The Few, The Proud…….The Dogs Of 9/11

Bretagne was the last of the 9/11 search and rescue dogs to be laid to rest. The above video show the honor given her by the officers (video says it is Houston firefighters) as she takes her final steps. There were many American heroes in the aftermath of 9/11. These dogs were among them. The rest of this post is the first one I wrote about the dogs on the anniversary of the attack.Β 

We have all heard that heroes come in all shapes and sizes; sometimes the most unassuming person rises to the occasion and meets the challenge. And sometimes it is a very special type of animal, a rescue dog. In the aftermath of 9/11 bombings, the world’s largest deployment of rescue dogs were used to search for survivors, working tirelessly with their handlers, searchingΒ  the ruins, and according to witnesses, giving great comfort to the workers. Dutch photographer Charlotte Dumas has published a book called Retrieved, featuring the surviving dogs in their final years. Read more and check out the pictures of these wonderful dogs here in this Daily Mail article.

Many of these dogs have heart wrenching stories. One of the most well known and celebrated of the rescue dogs is Jake. He was found abandoned and injured, with a dislocated hip and broken leg. Adopted when he was 10 months old by Mary Flood, a member of Utah Task Force 1, a federal search and rescue team, Flood helped train Jake to become a certified rescue dog. Jake was most known for his work at Ground Zero, but he also participated in the post Katrina rescue effort. Jake helped train other dogs for this important work in his later years. Jake died in 2007, but we remember and honor him this week as one of the true heroes who served selflessly, with courage and love.

Here is a touching quote from the rescue scene:

“I volunteered to serve food to the workers at Ground Zero after 9/11. There were dogs trained to find living people. The dog handlers became worried because the day after day of not finding anyone was beginning to depress the animals. So the people took turns hiding in the rubble so that every now and then a dog could find one of them to be able to carry on.” –Sigourney Weaver.

The rescue dogs at 9/11 had thousands of hours of training before their grim task at Ground Zero. Dogs and handlers work together, usually beginning the training when the dog is just a puppy. The dogs are capable of squeezing into areas a human could never reach, and their intense sense of smell helps them find survivors.

Another quote from a ground zero witness:

“Urban Search and Rescue dogs that were deployed at Ground Zero included Australian shepherds, German shepherds, Golden Retrievers, Labradors, Border Collies, Portuguese Water Dogs, Belgian Malinois, Giant Schnauzers, and even Rat Terriers. What a dog could do with its nose was invaluable in the search. What a dog could do with its heart was equally invaluable.”

The dogs were able to lift the spirits of stressed workers. Cops and firemen, as well as the handlers, took great comfort from the dogs at a time when they battled exhaustion, despair, and stress. One account states: “It was beyond amazing what a licking tongue could do to lift a crushed human spirit, restoring morale to discouraged and depressed workers at Ground Zero”

The dogs suffered injuries during the rescue effort, but vets would patch them up and the dogs would go back to work, searching the ruins for more survivors. One dog, Kaiser, had a deep cut on his foreleg, but missed only one shift. Veterinarian teams worked 12 hour shifts to care for the courageous dogs. The injuries included cuts and scapes, broken claws, lacerations, dehydration, and emotional distress. Paw injuries were common as they made their way through the hazardous rubble.

Most of these wonderful dogs are gone now, but a few are still with us today as we pause to remember all the victims, and all the heroes of September 11, 2001. Never has man had a truer, finer friend than a dog. Today we offer them the honor and respect they deserve. Friends. Warriors. Rescuers. God bless them all, and a prayer of thanksgiving to Him for gifting us with such wonderful creatures.

 

 

NOTE: IT SHOULD NOT BE NECESSARY TO SAY SO, HOWEVER: NO COMMENTS ABOUT 9/11 CONSPIRACY THEORIES WILL BE ALLOWED HERE TODAY. THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION.

Β 

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126 Responses to The Few, The Proud…….The Dogs Of 9/11

  1. eagledriver50 says:

    To the 9-11 Dog Rescuers…Hand Salute to All the Dogs who helped on 9-11. And thank you to their handlers for the actions of these wonderful and courageous dogs…

    Liked by 28 people

  2. tuskyou says:

    Additional info/would pics about Bretagne/Brittany the last ground zero dog and others.
    https://www.today.com/pets/never-forget-last-9-11-ground-zero-search-dog-dies-t96676

    Liked by 6 people

    • tuskyou says:

      And thank you for providing this space to honor the dogs and their handlers. I love animals. I wish everyone did or at least respect their place in our lives. They do so much good for so many.
      Now I’m really going to cry

      Liked by 11 people

      • In says:

        Agree wholeheartedly with what you said. Not enough people respect animals, both wild and domestic.

