but for the next one…I don’t know. It depends if they are working their water pumps over time. They had hundreds of lines going into the cave pumping water out since the first day they found the boys.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Grandma Covfefe says:

          They had over 200 men scouring the mountain looking for a way in from above the cave since discovery day one. They dug over 100 holes and found a few possibilities but they didn’t pan out—- plus a car with 10 of them went over a cliff and one was badly injured and had to be airlifted out. This may have prompt them to scratch that idea for the moment, drilling a hole from above.and go with the plan to bring them out via dive.

          Liked by 3 people

    • dd_sc says:

      They hiked into the cave and got trapped when a flash flood filled the cave. Read an article that it is a team tradition to hike to the end of that cave and sign the wall.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Mkerlin says:

      They went into the cave BEFORE the rainy season rains began and when they turned around to come out the rains had flooded the cave.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Non=combative. says:

      They walked in with the coach to explore the caves. Once inside heavy thunderstorms dropped a larger volume of rain which flooded the cave. The caves are dry during the winter months but are flooded during the rainy season which usually starts mid-July. The caves are actually closed during the rainy season. I’ve explored these caves a few times when I lived in Thailand but never went in as far as they boys. A bit tight in spots.

      Liked by 4 people

    • MGBSE says:

      They walked…then it started raining. It is possible they had to keep backing up to avoid rising water.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Zippy says:

      Their idiot 25 year old soccer coach led them on the “adventure” there after a soccer game. That’s being pretty much being buried in the news for some reason. I found a ONE SENTENCE mention of it somewhere.

      Liked by 1 person

      • dizzymissl says:

        That has been all over the news.

        And people go on adventures. It’s normal, unless you are trying to raise a soyboy.

        Like

  2. kea says:

    Wow when you see that map of the cave…and read how they need to do this… wow…

    Silly question but why did they go into the cave? I read somewhere that it was some kind of initiation? That they wanted to write their names on a wall but again since I don’t trust the fake news I wanted to know if anything else heard anything different?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Sunshine says:

      The biggest problem would be the U-shaped very narrow tunnel. How is it that so many Asian countries still don’t give swimming lessons to their kids, I’ll never understand.

      Liked by 2 people

      • 3kidmama says:

        I grew up in a 3rd world country as the child of American expat teachers. NONE of my local childhood playmates could swim. When much of life is spent TRULY struggling to keep your kids with food in their bellies and a roof over the head, and just perhaps if you are really blessed your kids get to attend school (if you can eek out a few extra saved $ for shoes, a uniform, pencil and notebook) …the whole idea of “swim lessons” is simply not on the radar. No pools available to everyday people, and if parents don’t swim themselves, how/why teach their children? Plus, most local rivers are raw sewage and extremely dangerous to “swim” in anyway.

        Soccer is a sport played round the world because all it requires is a simple ball. A couple of trees or stones for goal posts, a flat area of land and you’re good to go! I’ve even watched adults play community soccer games using a “ball” created out of rags.

        It’s truly a different world than where we as everyday Americans are so blessed to live………

        Liked by 16 people

        • JC says:

          Thank you for this wise perspective, 3kidmama.

          Liked by 1 person

          • sturmudgeon says:

            Ditto! If one has never visited a country in this part of the world (and some others), and ‘connected’ with the general populace, (which I have, fortunately) one who has spent life entirely in the West… absolutely cannot envision the survival instinct displayed by these people… Americans, (and Canadians), are SO VERY FORTUNATE! Appreciate it!

            Liked by 6 people

        • Foggy World says:

          I was reading a UK paper and in the comments section someone pointed out that in Australia today, children are not permitted to graduate from primary school unless they can demonstrate that they know how to swim.

          We live on the East coast of the US and it amazes me how the number of children drowning goes up every year. It really doesn’t take swimming pools but access to a lake does just fine. It’s up to us though to start to put some pressure on school boards and parents to make sure that they do their very best to see that their kids do know how to swim and are comfortable in water. It’s skill set that is really needed.

          Liked by 2 people

          • wondering999 says:

            Upthread somebody made the point that rivers and lakes in many places are polluted with sewage and dangerous to swim in.

