Healthy Recipe Favorites From Treepers

Listen up Treepers. We have some among us who are facing some illnesses and struggles that have caused them to change their eating habits. This has created some discussion in our daily threads, and a number of our regulars have decided to put together some favorites to help each other out.

If you have any special recipes that you like that are lower in calories, sugar, or fat and you’d like to share, now is the time! Any tips on easier, perhaps faster prep? How about favorite home made treats or salad dressings?

We are looking for all kinds of recipes. If you are diabetic, a heart patient, or just smart enough to want to take care of yourself, please share your knowledge with us. If any of you have found better ways to cook while saving a few pennies, that’s a great tip too.

Thanks for sharing your favorites here. I think we can all look forward to some delicious new recipes.

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515 Responses to Healthy Recipe Favorites From Treepers

  1. GaruSutt says:

    I am in on a similar conversation elsewhere. One of the best bits of advise, believe it or not, is as simple as strict portion control. In many cases, it did help to make the budget match the meals.

    Liked by 4 people

  2. Lunatic Fringe, Phd. [undocumented] says:

    I am so going to bookmark this thread!

    Liked by 7 people

    • So am I Lunatic Fringe.

      Thanks for the post menagerie.

      Liked by 3 people

      • farmhand1927 says:

        Bring it on! After a lifetime of being famous for rich, hearty comfort food, country-sized portions and desserts both rich and delicate, I’m ready to change my ways, at least part of the time. I will sit back and learn here from the experts.

        The farmer in me wants to encourage everyone to raise something they eat, even if it’s a small patio tomato plant–cherry tomatoes are a great choice for that.

        I also think food dehydrators are great, as is a small freezer so when summer produce is at it’s peak you can stock up on fruits and vegetables. Sweet corn cut off the cob in summer and frozen with a little salt and sugar will be a hit on your Thanksgiving table, for example.

        If you are lucky enough to live where you could raise some chickens and have fresh eggs or raise your own beef, lamb, pork or turkey, well, don’t get me started….

        Eat fresh, make sure what goes in your mouth is clean, and remember, the fewer hands that touch your food, the better it is for you.

        My paternal grandmother, a hardworking no-nonsense German farm wife that had a half dozen loaves of bread rising every single morning by 4 a.m. for her brood, used to say, “Eat together as a family. It’s good for the digestion.” My elegant English maternal grandmother that had an attic full of sets of china and beautiful table linen always said, “No matter what you cook, add love first and then set a pretty table.”

        Liked by 14 people

        • All of this these are wonderful suggestions and brings back memories of my own grandparents.

          My French great grandma made a big mid day meal and dinner was only cold it’s Or sandwiches (easier I sleep well with a belly too full of food trying to get digested). The English great grandma and grandma were AMAZING bakers of desserts, cakes, pies, doughnuts etc.

          There are so many websites that have wonderful easy to follow recipes, such as allrecipes.com and others. If you would like to cook healthy with as few ingredients as possible (I.e. Keeping processed foods to minimum), and let’s say have some boneless pork chops, just do a search. Chances are if you like the ingredients and know what they all are, you will be able to prepare for yourself a delicious meal. I am a leftovers eating person so cooking once and eating twice is always a big bonus for me.

          Eating lots and lots of vegetables and some fruits and lean meats and plenty of salads is not hard. Pushing away from the table after one helping is the hardest part but critical to maintaining healthy weight

          Liked by 3 people

          • Sentient says:

            There’s one thing you have to eat to lose weight: less.

            Liked by 5 people

            • Jimmy Jack says:

              Definitely true. Plus move as such as you can throughout the day because it adds up. But what you eat makes a big difference in hormonal levels which impact hunger.

              Also, the health side effects from eating a 1200 calorie of fresh vegetables/fruits/lean meats is far different than 1200 calories of processed food such as Lean Cuisine meals etc. Their is an epigenetic effect based on nutrition – we are impacting our DNA and thereby the DNA we pass on based on what we eat.

              Just putting it out there.

              Liked by 1 person

            • Menagerie says:

              Only true if you eat the typical American diet. I never lost more weight or felt better than when I didn’t watch calories or portions, just ate lean meats and fish in reasonable portions, and vegetables and fruits. Tons of fruits which were “too many calories and to high in natural sugars” but I lost a lot of weight. No dairy, no sugar, no prepared foods except a few dressings and condiments. I also rarely ate grains.

              I guess you could call it Paleo with lots of fruit and vegetables.

              What you eat is a lot more important than how much.

              Liked by 2 people

        • Well said farmhand.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Kathy says:

      TIP: If you lose the bookmark, just type the word “recipe” in the search field (in the right-hand margin). Be forewarned, however, because the results will include Holiday recipe threads from years past — all of which are diet-busters!

      Liked by 3 people

  3. wizzum says:

    Hi Menagerie, I doubt there’s much you don’t know already! I still have day dreams about your baked ham recipe.
    What are we after though? There are so many different diets out there and what is a healthy choice on Atkins is a definite no-no on a liver sensitive diet.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Menagerie says:

      Anything, everything. Lots of people have different needs. All of us are probably wanting to cut down on sugar and prepared foods, some need low sodium, and healthy prep and cooking tips.

      Glad you enjoyed that ham, it’s our long time favorite recipe and my spoiled guys whine and moan if I serve any other ham, but it wasn’t mine originally. I found it on Pinterest.

      Liked by 1 person

    • EV22 says:

      When it’s too hot to cook, we make zucchini pasta using either a spiralizer or I’ll just cut the zucchini into fettucini-like strips and make a no-cook sauce.

      For the no-cook sauce:
      Into a blender or food processor:
      2-3 Red bell peppers
      At least 1 cup tomatoes
      2 tbls. Balsamic vinegar
      Some fresh or dried basil to taste

      Blend or pulse until everything is chunky.

      Add chopped scallions, black pepper and any other spices (oregano, etc.) that you like to the mixture. Sometimes I’ll add Parmesan cheese, sometimes not. If there’s anything in the fridge sitting around that goes well with it, I’ll throw that in too, like bits of ham, etc.

      We like the sauce to be on the spicy side cuz uncooked zucchini is pretty bland. Obviously, this recipe is just basic and has a million variations.

      Serve with salad.

      Liked by 5 people

      • EV22 says:

        Those red bell peppers need to be seeded!

        Especially if you use a spiralizer, you don’t even need to cook the zucchini.

        Like

      • mtc says:

        That sounds so good! Definitely gonna try your recipe!

        Like

      • My favorite is spaghetti squash. Already cut up by mother nature.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Windy Day says:

          And if you prefer a pizza, try putting your sauce and veggies on thin strips of zucchini which have been baked for about 10 minutes at 350 degrees. After adding the toppings, put it back in the oven and melt the cheese. It’s a great low-carb alterative to pizza.

          Speaking of pizza crusts, I tried the cauliflower crust. You may have better luck, but my experience is that it made the cauliflower better and the crust worse!!!! ๐Ÿ™‚

          I also made a pizza using oat flour (I used a blender to grind up oatmeal to turn it into flour). That was pretty good–it came out nice and crunchy, but it was even better after adding some herbs.

          And finally, I posted on another thread a while back my sour dough pizza crust recipe and how I make it (WITHOUT a lot of the fuss that just about everyone says is necessary to make sour dough). I can repost this if anyone is interested. Sour dough is better for diabetics since the process of making the sour dough sour consumes the sugars.

          Liked by 1 person

  4. McGuffin says:

    Need new ideas for meal. I can’t wait to get some tried and true recipes from you all!

    Like

  5. uvaldegirl says:

    I’ll post some recipes asap but a few things I’m trying to do are confine all meals to an 8 hour period – 16 hour mini fasts. Intermittent fasting is the term. Apparently, by 8-10 hours one has burned the stored carbs or glycogen and the body starts to burn stored fat. Also, high intensity exercise is good for promoting calorie burning I hear, so I walk and then jog or cycle leisurely then pump it up for short bursts.

    Liked by 1 person

    • blognificentbee says:

      Just read a book about breaking insulin resistance (which happens to most of us at a certain age) with mii-fasts. Makes sense, so trying it out this week.

      Like

    • parteagirl says:

      Intermittent Fasting has been great for me. I started with the 5:2 plan which is two non-consecutive days of limited calories (500 for women, 700 for men) and the other 5 days eat normally/reasonably. It will shrink your appetite, so that when you can eat, you physically cannot eat as much as you think you want.

      I have now gone to a “Feeding Window” intermittent fasting plan where you consume all of your calories within an 8 hour (or smaller) time frame. I have always been MORE hungry the rest of the day if I eat before noon. I’ve heard it explained that this is due to when my coritsol levels peak. For some, it is within 30 minutes after rising, and that eating while cotisol levels are peaked stimulates your appetite. After morning coffee, I don’t eat until sometime between 2 and 5pm and then nothing after 10pm.

      I do get hungry sometimes, around noonish, but hunger comes in waves that diminish with drinking lots of fluids. Lipton’s Honey Lemon green tea, which I drink as unsweetened ice tea, is amazing when it comes to curbing my appetite.

      I also brew my own Kombucha tea with the easy “continuous brew” method, and it’s great for appetite suppression, contains all of the B vitamins and for some reason, has really helped me with seasonal allergies.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. keebler AC ovfefe says:

    What kind of yummy vegetable is at top of photo with purple center?

    Like

  7. Kathy says:

    Thank you, Menagerie, for this special thread! Here’s the low-fat/low-carb dish I made this weekend. The vegetables and seasonings listed are just suggestions; you can add several kinds — or only a few — and the dish will be tasty.

    CIAMBOTTA (or GIAMBOUTE): Italian Summer Stew

    Using olive or canola oil in a heavy pan with a good lid, brown 2-lbs. beef cubes (do not flour). Reduce heat, put on lid, simmer on low heat about 30 minutes. Add 2-3 whole garlic cloves (remove later) and continue cooking on low heat for at least 2 hours. After this, add vegetables in layers:

    … 3-4 carrots, peeled, cut into chunks (not too large)
    … 8 medium onions, whole, tough outer skins removed
    … 8 bell peppers, cored/seeded and cut into eighths
    … 8-10 tomatoes, not peeled, cut into sixths or eighths
    … 6 cups sliced zucchini (not peeled)
    … 6 mushrooms, sliced (or 4oz. canned)
    … 1 cup diced eggplant

    Use no water. Use a heavy pan with a good lid, as it will draw its own juice. After each layer, add pinches of desired seasonings (salt, pepper, basil, oregano, bay leaf, rosemary, thyme, parsley, fennel seeds). Cook on medium heat until vegetables are tender, but not shapeless. Serve in soup plates or bowls.