        Moslems hate dogs and are very abusive to all animals. Look at what Moslems do to people. Much worse to animals.

        I am crying so hard that I can’t type.
        I can’t watch the video. It breaks my heart. Thinking of what people and dogs went through to rescue others.

        I have a T-shirt that says “There Is A Special Place In H3ll For Animal Abusers”. I get looks when I wear it.

        Last week we took a sick duck to the vet. Two people who were waiting for their turn to see the vet said…”A duck? You brought a duck to see the Vet?”.
        I said “Yes. This duck is a pet.”. My daughter was very upset and shot daggers with her eyes at those people.
        One man just shook his head like we were crazy.
        When we were leaving some different people had come in for appointments, and they oohed and awed over the duck and asked questions, wanted to pet the duck.

        ANY and all animals deserve respect. ALL animals who are trained to serve and help mankind deserve to be remembered for their service and sacrifice.

        Liked by 12 people

        • Covfefe-USA says:

          Will Rogers: “Never trust a man who doesn’t like a dog.”

          Liked by 8 people

        • Chuck Roast says:

          The more I am around dogs and people, the more I like dogs.

          Liked by 6 people

        • Lost in Vegas says:

          We have a pet duck as well. 10 yrs old. Wouldn’t think nothing of it to take him to the vet. Some people would never understand, but those people I can do without.

          Liked by 2 people

        • TPW says:

          I can relate …..Sure want to see all my beloved canine companions when I go…all german shepherds…..so loyal to a fault. One of them became paralyzed and I had to express his bladder and bought him a wheelchair to help him get around. Used to get positive and negative feedback. The negatives were wondering why did I not put him to sleep. Some people sincerely don’t understand how a person can have that kind of relationship with an animal. I remember when conventional wisdom was animals don’t have feelings or emotions..but we all know nothing could be farther from the truth. Anyway he lived 2 years being paralyzed and he let me know when he was ready to go.

          Liked by 3 people

      • Patriot Lady says:

        “Now I’m really going to cry.”
        And I’m joining you.

        Like

  3. Michael says:

    Almost any dog is better people than are most people.

    Liked by 27 people

  4. Oh my Lord that blessed little creature…

    😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭

    Liked by 8 people

  5. Ploni says:

    Stop it! Stop it! Stop it now!

    The souls of more than 3,000 dead and dying Americans are screaming for truth and justice and this is what is being put forth?!

    Today of all days . . . wake up from the fantasies and delusions!

    Like

    • georgiafl says:

      YOU stop it right now. Get over it or get out of here.

      Liked by 13 people

      • Ploni says:

        No! This content is obnoxious and degrading to the memory of the victims of the 9/11 evil and any American — no, any human being! — who demands that true justice be done.

        Instead of real investigation, people are smothered in feelgood delusions like this until — exactly what we have today, 16 years later — they are immersed in lies and cover-ups with seemingly no hope of getting the truth.

        BTW, who do you think you are, georgiafl, to demand that ANYONE refrain from expressing themselves on this site or threaten them to leave?!

        Like

        • Menagerie says:

          If you comment one more time on this post, or any other of our 9/11 posts today I will permanently moderate you. You have made your feelings clear, now shut up, or never post again here.

          Liked by 13 people

        • georgiafl says:

          I’m not anyone of importance – however – your comment is disrespectful to Menagerie and the canine heroes of 9/11.

          Liked by 16 people

        • Dave Radetsky says:

          Ploni – If this content is obnoxious, then you don’t understand God’s view of animals. They, too, are part of His creation and He was given humans stewardship over them and all of creation. On judgment day we will be held accountable for how we treated that creation. I have absolutely no doubt that animals are important to Him and therefore, should be important to us. However, and I’m a huge animal lover (I’ve had 42 animals during my adult lifetime) but I also understand that while God’s creation is important to Him, He values humans above all others and that’s why Jesus gave His life. So, while I cherish animals, I fully appreciate that humans are extra special because Jesus died specifically for us.

