We Remember – Pearl Harbor Day

On July 21st 2017 President Trump met with survivors of the attack on Pearl Harbor and the sinking of the U.S.S. Arizona.

[Transcript] 2:51 P.M. EDT – THE PRESIDENT: Thank you very much. Today it’s my distinct privilege to welcome to the White House three of the five living survivors of the USS Arizona. This is their first time to our nation’s capital — Ken, Lauren, and Don. I hope this trip does honor to you and your truly heroic service and we wanted to thank you all. That is so good. Thank you very much. Thank you for giving me the nicest hardware, plus a beautiful patch. Thank you.

For these three World War II veterans, December 7th, 1941, the brutal attack on Pearl Harbor is forever seared into their memories. It’s also seared into America’s memory because, on that grim day, this mighty nation was roused to defend freedom itself.

Each of them has a harrowing story of courage to share. They tell us of the American spirit under fire, and of the will of our people to defeat threats to our nation and to the civilized world.

One of the heroes with us today is Ken Potts. Ken was on the shore at Pearl Harbor when the attack began. Rather than flee from the fire and the chaos, he drove his small boat into the blazing hot water. He climbed aboard the sinking Arizona, and he carried off passengers one by one.

Ken, it is an honor to meet you, an American hero whose love of our country and love of his brothers was greater than his concern for his own safety. And he paid a very big price. He’s gone through life in a little bit worse condition than he could have but he was very, very happy that he did it.

We’re deeply grateful that you are here today with us nearly 76 years after that December morning. You are a living witness to history and a living example of true American courage. Ken, how are you doing? Are you all right?

MR. POTTS: All right.

THE PRESIDENT: You doing good?

MR. POTTS: Yes.

THE PRESIDENT: You’re feeling good?

MR. POTTS: Yes.

THE PRESIDENT: You better believe it. (Laughter.) He looks good to me. Thank you very much. Thank you.

Lauren Bruner and Donald Stratton are also with us. They were on the deck of the USS Arizona, doing their duty, when the ship was engulfed by massive, massive flames. They were both fortunate enough to be rescued by another courageous hero, Joe George, whose daughter, Joe Ann, is with us today.

Joe was in a boat next to the USS Arizona, and when he saw several men still standing, he hurled a rope onto the deck of the ship at tremendous risk to himself. Lauren and Don clung to that rope and, hand over hand, they crossed through the 70 feet of flames, burning endlessly.

The story of Lauren and Don’s devotion and duty doesn’t end there. Despite suffering terrible burns, still with them today, they both served in the Navy for years after, fighting in some of the greatest Pacific engagements in World War II. Lauren and Don, thank you very much for your lifetime of service and your lifetime of sacrifice. Thank you very much. Thank you.

MR. STRATTON: Thank you.

THE PRESIDENT: Feel pretty good, right? How long have you been married? Have long are you together? Listen to this one, folks.

MR. STRATTON: Sixty-seven years. My wife.

THE PRESIDENT: That’s a long time. That’s beautiful. That’s beautiful. Thank you.

MR. STRATTON: Thank you.

THE PRESIDENT: That is beautiful.

As Lauren and Don will tell you, they’re here because one man, Joe George, stopped at nothing to save them. Joe George rescued six men that day. He is no longer with us, but he will always honor and remember a man — we will always do this — whose courage knew no limits. His name will go down in history — very brave, very strong.

Joe Ann, your father makes us all proud. Thank you for inspiring our nation by telling the story of your father — a true patriot; a well-known man; a man that goes down, really, in the history with the Arizona; and a total hero. Thank you very much.

MS. TAYLOR: We’re very proud of him.

THE PRESIDENT: You should be, right? That’s so nice. Thank you for being here. I think you loved him, right?

MS. TAYLOR: I loved him very much. And I know you understand because you have your daughters.

THE PRESIDENT: I do.

MS. TAYLOR: You understand the relationship.

THE PRESIDENT: That’s true. Thank you, Joe Ann. Appreciate it.

There are many remarkable things that I witness as President, but nothing can take the place of meeting heroes like those with us today. In them we see the strength of our nation, the courage of our men and women in uniform, the resolve to never accept failure, and the belief that justice will always triumph and that the America — and the America that we know and love — the United States — will always prevail. We will always prevail.