    ==================
    Note 1: For best results, cook the beef low and slow for several hours to make it fall apart like shredded pork. The easiest method I’ve found is to start by browning the meat in the evening, cooking it overnight in a crock pot on the lowest setting then, in the morning, strain the meat from the broth and refrigerate these in separate containers. Finally, about 2 hours before dinner, I layer the vegetables in a crock pot, pour the strained broth over the vegetables, add the shredded meat as the top layer, and finish cooking on a medium heat setting.

    Note 2: For young children or folks with dentures (who might be bothered by fennel seeds, rosemary or thyme twigs), here’s a tip: Gently simmer any “tough” herbs in a little beef broth (plus a splash of olive oil) while you’re browning the beef cubes, then strain out/discard the bits and add this seasoned liquid when cooking the vegetables.

    Like

  8. Fe says:

    One tip is to include a variety of color on your plate, purples, dark leafy greens, yellow, orange, red. My favorite way to eat some veggies is to bake them in the oven after I have tossed them with some olive oil, salt, pepper. Primo yummo๐Ÿ˜€

    Liked by 9 people

    • Jmbuck says:

      Yes, that is my go to meal. Roasted vegetables and lean meat or fish like salmon. Roasting enhances the flavor of the vegetables, Yummy. I also love the Turkey Chili with zucchini on The Fast Metabolism Diet. I make double patches and freeze it in portions. It also has 4 kinds of beans plus lintels. Really good. This is going to be a great thread.

      Liked by 3 people

      • trapper says:

        Even meat that isn’t lean is made leaner by broiling or grilling so that the fat drips off. And Fe – roasted veggies like you do them are our favorite, or done on a grill in a metal basket or veggie pan for grilling.

        My only contribution is to not eat until you are full, but only until you no longer feel hungry. I find I still have half a plate of food left when I do this.

        Like

  9. jrapdx says:

    What a timely topic! For a bit over a year I’ve been been figuring out how to live with a low-salt diet. Turns out to be a non-trivial problem to solve. I like great food and a pretty cook myself, but making food that tastes like something without using salt is quite a challenge! My hunch is a lot of people are told by their consultants to limit their sodium intake, but it’s tough advice to follow.

    No mystery that food prepared without salt just tastes bland to most people. Makes me wonder—how many folks out there are having a hard time adhering to sodium-restricted intake?

    I’ve come up with some recipes that at least to my taste buds are a good start, and I’d be happy to share if anyone’s interested.

    Liked by 2 people

    • wizzum says:

      Have you tried potassium chloride? it does taste salt-ish but I find it bitter if I use too much. Definitely adds salt flavor though.

      Like

      • jrapdx says:

        Yes, I use KCl regularly, but I completely agree with you about the taste. It’s sorta salty but also bitter, or sweet depending on the concentration. I find it most useful with a small amount sprinkled on top of asparagus, and less useful for a pot of beans where a lot of it would be necessary to get much effect.

        Also combined with acidic flavors, like citric acid, in very small amounts the “salty” impression is improved. Some versions of “salt substitute” add some organic acid for this reason. I find lime juice a good adjunct, and where it fits, vinegar works too (salad dressings).

        An issue with KCl is that some people have to restrict potassium too. Some diuretics can cause potassium to accumulate, and people with kidney failure could easily overdo potassium intake. But most people can handle a reasonable amount of salt substitute, a teaspoon or so a day is probably fine.

        Liked by 1 person

    • maiingankwe says:

      I don’t know very much about salt, but I do use sea salt rather than the usual table salt. They’ve gotten pretty fancy on their Sea salt too, like Himalayan Sea Salt which is real pink and flavorful. I really like it.

      I would assume sea salt isn’t the best either if one has to cut down, but for people who want a healthier choice, sea salt would be my choice. Please feel free to correct me if I’m wrong.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Jimmy Jack says:

        I was going to suggest that as well. I’d highly recommend Maldon sea salt flakes. A bit pricey as far as salt is concerned but a tiny sprinkle imparts tremendous flavor.

        Also, I’d switch to Celtic sea salt for a salt shaker and cooking salt. This has needed micronutrients that add removed from regular table salts.

        If it helps at all, the most recent research indicates a low salt diet isn’t as helpful as once thought; also, recently shown that salt is needed to get rid of body fat. I’ll find some links in the AM and post those

        Liked by 4 people

        • jrapdx says:

          For sure mileage varies when it comes to sodium intake, individual requirements (and tolerance) are all over the map. One size doesn’t fit all, no question about it.

          However there are lots of reasons and conditions where sodium restriction is recommended. High blood pressure is perhaps the best known, but there are many indications for lowering sodium intake. In my case I have several high-priced consultants in as many specialties all recommending the same thing. No point having all that powerful talent on my team if I’m just gonna ignore their advice.

          For people who can tolerate it, by all means enjoy what you can. As it’s said, take all things in moderation, including moderation.

          Liked by 2 people

        • farmhand1927 says:

          Many people have been led to believe a low salt diet is necessary for everyone. While it’s true there are medical conditions that require it and in some instances, failure to comply can lead to death, some have an unnecessary fear of using salt. Had we not developed an addiction to the heavy sodium contents in processed food, we’d likely not have to work so hard to restrict intake.

          My working career outside the home and off the farm was healthcare. I started in a hospital kitchen at age 15 learning abt diets and portions—and also became an expert at scrubbing gigantic pots and pans! During the course of my career I worked in patient care, billing and insurance, physician group practice management, medical records, chart review for quality and risk management and finally in hospital administration.

          The relevance of sharing all that is only to reveal I’ve seen what damage we can do to ourselves when we fail to use common sense and self control in what we eat and drink.

          Salt is often maligned just as sugar is. Again, failure to employ common sense and self control is what gets us into trouble with both. Always follow whatever specifications your physician gives you. But in terms of salt and sugar (saline and glucose) for the healthy person, remember that when we are hospitalized for surgery, following an accident or injury or for a critical, life threatening condition, depending on our diagnosis, we likely are going to quickly get an IV started of saline (salt) or glucose (sugar) and if God has deemed it so, our lives will be saved and we will recover.

          Salt can kill, it can also save. Don’t overuse and abuse it but remember we are all called to be the salt and light in the world. White, pink, black, gray, coarse ground or flaked, salt can and does do a body good!

          Liked by 7 people

      • jrapdx says:

        I used to have quite a selection of salt on hand, so I’m familiar with a number of variations. Sea salt can contain some trace elements, though mileage varies on that score. You’re right, when it comes down to it, sodium chloride is the same no matter what the source. “Fancy” salt has no advantage in that respect.

        Issue is that 1 teaspoon of salt (no matter what variant) contains ~2300 mg of sodium, which coincidentally is the recommended sodium intake for unrestricted, that is “normal” diets. That teaspoon doesn’t include the sodium naturally occurring in foods, which means a “normal” diet would allow for only ~1/2 teaspoon of salt a day.

        For people advised to keep sodium under 2000mg a day (1500mg is the preferred target), it leaves little room for error. But I’m over whining about it, Nature isn’t selective about who she picks on, and she doesn’t care what I think of it either.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Blue Ridge Mts Va. says:

        Natural News had a great article about healthy alternatives to toxic processed table salt that you might be interested in reading.
        http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-07-09-8-healthy-alternatives-to-your-toxic-table-salt-you-can-start-using-today.html

        I use Pink Himalayan salt as it is rich in minerals, not to mention low in sodium. I have to be concerned about my diet as I have chronic Lyme disease which gave me a few problems such as Alpha-Gal, and IgE mediated food allergies galore. Alpha Gal is transmitted by the Lone Star Tick. The reaction is not like the typical IgE mediated allergy, it is a delayed reaction following the consumption of mammal ingredients especially red meat and dairy. Alpha-Gal has made me a Pegan. I am glad I can find local raised chicken and eggs. I would suggest that CTH readers buy local raised meats, eggs, and vegetables. If possible grow your own. The test for Alpha-Gal is not reliable. The same can be said of tests for Lyme disease. Pay attention to your symptoms following tick exposure. I like using a crock pot for cooking. I also like the Eat Fat and Get Thin diet as it promotes dairy and grain free eating. Lyme literate doctors promote the same thing: don’t eat grains such as wheat (GMO), and don’t consume dairy as it causes inflammation. I use So Delicious culinary coconut milk in organic coffee. I use organic coconut butter as a butter substitute. I make organic coconut flour bread.

        If you can have dairy, buy local milk. If you can you might want to make your own Kefir. Cultures for Health sells Kefir grains-both milk grains and water grains. The grains are reusable. They will grow, then you can share them with friends. Fermented products such as Kefir, and sauerkraut are great, as are fermented vegetables. I make my own sauerkraut and I use the Pink Himalayan salt instead of toxic table salt.

        Liked by 2 people

        • jrapdx says:

          From wikipedia, “Himalayan salt is chemically similar to table salt plus mineral impurities. It consists of 95โ€“98% sodium chloride, 2โ€“4% polyhalite (potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, oxygen, hydrogen), 0.01% fluoride, 0.01% iodine, and micro-amounts of numerous trace minerals.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Himalayan_salt

          Sodium content is just a few percent less than pure NaCl, IOW no advantage over table salt on that score.

          Liked by 1 person

      • farmhand1927 says:

        All salt comes from the sea, I believe. Like everything else in our diets these days, it gets processed and refined down to different granular sizes, color, etc. I prefer coarse ground sea salt because its probably closer to its natural state. When it comes to food, the less its messed with, the better, IMO.

        Like

        • Only French Sea Salt Fleur de sel de Camargue by Le Saunier for me. Pricey but online you can find it cheap do not but at a specialty store $12-$14 dollars vs $5 or $6.

          Like

        • varsityward says:

          All salt comes from the sea… yes and no. Some salt comes directly from the sea and is obtained by evaporation. Lots of salt is mined from the earth from salt beds that were once sea beds that evaporated and got buried in tectonic shifts. Himalayan salt is mined in an area near Punjab from such a mine. The source is a buried sea bed, so it’s not wrong to call it sea salt.

          Like

      • mikgen says:

        Himalayan Sea Salt??