            I agree that swimming is a basic life skill. Also, if any homeschoolers are reading — lifeguarding is a very valuable skill also, and I know at least one college that had short hours at their athletic pool because they couldn’t get enough lifeguards. I never trained as a lifeguard, but if I had every resource I would have wanted as a kid, this would have been one of my early goals as soon as I was 15 years old, and I would have trained even before that. Following link from a university in Houston lists the skills needed.
            https://ssl.uh.edu/recreation/aquatics/pdf/lifeguard_fact_sheet.pdf

            Liked by 1 person

        • Sunshine says:

          You’re right. I have a friend who loves fishing. He can’t swim but he has a small motor-boat. He’s terrified of the water. I know people whose parents can’t swim but they all sent their kids to swim classes. In Thailand, life is different. It’s very sad that they allowed their rivers to be so polluted. The government needs to put money into education.

          Like

        • sobriquet4u says:

          I so agree with your comments. Unless you have traveled to Thailand and met these people as I have then you can not sit here and pass such unjust comments. (as seen above) These people for the most part are some of the kindest I have met while traveling the world. They live simple lives and are not as cautious as Americans. The majority practice Theravada Buddhism and therefore the connection between buddhism and nature is inseparable. The young coach was a practicing monk before giving it up to spend more time with these children. His discipline and meditation whilst a monk has aided greatly in keeping these children calm. The parents of these children have chosen gratitude toward the young coach rather than bitter and unwarranted criticism.

          Liked by 1 person

          • wondering999 says:

            Agree. Was part of a group once where one of the participants told the story of being a caretaker of kids, when a kid accidentally was killed in a pool (by electrocution — loose pool light connection, which never would have occurred to me as something that can happen).

            Also my kids were in a summer camp when there was a van accident (15-passenger van, apparently those are very dangerous, I found out later). One of the kids who did not want to stay seatbelted and had unbuckled, was killed when the van fishtailed and turned over. My child, thank you Lord for mercies, was in the *other van* that didn’t turn over.

            There are so many risks in this life. Good to learn about the misfortunes of others if it helps to be more careful in preparations, but I’d never want to judge. Next time the stupid leader during an accident could just as easily be me or one of my grown kids. There are so many things that can go wrong, especially with large groups. I could list a dozen stories of misfortunes narrowly averted within my circle of friends. This situation just makes me grateful that bad things haven’t happened to me

            Like

        • pacnwbel says:

          Thank you 3kidmama for a realistic report on the way things actually are is helpful to the untraveled American mind, which tends to assess situations within the parameters of its own experience

          Like

    • booger71 says:

      One of the boys had been in the cave before. People like to explore caves. I am a caver myself.

      Liked by 1 person

      • kea says:

        I mean I can understand it. Caves are fun sure but at least take a few things with you before you go. From the sounds of it they just walked in right after soccer practice?

        Like

  3. margarite1 says:

    The first miracle is that they were even found!

    Be interesting to hear why they were so far back into that cave.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Minnie says:

    Prayers for the children, their Coach and all involved in their rescue.

    Trust in Jesus 🙏

    Liked by 9 people

    • Minnie says:

      We are not alone
      He goes before us
      He will never leave us

      He calls us, redeems and calls us as His own

      He is our strength
      He is our defender
      He is our comfort in the storm

      (Kari Jobe – I Am Not Alone)

      How miraculous this song is playing at this precise moment in time on my car’s XM The Message – God wink ❤️

      Never ever ever lose hope ❤️

      Liked by 7 people

  5. Minnie says:

    Thank you for this thread, Sundance.

    Where two or more are gathered in His Name 🙏❤️🙏

    Liked by 8 people

  6. Sunshine says:

    The rescue teams are putting full-face diving masks on the boys before removing them from the ledge. Also, the Israelis donated $100,000 of wireless communication equipment that allowed the boys to communicate with the outside world.

    It took quite a long time to come up with a successful plan. I have no doubt that when USA Seal team became involved, it greatly aided in the effort.

    Liked by 3 people

    • booger71 says:

      Actually there are several American cave diver volunteers on site. Cave diving is quite a bit different than the ocean diving the Seal teams do.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Cheri Lawrence says:

        Didn’t some rescuer Thai navy seal or something already lose his life?

        Like

        • America First says:

          Unfortunately, yes. He was a 38 yo very experienced ex-naval seal (as Thais call them), and a very fit triathlete. It is heart-breaking to see on the map of the cave how close he was to the staging chamber when he died.