And by the way, we’re building it up bigger — you know this. We’re building it up bigger and stronger and better than ever before. Our military is very proud again, aren’t they?

LIEUTENANT PREVITS: That’s right.

THE PRESIDENT: You see what’s happening.

LIEUTENANT PREVITS: Indeed.

THE PRESIDENT: They look at the day’s budget, and so they’re seeing lots of ships, right? Lots of planes. Lots of great equipment.

LIEUTENANT PREVITS: Yes, sir.

THE PRESIDENT: Ken, Lauren, Don, and Joe Ann, I want to thank you for reminding us who we are, where we come from, and why we never, ever give up. Your story gives us all inspiration to do the right thing for our country, our countrymen, and for our God. Thank you very much for being here. Thank you very much. It’s a great honor. Thank you. Thank you all.

Q Mr. President, what are you trying to accomplish with your staff shakeups today? Can you explain to us what you’re trying to accomplish?

THE PRESIDENT: Make America great again.

You want to hear this, fellas? It’s very interesting. Very interesting. Very beautiful statement. Very beautiful statement.

MR. STRATTON: All the people we met today and all the people who were lined along — that we’ve been with, you could tell, with our military and everything, that this country is coming together again, and we’re going to be there.

THE PRESIDENT: That’s good. And now I know why you married this guy such a long time. (Laughter.) That’s beautiful. Thank you.

I could never have said it that well, believe me. (Laughter.) Believe me. Thank you. That’s so nice.

END – 2:59 P.M. EDT

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78 Responses to We Remember – Pearl Harbor Day

  1. Monadnock says:

    Loving this man.

    Liked by 6 people

  2. MIKE says:

    So much greatness in one photo. As i look at the three greatest American survivors, I think of that quote from the Japanese general(Tojo?), “I fear all we have done is awaken a sleeping giant.”

    Liked by 4 people

    • keeler says:

      The quote is from Tora! Tora! Tora! and is attributed to Combined Fleet Chief Isoroku Yamamoto, but is apocryphal. Despite being opposed to a war with the United States Yamamoto nevertheless planned and led the Pearl Harbor attacks.

      Yamamoto had spent extensive time in the US, and this experience had taught him Japan could never win a prolonged war against the US (he was correct: by 1945 US industrial production had increased 25 times its pre-war levels). This foresight, combined with traditional Japanese naval doctrine, led him to conclude Japan’s only hope was to force an early decisive battle. This led to the attack on Pearl Harbor, a spectacular Japanese victory, and the Battle of Midway six months later, a spectacular Japanese defeat. The US sank four of the six Japanese carriers which attacked Pearl Harbor, leading to the loss of all the carriers’ aircraft and a significant number of veteran aviators, whom could not be replaced.

      Within six months of Pearl Harbor, Japan and Yamamoto had already lost the Pacific War. After Midway, it was only a matter of time, money, and blood.

      Liked by 10 people

      • MIKE says:

        Thank you. Treepers are the best.

        Liked by 2 people

      • jrapdx says:

        From what I’ve studied re: the Pacific Theater of WWII you’ve got it right. The history of the battle of Midway is fascinating, gives insight into the events of warfare. The elements of chance were tremendous at Midway, it was a combination of tremendous courage on the part of US forces and lucky breaks that lead to the sinking of 4 Japanese carriers. Midway was the beginning of the end, but tragically it took 3 more years of bloody fighting and detonation of 2 atomic bombs to convince Japan to surrender.

        Liked by 1 person

      • mike says:

        Pearl Harbor was a strategic failure for Japan, despite all our horrors and damage:

        – The bungling of the declaration of war, a crucial 1-2 hours late, extra outraged American citizens, united peace oriented US in an implacable resolve to destroy Imperial Japan, as unspeakably sneaky Evil.
        – No carriers present, IJN totally missed our aircraft carriers; even to have sunk 1-2 would have been disasterous.
        – IJN failed to attack two critical strategic asset groups, the filled oil tankage and our subs. Big oops on a 3rd wave that needed to be in the air before 2nd wave landed.

        Liked by 1 person

    • G. Willikers says:

      That quote would be from Admiral Yamamoto who attended Harvard (1919-1921) after attending the Japanese Naval academy.