        Someone must have their geography messed up.
        ๐Ÿ™‚

        Like

      • A2 says:

        You are not wrong. I always use sea salt no additives. Maldon is my preferred product but also Marlborough

        Liked by 1 person

    • herbs! i’m a huge fan! tarragon for chix, tuna salad, eggs. garlic, basil, rosemary. there’s a lot of different basils out there: cinnamon, licorice (can use on chicken and fish in place of fennel), lime, black opal (which turns white vinegar pink, so it’s fun to use as a dressing). it’s amazing how herbs will wake up other flavors. i just made strawberry jam, with a tblsp of basil thrown in at the last minute of cooking. wow! butter, lemon, dill and onion slices for any fish filet. also growing obsessed with different sorts of vinegars. if you have to limit your salt, save it for the one dish that needs it (steamed vegetables for me), use herbs in your meats/rice/beans. also…use fresh whenever you can…..the fresh alone brings a taste that only additives can give to canned/frozen products.

      Liked by 2 people

      • jrapdx says:

        Thanks for the tips. I agree, using herbs and flavors helps a lot in the absence of salt. And I think you’re right, once we get used to the routine of preparing our own vegetables, meats, beans and all, it’s not a big deal and adds immensely to the taste of the food we eat!

        Like

    • millwright says:

      After a lot of research I’ve pretty much abandoned the “low sodium/sodium substitute ” concept. I don’t use much salt (kosher) in my cooking and our table salt is iodized excerpt for pastas and potatoes which need salt. But I do use a great many herbs in my cooking to enhance flavors and aromas, ( a lot of taste is smell ) . The various varieties of peppers can serve to address the “salt tongue” in some preparations.

      Like

    • Esperanza says:

      Are you sure you need to reduce so much if you’re cooking from scratch? The amount in processed foods is incredible.

      Liked by 1 person

      • jrapdx says:

        The amount of sodium in packaged foods goes from a little to huge. If avoiding those items, then pretty much you’re cooking from scratch. Thing is learning to read labels and taking the “serving size” into account. For example, a “reduced-sodium” soy sauce has 460 mg per tablespoon, and a can of “organic” lentil soup has 590mg in one cup or 1/2 can.

        How likely is a person to limit intake to one “serving”? To keep sodium intake low enough to meet specs means being selective about ingredients and adapting recipes to match.

        Like

        • no-nonsense-nancy says:

          i make a spice that I use in place of salt. i take some sun dried tomatoes and grind them in a coffee grinder, sometimes putting them in the oven to get them even drier. Then I mix them in a small bowl with a bottle of garlic powder. I then add a couple packs of that dry pesto sauce and stir it all up. I put it in a salt shaker and and sprinkle it on just about everything. I call it Tomato-Garlic-Pesto Spice. It makes a lot so i give shakers of it away. My family love it. It is good on my home made pizzas, eggs, stir fries and just about everything. It is just like I used to buy from Tastefully Simple. I use very little salt.

          Liked by 1 person

          • H.R. says:

            Great contribution! Now that you’ve given the basics, I can use your flavor profile or play with variations using my favorite combos. I like a dash of cumin with meats or veggies, and a bit of ground fennel seed might go nicely with your Tomato-Garlic-Pesto. Lot’s of flavors to play with.

            Thanks!

            Like

    • Have you tried Mrs. Dash seasoning? Haven’t needed it but was my father’s favorite who had to do low salt decades ago.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Plain Jane says:

        We’ve been using pink salt for cooking and the table for a few years, and now the Morton regular is way too salty and overwhelming for us. The pink is supposed to have more minerals, and that’s why we started using it.

        We had awesome rockwell water (200+ feet down) but when the nearby town put in a town well water supply, our water changed, so we put in a reverse osmosis unit. Unfortunately that takes out naturally occuring minerals.

        Like

      • Jacqueline Taylor Robson says:

        I like Mrs. Dash. They now make a lot of different flavors. My fav is “Fiesta Lime”. I use it on corn on the cob with just a little bit of coconut oil! Que Rico!

        Like

      • jrapdx says:

        Yeah, use Mrs. Dash quite often, comes in different flavors too. Kinda like the “extra spicy” for southwest-style dishes. Other non-salt spice-herb mixes at the grocery are also good.

        Another option is clam juice, some brands are quite low in sodium, just 20mg/tablespoon. Gives a nice “fishy” flavor, much less salt than most “fish sauce”-type products.

        Like

    • Joyful Noise says:

      As I have aged, I have naturally become more sensitive to salt in food. I usually lightly season my food before cooking or just as its finished cooking. I never add salt to my plated food. I use table salt for baking, but not for anything else. The fine grains have a way of being too much for me. I prefer to use a salt mill. My food is flavored but not covered in salt. Stay away from prepared foods (check labels for salt content), canned vegetables (choose frozen or fresh instead) and canned soups. Try to eat foods with the least processing, so you can control your salt content. Train your taste buds and cut back on your salt content.

      Like

      • jrapdx says:

        You’re right, knowledge IS power when it comes to nutrition. Knowing what’s in stuff is the key, so reading labels is crucial. And really understanding “serving size” is vital.

        Though sometimes labels are just plain wrong. (I won’t say “fake news”.) Wife bought some pickles (for dinner guests). The label says serving size is 1 oz., “Sodium 3g 0% (%Daily Value)”. Well, 3g = 3000mg. I don’t think so, obviously completely screwed up. The producer’s web site wasn’t working either.

        Salt isn’t the only dietary factor I have to attend to, but is the hardest to deal with because it’s everywhere. Restaurants are a killer. Every time it’s negotiation with the waiter or chef that rivals passing a healthcare bill. Talk about the “art of the deal”. If I go out for dinner often enough eventually the restaurants I go to will catch on. With any luck the info will spread around and make life a little easier for other people too.

        Like

      • jrapdx says:

        You’re right, knowledge IS power when it comes to nutrition. Knowing what’s in stuff is the key, so reading labels is crucial. And really understanding “serving size” is vital.

        Though sometimes labels are just plain wrong. (I won’t say “fake news”.) Wife bought some pickles (for dinner guests). The label says serving size is 1 oz., “Sodium 3g 0% (%Daily Value)”. Well, 3g = 3000mg. I don’t think so, obviously completely screwed up. The producer’s web site wasn’t working either.

        Salt isn’t the only dietary factor I have to attend to, but is the hardest to deal with because it’s everywhere. Restaurants are a killer. Every time it’s negotiation with the waiter or chef that rivals passing a healthcare bill. Talk about the “art of the deal”. If I go out for dinner often enough eventually the restaurants I go to will catch on. With any luck the info will spread around and make life a little easier for other people too.

        Like

  10. Plain Jane says:

    Wonderful. I just perfected my recipe for chocolate fudgy syrup ๐Ÿ™‚ for DH, the kids and grandkids.

    However, I am diabetic 2 , and do not take meds. Been able to get away with that through diet and exercise for years, but have been doing a super struggle since I messed up my foot. Including all hidden carbs and sugars I do not consume more than 20 carbs a day unless it is in green veggies or a sweet potato with cinnamon and butter. Never eat anything white, nor grains. But now am fighting hard. I am now going to try to add more fiber via eating more of my flax seed crackers.

    I have some recipes in my head, but will try to type them out. One of my favs is okra hamburger soup with leftover veggies that I accumulate in my freezer container (like the 3 spoons of peas, the 6 greenbeans, the 4 spoonfulls of corn, etc.) Also started spiralizing zucs because I so miss noodles.

    This thread is a great idea, hope it is successful.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Menagerie says:

      I have a bad foot too. For times when you can’t walk, or if you are unable to exercise, there are some really great YouTube vids with chair exercises. Some are crappy, but there are a remarkable number of them that will really get your heart rate up.

      Also, could you use a rebounder? I love mine. Cheap ones are hard on the ankles and can cause pain, but a good one is a great investment if you will use it. Good for aerobic exercise and also very good for core strength, and has other health benefits. For example, it’s supposed to be good for your lymphatic system.

      My two favorite possessions for my health are my nutri bullet and my rebounder.

      Liked by 1 person

      • georgiafl says:

        Menagerie, Would you mind telling us the brand/type of rebounder you like?

        Liked by 1 person

        • Plain Jane says:

          Yes, Menangerie, please post what type and brand.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Menagerie says:

          I have a cellerciser. It has springs, and many people, especially those who are older, prefer bungee cords. The Cadillac of all bungee cord rebounders is the Bellicon, which is very expensive, but people love it. A less expensive model that also gets good reviews for a bungee cord is the jumpsort.

          The features that drew me to the cellerciser were that I could get a model that folded in half and was easy to store, and that it seemed to have much better reviews among those who used it to promote health, such as assisting your lymphatic system, than the bungee cord models. It has the best warranty in the business, the springs practically last forever, and the customer service of the company is outstanding.

          Critics of the spring models say they are loud. I keep my springs oiled every few months with a drop or two of oil and they make almost no noise at all. The bounce is firm, but not hard. As I have a foot problem, I didn’t want to risk getting a model that had so much bounce to it that my ankles would be at risk. Also, on the bungee cord models you are supposed to move the bungee cords very frequently to avoid wear. I didn’t want to do that.

          Here is the link for the cellerciser. You will find many videos on youtube with good workouts and info about it.

          https://cellercise.com/

          There are a lot of good choices out there. Review carefully. You get what you pay for though. If you want to know if you will like it, you might be okay getting one for forty bucks or so from Walmart and trying it for a few months, but if you know, like I did, that you will use it a lot, try to get the best one you can afford, because there is a lot of difference in the mat and springs or bungee cords.

          This is the site I bought mine from. They sell several models, have great information so that you can make a choice.

          http://www.healthytrampolines.com/

          Hope that helps.

          Liked by 1 person

      • The Tundra PA says:

        What is a nutri bullet?

        Like

  11. mtc says:

    As far as ease of preparation and for healthy eating, it’s hard to beat an electric stackable food steamer with a timer and a rice basket.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. carnan43 says:

    There are good fats – check out Dr. Mercola. Low fat isn’t the answer to health. Carbs are the real villain in any menu. Sugars, particularly from corn, corn oil, soy, feedlot beef and chicken laced with antibiotics, are health hazards.Organic flax oil, extra virgin olive oil, organic veggies, and grass fed critters are better choices. Diet sodas – laced with chemical sweeteners are the road to hell. Reseach where aspartame came from – you will be shocked. Our Government does zilch research on the chemicals added to our food. Corporate America owns the stooges in our political arena.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Jacqueline Taylor Robson says:

      I can’t drink or eat anything with aspartame. It gives me seizures! I used to drink a lot of diet Coke. Now I’ll have a Splenda Coke (1 can per week). I like to drink flavoured water. You can buy big cups that have a receptacle for putting in your own flavours like citrus fruit, cucumber, mint, etc.
      I find that that like any other habits, you can change if you really want to. When you notice how much better you feel, it’s really worth the effort!