          All that said, it sounds to me like you may have more connection to 9/11 than we are aware. You may have suffered a loss there that only a few here may understand. Or, you just might be a person with a heart for those who were lost in this tragedy and their loved ones who were left behind. Bless you for your concern and feelings for those people. But please understand that this particular thread was not to take away from those peopel, but rather to show respect and honor for the hard work put forth to save as many humans as possible, and there’s no doubt that animals played an important role in that.

          Liked by 15 people

        • joninmd22 says:

          Georgiafl is a better person than you’ll ever be.

          Liked by 2 people

        • JoAnn Leichliter says:

          Ploni, I understand the intensity of your feelings about what happened on September 2001, and, in fact, I share that intensity. It does not detract from that, however, to pay tribute to everyone who struggled to find survivors in the horrible aftermath, be they human or canine.

          Liked by 2 people

        • The Tundra PA says:

          What a ludicrous statement! Honoring the dogs who searched for survivors is not in any way “degrading to the memory of the victims”.

          Liked by 2 people

        • 7delta says:

          The dogs were able to lift the spirits of stressed workers. Cops and firemen, as well as the handlers, took great comfort from the dogs at a time when they battled exhaustion, despair, and stress. One account states: β€œIt was beyond amazing what a licking tongue could do to lift a crushed human spirit, restoring morale to discouraged and depressed workers at Ground Zero”

          Of course, everyone wants justice, Ploni, but this post is about the reality and importance of unconditional love, whether it’s to the humans who despair over not being able to do what they have chosen and trained to do…save people…or in response to the soft nuzzle or wet kiss of a pooch that is unable to find the people he’s giving his all to locate so they can be saved. Searchers, man and dog, comfort one another when there seems to be no comfort they can give to those they came to save.

          As someone who spent a lot of time trying to save people who were critical, I can tell you, there is an emotional toll when you lose that battle. When you’re not fast enough to snatch a fleeing spirit back or you’re missing some tool unknown to man to interrupt death’s claim, and the feelings of failure descend on you, it’s not because YOU failed, but because a precious life, a very important person to his/her loved ones, was lost. Your empathy is for them, not yourself. The ache of losing and knowing the hurt family suffers is real and often not acknowledged until it’s quiet and dark, because other people’s lives depend on you to be professional. You have to face it, care for the hurting, then go back out and do it again tomorrow, because you might save the next one.

          Whatever pain you carry, I pray you will find unconditional love and comfort. I send mine to you.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Menagerie says:

      I fail to see how remembering the dogs who, at great cost the their own health, served so well in the aftermath, dishonors the dead and dying. Your hysterics fail to make any point whatsoever.

      Liked by 22 people

      • Covfefe-USA says:

        Yes – that video kicked me in the gut, and I’m still upset – I had no idea of that happening at the time, and it appeared she was being led in to be euthanized, which was horrible to see. Those dogs were all heroes; just like the wonderful military and police K-9s. I’m shocked someone would apparently take exception to honoring their service to their country.

        Liked by 2 people

    • joninmd22 says:

      Moderator, please remove.

      Liked by 1 person

    • terryjlongo says:

      Ploni, it is not an either/or consideration. One can grieve for lives lost and absence of complete justice while simultaneously appreciating these amazing creatures!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Sharon says:

      There is much being put forth besides this. I would imagine dogs are being used in search/rescue and retrieval operations in Florida today, as they were in Houston. We don’t have to choose between honoring those who died and appreciating those who were first responders: we are able to do both. Those dogs, living and dying, are not fantasy – they are reality. The dogs who continue to save people’s lives today are reality.

      Millions of people have just been through a frightening and anxiety-ridden 4-5 days, and for some of them the anxiety and fear (and perhaps dreadful news) continues today. Any one of us may find it little more manageable for our taut emotions to think for a few moments about the doggies that helped the best they could. Many of the tears that are shed over these dogs today may be a release of the anxiety and pent-up fear from Irma and Harvey. Doesn’t matter how much of which. Humanity does the best it can in hard times – and that extends to you as well.

      No one at this site intends disrespect to those who died. That is a reaction that could only rise out of projection of something that is personally unbearable, or complete lack of knowledge.

      There have been 367 posts on the Treehouse made regarding the two September 11 losses of life. Only a couple of them mentioned animals.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Michael says:

        “No one at this site intends disrespect to those who died. That is a reaction that could only rise out of projection of something that is personally unbearable, or complete lack of knowledge.”

        Exactly right.
        Ploni if you see this I have one wish for you. Please get this book and read it carefully.
        Actually I think this book ought be on everyone’s library shelf.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Athena the Warrior says:

      You should be so lucky to have the kind hearted, loving soul of a dog.