      Liked by 1 person

      • MIKE says:

        TY. Treepers are the greatest.

        Like

      • CiscoKid says:

        Probably the worse statement of WWII .
        The Commander of the Japanese held island of Tarawa said it would take a million men a hundred to take the island.
        US Marines did it in three days.
        20-23 November 1943.
        But the cost was horrible.
        1,000 kia and over 2,000 wounded.

        Liked by 2 people

        • CiscoKid says:

          …a hundred years…

          Like

        • MIKE says:

          Funny you should mention that. My dad was there. 837 Marines killed in the first wave which lasted eight hours. Mostly from the 2nd Marine division, whose motto is, “Follow me”.
          Recon was inadequate/inaccurate. They bombed the crap out of Betio but never knew the Japanese had heavily fortified bunkers of concrete and steel. Logistics never accounted for the neap tide so the personnel carriers, especially the wood-bottom higgins boats, were stuck as far as a half mile from shore on coral reefs. To make matters worse, about half of the division were armed with the brand-new M-1 Garand, untested in harsh environments.
          Most immediately jammed when submerged in salt water. So the Marines with jammed M-1s would follow behind the Marines who still had their Springfield 03’s into shore, and if struck, the trailing Marine dropped the M-1 and picked up the 03 and continued in to shore.
          Two bouts of Malaria, more heavy combat on Saipan and some more abuse on Guadalcanal later Dad met Mom on leave from the 9th st. barracks in D.C. By the way Pops said his worst experience was seeing the civilians leap to their deaths on Saipan because the Japanese Gov’t told them if they got captured the Marines would torture and rape them. Men, women with babies in their arms, and children. There’s more but I have to stop now.

          Liked by 3 people

    • and that’s what they did.
      WAS AWAKEN OUR SLEEPING GIANT.
      GOD BLESS ALL OF THEM WHO GAVE THEIR ALL FOR OUR NATION.

      Like

  3. Hand Salute to ALL WW II Veterans alive now and the ones who lay in Peace…Thank you

    Liked by 7 people

  4. Suzanne says:

    I watch a fair amount of programming on AHC and they ran a series with actual footage of the battles in the Pacific… Guam, Okinawa etc. The servicemen who were shown were just boys… and I do mean BOYS… many of them didn’t look old enough to shave… but they were so determined to serve that a lot of them lied about their ages in order to enlist. And off they went… into what proved to be Hell on Earth. I wish I thought as many of todays young men and women would be so eager to defend us… many would, but a lot of them would again stay here and protest against what they deem to be another “illegal” war.
    I was born in 1946 and I really miss the simpler life of the America in which I grew up

    Liked by 5 people

    • jrapdx says:

      At the VA facility where I go to receive some health services there’s a corridor dedicated to the stories of underage servicemen. Fascinating to read their histories. Just as you say many didn’t give their true age when they enlisted. IIRC the youngest was 13, but many were only 14 or 15. Fascinating to think how that would be today.

      From what I’ve read the current generation of teens, the so-called “Gen Z”, is in contrast to older siblings once again very patriotic. I like to think were the nation threatened in the same way as it was on Dec 7 1941, these kids would volunteer as they did then.

      Liked by 5 people

      • piper567 says:

        jrap, many are…The_Donald is a place where many announce their joining the USA Armed Forces.
        These posts receive a LOT of support, prayers, and congrats along with envy from older posters.
        Donald Trump has been a true inspiration to many young people, who are grateful to serve under him as CiC.
        I find this very encouraging, along with an acknowledgement that there is an upcoming generation who is “woke”, as they say, to do their duty by this great Country.

        Liked by 3 people

  5. zephyrbreeze says:

    What must these veterans think of their sacrifices when they watch what is happening in our country, and how many people here hate the US? They suffered and died for us, they were literally our saviors.

    Victor Davis Hansen gave an amazing recent talk about WWII history and his new book. I learned about 20 new things just from this one talk.

    http://public.josephsoninstitute.org/2015/08/poc-hull-challenge-public-service/

    Liked by 2 people

    • zephyrbreeze says:

      Wrong link – this is correct (although the above link contains an amazing speech by AZ Gov Jane Hull on maintaining integrity WHILE in office.