      Like

  13. The Devilbat says:

    After a lot of research, it looks as though wheat is a real health killer. My wife and myself cut it out of our diet and we are doing so much better. It is very hard to cut out as it is in so many products but it is well worth the effort. You will see a difference pretty soon after cutting it out of your diet.
    Yes, I know all about, “Give us this day our daily bread” but amazingly it really is true. Wheat is very bad for you.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Sylvia Avery says:

      Wheat Belly or Paleo type diet here. No grains, no sugar. It was hard for the first couple of weeks, but now I don’t mind.

      Liked by 3 people

      • A2 says:

        I only eat grains on very are occasions, but have not eaten sugar, or sugar based foods like cakes and biscuits for three decades. Fruit is sweet enough and at times cloying. You will not miss sugar, trust me. In most of the fresh veg and fruit there is enough sugar. I can’t even eat a mango in season it is so sweet.

        Liked by 2 people

      • amy1212 says:

        We avoid wheat and follow the recommendations of Paleo (no white sugar) and Atkins (he did not invent, just popularized – recommendations have been around since 1865). Read Gary Taubes book, “Good Calories, Bad Calories”. Medical profession has pushed lies that have no basis in fact (like MSM) such as Low/no salt, avoid red meat, eat low fat – all BS. His book has the facts, the actual studies so you can read for yourself. If you want to get fat or have health issues, follow the food pyramid (totally made up). My parents lived to their late 90’s. They always said – if it passes thru your car window or has a label, it is not food. We use acupuncture and Chinese herbs. No white sugar, no white flour or “white coats”. Dr. Steve Phinney also has a lot of good information about high fat/low carb (no trans fats). Here is one of Gary Taubes articles that has a lot of good information. http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/07/magazine/what-if-it-s-all-been-a-big-fat-lie.html

        Liked by 2 people

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      I have had the same experience with wheat but would add it seems that there are some wheats that are less healthy producing less negative side effects than others. The problem is with restaurant or processed food it is impossible to tell what is being used. If you do cut out wheat totally, which I agree is very, very hard bc it is used as an emulsifier to keep foods shelf stable, once you do your body will pick up immediately which foods have the most/least impact on your system.

      One simple change – get rid of soy sauce and replace it with tamari sauce instead. Same flavor but no wheat.

      Like

    • Blue Ridge Mts Va. says:

      Wheat is terrible, mostly because it is GMO and loaded with Glyphosate. I would recommend avoiding wheat, corn, and soy. All are GMO. Read the book called Wheatbelly written by William Davis MD. Modern wheat is nothing compared with ancient wheat.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Sayit2016 says:

      I really like the Ezekiel brad I get at Trader Joes ; ) It is sprouted and for me makes a big difference.

      Like

  14. NannyG says:

    Instead of salt or salty broths I add a bit of sake when I make rice.

    Also instead of salt I marinate veggies for grilling in basalmic vinegar and spices, lemon juice and wine.

    Instead of cooking in oil I use oven “frying” and spray on a bit of Pam olive oil or butter flavor.

    Apple sauce is a great substitute for oil if you want to bake a cake from a box.

    One of the reasons to “beer butt” a chicken is that more of the fat can cook off and the bird doesn’t soak it back up.

    Skinless chicken can be tasty if you marinate it and baste it:
    http://topsecretrecipes.com/Koo-Koo-Roo-Original-Skinless-Flame-Broiled-Chicken-Copycat-Recipe.html
    Chervil is a great substitute for salt in that recipe, btw.

    Liked by 3 people

    • jrapdx says:

      Your idea of using sake for rice is a good idea, will have to try it! I’d agree about salty broth, we use home-made unsalted stock with good results. Same basic idea, we use lime juice to create a “salty” flavor, adding a little to vinegar is good for pickling, and in dressing for slaw. Good tips, thanks.

      Like

  15. millwright says:

    Wow ! Food and food prep ! Chief among my favorite things ! Thanks Menagerie ! I do most of the cooking in our house and I’m always searching for recipes/techniques my wife ( a controlled diabetic) and I can enjoy alone or with guests . Wife is a “Dutchy” hence fond of pasta, pork and chicken but fussy about seafood . Don’t know if I have much to contribute in the way of “recipes” as I’m a look, smell and taste sort of cook but I do have a couple of favs some might enjoy !

    Liked by 1 person

  16. tappin52 says:

    Vegetable Soup

    1 T olive oil
    1 onion, chopped
    2 cloves garlic, chopped
    2 zucchini, quartered lengthwise and chopped
    3 carrots, peeled and sliced
    2 stalks celery, sliced
    1 bell pepper, any color, chopped
    4 Cups fresh baby spinach (can use frozen)
    1 28oz can diced tomatoes
    1 10oz can diced tomatoes with green chilies (omit if you don’t like heat from chilies)
    1 32oz carton chicken or vegetable stock (low sodium)
    2 t herbs de provence
    sea salt and black pepper to taste

    In a large pot, heat olive oil and sautรฉ onion until it begins to brown. Add garlic and sautรฉ about 1 minute more (do not brown garlic). Add all other ingredients, except fresh spinach. Bring up to a boil, then lower heat to simmer and cook about 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add spinach and simmer another 15 minutes.

    This recipe is something that I eat regularly. I keep it in the fridge and add different proteins and carbs to round out the meal. Sometimes I add chicken or fish for protein. And I will add either quinoa or sweet potato for a carb.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Bree says:

    Was happy to have some advice awhile back on extra virgin olive oil from California olive branch. I love it and my daughter can’t stop cooking with it. Great flavor.

    Liked by 3 people

  18. Whole grape popsicles.
    I personally don’t like the texture of grapes, so I wash them and then puree them in a blender, seeds and all, then freeze into yummy popsicles. My nephew likes them best frozen whole.
    I can emphatically testify to how much grapes helps hydrate and clear the lungs amazingly well, which in turn oxygenates the whole body more effectively. Many benefits.
    More info here. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/fruit/health-benefits-of-grapes.html
    The healthiest advice I would have is trade cows milk for almond milk and eat grapes, the darker the better.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Lburg says:

      When the children were young I used to take grapes off the stem. wash them, roll them in a towel and then freeze them in a single layer on a parchment lined cookie sheet. Voila! Instant Grape sorbet!

      Once they were individually frozen, they went into a bag for doling out as needed. (might cut them into halves or quarters for little kids….)

      Liked by 2 people

      • A2 says:

        I find that interesting because my mother-in-law, old Beijing ren, said they used to put persimmons outside the window to freeze and that was their ‘ice cream’ .

        Liked by 1 person

        • Lburg says:

          Next time I find persimmons, I’m going to try that! Thanks A2.

          Like

          • A2 says:

            Even more interesting is that in Korea they had no access to sugar or sugar beets so traditionally to get a bit of sweetness they used pears, Adds a fragrant and complex sweetness to dishes. They still do so today at home and only in the best Korean restaurants. You can taste the difference.

            Liked by 1 person

  19. b4im2old says:

    I don’t know if this qualifies for this thread, and I know some see it as a fad… BUT as an older single person I know I’m eating better/healthier/more balanced meals since my adult kids gifted me with an Instant Pot DUO 6 qt 7-in-1 pressure cooker. It’s also available in an 8qt size, too. There are tons of recipes/every kind imaginable available online for it! It does so much!!! It even has a slow cooker mode on it, and many others!!

    I’m no stranger to pressure cooking, owning a stove top pressure cooker and a big stove top pressure canner…. but this electric Instant Pot is amazing! And with a few extra accessories it is VERY versatile. I haven’t had it long but omg I’ve done cheesecake, banana bread, chicken dishes with rice, chicken and fresh veggies (stack cooked at same time – called pot-in-pot), potatoes and hard boiled eggs at same time for fast potatoe salad, meat loaf with potatoes, onions, and carrots, pork chops with homemade mushroom gravy and chunky potatoes above it, homemade greek yogurt, etc., etc..

    Anyway, if this tip helps someone eat better and keep their kitchen cool without heating up the oven or stove top, or drying out your food in the microwave, GREAT! Enjoy! PS You can brown your meats in it too, before pressure cooking.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Rene says:

      I love my new Instant Pot. Have made refried beans, pulled pork, soups and great brown rice so far.

      Like

    • jrapdx says:

      Pressure cookers are great, we use ours frequently. One use is pressure steaming “pulses”, like garbanzos, lentils, black-eye peas, and the like. The method uses soaked beans, lentils, etc., cooking them in a basket over a cup or two of water for ~10-20 min. The high temperature steam cooks the peas to a firmer texture and richer taste.

      Like

    • Anita says:

      Oh, so you’re one of them? I work for Amazon. Just made it through Prime Week. I must have handled 20 Instant Pots myself during the last week, and I probably saw 50 more stacked on different pallets ready to leave the warehouse. Glad to see people are using them to cook with still….I was having sinister thoughts about jihadis and bombs. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

    • Menagerie says:

      I wish some of you guys would post recipes or specific tips. I bought an instant pot a year ago on prime day because I thought it would help me cook meats that are more tender and juicy with less effort. I am a really good cook, but I haven’t mastered the IP. I hate it so far. I’ve had two or three successes and many more disappointments.

      I’ve read recipe after recipe and damned if I know what’s wrong. I used to be able to cook tender and flavorful meats in the crockpot, now they almost always dry out. After googling, I found that the newer crock pots have a hole in the lid handle that lets moisture out. One woman said she puts a towel through the handle and then her crock pot cooks like the old ones did. Tried that and sure enough it was a good tip. The hole was in my lid, and sealing it made the meat good again. So I thought the IP would be a great idea. Not so for me yet!

      Liked by 1 person

      • b4im2old says:

        Here are two sites that I really like.

        https://www.pressurecookrecipes.com/easy-instant-pot-recipes/

        https://thisoldgal.com/category/instantpot/

        My kids like the instant pot fb group for recipes, but ugghh…

        I’m at about 6200′ elevation so most recipes I have to tweak a bit, but so far I love my IP!

        Tons of recipes out there, you can just search it by whatever you’re hankering for… like “instant pot paleo recipes” or “instant pot gluten free recipes” or by specific ingredients.

        There is a bit of a learning curve, but it’s a pretty short one. Other than using the yogurt setting for greek yogurt, I usually use the “manual” setting rather than the pre-programmed setting options – even for rice. I like CONTROL!! LOL! ๐Ÿ˜‰

        Hope you don’t give up on it! ๐Ÿ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  20. SandraOpines says:

    I have many food challenges due to:
    Celiac Disease = Gluten Free Diet which is no wheat, barley, rye, oats (Diagnosed by biopsy 30+ years ago)
    Diabetes Type 2 = no sugar (2 sad years without sugar………. age I guess as I am not overweight) No meds for either issue. My diet is pretty limited.

