Dramatic Video: Dozens Feared Dead – Boat Carrying 150 Tourists Sinks In Colombia

Details Sketchy – Dramatic video captures the moment when a boat carrying approximately 150 tourists sunk in Colombia resulting in dozens dead, according to most recent media reporting.

The vessel was in the Penol reservoir when it went down, near the tourist town of Guatape, approximately 28 miles east of the capital Medellin. At least 25 people are feared to have died after passengers failed to put on their life vests, according to witnesses.

According to The Daily Mail police have so far confirmed three fatalities with 30 people still missing.  In the video tourists can be seen scrambling to get to upper decks in a bid to stay above the surface level as the boat plunges into the water.

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93 Responses to Dramatic Video: Dozens Feared Dead – Boat Carrying 150 Tourists Sinks In Colombia

  1. Daniel says:

    This is unbelievable in so many ways. As I see recreational boaters skipping by not attempting to help anyone at all? It might be useful to contextualize what we’re seeing by understanding something about the construction of these vessels. I presume these are platforms riding on pontoons or perhaps multiple keels?

    That abrupt collapse in the scene was the most frightening of all.

    The failure to wear life vests… that’s the extreme arrogance of it all.

    If we are to look for proof of our divine origins, then we need look no further than our inability and our unsuitability to live in the natural world. Animals have ways of surviving their environments. There are scarce if any natural environments where humans can live without a LOT of human inventions. And without them, born straight from a loving mother, we will all be dead in a short while.

    Sure, we live within animal bodies made of the same stuff. But are we really suitable to our environments? Natural selection dictates that we should be adapted to nature and yet we are not — far from it. I know there are plenty of arguments which would claim we’ve evolved to rely on our intelligence alone but I’m not sure that’s quite enough to explain us.

    I know I just went off on an unrelated tangent, but what I see is human hubris among other things as failure to take their own lives seriously as they did? It just seems to further from God people become, the worse things become.

    Liked by 12 people

    • This is al about safety. The arrogance of those who did not use mandatory life vests, thinking of them as an annoyance. “It wil never occur to me” While working at the docks I have been realizing that just one single, insignificant detail can unleash tragedy. Those pesky safety rules can realy save you someday.

      Liked by 4 people

      • auscitizenmom says:

        My son was the rescue diver on a Navy ship out at sea. They were doing some sort of training with sailors in the water. He actually had to go in to save one because the guy hadn’t secured his life vest correctly, it got wrapped around his neck and he started drowning. Sometimes people just aren’t careful.

        Liked by 10 people

        • G. Combs says:

          Common sense just isn’t common at all.

          You should see how ordinary people act around horses!

          Horses rank in the top 20 most lethal animals killing 20 people each year in the US. A study at a hospital in Sweden showed “Dogs caused nearly one-half of the injuries, while horses caused one-third of the injuries and the highest number of fractures.”

          Ask any serious horsemen and they know of someone who has been seriously hurt or killed and everyone of us eventually gets stepped on, bitten, kicked as well as bucked off.

          Unfortunately you can NOT get the fools in the ordinary public to obey such simple safety rules as
          1. DON’T walk behind the horse. They can kick.
          2. DON’T pat them on the nose, it contains LARGE teeth that can bite a finger off. (Corollary: NEVER feed a strange horse.)
          3. DON’T run up to a horse, you can scare him causing him to rear and he may strike at you. A front hoof to the head can easily kill especially if shod with iron shoes.

          No matter how many times you tell some people these simple safety rules, they will continually ignore you and them, but they are darn quick to sue if their idiocy causes them injury.

          To tell you the truth, I am amazed more people do not earn Darwin Awards. Especially on the Left Coasts since they have been trained to ignore instructions as well as logic, reason and reality.

          Darwin Awards: Chlorinating The Gene Pool.

          Liked by 7 people

          • auscitizenmom says:

            I absolutely love horses, but I am a little afraid of them for all the reasons you listed.

            Liked by 6 people

            • G. Combs says:

              I have been around horses for 60 years now and I still am ‘a little afraid of them’ that is Irespect them. It is the ‘old friends’ you are careless around that are the most dangerous.

              Liked by 1 person

            • Mikayla825 says:

              Me too. I have a memory of childhood and I don’t know if I’m even remembering everything correctly. When I was about four years old my mom, grandmother and I were feeding carrots to horses in the field behind where we lived. I got “nipped” by a horse, she merely got my shirt but I have had a healthy respect for both ends of a horse ever since.

              Liked by 2 people

              • auscitizenmom says:

                I had a friend who was bitten at the top of her breast. She reached up to pet him or something and didn’t know he had a painful absess somewhere and he bit her. He bit all the way through the muscle and didn’t let go until she fainted. She has two horrible scars to prove it.

                Like

          • Sharon says:

            A couple of weeks ago, it was my privilege to “meet” the two old buddies, brother horses around age 25, which belong to a friend. It made sense to me to ask her before I reached out to the one which approached the fence where we were standing – ask if it would be all right if I did some cheek-scratching. It was, and I think both the horse and I were happy with the outcome. I would no more approach or touch a horse that doesn’t know me than I would quickly handle a dog I don’t know/that doesn’t know me.

            Like someone said above – common sense is not at all common. Used to be. Not now.

            Liked by 8 people

          • annieoakley says:

            Horses are dangerous if people are too comfortable around them.