          Liked by 2 people

      • Sunshine says:

        I know. The water current is exceptionally strong and the twists and turns make it very difficult to manage.The Thai diver died from exhaustion. I hope one of the rescues is filmed. I will be a great movie. I have hope for all of the trapped people.

        Like

      • G. Combs says:

        Thanks for the info Booger, I figured American cavers would be there since they have technical knowledge and many actually train in cave rescue techniques. (I have been to courses sponsored by the NSS.)

        Like

  7. MfM says:

    I read somewhere that one of the British divers who found them had to return to the U.K. for medical treatment. I haven’t seen an update on that.

    Like usual some of the British papers have more photos and stories then U.S. ones.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. dizzymissl says:

    Elon Mush has developed a mini-submarine he is currently testing. It will be sent to Thailand within the next couple of hours in case they have trouble with getting out any of the other boys.

    Liked by 2 people

    • dizzymissl says:

      **Musk** not Mush, lol.

      Liked by 1 person

      • auscitizenmom says:

        LOL I thought you did that on purpose. 😀

        Liked by 2 people

        • JC says:

          Haha… me too.

          Good for Elon, though, for trying to help. My guess is he already has a few of his engineers puzzling over this. They are extremely innovative and highly driven to succeed. If they can’t solve the puzzle this time, I’d lay odds that he’ll be on it for future underwater rescues. Say what you will about his politics, but he has a big heart and a commitment to humanitarian causes.

          Liked by 3 people

          • sickconservative says:

            Guess I’m not the biggest fan as he is free thinking but seems to rely on Gov’t to much for me.

            Liked by 1 person

            • JC says:

              Oh, I’m with you on that, sc; absolutely.

              He does have some good qualities that have made a positive difference in many lives, so I’m hoping he’ll continue to do that. President Trump seems to value his expertise for Space Force and looking to the future of high-tech govt needs. One of those situations where we need the assistance of those w/whom we disagree, hehe.

              Liked by 1 person

      • MfM says:

        I also read that they are also looking into an ‘air’ tunnel for the kids who can’t swim to get through the tightest parts. After the fact I’m sure we’ll find out a lot of details.

        Liked by 2 people

        • KittyKat says:

          I read that a team is searching for the airhole above the cave that has been letting in the oxygen, so they can lift them out, which would be much easier and faster than the long underwater swim.

          Liked by 2 people

      • Cheri Lawrence says:

        Hahahaha!!

        Like

    • Grandma Covfefe says:

      Musk is not involved now. Check the date on your twitter. Thai Team moved in quickly to start the rescue on Sunday (today)10 AM (11 PM ET Saturday –yesterday) claiming they have peak readiness, so Musk back off and wish them prayers and luck.

      Thai definition of peak readiness is perfect weather, water, and the boys’ readiness, physical and mental. And that decision happened prior to the first stage rescue.

      Boys is having to deal with pitch black cave at all times, muddy water (one diver said it is actually mud that is watered down, not dirtied water), strong currents, oxygen-depleted air, and all these twisted, jagged tunnels. This cave is not a typical cave we’d envisioned. It goes from a large cavern down to about 3 feet holes. Crazy, hair-raising dive.

      Like

    • margarite1 says:

      Is the kid supposed to get inside that metal cylinder? I’m guessing it will fit through that “U” shape in the cave?
      I can’t even imagine how tough this really must be.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Cheri Lawrence says:

      Great finally some of these rich people doing some humanitarian work!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • TwoLaine says:

      They’ll be done by then.

      Like

  9. StuckInBlue says:

    Here’s an excellent article on the #ThaiCaveRescue efforts. The scale is immense. Hats off to Rob Harper, John Volanthen, and Rick Stanton for being the team that initially found them,
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5930075/18-divers-enter-Thai-cave-deadline-looms-save-trapped-soccer-team.html

    Liked by 2 people

  10. dizzymissl says:

    Another Musk invention/collaboration for the boys

    Arcata’s Wing Inflatables, SpaceX collaborate on Thailand cave rescue

    http://madriverunion.com/arcatas-wing-inflatables-spacex-collaborate-on-thailand-cave-rescue/

    Liked by 1 person

  11. kathyca says:

    So this quote is buried way down in the dailymail’s article StuckinBlue linked. This makes me feel a little better. I was thinking they had to swim in muddy water for 2-3 hours…yikes!