    Tip: Pressure Cooker is your friend! I have 4 stove top Pressure Cookers and 1 electric. I can feed a crowd of 30 to 50 people with healthy foods in about 2 hours or so. The fats separate upon sitting and you can pour all of that off. Don’t be afraid!!!! They rock for speedy and healthy meals.

    I get asked often what brand of Pressure Cooker I use. Fagor is the only brand I use. Splendid is the model of my stove top cookers.
    http://www.fagoramerica.com/cookware/pressure_cookers/splendid_line/splendid

    I hope this posts right as I can’t fix it if it doesn’t.

    Liked by 2 people

  21. EV22 says:

    A pretty healthy, no-bake, pretty fail-proof, delicious apple pie!

    Ingredients:
    1/2 cup steamed oats (not cooked)
    1 cup nuts soaked – I use walnuts (you may need a bit more, I use an 8″ pie pan)
    *1 large dried date or 2 dried apricots soaked until soft (reserve the water) – (I use Medjool dates)
    6-7 peeled apples, cored and sliced (I like Gala, Fuji and Jazz apples)
    2″ fresh ginger (sliced thinly and cut in half) Be sure to taste the amount of ginger as you follow the recipe as some ginger can be very strong and spicy, other times it can be relatively weak.

    *The dried fruit can be entirely eliminated as the apples will soak into the nut mixture somewhat.

    In a food processor:
    For the pie crust:
    Pulse oats until fine
    Add soaked nuts and date (or apricots), pulse some more until everything is finely chopped
    Add reserved dried fruit water a little bit at a time until the oats, nuts and date pull together. If you’re not using fruit, just use water.

    Take a pie pan and line the bottom with the nut mixture. There should be enough for a thin crust.

    Back to the food processor (and no, you don’t need to wash out the bowl):
    Pulse 1/2-3/4 of your apples and 1/2 the ginger until it’s the consistency of chunky applesauce
    Taste and see how strong the ginger is. If it’s not overwhelmingly strong for your taste, add the rest of the ginger or whatever you feel is right.
    Add the remainder of your apples into the apples already in the bowl and gently pulse everything until there are still small apple chunks visible. The point is to have a difference in texture between the two batches of apples.

    When you’re done pulsing, see how watery the apples are. Sometimes, I have to strain the apple mixture as it’s too watery, but it makes a great drink.

    Pour apple/ginger mixture into pie pan. Cover with plastic wrap, refrigerate for at least a few hours and and enjoy. (My apple pies never discolor because they’re eaten within 24 hours and the ginger helps too!)

    Liked by 3 people

  22. Maquis says:

    When I’m doing low carb, or did…I got this little trick from a friend. Just make a packet of sugar free jello (fake sugar, chemicals, blah! yeah, I know…) I really like the raspberry, and while it’s still hot after you’ve finished ensuring the jello is properly mixed you put in some cream, some use less, I use more…about a third of a cup, or so, but less is fine, you’ll find where you like it, and your concern for natural milk fat… Then you just blend it in, how well also will become something one tweaks to taste after they’ve played with it a couple times. I blend it in pretty well, so the cream appears completely dissolved and evenly dispersed. Put it in the fridge, in an hour or few, you have nice jello (Raspberry!) with a cream/jello layer on top, almost foamy, but well set. It is really good! Makes it easy to follow the regime when you have that waiting for you after dinner!

    Of course, normal people will likely want to split it up into dessert bowls or cups or what have you, to share, or to avoid eating the entire mess of it at one sitting. Very easy. Just my style. Not much on cooking these days, too, tired.

    Liked by 3 people

  23. Marygrace Powers says:

    Here’s two on-the-go healthy recipes – from vitalchoice.com
    I love the vital choice sardines!

    Two Tasty Sardine Spreads/

    “We have two Sardine spread ideas todayโ€ฆ one bears a Mediterranean accent, and another, adapted from Dr. Andrew Weil, offers a Scandinavian spin.

    Sardines rank among the richest sources of omega-3 fatty acids (1,200 mg per 4-3/8 oz can), and offer ample amounts of calcium (400 mg per 4-3/8 oz can) and vitamin D (290 IU per 4-3/8 oz can).

    We went all the way to Portugal to find our succulent Sardines, picked and packed by a family that’s been at it for more than a century. For Vital Choice, they custom-pack Sardines harvested when levels of fat, omega-3s and flavor reach their seasonal peak.”

    If you enjoy a bit of heat, use our Spicy Sardines, packed with a single red chili pepper.

    Sardines and Watercress on Toast -Serves 1

    1 slice whole grain or pumpernickel bread
    Garlic clove, halved
    Ripe tomato, thinly sliced
    1 can (4โ€’3/8 oz) Vital Choice Portuguese Sardines
    Handful of organic watercress or wild arugula (rocket)
    Splash of balsamic vinegar

    Lightly toast the bread. Rub the cut side of the garlic over the surface of the toast and arrange the tomato slices on top.

    Add seasoning as desired. (Our Organic Salmon Marinade Mix would go well with this spread.)

    Break up the sardines with a fork and arrange on top. Pile on the watercress and drizzle with balsamic vinegar.

    Scandinavian Sardine Spread – Serves 1โ€’2

    1 can (4โ€’3/8 oz) Vital Choice Portuguese Sardines
    1โ€’2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
    1 tablespoon onion, finely chopped
    1/2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

    Drain the fish and mash them with a fork in a bowl together with the mustard.

    Add the onion and lemon juice and stir.

    Spread on whole grain bread, brown pumpernickel bread, or whole grain crackers.

    https://www.vitalchoice.com/recipe/two-tasty-sardine-spreads

    Liked by 5 people

  24. Fabens Freddy says:

    FWIW from the guy with the world’s biggest sweet tooth & most notorious Dr. Pepper habit – sugar is straight-out poison. And when the day comes when you decide to eliminate it from your life, you will find that quitting it is *much* more difficult than stopping … oh, Lortab, among others (no, not a junkie, the chronic pain finally went away & didn’t need the pills anymore)

    much, MUCH more difficult. if you’re looking to get healthier, quit sugar soonest – because every day you’re still using it is X much more work come quitting time.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Kristin says:

      Fabens: I can now have my morning coffee without sugar. It takes about a week to get used to it. It’s a start.

      Liked by 1 person

      • kurt72 says:

        We use local maple syrup instead of sugar. Tastes great! I’m in Maine so there’s lots of places to get it. $50 a gallon. Since the trees are wild it’s organic too.

        Like

        • Jacqueline Taylor Robson says:

          We have a local bee-keeper who gives us the raw rich bounty of her hives! I make my own organic yogurt, and it is just wonderful with a little honey and maybe some fresh figs if my fig tree sees fit to produce. This year looks like a small crop, can’t wait!

          Like

  25. maiingankwe says:

    I will have to think on some low cal recipes. I’m an old fashioned cook preferring to cook most meals from scratch and using real butter and bacon grease for my eggs in the morning etc.

    We do eat a great deal of wild game, which I find to be the best. There aren’t any antibiotics and whatever else they shoot up pigs, cattle and chickens and so forth with.

    Our family eats a great deal of moose meat, which never gets old. I make sure we get a good amount of ground meat, which takes more time, but so worth it. We make them in two and four pound rolls to freeze.

    Everything a person can use ground beef for I use moose meat. Tacos, I use moose meat, casseroles, I use moose meat, spaghetti I use moose and pork. Everything and everything a person uses ground beef can be replaced with ground moose meat.

    We eat a lot of grouse, salmon (only me), use to have pheasant when my Dad would hunt, I love fish, especially Arctic char, which is my favorite. I used to eat a lot of squirrel stew when I was in college and rabbit, but they’re too small and lean where I live now. Plus, it’s hard with a family, not enough to go around.

    Anyways, if you have a hunter in the family use them if you can. I know the state of Alaska allows a hunter to hunt for an Elder or a pregnant lady with a permit. It doesn’t cost anything. I had to call Juneau when I was asking the fish and game, but I finally got my yes answer a day later after they researched it for me and explained what I needed to do. Oops, when I was pregnant and explained I couldn’t go trudging through the woods with the hind end of the moose while pregnant.

    So, if there are any Elder Treepers or pregnant ladies, call your fish and game and see if you can have a hunter hunt for you with a permit. For my state, it just took the hunter and I to go down together and fill out the little bit of paperwork.

    If you are able to cook with moose meat or any other venison you can use the same ratio of hamburger meat to the venison. Sorry I am not much help with the recipe side of this thread, unless of course you’re just looking for regular meals. ๐Ÿ™ƒ
    Be well,
    Ma’iingankwe

    Liked by 6 people

    • Windy Day says:

      We do the same thing with deer meat here in Texas (no mooseses walking around in our part of the world). I have a whole freezer full of ground venison, hams, and backstraps! Yum! I use the ground venison to replace every kind of ground hamburger meat–except for when I occassionally want a real hamburger.

      I know some people will freak out about this, but we also eat wild hog meat. If it isn’t a huge hog, the meat is quite good, and the meat is much leaner than what you get at the store. My husband (the hunter in the family) has killed a few of the big ones, and YUCK! Those are nasty. After I refused to cook or eat them, he decided that he didn’t need to bring every animal home that he shot. Sometimes, though, he has to shoot a big one (to keep it from ripping up somebody’s wheat field or something), and he hates to waste meat, but . . . . UGH . . . . let the buzzards have it!!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • maiingankwe says:

        Wild hog meat sounds so delicious it has my mouth watering. You’re right, when some animals get on in age the meat is nowhere near as tasty or tender.

        I wonder if there are any wildlife refuges in your area, and if they would take hog meat. I have no idea how they do things, so it’s just a late night guess.

        Dang, I love ham and bacon, I can’t get my mind off a good tasty hog, it’s been so long.

        Have an awesome week, and stay smiling,
        Ma’iingankwe

        Like

    • Jacqueline Taylor Robson says:

      Here in N.E.Georgia, we have a lot of deer meat. I use it the same as ground beef, plus we love to BBQ the tenderloin and ribs. I also enjoy making deer jerky. YUM!

      Liked by 1 person

    • “I know the state of Alaska allows a hunter to hunt for an Elder or a pregnant lady with a permit.” Wait…what? People are allowed to hunt old folk and pregnant women???

      I know that can’t be what you meant but when I read it…

      Liked by 1 person

      • maiingankwe says:

        You had me laugh for quite a bit and shake my head for my foolish choice of words. No, we don’t hunt our Elders or pregnant ladies. We hunt for them. Thanks for the good catch and great laugh.