      This is Victor Davis Hanson on WWII

      Liked by 3 people

      • Sylvia Avery says:

        VDH is a very smart and insightful man.

        IIRC he was critical of PDJT during the primary process. I noticed, because I read a lot of VDH and because by that time it was obvious PDJT was going to be the candidate and we had all best get on board because it was PDJT or The Creature from Chappaqua so I was becoming increasingly annoyed by PDJT criticism.

        However, he has been very supportive of PDJT at least since the election if not before , and it seems to be he “gets” our President and can certainly see and value his achievements.

        I appreciate VDH’s talented writing about politics and history very much.

        He has written this new book about WW2 and I think I am going to order it for my brother for Christmas and hope he’ll let me read it, too. (Grin.) He has approached WW2 thematically instead of chronologically and I have read a lot of good stuff about it.

        Thanks for posting the video. I am always interested to hear what VDH has to say on any subject.

        Liked by 1 person

        • sat0422 says:

          Donald J Trump had to fight a war against 16 primary contenders for the opportunity to put his name on the ballot against Hillary Clinton. As they say, war is hell.
          If Trump had played nice with any of those 16, he would not be president today. He knew the depth of corruption that many of them embraced, he knew of the weakness that many of them possessed and he knew that the American public was gullible. Trump does his homework and his read on the character of people is better than most of us can even think about. Thank God for President Donald J. Trump.
          BTW, my Dad was on the West Virginia and I grew up knowing how horrible that day was. He went on to many battles in the Pacific but as the President says, it was his choice. He didn’t know war was at hand but it the beat the heck out of trying to survive in the south after the Great Depression.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Sylvia Avery says:

            God bless your dad for his service. Times were pretty rough for most people following the Great Depression. It is hard for us to comprehend because our view of poverty has shifted. Even our poor generally are better off than most folks even after the Depression was supposed to be over.

            Like

  6. jrapdx says:

    As a kid growing up in Arizona back in the 50’s, Pearl Harbor Day was always special. On the radio, day-long commemorative programs were broadcast, reverent and solemn. Young as I was, I was deeply moved and it left an indelible impression.

    As an adult I’ve visited the Pearl Harbor site many times and it never fails to bring me to tears. We’re going to Hawaii again next month and I wouldn’t miss a chance to go again. Interesting that Japanese visitors just about outnumber Americans and are just as moved by the memorial.

    Then I remind myself WWII in the Pacific began and ended with tragic loss of innocent lives. Yes, we’re all in it together. The hell of war will engulf us all and we must prevent it. Thank God for the men and women putting their lives on the line every day. Pearl Harbor Day spans the tragic loss of that bitter day and the realization such a day need never be experienced again.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Orygun says:

      I visited the Alamo several years back and I was amazed at the number of Japanese that visited that site also. They have a special reverence for acts of bravery.

      The young answered the call in Korea and Viet Nam but the media by then was turning out anti-American propaganda just as it does today. The media is nothing but a propaganda tool of the left.

      It was so great what the survivor said at the end. Those returning vets were our teachers going to school and it wasn’t until the next generation that the schools started twisting their message.

      Liked by 2 people

      • jrapdx says:

        The fact the “Gen-Z” youth appear to not buy the leftist propaganda like their older siblings or parents gives hope that they will heed the call should it be necessary. If they support President Trump as reports suggest that generation may be spared the horrors of war. That’s something to aim for.

        Liked by 2 people

  7. G3 says:

    🎶Remember Pearl Harbor 🎶 That was great- at the signing of the proclamation.

    Like

  8. Pam says:

    Liked by 4 people

  9. fleporeblog says:

    This is an ABSOLUTE must watch for All Americans! I am at work crying like a baby. It took 76 years for these American HEROS and the daughter of a fallen HERO to receive the recognition they so deserved! Thank you Father for bestowing on our country President Donald J. Trump!

    The pride from Mr. Stanton was beyond anything I have seen in a long long time! The man absolutely loves our President and our Country. I got chills down my back hearing him echo those words and make those fists as hard as he could. The man is ready to go back into the military if his body would give him the chance.

    MR. STRATTON: All the people we met today and all the people who were lined along — that we’ve been with, you could tell, with our military and everything, that this country is coming together again, and we’re going to be there.