      Sod off.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Concerned Virginian says:

      “Ploni Almoni” (this guy left off the “Almoni”) is Hebrew for “Mister Someone”. Sort of like trying to be anonymous.
      I’ll take a rescue dog, my Yorkies, a dog from the SPCA, over this “Ploni”.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Content removed by moderator because it violates the commenting policy of the Treehouse. And decency.

      Like

    • fuzzi says:

      There’s an old axiom, expression, that should be observed, but is rarely in this “make your feelings known NOW” age:

      If you can’t say something nice, DON’T SAY ANYTHING AT ALL.

      Sometimes it’s best to stay silent and move on.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. georgiafl says:

    I love that K9 Officers are treated with such respect just like human officers by law enforcement.

    They are listed as fallen just like when a human officer gets shot. https://www.odmp.org

    Same with equine members of law enforcement.

    Liked by 14 people

  7. stella says:

    Dog is truly man’s best friend. These brave and determined animals help so much in times of disaster.

    The dog handlers became worried because the day after day of not finding anyone was beginning to depress the animals. So the people took turns hiding in the rubble so that every now and then a dog could find one of them to be able to carry on.

    I remember reading this, and crying.

    Liked by 16 people

  8. Kroesus says:

    it is no accident that d-o-g is G-O-D spelled backwards…….our creator gave us a wonderful example of selfish love and loyalty when at times none of us deserve it…..a canine is the true sense of ;love and persistence in the human spirit

    Liked by 9 people

  9. aqua says:

    This incredibly special post shows us that hope and hard work get us through. I weep for all those who lost their lives, especially the firefighters and first responders who tried so hard to save people. The dogs give us a chance to smile at how they, too, worked so hard to find our family members, friends, coworkers and neighbors.

    Thank you for posting this today. Let’s take a moment to appreciate those incredibly talented and brave sniffers and the love and hope these dogs brought to so many.

    Liked by 9 people

  10. LKA in LA says:

    Thank you for this post. I see God in everyone of those dogs faces. Tears here for those in heaven.

    Liked by 7 people

  11. carrierh says:

    I like both cats and dogs and the comfort they can bring to everyone. Who can truly be alive without one or the other in their homes?

    Liked by 7 people

  12. joninmd22 says:

    I watched part of the last video and waterworks. (And i’m a cat person)

    Thanks to all the dogs and handler who go above and beyond.

    Liked by 3 people

  13. DeplorablePatriotInCa says:

    I am troubled by the fact that it looks like the dog was being put to sleep and wasn’t allowed to die a natural death. Very sad.

    Like

    • amwick says:

      It is the most profound act of love, to end a beloved pets suffering. And this dog was more than a pet, this dog was a hero. Yes, it was sad, but it was love. I am sure.

      Liked by 6 people

      • Katie says:

        It is one of the hardest things I’ve ever had to do. Twice. One of our Berners had a genetic disease that crippled her back end, and the other couldn’t keep any food or water down for several days. Her suffering was obvious to anyone.

        The only comfort those of us who have had to experience this is knowing you relieved their suffering, and they were surrounded by the people who loved them most.

        Can’t type anymore – the tears are overflowing…

        Liked by 6 people

      • Roux Bella says:

        My front yard is a “cemetery” for my dogs. There are lovely camellias planted over each one…a “tomb stone” of sorts. I can go out and visit Mandy, Amber, Slique and Papoose every day. Love my dogs.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Menagerie says:

      She had kidney disease and had not eaten for three days.

      Liked by 7 people

    • Michael says:

      I hope when it is my time to go, and if I cannot do it myself, I hope someone loves me enough to send me on my way. I know this won’t be popular idea here but I’m comfortable with it.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Steve in Lewes says:

      Don’t be troubled. They tell you when they are ready to go. It’s difficult to explain.
      We had our first dog for 15 years, you get to know them. You know what they want
      by just the way they tilt their head, wag their tail, or lay their head on your lap.
      The poem “Rainbow Bridge” may help.
      http://petloss.com/rainbowbridge.htm

      Like

    • Nan says:

      My mom had a beloved dog she couldn’t bear to let go of. That animal suffered for over a year while she tried to make the decision to put her to sleep. It may seem mean, but hen an animal is terminal, it’s the kindest thing you can do. Animals don’t often have quick natural deaths; they linger. I’ve had several animals die in my arms, and let me tell you, it’s not pretty.