        So sorry. Hope I didn’t scare anybody from visiting our state during hunting season. Who am I kidding, only the snowflakes would fall for that. All of those can stay home please. Unless they’re up for being used as bear bait. I’m all for that.

        Like

  26. millwright says:

    Tis the season, and i do a lot of barbecue of everything from beef to fish to pork to chicken . All ( generally ) on indirect heat from a wood ( usually apple ) wood fire. All are prepared with a dry rub containing various seasonings and herbs and some kosher salt depending upon the meat. The sole exception is a beef rib roast which gets a heavy coating of kosher salt along with the herbs and direct grilling at high temp until a crust is formed. Its then returned to indirect heat . Otherwise I’ve found low and slow is best. I also do oiled/seasoned veggies near 6he end of the cook. And, FWIW, I soak very fresh sweet corn in water for a 1/2 hr or so than put them on a hot grill fire to roast until the husks dry, become translucent and shrink tight to the cob. Shuck and eat as is or add butter and salt per your taste !

    Liked by 2 people

    • maiingankwe says:

      I wrap bacon around our corn on the cob and then you don’t even need butter, but I don’t think it’s very healthy for you. It tastes great though!

      I haven’t mastered BBQ yet, still working on that one, but I do enjoy great BBQ.

      Great ideas, thank you.

      Like

  27. Kathy says:

    RENE’s COLE SLAW — from a Paula Deen cookbook

    Dressing: Combine these ingredients in a small glass bowl, adding salt and pepper to taste. Cover and refrigerate while preparing the vegetables. Just before serving, pour the dressing over the salad ingredients and toss well.
    … 1/2 cup mayonnaise (I recommend Hellman’s)
    … 1 tablespoon sweet pickle relish
    … 1 tablespoon yellow hotdog mustard
    … 1-1/2 to 2 tablespoons honey

    Salad: Place these ingredients in bowl large enough for mixing/tossing:
    … 5 cups shredded cabbage
    … 1-1/2 cups dried cranberries
    … 1/2 cup slivered almonds (toasted if desired)
    … 1/2 diced celery (I prefer sliced wafer thin)
    … 1/2 cup chopped scallions, white and green parts
    … 1/2 cup chopped green bell pepper

    =============================
    Note 1: This is my most-asked-for summer BBQ side dish, and also a must-have for our Thanksgiving turkey dinners. Nutritional information can be found at: http://recipeofhealth.com/recipe/paula-deens-renes-coleslaw-107332rb

    Note 2: I don’t mind shredding 5 cups of cabbage by hand. When doubling or tripling this recipe, however, I often use store-bought pre-shredded cabbage — just not the angel hair cut because it goes limp very quickly after the dressing is added.

    Liked by 2 people

  28. Kathy says:

    CORN, AVOCADO & TOMATO SALAD — by Paula Deen

    Dressing: Whisk these together in a small glass bowl or measuring cup; set aside. Just before serving, pour over salad and toss gently to mix.
    … 2 tablespoons olive oil
    … 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
    … 1/2 teaspoon grated lime zest
    … 1/4 teaspoon salt
    … 1/8 teaspoon pepper
    … 1/4 cup chopped cilantro or regular parsley

    Salad: Place these ingredients in a large glass bowl:
    … 2 cups cooked corn, fresh or frozen*
    … 1 avocado, diced into 1/2-inch pieces
    … 1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes, halved
    … 1/2 cup finely diced red onion

    ==================
    Note 1: This recipe is great for using leftover grilled corn. *Frozen niblets also work — just oven roast them in a single layer until lightly carmelized. If the corn is still warm when added, it will cause the avocado to “melt” somewhat into the salad (a few in our family actually prefer it this way).

    Note 2: Nutritional info can be found at http://recipeofhealth.com/recipe/corn-avocado-and-tomato-salad-paula-deen-522419rb

    Liked by 2 people

  29. I have personally found that the Mediterranean Diet is helping to live healthier. Less processed food. As a vegetarian for 25 years, I also love olives, beans, and garlic.

    Looking forward to new ideas.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. I have personally found that the Mediterranean Diet is helping to live healthier. Less processed food. As a vegetarian for 25 years, I also love olives, beans, and garlic.

    Looking forward to new ideas.

    Liked by 1 person

    • deanbrh says:

      Heirloom Beans from ranchogordo.com are especially tasty so don’t require fattening things like ham or bacon for flavor. We do them the old long way but our son-in-law has great success doing them in a pressure cooker, which seems to be the latest kitchen fad appliance. We use Swanson’s low salt no fat chicken broth, instead of water, and usually buy the smallest white beans,

      Our newest passion for lunch is Clover Organic Small Curd cottage cheese, never the low fat variety only because we would rather eat just a little bit of the original anything than eat alot of the low fat versions that have too much salt and odd fillers. We have a small side of salsa, either Herdez Cassera canned, or Sanchez Roasted from the refrigerator section of the grocery store, OR a pint of cherry tomatoes cut in half and sprinkled with a bit of salt and pepper.

      Tamales from tucsontamales.com are another lunch we have fairly often, 250 calories per each and done in 3 minutes from freezer to microwave. We buy 15 packs at a time and they arrive frozen, 2 to a pack.

      Last, the quickest most satisfying lunch of all, slice an avocado, arrange the very thin slices on a piece of toasted lightly buttered sourdough french bread, top with another slice of toast and press down while you cut the sandwich across to make 2 triangles. Avocados are sooo good for you and it’s a very satisfying lunch. We split one avocado between the two of us.

      Liked by 1 person

  31. Kathy says:

    MEDITERRANEAN CHICKEN SOUP
    (Land-O-Lakes Chicken Cookbook)

    This soup is very low-carb, quick to make, and great for using up leftover chicken (canned chicken also works). Not all our grandkids like black olives so, if they’re visiting, I just add the black olive can liquid to the soup and place the olive slices in a condiment dish on the dinner table. Either way, I make sure at least a little black olive flavoring gets in there.

    Stock: Combine all these ingredients in a Dutch oven:
    … 1/2 cup orange juice
    … 3 (10-1/2 ounce) cans chicken broth
    … 1 (8 ounce) can stewed tomatoes
    … 4 medium carrots, sliced thin (about 2 cups)
    … 2 medium onions, rough chopped (about 1 cup)
    … 1 bulb fresh fennel, trimmed, sliced thin
    … 1/4 teaspoon salt
    … 1/8 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes
    … 1 tsp. dried basil (or 1 tablespoon chopped fresh)
    … 1 tsp. dried thyme (or 1 tablespoon chopped fresh)
    … 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

    Cook on high heat until mixture comes to a full boil (8 to 10 minutes). Reduce heat to medium and cook another 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Then add:
    … 3 cups cubed 1-inch cooked chicken
    … 1 (2-1/4 ounce) can sliced black olives (about 1/2 cup)

    Continue cooking until heated through (2 to 3 minutes). Ladle into individual serving bowls, and sprinkle each serving with parsley.

    Liked by 4 people

  32. aredtailblog says:

    I don’t so much have recipes so much as a specific dietary course.

    Morning (6 or 7 am): two eggs, serving of brown rice

    9 or 10 am snack: two pieces of string cheese. An apple with the snack if you wish

    Lunch: half a pound of either chicken breast or pork loin with a serving of brown rice and boiled cabbage.

    3 or 4 pm: same as mid-morning snack.

    Dinner: same as lunch

    This is actually my workout diet as per the recommendations from my gym (body-building). You can technically eat as many leafy greens per the three main meals as you wish, but the idea is that the majority of your protein comes from animal-based food and the carbs are enough to maintain brain function and keep the caloric count low yet not dangerous. If you shop right, you can get the string cheese at $5 for a 24 pack, and the pork and chicken can be kept under $2 a pound if you keep an eye out on sales or decently priced meat. Get the rice in large, uncooked bags, and prepare meals beforehand. Add spices that are relevant to your tastes/health needs when cooking the rice.

    If you feel like variation: string cheese can be cottage cheese, apples can be a handful of blueberries, and the chicken can be fish (the guide said tilapia was permitted, but tilapia from California is a bit garbage nutrition-wise, these days).

    Following this should keep your monthly budget between $120 – $140. Diet is lactose free and should also be low glycemic even if you choose to add the apple to your cheese snack.

    Like

  33. Plain Jane says:

    I think my comment of about an hour ago landed in the garbage bin.

    Like

  34. RC says:

    There are many different nutritional approaches for various health challenges.

    One place to start is Dr. Peter D’Adamo’s Eat-Right-4-Your-Type and Cook-Right-4-Your Type based on your blood type. For example, Red Meat is great for Os but terrible for As, while Chicken creates heart trouble for Bs and ABs. The D’Adamo cookbook provides appropriate substitutes with classic recipes.

    Those faced with Alzheimer’s / Parkinson’s might check out Dr. Bruce Fife’s Cure-Alzheimer’s-Now ! Dr Fife builds on the discovery of Dr. Mary Newport that the human brain will run beautifully on medium chain triglycerides (rather than conventional glucose) and Coconut Oil is 60% medium chain triglycerides. Morning eggs can be cooked with Coconut Oil, and more of it can be incorporated in mid-morning and afternoon broths, worked into a butter-and-coconut spread for baked potato and so on.

    Celiacs — of which I am one — now have a variety of non-gluten pastas, but the substitute I prefer is open baked, seeded Acorn or Kabocha squash with a little olive oil. These cooked squashes will accept tomato sauce much like wheaten pasta. Since the loss of intestinal villi creates digestion issues, I take a broad spectrum digestive enzyme with meals.

    Cardiologist Dr. Stephen Sinatra is the go-to guru for heart issues and nutrition. A friend of mine, in his 80s, uses a Dr. Sinatra combination of the amino Carnitine + Ribose + Co-enzyme Q 10. His own cardiologist was amazed at the health turn-around in 4 months

    Mother was diagnosed with Malignant Melanoma Stage 4 back in 1982. She went on a 1920s Tuberculosis Diet, known in the US as the Gerson Diet, and her surface tumors were gone in 4 months. The diet involved 13 glasses of fruit and vegetable juice, a little baked fish, vegetable soup, yogurt and such. It took a further 20 months to clear internal cancers and she lived 15 years, dying of a stroke when nearly 85.

    May this information will be of help.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Blue Ridge Mts Va. says:

      I love Dr. Sinatra. His protocol of D-Ribose, CoQ10, L-carnitine, niacinamide, Fish oil, and Magnesium has also helped Lyme disease patients, those who have Fibromyalgia, and Chronic fatigue syndrome. I had to substitute the sublingual precursor NADH instead of niacinamide, and also magnesium malate instead of magnesium oxide.