    I hope everyone at CTH gets a chance to watch that video from the WH! Worth every single second.

    Liked by 6 people

    • jrapdx says:

      I remember seeing the video of that event, very moving. It used to be that Pearl Harbor verterans would sometimes be available at the Pearl Harbor site to talk about their experience or answer questions. Of course very few are still living so the opportunity to interact with them is nearly gone. Their stories though are eternal and great that PDJT honored them and the record of their visit to the WH will be around for future generations to appreciate.

      Liked by 3 people

  10. keeler says:

    Marine and Navajo code talker, George B. Willie Sr, 92, died on December 5th. Willie served later in the war, during the Battle of Okinawa, but his death is a reminder that our WW2 veterans are rapidly fading into history.

    Ahéhee’ Willie.

    Liked by 5 people

  11. Pam says:

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Atticus says:

    There are some that make fun of Our President because he doesn’t “sound like a President should”.
    I think his speeches are just great, he’s a real unvarnished American speaking his mind. Something we need much more of.

    Liked by 4 people

    • FL_GUY says:

      Are these the same people who declared that O was articulate? I totally lost respect for Krauthammer the day they played a clip of O campaigning in ’08 on the Fox All Stars. In the clip, O sounded like he was auditioning to do the ending of a Loony Tunes. Immediately after playing the clip, Krauthammer said with a straight face how ARTICULATE and polished O was. I never took Krauthammer serioursly after that.

      President Trump is the most Presidential President we’ve had in my lifetime. He’s educated, sophisticated, a snappy dresser and tells it like it is. Now to me, THAT is Presidential!

      Liked by 4 people

    • Coldeadhands says:

      Ah…unpolished he may be… but to paraphrase Lincoln in response to criticism of General Grant’s high casualties at the Battle of Shiloh “I (we) can’t spare this man, he FIGHTS.
      These two more men were also relentlessly dogged for their lack of polish!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Coldeadhands says:

      We are blessed to have a fighter in PDJT.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Honor the sacrifice by confronting INFAMY with TRUTH….

    “Pearl Harbor Betrayed” by Michael Gannon, US Navy sucker punched by FDR

    “Dec 8, 1941…. MacArthur’s Pearl Harbor” by William H Bartsch, given
    12 hours notice, Dugout Doug sucker punched the US Army Aircorp

    Wiki/Torpedo_Alley….FDR sucker punched the US merchant marine,
    kills 5,500 sailors between Jan and July 1941

    Mers-el-kebir, July 3, 1940…. Churchill sucker punched French Navy

    Like

    • sat0422 says:

      My Dad left home in small town Tennessee and joined the Navy. He came from a long line of Democrats and returned home to never vote for a Democrat for anything. I respect him and believe that he understood that FDR was not a man to be admired. He never argued his point with those at home who benefited from FDR’s programs, but he understood much more than any of them could ever know

      Like

  14. Mike diamond says:

    God bless our service men and all who lost their lives at pearl harbor!!!! And now you know why I never watch a N f L foot ball game !! If they can’t stand and respect our flag and national anthem ! I’m done with em!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • CiscoKid says:

      Roger that.
      For Cisco, N⚰F⚰L

      Like

    • sat0422 says:

      I guarantee you that Kapernick and Beyonce never heard of Pearl Harbor and have no intention of checking it out on thier latest I-phones. History is just something to be denied by those kind of people. No character, no conscience, no appreciation, no nothing burgers.

      Like

  15. tonyE says:

    Admiral Kidd is on that wall, just to Trump’s left. Look!

    That disaster took seamen and admirals alike…. you can see a CPTN, LCDR, RADM, ENSG, chiefs, petty officers, apprentice seamen, etc…

    So sad. And to think I used to sail little rental sail boats from the marina at the Subase and come within 400 yards of the memorial and yet we never went to see it.

    Like

  16. redridge45 says:

    Very nicely done!

    Like

  17. Our greatest generation. It was such an honor knowing them in my lifetime. My dad was once such person and I’ll never forget him and others like him who sacrificed so much in WWII.

    Liked by 3 people

  18. Pam says:

    Replay of the earlier ceremony with POTUS and the awesome vets!