    “Each boy pulled out was accompanied by two divers on the perilous 4km (2.5miles) journey through murky waters and narrow tunnels. It’s understood they were able to walk most of the way after teams drained the water level by 30cm (12ins) last night.”

    Liked by 2 people

    • kathyca says:

      and when I say swim, I mean swim underwater with scuba gear. I swear, if I had to do that, I would have to think about it for a good long while!

      Liked by 4 people

      • Cheri Lawrence says:

        Yes panic for me!!

        Liked by 2 people

      • StuckInBlue says:

        I doubt if any of the trapped folks can summon the energy for panic at the moment.

        Like

      • G. Combs says:

        “…I swear, if I had to do that, I would have to think about it for a good long while!”

        Try it WITHOUT the scuba equipment! Some Brits took me into a cave with 8 sumps that had to be free dove. I had to uphold the honor of the USA and I HATE WATER AND SWIMMING! Description of the ‘bit wet’ cave Swildon’s Hole that was my introduction to British caving. 🙄

        I am not at all surprised the British cavers were part of this rescue. They are very very hard core cavers.

        Like

  12. Grandma Covfefe says:

    For now everyone is “sleeping” in Thailand.

    If it’s 3 PM ET, then it is 2 AM in Thailand.

    They’re planning a gathering of something around 7AM (6PM ET) (4 PM PT for me)

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Lactantius says:

    Just a few miles from Chiang Rai you can be in a third world jungle environment. Elephants track freely and malaria is a threat. These kids grow up clinging to the sides of pick-up trucks as a method of getting to school. If we take our presumptions of “safety” to such places, we will soon be overwhelmed by reality. Kids bathing in streams are taken suddenly by flash floods.

    Before we begin to hector “these people” for not thinking, it would be wise to be acquainted with the realities of the jungle, the third world, karst limestone craziness, laterite soil, melioidosis caused by a soil and water-dwelling bacteria called B pseudomallei which has a 90% death rate if not treated early, ……. Thailand is a beautiful and wonderful country full of gentle and loving people. It is perhaps the safest third country in the world. But lets not dump on the “ignorance” of these people. In all good faith, most of us could not survive a week in a tribal village living as the people do.

    That coach has already contemplated the dishonor he has brought upon his soul and the souls of his ancestors. He knows he must rid himself of the suffering he has brought upon himself. He must concentrate on maintaining the right view, intention, action, thoughts, perceptions, etc. The coach is putting himself through far more than most who blithely damn him can imagine.

    Liked by 8 people

    • Non=combative. says:

      Nicely worded Lectantius. I lived in Thailand for 6 years. My wife is Thai and we returned to the US 2 years ago. She has literally been glued to her computer watching live streams from Thai news outlets. Thanks to the Internet she is able to communicate daily with her extended family in Thailand. In many instances Thailand is an insular society tho that trend is slowing changing. School kids from primary all the way to University wear uniforms to school. Teachers, police and all others in a position of authority are held in high regard in Thai culture and this is the reason the Thai Navy Seal who perished will receive a Royal funeral as proclaimed by the King who is beloved by the Thai people. This young soccer coach will be stigmatized in his belief that this incident lays squarely on his shoulders. Thai society has come to a complete standstill since this episode began. My wife and I join all around the world who are praying for the safe rescue for those remaining and for all those who are sacrificing their lives in their efforts.

      Liked by 5 people

    • benifranlkin says:

      Good. We know that most countries like Thailand are poopholes…these folks know those risks..but to blithely walk into cave with kids that are not your own and get stuck tells me the coach didn’t think this thing through. He deserves all his bad feeling he has for himself.

      Like

      • Lactantius says:

        Thailand is not a poophole by any stretch of the imagination. But you can cross the Mekong into Laos and find a real poophole. Or you can just walk into Myanmar and find out what life under the treacherous eye of a corrupt military is really like.