      Like

      • Even adult dogs only reach the maturity level of small children (3-4 years old). It’s one of the reasons they’re always happy to see us. Unfortunately when they get older and life becomes painful they don’t understand why. All they know is the pain. IMO this is the reason that it’s humane to help them pass. That said, I had a dog that died in my arms. He had a stroke and passed within a week. I still miss him.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. amwick says:

    TY Menagerie… as I have observed, sometimes angels have no wings… These precious heroes.

    Liked by 3 people

  15. WeThePeople2016 says:

    I have always thought of the dogs and what they did after 9/11. Many became ill from being exposed to the chemicals in the rubble. Dogs are amazing creatures and are so loyal and work tirelessy for their fellow man.

    Liked by 4 people

  16. John Doe says:

    I truly believe dogs are going to help to save our country and the world. Bomb sniffing, search and rescue, military, therapy, assistance, seizure alerts, guide dogs, cancer detecting, and on and on these beautiful creatures from God help humans in myriad ways every day. And, of course, our everyday pets that “just” fulfill us and bring us joy and comfort throughout their lives.
    DOG is GOD spelled backwards.

    Liked by 4 people

  17. thesavvyinvester says:

    Thank you Sundance for reminding us of those that serve, even our beloved 4 legged friends. Those of us w/ L.E. in our families and those of us who have ( or had ) and love Dogs get it, and the bond between those that Serve and their Service Dogs. However, on this day I come to the CTH, and for some reason my screen is blurry again, you get me every time Sundance, but that is more than ok….

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Vankoo says:

    19 The creation waits in eager expectation for the revelation of the sons of God. 20 For the creation was subjected to futility, not by its own will, but because of the One who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself will be liberated from its bondage to decay and brought into the freedom and glory of the children of God.

    Rom 8:19-21

    God will redeem creation as well (that includes animals).

    Liked by 4 people

  19. dogsmaw says:

    The truest example of unconditional love can be found in a dog…how do I know? Im their maw πŸ˜›

    Liked by 5 people

  20. Mike diamond says:

    This dog was really mans best friend!

    Liked by 2 people

  21. I absolutely love our animal heroes, but in defense of Ploni, there are many people I know who are depressed and outraged that there is far more ‘feel good’ism than continued outrage against those who did this. The terrorist religion that did this to us is being given just as much ‘feel good’ protection by the major media and politicians and educators, while those who lost their family members, their friends, their livelihoods and so much more are constantly told to ‘get over it’ or ‘quit whining’. The folks from the Seal Team 6, the folks from the Benghazi atrocity, the folks from the countless skirmishes that needlessly killed our heroes have been similarly silenced and shamed and told to join in the ‘feel good’ ism.

    Now, elsewhere I’ve been posting tribute after tribute to our heroes and I DO understand and support THIS post, but Ploni could very well be one of those who have been literally intimidated into suppressing their grief/rage/frustration.

    I have been moderator before and I VERY respectfully suggest that to err on the side of assuming Ploni is quite possibly one of those trapped in a world that is fast approaching ceasing all outrage over this tragedy and ceasing all action to forestall something as atrocious happening in the future would be a …heroic act of empathy and kindness by the moderator and those reading.

    I am frequently stunned by the level of misery that so many are left with as we move from horror to recovery to tribute…leaving behind the choice to eradicate the forces that brought forth so many heroes.

    I stand with ALL of you, including Ploni…and please accept that my tone is not preaching or condescending or criticizing any of you. I have maybe just been exposed to too many who are still ‘bleeding’ too rawly from these horrors.

    God bless America, God bless our first responders, God bless those who sacrificed and God bless those who elected this president in the hopes of leveling the field and driving away all of those made these atrocities happen through their deliberate politicized opposition to common sense warnings about maintaining our safety and protection.

    REspectfully, I thank you and hope that my post is received as it was intended. I am definitely among those who cannot throw the first stone.

    Like

  22. NJF says:

    This year’s anniversary seems to be hitting me especially hard this year. Likely it’s due to the realization that in the wake of Harvey & Irma there are many who seek to keep this great country divided. They are trying to subvert the spirit the nation held in its heart after the awful events of 9/11/01, the spirit that brought all Americans together.

    WE MUST NEVER FORGET….not only those lost, but also that love of country that kept us united.

    God bless these beautiful warriors for helping during such a tragic time of need.