      Like

    • Menagerie says:

      You should check out MCT oil, which we have in our coffee each morning. I still use coconut oil in cooking, but after recommendation from my son, and a little research I decided to add the MCT oil.

      Originally I was interested because two of my sons were discussing the “energy burst” you get almost immediatly because it goes straight to the liver. My husband and I must be completely old and too out of shape for this benefit, we do not experience that at all, but I read about a lot of people and athletes using it for that reason. After reading up on it though, I decided to use it anyhow for the health benefits. I buy it from a company named Onnit. A bit pricey for a bottle, but if you use a couple spoonfuls a day, as we do, it lasts a very long time.

      Anyhow, MCT vs coconut oil might be something you want to check out. Both have real, but different, health advantages.

      Liked by 1 person

  35. ditzee58 says:

    My recipe is simple and adaptable because I don’t like to cook. Just enough butter- not margarine- to coat the bottom of the skillet. Then add either shrimp or diced chicken and cook til done. For the shrimp, I squeeze a bit of lemon. For the chicken, I add a capful of wine or cooking sherry. If you can have steak, treat yourself every once in a while. Same thing, coat the skillet with butter, sear the steak, and then lower the fire and cook to your taste. I add finely chopped garlic either to the butter to brown or just add it to the top of one seared side and let it cook. My side is usually a salad. I like mine with little to no salad dressing because I can taste the vegetables.

    As most of you know a little bit of the forbidden stuff is okay and it makes a world of difference because those teensy bits which make food delicious are so appreciated by those of us who have to or had to watch our diets. Mine was whenever I was pregnant. My normally low blood pressure would skyrocket and I had to follow a super restricted sodium diet.

    My hint is to ALWAYS eat protein first and chew it slowly. You will feel full much faster than if you eat carbs either first or with your protein.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. It’s better to keep things simple if you’re trying to lose weight – the more you complicate things, the less you will stick to it. Scrap any rec’s from the FDA’s pyramid.. They’re selling what we produce in the US, not what will keep you healthy. Sugar and grains-(not just a gluten prob) cause more probs than people realize. If farmers fatten cows up with it, you can easily get fat on it too.

    Meat and veggies, plus be sure to move (walk at min) rest.(get plenty of sleep), and also take care of your gut (kefir, easy to make). Here’s a biggie: Don’t eat late at night, this is literally a killer. Of course, there can be exceptions, but your habits will add up to something in total, one way or the other. It’s also important to take care of your mind because the body easily follows. Book: “Mood Cure”, by Julia Ross – Diet and Vitamin centric.

    Feeling lazy and don’t want to cook?
    Veggie shakes, ex., 1 cup of Kale, 1 cup of Baby Spinach, 1/2 apple, 1 pinch of ginger, if you like garlic then throw some in, ice and water. There are many good alternatives to cooking meals, that are quick so long as you have the ingredients ready.

    Protein shake: 1 banana, 1 tbsp of natural (low sugar) peanut butter, 1-2 scoops protein powder, ice, and milk. The variations are limitless.

    instead of using pasta for spaghetti, try using spaghetti squash instead. I went from meat and potatoes, sugars and grains only, to incorporating veggies and eliminating sugars and grains – viola, the weight melted off. This is so important that I’ll repeat: Good rest, Don’t eat late at night, stay away from sugar and grains, take care of your gut, and move your butt in some way.

    This is my advice because it is what has worked well for myself. I’m still working on my first cup of coffee, but I’ll think of more recipes later. Good Luck!

    Liked by 9 people

    • I drink the veggie shake but I add one cup of arugula to the kale and spinach. Add 1/4 cup of salt free V8 juice. Tastes very good.
      Good for wash out the gut!

      Liked by 1 person

    • adoubledot says:

      tearjr, I do a similar veggie shake:

      kale (leaves only, no stalks)
      baby spinach (or romaine lettuce)
      1 chopped stalk of celery
      juice of 1 lemon
      1/2 avocado
      a bit of fresh cilantro
      a little sea salt
      1 garlic clove

      Add purified water and blend.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Menagerie says:

      Rather than protein powder, which often has hidden ingredients, and sometimes even sugar, I use hemp seeds for protein, I also add flax seeds to my smoothies. I use, sparingly, honey or maple syrup to sweeten a little. And a good tip for a creamier shake, especially if you want a chocolate shake, is to add just a slice or two of avocado. You won’t really taste it.

      Liked by 2 people

      • adoubledot says:

        But even if you did, they’re delicious – thanks so much for this thread!

        Liked by 1 person

      • We use a company that offers an awesome military discount and doesn’t use fillers. I get good results with whey (weight-lifting), and just recently learned that there might be some digestion issues w/ casein, so the jury is still out for me on that. As a male, I stay far away from any soy based anything, but there’s some science that indicates that soy protein isolate might be a good thing. I think hemp protein is awesome, but I live on a military base so it’s a big no-go, otherwise, I’d definitely be using it daily.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Menagerie says:

      I would also add that when I am eating well, which I’m failing at right now, using a morning smoothie is a real mental tool for me. I try to eat nine servings of fruit and vegetables a day, and since I get lazy and default to things like oranges and blueberries and spinach, I also have a goal of eating five kinds of fruits and vegetables most days.

      So, in the mornings if I make a smoothies with three fruits, usually frozen berries, peaches, and maybe a half frozen too ripe banana, and toss in greens, beets, cooked leftover sweet potatoes, or any other vegetables I can think of, like a little cabbage, I feel I have started my day with a big deposit in the bank, and I am less likely to eat badly or not exercise.

      It’s just a mental trick, but it works for me.

      I also like to add ginger and cinnamon to smoothies, and a spponful or two of real apple cider vinegar, which I always try to use daily. My little nutri bullet, bought over two years ago, is my favorite appliance ever. I have a Vitamix I never bother to use because the little deal is so much easier to use and clean.

      There are great smoothie recipes on Pinterest. I don’t happen to be taste picky on smoothies and can just mix all kinds of stuff and drink it, but you can use recipes and get a really good drink.

      Liked by 5 people

      • I totally understand the vitamix buggaboo, but since I’m making shakes for 5, and the fact that it literally atomizes every thing (lol) it’s what I use. I take curcumin extract (with peperine), so I try to lay off cinammon, although I do take breaks from curcumin, and switch to cinnamon sometimes.

        We tend to start off our day with a green smoothie as well, as it sets the tone for the rest of our day, nutritionally. We’ve gotten to the point, to where we can slam a shake in a matter of seconds, so having something sweet in it to buffer. I try to limit my fructose intake as much as possible, unless it’s post-workout, in which case, bananas do the trick, along with my protein. This isn’t based on scientific post-workout best practices – I just like fruit ๐Ÿ™‚

        Like

      • I’m sorry for the dub post, but I forgot to Thank you for this thread.. It’s fun to take a break from politics for a minute and focus on health. Iron sharpens Iron ๐Ÿ™‚ Thanks, Menagerie!!!

        Liked by 1 person

  37. theresanne says:

    If you like salad but don’t want the extra calories of salad dressing, try adding cole slaw and/or carrot salad on top of your lettuce.

    Lo-Cal Cole Slaw:
    1 head thinly shredded cabbage
    1/4 cup sugar
    1/4 cup olive oil
    1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
    1 cube Chicken flavored Knor
    Mix last 4 ingredients and toss into cabbage.

    Lo-Cal Carrot Salad:
    1 lb carrots, thinly shredded
    1/3 tsp salt
    1/4 cup mayonaise
    1/4 cup milk
    1 can pineapple chunks, drained
    Raisins, optional
    Mix salt, mayo and milk. Add to carrots, toss. Add pineapple chunks.

    Like

  38. A2 says:

    I don’t eat processed food. Only fresh. I suppose excepting condiments. My preferred meals always include tomatoes and olive oil. Every day, without fail. Love them.

    Fresh is best. But going to the market every day, perhaps is not an option for many.

    One of my favourite meals is Hainan chicken rice. I skip the rice but it is essentially poaching a chicken stuffed with spring onion and fresh ginger slowly (at least an hour at a very slow simmer). Then ( not in the past) removing the skin and bones, slicing and served with sauces. Usually spring onion, garlic, ginger chopped with sesame oil; or chili ,soy sauce and ginger, garlic; or freshly made mustard from powder. The poaching broth if skimmed makes a nice soup and you can add veg to it. Nice as a side, is fresh made cucumber pickle ( slice the cukes, salt, drain and add cider vinegar and a tad of sugar).

    I made it two days ago. Filling and fresh and low calorie.

    Another low cal recipe is buying fresh prawns with shell and steaming them. Serve with a soy, ginger , chili and chopped spring onions and garlic fresh sauce. Peel and dip. (we always heat up peanut oil till boiling and pour over the sauces but you may omit.

    We also buy our prawns and fish swimming. Steam the fish with ginger, garlic and spring onion. Yum.

    I could go on and on but my favorite meal is oysters on the half shell and a dry martini.
    Cheers

    Liked by 2 people

    • Bob Thoms says:

      Sounds delicios…prawns themselves shrimp? You don’t devein?

      Like

      • A2 says:

        We call them prawns . No need to de-vien. Just pull the heads off (we used to eat them yummy, but all the toxins are concentrated there). If a vein just pull out with fingers and dip. I think many do not realize how filling they are. Part of this maybe the de-shelling (like eating crabs and lobsters) makes for tiny bites . ๐Ÿ˜€

        Like

    • Hainin chicken Singapore style or Malaysian style they still taste so good. You cas use brown basmati rice if you prefer just cook the rice in chicken broth. Yummy!

      Like

      • A2 says:

        Yes indeed. The broth from the poaching makes for tasty rice and soup. I just am not much of a rice eater. Makes me a bit of a weirdo . I only like it in juk (congee) especially if I am under the weather or have had too many martinis. ๐Ÿ˜€

        Like

      • Menagerie says:

        I just for the first time made a ground chicken dish. Served on Bibb lettuce as roll ups, a P F Changs knock off dish. Just brown the meat, adding finely chopped onion, drain liquids, then add hoisin, sesame, and sweet Thai chili sauces. It was delicious.

        Liked by 1 person

  39. Kristin says:

    One of my all favorites as a snack but also as an appetizer or accompanying veggie: Roasted Brussels sprouts.
    Wash and cut sprouts in two. When salted water is boiling add sprouts for two to three minutes. Drain. Arrange on oven tray, drizzle with olive oil and lemon, pepper and nutmeg and roast till ready ( till edges brown).
    Deliciously addictive and healthy.
    FYI: if you have a Sprouts store like we have here in AZ, they have them ready made in the deli section.