        It is an error to neglect the reality on the ground in these countries and to assume that Western “wisdom” is pluperfect. The “poor judgement” of the coach is being “judged” by Western standards. He should be a helicopter parent who straps all his charges in and fends off any possible surprise such as a rock slide or roof collapse or whatever. I make no brief for the care and thinking of the coach. But I do criticize the Monday morning quarterbacking by “sophisticates” watching CNN. Down in the Phi Phi Islands of Thailand little children shinny up vines to the 100 foot high ceilings of caves to reach the nests of birds to steal their eggs. That may be “primitive” stuff to the enlightened world, but it is how they roll in other lands and places.

        Why do we have to emulate the Progressives and deplore what we can’t wrap our sophisticated minds around?

        Doctors without Borders tend to these people and perform everyday fixes that are miracles within the culture they are treating. In small ways, many people are reaching out to help those in need. Drop kicking this coach into purgatory is aimless. You have no concept of the real value he performs within the community he serves. Yes, he made a big error. But, the Thai’s will celebrate his survival with great thanksgiving. If that makes the Thai’s idiots, so be it.

        Liked by 2 people

        • G. Combs says:

          Also a point many many people do not understand is sanitation in KARST is difficult because the land is POROUS. Sewage is going to move through the cave systems without the cleaning mechanism we are used to here in the USA.

          And speaking of that problem. Indiana has/had a notorious cave full of poop and toilet paper because the town backflushed their filters into that cave.

          Like

      • sobriquet4u says:

        Ok “ben” we get it…your here to troll and be rude. Have you ever been to Thailand? If so you must have only visited the Soi cowboy district in Bangkok.

        Like

    • Sunshine says:

      Thanks for bringing us back to reality. You’re right.

      Like

    • sobriquet4u says:

      Again thanks for explaining this to others.

      Like

    • LULU says:

      Thank you, Lactantius. The very best post I’ve read on this story anywhere.

      Someone (a Thai) familiar with this cave says it has been mecca for young kids for eons.

      Like

  14. Coast says:

    About twenty years ago I went on a two-week Boy Scout camp outing with our oldest son. I don’t exactly remember where, but one of the activities was going to a cave and spending the night. The cave was operated by a private company, it was safe and dry, but I still found it uncomfortably cold. I don’t think I got more than one hour worth of sleep and anxiously waited for when the hot chocolate would be served. We also went on a deep excursion where the guide turned off all the lights to show what dark really means. Kudos to those kids on surviving.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. clipe says:

    “A helicopter flew the four boys to the nearby city of Chiang Rai,…”

    Kids, being resilient, might think a ride in a helicopter is a fair trade-off for their ordeal.

    Like

  16. carterzest says:

    Liked by 3 people

  17. Thank you for caring

    Like

  18. andyocoregon says:

    Oh the Humanity! A CNN reporter stationed at the Thailand hospital where the boys are being taken said doctors have told him they plan to keep all the boys in isolation from each other and their parents for about a week while they run all kinds of tests on them. OMG! The Horror of Separating Children from Their Parents!.

    Bring on the protesters!

    Like

    • Lactantius says:

      Your tone is pitch perfect. Of course they will isolate the kids and do extensive blood tests looking for every possible jungle saprophyte which may have invaded a young, weakened body. That is real, honest-to-goodness, first world medicine. It is quite possible one (or more) of these youngsters has become a cornucopia of jungle rot. First world Thailand has spectacular medical facilities and knowledge. Our very own pharmaceutical giants pay close attention to the folk cures in such places.

      Liked by 1 person

      • andyocoregon says:

        Oops, I forgot the /s again.

        In any case, I wonder if the lack of sanitation and footwear has made them sick? With no air exchange and no bathroom facilities, the air must have been absolutely putrid in that cave.

        Like

    • Grandma Covfefe says:

      Hey, Treeper Twitterers should Tweeter-bomb CNN twitter about separation of parent/child. You Treepers have come up with such clever remarks.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. JasonF says:

    Like

    • Echo says:

      Indeed.
      The media want us to think that “elite Thai Navy SEALS” are the commanders and doers and thinkers here. I admire their compulsory agenda pushing / social engineering in every circumstance, the propaganda never sleeps.

      Like

  20. MfM says:

    The nasty comments about Trump’s tweet about the U.S. helping with the rescue are riduculous.

    What a lot of leftists don’t realise is that many in the US really didn’t have any idea what was going on. His tweet opened their eyes. If just 2% of Trump’s followers say a prayer for the kids safety… that is a million people praying for them.