    Liked by 3 people

  23. Sam says:

    Thank you to all Search and Rescue handlers and their canine partners. It takes enormous dedication and commitment to be on a SAR team. Hundreds of hours are dedicated to training the teams that do such work. And they are teams. Each dog has a handler, a human, and both are trained in SAR work.

    9/11/01 taught SAR teams that dogs need boots and sometimes specialized vests or coats as well as eye protection when searching such massive amounts of rubble, often with dangerous nails, jagged steel and concrete, etc. Many dog clubs and associations held fund raisers to purchase boots that protect dogs’ feet, as well as protection goggles and specialized equipment to ensure the search dogs had some protection against injury while deployed.

    One firm I know of is offering free boarding for 30 days for police and military K-9s whose handlers have nowhere to place their dogs due to hurricane damage to their homes. These highly trained dogs are not always welcome at boarding kennels due to their training. The place offering free boarding is located in Paducah TN and sells K-9 supplies. They know how to handle K-9s. I hesitate to give the name lest it be thought of as an unwelcome ad, which is not my intention.

    Kudos to all SAR and K-9 teams deployed to find survivors and the dead, past, present and future.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Menagerie says:

      If you are sure of your facts on the free boarding, I have no problem with you posting their information. It might be a service for someone in need.

      Liked by 1 person

    • jane says:

      Sam..LIKE
      Thanks Sam…police and military dogs usually aren’t your Labs and Goldens….
      They are often of the Shepherd breed..Malinois, Tervuren, etc…

      Like

      • Sam says:

        Yes, Jane, they are. The K-9s and MWD (Military Working Dogs) are often dogs who have pronounced protective and chase instincts. This usually means a shepherd dog of some sort. These dogs come from bloodlines that both herded and protected sheep and their shepherd.

        Goldens, Labs, Border Collies and such do make excellent scent detection dogs and are very good at finding explosives, drugs and of course people. Every dog has something it does well, including those who are lapdogs who keep people company.

        Like

    • Sam says:

      thanks, Menagerie.

      The company is Elite K-9 in Paducah, Kentucky. (I misidentified the state in the first post. Sorry.) 7660 Old US Highway 45, Boaz, KY 42027

      They have space for 30 dogs in separate kennels. Call 270-534-0500 for information.

      Liked by 1 person

  24. What a beautiful tribute.. I cannot watch the video today, as I’m in the process of losing my precious Beagle, Mira, to cancer. She is in her final days now and my heart is too tender at the moment. She was a rescue who has been with my family for 7 1/2 years and it’s not enough time – never enough time. I love this quote, and don’t know who to attribute it to:

    “Until one has loved an animal, a part of one’s soul remains unawakened”

    Thank you for this beautiful post. I will revisit it later.

    Liked by 4 people

    • freddy says:

      β€œIf there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • Concerned Virginian says:

      “Dog Heaven”, by Cynthia Rylant.
      It’s a children’s book to help them try and cope with the loss of their pet, but I think it’s a pretty powerful help to adults, too.
      I believe that dogs have souls and spirits. These are still around after the physical pet is gone.
      I saw my late dog, “King”, years after his death in the dog “Sugar” that I saw on the street in Carmel, California. This dog looked almost exactly like my old dog. Sugar’s owner kindly allowed me to talk with her for a minute and pat her. I swear, Sugar wagged her tail like my King and when she looked up at me, I saw my old dog in her eyes. Never will I forget that.

      Liked by 2 people

      • I agree – they have souls and we will see them again in Heaven. I absolutely believe that.

        Liked by 1 person

        • P7rancher says:

          A story:
          A group of clergy were gathered at a conference and were asked to consider if dogs (all pets) had souls? Some of the most learned replied no, nowhere does the Bible talk about animals having souls, only humans. A wise and elderly member of the group said God wants us to be happy in heaven, he will do everything in His power to make us happy, why would our loving God not want us to be reunited with our beloved pets? No one responded. β€οΈβ€οΈπŸ™πŸ™

          Liked by 2 people

    • In says:

      So sorry to hear of your sweet Beagle. I had to put down one of my dogs this past June 2017….cancer. He could no longer stand, quit eating, losing weight fast.
      He was my mother’s dog, 105 pounds, Mastiff-Chow-? mix. I took in her two dogs when she went into assisted living for Alzheimer’s. He was the best Rattlesnake finding dog I have had since my Wired Hair Fox Terrier when I was in high school. He fiercely protected my mother, was very gentle with her.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’m so sorry for your loss and thank you for the kind words. She’s still with us but barely. We’ve been doing hospice for the last 5 – 6 weeks. It’s killing me. Tomorrow is the day – I called today but the vet who has been treating her this entire time is out until tomorrow. While we know and like all of the vets in the practice, I want him to be the one with her for the end. They have a special bond.