    Liked by 4 people

  19. freq says:

    The day that changed a generation forever… December 7, 1941…

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Bendix says:

    Was thinking about my flag when I got up, forgot about it until I went out, and saw other flags flying; forgot when I returned, and only got reminded just now.
    FWIW, it is going to fly for the hour or so until sunset.
    I think it’s the whole “half staff” concept that makes me put it off on this day. It doesn’t work so well with my flag.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Texian says:

    Many of us here had grandparents, great uncles and great aunts who rose up to the challenge.. Unafraid of claiming the righteousness, the high ground, the patriotism that America is truly the shining light on the hill for its people and the world..

    Most of them have now passed away.. It is our duty to pass on what they had taught us, what they had given us, what they had preserved at great cost..

    We, You, Us today, are the crucial link between then.. and now.. Between Freedom and Tyranny..

    Many traitors in this Country want to selfishly cash it all in.. sell the whole farm.. and leave nothing but tyranny for their Country’s own offspring..

    It is up to us to stop them..

    Liked by 2 people

  22. Pam says:

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Bendix says:

    They don’t make ’em like that anymore.

    Liked by 2 people

  24. Pam says:

    Liked by 4 people

  25. Monadnock says:

    Been there – stood over the Arizona – read the names on the wall – hand over heart – tears then, tears now. When my life is done, may that life I lived be found worthy of their sacrifice.

    Liked by 5 people

    • CiscoKid says:

      Well said!
      And these anti-anything American have never put their ass on the line or lost a loved in one of America’s armed conflicts.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Shark24 says:

      Reposting this from today’s Open Thread:
      The lovely Ms. Shark24 and I were in Hawaii back in Sept for a wedding and since she had never visited the Arizona memorial before, we spent a morning at the museum plus the shuttle to the Arizona. I can not recommend this visit high enough to anyone visiting Oahu. The museum complex is very well done and a big upgrade from my last visit 30 years ago when I was in the USAF. It is a great reminder to all that although our adversaries are different, vigilance is still the word of the day. May God rest the souls entombed there and all those souls that have sacrificed all ( in this world anyway) to give us the incredible life we are able to pursue here in the USA.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Pam says:

    Liked by 3 people

  27. Pam says:

    Liked by 3 people

  28. Pam says:

    Liked by 2 people

  29. duchess01 says:

    THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2017
    The 76th Anniversary of Pearl Harbor and the Day of the Lord!

    http://www.theignorantfishermen.com/2016/12/the-75th-anniversary-of-pearl-harbor.html

    Liked by 1 person

  30. keeler says:

    I always like to share this on Pearl Harbor Day. It’s incredible to think the young people attending the 75th Anniversary of Gettysburg are now as old or older on the 76th Anniversary of Pearl Harbor. No one in attendance or who saw this newsreel on release could have imagined a few among them would one day become revered veterans themselves.

    Liked by 2 people

  31. Pam says:

    Liked by 4 people

  32. tonyE says:

    Just really love the way Trump relates to people.

    Those geezers are great. I specially love the guy in the Aloha shirt:

    “Hey, Granpa, you’re gonna meet President Trump. Let’s go buy you a nice suit.”

    “Heck no! I’m wearing a Rayn Spooner, he knows.”

    The kind of guys who have nothing to prove. Heck, besides Pearl Harbor, who knows what else they came through?. Take a look at those salad bars. Love them. So few left nowadays.

    Liked by 2 people

  33. PatriotGalNC says:

    My mama…(who passed some years ago) told me a story about December 7th, 1941. She was 20 years old at the time. She worked at a general mercantile back then, and though the store was closed (because it was Sunday)…she and her fellow employees were actually working that day. They were putting up Christmas decorations, unpacking deliveries and stocking the shelves for the shopping season. They had a radio on downstairs in the main store. She and another co-worker were upstairs in a storeroom unpacking a crate with dishes in it. Another co-worker came running up the stairs to tell them that they had just heard on the radio that the Japanese had attacked Pearl Harbor in Hawaii! They were all shocked and shaking. Then, my mama looked down at the china plates she was unpacking…Made in Japan.
    She put the plate down and refused to put the box of china from Japan out. To the day she passed away, she never would eat anything that had RICE in it, because it was Japanese. Strange, huh?