    Liked by 6 people

  40. Blue Ridge Mts Va. says:

    How to make Spicy Sauerkraut
    Two large organic red cabbages
    PInk Himalayan salt
    Organic ginger root
    Organic whole Garlic cloves
    Organic whole cayenne peppers
    Container
    large glass jar as the weight
    large plate
    large tea towel
    a grater

    Sauerkraut is a live-culture โ€œprobioticโ€ food. If you have trouble digesting garlic, fermenting the cloves is an easy way to add garlic to your diet. Grate your cabbage, and ginger root. I use a large container to layer the grated cabbage, ginger root, whole garlic cloves, and cayenne peppers. I grind Pink Himalayan salt and add to each layer. Then I put a plate on top of the layers, and then my glass milk jar (filled with water). I cover the entire thing with a large cotton tea towel. Depending on the room temperature, fermentation may take longer. Keep checking. I usually harvest kraut in a few weeks. If you see any scum during the fermentation process, remove the scum.

    This is a video on making sauerkraut. She makes her a little differently. https://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/fermenting/how-to-make-homemade-sauerkraut-zv0z1403zkon

    Liked by 3 people

    • A2 says:

      I love sauerkraut. But only have the canned stuff which is tasteless.I have been reading how to make it. Need to do this.

      Like

      • PreNanny says:

        Homemade kraut is a whole other world than canned and VERY easy to make.
        A couple of pointers for you:
        Freshest cabbage you can find, if not from own garden try farmers market or ask grocer when do they get cabbage delivered and purchase that day. Freshness = higher water content which creates the brine + salt.
        Hand cut the cabbage it is ok not to have it all uniform in size a chunk here or there is no big deal and can offer different tastes. Think 1/2 sour vs dill pickle.
        Place cut cabbage and mix in salt into a large tub every 20 mins or so get your hands in there grab and squeeze do this for 1 – 2 hours ( 3 to 6 times ). I call this weeping the cabbage, what it does is start the drawing out of the water and creates the brine. I use a topless crock with towel under for the next step which is to compress the cabbage and remove any air pockets. Have found the elongated mallet ( not sure what it is called I use for sausage stuffing is perfect tool for this process ). Take a few handfuls of cabbage place in crock and press press press. I cut the edges off a tupperware lid to fit the top of my crock ( inside not outside ) and place a qt mason jar with water on top of that ( you want the brine to be above the highest layer of cabbage at all times ). Wet a dish towel and drape over. Within 24 hours you will start seeing bubbling that means it is fermenting!
        Every morning I remove the towel, press down on mason jar, wet it again and place on top.
        When bubbles stop I call it DONE 7 – 10 days usually. Can put in zip bags and frozen or placed in fridge and consumed.
        Start with cabbage and salt for first batch can get more fancy with future batches once you get process down.
        it is def MAGA food

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sandoor Katz has a ton of youtube vids on various methods for fermenting foods.
        http://www.wildfermentation.com/

        Like

  41. Donna in Oregon says:

    Nice summer treat for those with diabetes (no sugar) or just because it’s healthy:

    Chocolate Pops

    RECIPE INGREDIENTS

    1 (8 ounce) container plain nonfat yogurt
    1/4 cup sugar-free cocoa mix
    1/4 cup No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated. Like Splenda
    4 frozen treat sticks

    Instructions

    Mix all ingredients in a small mixing bowl. Spoon mixture into four, 3 ounce paper cups. Set cups in a muffin pan or on a flat plate. Place frozen treat sticks in the center. Freeze about 3 hours or until solid.

    Peel paper cups away from frozen treats before serving.

    50 calories each. Takes about 4-5 minutes to make.

    Like

    • Kathy says:

      Frozen banana pops are always on hand for our grandkids. Mashed ripe banana, 1 cup plain yogurt, splash of vanilla, and a few mini chocolate chips. We use wooden craft sticks with notches for the “handles”, and store in Ziplock freezer bags once they’re completely frozen. The sugar-free cocoa mix sounds perfect for a mashed strawberries version — thanks for the idea, Donna!

      Like

  42. dpeeze says:

    My partner and I have for some time avoided beef and pork in our diet. As of last week, chicken and turkey are out too. Not so much nutritional as our increasing awareness of animal welfare. We now are choosing fish, cheese, and legumes as our protein sources. Sam’s Club has a good selection of frozen fish, especially Salmon and Mahi Mahi burgers. With a meat thermometer at 165 degrees, they’re done and delicious

    Like

  43. Lburg says:

    Yes. I know it sounds gross. But it is surprisingly tasty, healthy-ish and so quick to make. I
    (recipe from: http://www.howsweeteats.com/2013/02/chocolate-avocado-pudding-yep-its-a-thing/)

    Chocolate Avocado Pudding
    Yield: serves 2-4

    Ingredients:
    4 ripe avocados
    1/4 cup light coconut milk
    4 tablespoons unsweetened dark cocoa powder
    3 tablespoons honey
    2 ounces of dark chocolate (72% or higher), melted
    2 teaspoons vanilla extract
    1/8 teaspoon salt

    for topping: whipped cream, coconut whipped cream, sprinkles, cocoa nibs

    Remove avocados from the skin (and pit) and place in a food processor. Blend until combined and creamy. Add in all remaining ingredients, blending until pureed, scraping down the sides when needed to combine. Taste and season/sweetened additionally if desired. Blend for a good 1-2 minutes until completely creamy, then serve with desired toppings.

    Liked by 4 people

  44. Blue Ridge Mts Va says:

    How to Make Kefir

    Obtain some grains (they look like sea coral in a clump).
    The grains are used over and over. They will grow. I have frozen my excess grains.
    You can order kefir grains from Cultures for Health, or get your friends to share some grains
    Take about 1 tsp of grains and add to a glass jar filled with local milk. Don’t use ultra pasteurized milk.
    Transfer the active kefir grains into up to 4 cups of fresh milk.
    Cover with a coffee filter or butter muslin secured by a rubber band or jar ring.
    Place in a warm spot, 68ยฐ-85ยฐF, to culture.
    Culture until milk is slightly thickened and aroma is pleasant.
    This is a video about making Kefir.
    This is so much easier than fixing yogurt.

    Liked by 1 person

  45. georgiafl says:

    When eating healthy and losing weight, I like the Dr. Phil, Weight Watchers and Diabetic diets. These are sensible, balanced, not extreme, based on research.

    When filling your dinner plate, mentally divide it in equal quarters. (Dr. Phil doesn’t say this, but it’s like making the Sign of the Cross over your plate.)

    1/4 of your plate should be protein (a portion of meat, fish or chicken portion is the thickness and size of the palm of your hand).

    The second 1/4 of your plate can be starch – potato, bread, rice or pasta – approximately 1/2 cup).

    The remaining 1/2 of your plate should be non-starchy vegetables and/or salad with lettuce, spinach, tomato, cucumber, carrot, etc. (1 cup each).
    Note: Pasta salad and that jello and cool whip stuff with canned fruit cocktail and marshmallows are not salads.

    This method is very helpful when going through a buffet or a potluck line at church. If you are at a restaurant, ask for a take home container to save any excess portions for dinner or lunch the next day)

    Also to regain or maintain health – we must incorporate Exercise into our life – Exercise is an anti-oxidant and helps maintain/restore all our systems. Walking and cycling indoors and out, gentle stretching, light weights and deep breathing are safest for seniors. Walk and lift light weights for upper body strength – 30 minutes to an hour – 5 days per week. Get up and walk 5 minutes every hour instead of sitting long periods of time will help prevent strokes and varicose veins.

    Liked by 2 people

  46. bitterlyclinging says:

    Take an entire boneless pork loin, soak it in a brown sugar, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder solution, at least overnight, preferably for a day or so, remove from solution, pat dry, let sit for an hour, slice longitudinally, fill the inside with plentiful bacon, then close, string tie the loin in as round a shape as possible, apply a generous brown sugar, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder, mustard powder, Adobo rub. Preheat grill to at least 400 degrees, toss loin onto grill, turning every 4 minutes until surface is grill marked, turn all burners off except primary burner with wet wood chips in tray over it, move loin off to the side, but reasonably close to primary burner, 200-300 degrees. Two and a half hours more or less till internal temp at least 140 degrees. MMM-MMM good.

    Like

  47. adoubledot says:

    Another thread a couple days ago recommended cauliflower mashed potatoes. Here’s my recipe:

    1 head of cauliflower florets
    1 bunch of scallions, separate greens and onions and finely chop the greens. Set aside about 1/4 of the greens for garnishing.
    1 clove of garlic (optional)
    1 tsp Dijon mustard
    1 Tbsp vinegar
    1 cup homemade mayonnaise (recipe below)
    1/4 tsp salt
    fresh ground pepper

    Steam the cauliflower florets with the white halves of the scallions and garlic (10-15 minutes)
    Put the steamed mixture in a blender (love my Ninja!)
    Add the mustard, vinegar, mayonnaise, scallion greens, salt & pepper
    Blend until smooth and garnish with remaining scallion greens

    Mayonnaise
    1 Tbsp Dijon mustard
    1 Tbsp vinegar
    1 Tbsp lemon juice
    1 egg (room temperature ideal, but doesn’t have to be)
    1/4 tsp salt
    1 cup avocado oil (or any other healthy oil like olive or grape seed)

    Mix all ingredients in a cylindrical container. Immerse a hand blender to the bottom and blend until the mix is fully emulsified (5-10 minutes). Tilt and move the blender around at different angles to get all of the oil involved. Use within 2 weeks.

    Liked by 1 person

  48. GrouchonotKarl says:

    “Forks Over Knives” helped us move from animal based diet to plant based. The stats don’t lie, yes they can be manipulated however feeling healthier, sleeping better, losing a few lbs is herein confirmed measureables.

    Liked by 1 person

  49. julegate says:

    This is not a recipe however this has helped me battle an adrenal gland issue. Please go to Mother Earth Minerals purchase their book Wellness Secrets of Life. ($20.00$”). Their premise is all disease is caused by vitamin and mineral deficiency. This is exactly how my Doctor started off my treatment, massive doses of Vitamin C and D.

    I don’t have a recipe as I had to change what I ate: all organic meat. As much organic veggies. To drink water, water and more water. Good water ( I bought a water purifier.) No fast foods. Green tea instead of coffee.

    I cannot stress enough how the book helped me. I had a good working knowledge of how vitamins and minerals are used in the body. It was and still is a journey.

    Liked by 1 person

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