        Like

  25. freddy says:

    My dog who protected me unconditionally died recently and I asked God to take anything from me …but not my dog…That’s how much some people love their dogs. I’m one of them…… when you bring one home you are now in the midst of a huge responsibility and you will fall in love so there is great emotional risk but so worth it … The rewards of loving a dog far outweigh any risk involved……..

    Liked by 3 people

    • So very, very true. It’s so hard to lose a beloved pet because so many people just don’t “get it” and think you should just “get over it” because “it’s just a dog”. I feel sorry for those people. If you’ve never had that deep connection and love for a pet you’ve missed something wonderful.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Katie says:

        You have my empathy as you go through Irma’s battle with cancer. You want them to live forever.

        One thing a friend told me a long time ago (her husband was killed in a plane crash just 6 weeks after they were married). When I said how sorry I was it happened so soon in their marriage, she calmly said “there’s never enough time when it’s the one you love.”

        She’s right – no matter if you have a dog for 6 weeks, 6 months, 6 years, or 16 years, it’s NEVER enough time. So the best we can do is love them, care for them, enjoy them, and give them the best possible life. In time, knowing you did that will bring you some much needed peace and comfort.

        Like

        • Thank you for those kind words. And you’re right – it’s never enough time. She is a rescue and we’ve had her for 7 1/2 years. I have no idea how old she is, but the vet’s best guess when we got her was between 3 – 5 years. What you said reminds me of the line from Rudyard Kipling’s “The Power of the Dog”:
          “…Our loves are not given, but only lent,
          At compound interest of cent per cent.
          Though it is not always the case, I believe,
          That the longer we’ve kept ’em, the more do we grieve:
          For, when debts are payable, right or wrong,
          A short-time loan is as bad as a longβ€”
          So why in Heaven (before we are there)
          Should we give our hearts to a dog to tear?”

          Liked by 1 person

  26. Tim702 says:

    Blessings to all the 9-11 heroes. On 3-22 of this year, Sadie, and I took that one last slow walk. She wasn’t a hero to anyone but us. For the 15 years we shared, we are truly thankful she was part of our family.

    Liked by 6 people

  27. lisaginnz says:

    I spent a few months crying after 9/11 happened… for the horrors, for the lives lost, for the hero helpers, for the survivors and for the search dogs. I remember a search dog was lost when a tower fell… they removed his wee body with a stretcher and flag… out of respect… just like when they found people. Still makes me cry.
    #NeverForget
    #BanIslam

    Liked by 3 people

    • fuzzi says:

      I can’t watch any of the tribute videos, nor the videos of the towers after the attack. I’m tearing up just reading the posts, and remembering what I saw then, 16 years ago.

      911 is something I will never forget.

      Thank you, people and dogs, for your service to others in need.

      Like

  28. wheatietoo says:

    Dogs don’t understand the evil things that humans do to each other.
    They just want to love us and help us.

    I love dogs.
    And I am humbled by their good nature and eagerness to serve.
    They are one of God’s greatest gifts to us…may we strive to be worthy of them.

    Thank you for this post, Menagerie.
    Much appreciated.

    Liked by 3 people

  29. tonyE says:

    Love dogs.

    Have had two.

    Can not have any more. It just broke my heart.

    But I enjoy my daughter’s.

    Sort of our grand-dog.

    Liked by 2 people

  30. kyasgrandma says:

    Noble, heroic, dedicated, disciplined…these dogs were/are worthy of all recognition.