    Like

  21. America First says:

    I’ve been thinking about how impossible it would have been for any of them to really get a proper nights sleep. From the pictures they looked rather crowded on that ledge, as well as cold and damp.

    Over two weeks without sleep, and even the best diver in the world would be not at their physical or mental best. To see these kids in such good spirits and not hallucinating is remarkable.

    Like

  22. Texian says:

    The divers are trained in extreme self-discipline and strength of mind with a high sense of self-confidence.. They are encountering zero visibility in confined spaces for extended periods of time. Evaluating every move, every obstacle, before proceeding is critical – a calculated risk.. All the while having to tend inexperienced personnel through the process. Hence the long duration of a single rescue run.

    The British diver who found them that was sent back for treatment was probably bent. The varying pressures in the water pockets and air pockets are unknown, the varying lengths of dive times, etc. There should be a recompression chamber onsite with a mandatory decompression treatment run. Commercially, in our company tables any dive made in less than 60 f.s.w. had a maximum bottom time without decompression of three hours.. Any longer required a SurDO2 treatment table.. And even at a three hour bottom time we would do some chamber time afterwards for good measure. Diving physics is an inexact science in that it affects every person differently depending on temperature, body composition and rate of physical activity. I would not make that dive without a SurDO2 recompression system onsite.. Whether ten hours, five hours or three hours – All should have a mandatory SurDO2 decompression run immediately afterwards.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Texian says:

      CORRECTION: Its been awhile.. i checked one of my old company manuals..

      Any dive made in less than 40 f.s.w. – that is 40 f.s.w. – has a maximum bottom time without decompression of three hours.. 180 minutes at 60 f.s.w. is an exceptional exposure dive that has water stops and over an hour of SurDO2 treatment time..

      Like

  23. jakeandcrew says:

    “Thai media reported Monday that the 25-year-old soccer coach was among those who were rescued, CBS News foreign correspondent Ben Tracy reports. Tracy said that while that may seem odd, it’s been reported for days that the coach was acutally in the worst shape of those trapped in the cave, since he had been giving the boys all the food and water he had on him.”

    https://www.cbsnews.com/live-news/thai-cave-rescue-operation-resumes-thailand-boys-soccer-team-2018-07-08-live-updates/

    Like

    • MfM says:

      I’ve heard talk of that. I doubt he was given any choice in the matter.

      If it was like the Chilean mine disaster several of the strongest went out first to test the procedure then the ones in worse shape mentally or physically.

      Like

    • MfM says:

      The other advantage is that he knows the boys and maybe was also seen as one who could be of more use outside.

      Like

      • MfM says:

        It may also have been practical, he was likely the largest, if they got him out it was a psychological boost to the remaining kids. Also it meant the divers weren’t dreading dealing with him being weak and big.

        Like

  24. MfM says:

    Rescue on going, I’ve heard/read they were up to seven, but not confirmed by Thai government.

    Like

  25. MfM says:

    Saw a tweet that Thai government confirms 8 out. Trump news 24/7 was the Twitter account.

    Like

    • Benson II says:

      MfM, If that’s the case I think that’s absolutely amazing. There must be lots going on we know nothing about as far as pumping water out, enlarging of spaces, etc. Hope the rain hold off totally.

      Like

      • MfM says:

        I also read that they had worked at damming a side tunnel that was letting water in. Not sure if that is accurate. I’m sure a lot of info on how they did it will come out after the rescue is complete.

        I also read that the British group is fairly large, not just the 3 men who we’ve seen mentioned. It makes sense, there are a lot of caves and mines in England and Wales.

        Like

  26. jakeandcrew says:

    Another graphic that shows how treacherous and scary this rescue mission is…

    Like

  27. jakeandcrew says:

    Very interesting thread from an experienced cave diver. It really is a miracle that 8 have been saved. May God’s grace continue to watch over the remaining 5, and bring them safely out also – along with the heroes working so hard to save them.

    Like

  28. Grandma Covfefe says:

    Check my postings for more info of rescue at today Open Thread. timed at 12:21 AM.
    Praise God, eight is out. Five more to go.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. pacnwbel says:

    What incredibly good news that four more boys have been brought out, this is the power of prayer in action. We must keep up the prayers until all are out, and then it will be a great thanksgiving for the wonderful people who made it possible in the worst of circumstances.

    Like

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