    Liked by 3 people

    • Sylvia Avery says:

      Not strange at all. My parents were of the WW2 generation. As a young kid in the 60s I clearly recall my parents and their friends recoiling from all of the cheap Japanese goods flooding into the country at that time and not just because it was inferior stuff. They were so displeased to having anything to do with Japan and the Japanese.

      It is sort of like the Germans were bad, yes of course, but it was OUR people who were slaughtered in Pearl Harbor and that made it immediate and personal for many

      There are so few of that generation left. My own parents are gone, now, and their friends, too. We owe them everything. My generation was so busy rebelling against them it took a long time to grow up and recognize all that they did for us.

      Liked by 1 person

      • sat0422 says:

        My parents were so offfended that we offered to buy them a microwave over that was made in J’pan. My dad, a Pearl Harbor survivor was horrified when I purchased a Datsun automobile. I will never forget this statement: “those sob’s nearly killed me at Pearl Harbor,” and then he went back to watching a baseball game on TV. We never talked about my little brown Datusn again.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sylvia Avery says:

          Yes, reactions like that were really not that uncommon, certainly in the 60s and even into the 70s. My dad was just dead set against any of the Japanese cars or motorcycles probably until somewhere in the 80s.

          Like

  34. This was beautiful.

    1 – I hope that POTUS will continue honoring the men/women of this horrific American turning point. It won’t be long when there will be no survivors left. When that happens, it would be cool if POTUS’s people would gather a few family members of 4-5 servicemen to display photos and share the stories of those men and what they did, what they had to endure, etc., to keep this part of history ALIVE and real to the generations…

    2 – one of the things that takes so long in going thru the Pearl Harbor Memorial is looking at all of the collected photos, models, memorabilia, this serviceman’s hat, that service man’s journal, etc., and all of the audio clips of people recounting the moments before, during and immediately following the attack. It is gripping. For history buffs, spending an entire day at the memorial is the bare minimum of time you can spend trying to digest all of this info on a very important part of recent American history.

    I wish I had the $$$ to set up a foundation: the goal: to help as many American high schoolers visit this memorial as possible…….

    Liked by 1 person

  35. G. Combs says:

    My Dad, and my Mother’s only brother served in the Pacific theater. Dad was stationed on Hawaii as the JAG liaison between the hospital and the Red Cross. — He hated the Red Cross. My Uncle was in the Air force as a belly gunner. He saw a lot of atrocities on the islands where they landed and never got over his hatred of the Japanese. He managed to miss his plane’s take-off on one island due to a flat tire on the jeep he was heading to the airfield in. The plane was shot down and all his mates were lost.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Gov Jay says:

    Now… just compare this to the sheer contempt that the POS Marxist community organizer had for these brave men…

    Liked by 1 person

  37. AZmama says:

    My Grandmother’s brother, John Brady’s, was one of the 52 survivors of the USS Arizona. He changed his last name to Brady to sound more American. Family was from Hungary. God bless him and everyone who has and serves now.

    Liked by 3 people

  38. Pam says:

    Liked by 1 person

  39. Pam says:

    Like

  40. adam3wade says:

    My grandfather (passed away two years ago) was a WW2 veteran. He lied about his age so that he could enlist. To him and the thousands of other like him it was never a question about what they should do. They knew what to do and did it with bravery and honor. This year I was fortunate enough to visit the Pearl Harbor Memorial. It was moving and very surreal.

    One of the things that struck me is how much disrespect there was at the memorial. People joking, laughing, talking loudly and obnoxiously. I fear that in another 10 years (or less) when the veterans are all gone, we will forget the meaning of December 7th. Much like Memorial Day has come to mean a day off of work and not much else, I fear that December 7th and by extension WW2 will become lost on new generations.

    Talk to your kids, family, friends on dates such as this about the significance and meaning behind it. For the generation that fought and died during this conflict they truly were and are the greatest generation.

    Liked by 2 people

  41. Gil says:

    My MIL was a toddler and separated from her mother on that day while the family was in Hawaii, stationed there full time. She was found about a week later with a native family, well taken care of. I could only imagine, your home attacked, your husband on duty, your little daughter gone.
    Thank God for heroes and miracles.

    Liked by 3 people

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