    β€œI talk to him when I’m lonesome like; and I’m sure he understands.
    When he looks at me so attentively, and gently licks my hands;
    then he rubs his nose on my tailored clothes,
    but I never say naught thereat.
    For the good Lord knows I can buy more clothes,
    but never a friend like that.”
    ― W. Dayton Wedgefarth

    Liked by 4 people

  31. 100% YOOPER says:

    πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’–πŸ’”πŸ’”πŸ’”πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘
    Love those pups!!!
    Cried just reading the headline.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. wodiej says:

    Thanks so much for the post. Dogs are angels.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. kidsndogsncats says:

    I love dogs and have had them all my life. My last dog was a wonderful Lab/Great Pyrenees mix who actually picked me out when I went to the shelter to look for another dog.
    This last March, she didn’t feel well. The vet said she was getting old and everything was starting to shut down, and she was experiencing kidney failure. I could see how miserable she felt when she looked at me, and I knew it was time to let her go. I believe it was what she wanted. I miss her so much.
    I’ve had many labs over the years, but this was my first experience with these wonderful gentle giants. There are many of them on the farms and ranches in Oklahoma, I think I’ll look for another one. Or maybe I will get picked again.

    Liked by 2 people

    • fuzzi says:

      My last dog let me know, refused food and water, and I did what was best for her.

      My current sweetie is 8, and has hip dysplasia. She’s a big girl, about 100 pounds, and I won’t be able to carry her outside for her needs…I dread the day when she can’t walk anymore.

      If anyone wants to read more about those involved in search-and-rescue, I’d recommend a book “Scent of the Missing: Love and Partnership with a Search-and-Rescue Dog” by Susannah Charleson. It was published about 6 years ago, should still be available.

      Like

      • jane says:

        Fuzzi….I feel your pain….I lost my 16 year old a year ago….but he was only 65 lbs…..
        This helped, probably allowed me to keep him an extra year:
        http://helpemup.com/
        They are expensive, but I did my research….and they are very well made and engineered…only trying to help..I am not trying to promote any product!

        Like

      • Monadnock says:

        We lost a neighbor in WTC 1 on 9/11. I didn’t know him very well, but he was very well thought of. I remember him frequently, especially when I fly, which I do on business far more than I’d like.

        I make a habit of keeping 9/11 fresh in my mind and heart – YouTube has quite a few entries that serve to remind me when I forget what is important. Sixteen years ago, my anger was white hot – it’s cold anger today – I have not forgotten, and I will forever support those who are taking the fight to our enemy.

        I found this post to be healing, not minimizing or insulting the memory of those who were lost.

        Thank you

        Monadnock

        Liked by 1 person

  34. First Last says:

    I love my dog more than most people. And I know she loves me too. Amazing really, humans are the most fooked up animals on the face of the Earth and dogs still love them.

    Like

  35. Blue Ridge Mts Va says:

    Thank you Menagerie for this post memorializing the 9-11 search and comfort dogs. Brought tears to my eyes. I love my dogs, they are my faithful companions. I no longer have my Tervuren. Now I have Border Collies. Actually throughout the years I have learned that dogs are sometimes better than people. Dogs demonstrate this fact daily. Mine do.

    Can’t trust a dog hater, they are anathema.

    Like

  36. next only to GOD, DOGS like these are TRUE HEROES.
    GOD BLESS ALL OF THEM AND THEIR HANDLERS.

    Like

  37. Barbara Willams says:

    Tears…but this made my day. In this nation of ungrateful snowflakes and offended victims, brave animals give me hope. Brave humans train them…that gives me hope

    Like

  38. oldarmyblog says:

    Dogs are the greatest. Have owned several and wept like a baby when I had to put them down. They were members of the family in every way. Put your dog and your wife in the trunk of your car for an hour and see which one is glad to see you when you let them out.
    Animals, unlike humans can not do evil. Even wild animals. Everything they do is related to survival of the species or feeding themselves. Humans have to be trained not to do evil. Unfortunately not enough of the evil ones are put down.

    Like

  39. czarowniczy says:

    Posted this a few years back but it’s worth posting again.
    We had a dog handler from the 911 search talk to us. She said that they learned from the Oklahoma City bombing that the fogs, trained to locate survivors/bodies, had never worked a large and devastated site as the Murrah building. The smell of death and decay was all over the site and the dogs could smell it but the destruction was so complete that they couldn’t find bodies.
    A ways into the search some the dogs started to act ‘off’ and didn’t seem as anxious or interested in working anymore, they were feeling ‘down’. One of the searchers figured that the dogs were depressed, they were trained to find people, they could smell people but couldn’t actually lay nose on anyone. One of the dog handlers figured a workaround – back at the areas they were staying in they’d have a worker lie down under some blankets, one of the dogs would be put into a search mode and sniff around until the worker was found. Turned out it worked, the down dogs finally got some play, ‘found’ someone and attitudes picked up. Last I heard the technique was still being used at the WTC. Dogs know.

    Liked by 2 people

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