            Liked by 1 person

          • saveedra says:

            Spot on. I am a horse rider myself and know first hand how ignorant many are to horses. A stranger does not go up to a 800-1200+ lb horse and get in the horse’s space. A person needs to be horse educated before going near them. This applies to many animals too.

            Liked by 2 people

          • dayallaxeded says:

            Rule 1: I was about 7. A school friend got a gelding and invited a bunch of kids over to ride and do the usual kid stuff. Despite repeated admonitions not to go behind the horse, the new “owner” just had to tempt fate. I’ll never forget the perfect horseshoe print on his white t-shirt after the horse administered his discipline and launched him about 20 feet (you could even see the nail holes distinctly). And that sound–a very special kind of THUMP! Remarkably, he wasn’t seriously injured.

            Liked by 1 person

        • snailmailtrucker says:

          Tell your Boy….we Love him !

          Liked by 3 people

    • No, baby, the human race has not evolved. It has devolved. In the beginning God made mad perfect. Like Jesus the we could still walk on water.

      Like

    • dayallaxeded says:

      The worst thing that anyone could do during this incident was for a bunch of untrained, ill-equipped recreational boaters to “hurry” to the sinking vessel to “help.” I’d wager that at least a few, if not most of the deaths and injuries resulted from contact with (i.e., getting run over or otherwise struck) or attempts to jump onto well-intentioned but ill-advised recreational vessels. The key to survival in such a situation is not to panic, find something that floats (preferably a life vest), and get away from the sinking vessel. It’s not like they’re in the freezing north Atlantic or massive storm waves. Anyone who could even tread water or dog paddle, should’ve been able to survive this incident. Very very sad situation! Prayers up for God’s blessings, mercy, and guidance to all involved.

      Like

  2. H.R. says:

    Accident or terror? Either way, it is a sad moment given there were quite a few fatalities.

    On the bright side, it was good to see plenty of boats coming to pick up people. Even a jet ski came in to try to get a person or two.

    Liked by 5 people

  3. annieoakley says:

    I believe we can rule out bad weather/climate change. Was the boat way over loaded?

    Liked by 6 people

    • Looks like it is.

      Liked by 2 people

    • maiingankwe says:

      Cruise ships use these kind of local boats all of the time. When our family went on one I made sure to sit right by the life vests. They don’t hand them out to the travelers, but they will point out where they are in their safety speech. I remember asking where the children vests were and if they had them. Sure, they said, mixed in with the adults. I was not a happy camper no matter how great their record was. Anything can happen at any time. I just know after that I always made sure our family sat as close to the vests as possible, and even then I didn’t feel safe. I kept wondering if we would be safer on top where we could jump and swim or safer by being in reach of a vest.

      A lot of people here are blaming the passengers when we really don’t know if the lifevests were stored like I had explained or were offered as they boarded. I would hope from now on they would make sure all of the passengers wore them, however, different countries have different laws, and I doubt this would become a major concern in their legislation.

      I am ever so sorry this happened, my heart and prayers go to all the families and friends grieving from this. It is really sad.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Joe S says:

    With not having the ability to know the entire incident/story, it is hard to say what could have been done better, except the life jackets, like suggested here, are PRIORITY one.

    Hearing hundreds of various levels of distress calls during a lifetime of boating, one of the first things our US Coast Guard says to the captain (with things like what is your position?) or caller is almost always, “be advised, all passengers are ordered to put life vests on.”

    There is absolutely no reason for a single freaking drowning or loss of life for anything other than a heart attack, etc. in calm and still water like this, unless of course there was some kind of collision or something which caused the deaths and vessel sinking.

    Frankly, all schools should teach swimming or at least teach people how to tread water. There is absolutely no reason to drown in calm water. When I was in Sea Scouts, we would have MOB drills, and practice putting on type I life vests and the proper technique for jumping overboard with the old “cork” stile vests at the WMCA.

    Such a waste!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Joe S says:

      I meant “YMCA.”

      This must be a spectacular failure of the captain/crew to get the passengers in life vests. How fast did this thing sink? Or did they not have enough life vests?

      Liked by 3 people

    • MfM says:

      One of the major reasons that Sully’s excellent landing job didn’t go to waste was the ferry boats quick response.

      The do rescue drills like you talked about and could work as a team to rescue people. They were throwing life jackets and pulling people on board. They were geared for boat rescue but transferred their knowledge to the plane.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Joe S says:

        Yes.

        Those crews from the Hudson River crossing line passenger ships showed what good MOB and abandon ship rescue training procedures looks like.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Ken says:

      It’s just like people in the Navy that can’t swim.

      Liked by 1 person

    • dayallaxeded says:

      As one local swim instructor says, “Swimming is the one sport that will actually save your life.” Really doesn’t get much clearer than that.

      Like

  5. wheatietoo says:

    With so many boats rushing to the rescue, it’s hard to imagine that anyone would drown.

    But I guess it was a bit chaotic as the boat went down…and perhaps a few went under unnoticed.
    Such a shame.

    Liked by 2 people

    • NvMtnOldman says:

      How many of the dead were run over by all of the boats going in a frenzy?

      Liked by 2 people

      • M. Mueller says:

        Oldman, that occurred to me also. I don’t know much about boat accidents, but I can imagine falling off and having a boat and propeller go over me as I tried to surface.

        Liked by 2 people

        • livlovely101 says:

          Getting sucked under the boat or knocked out when falling are two other factors that could add to the death toll.

          Like

    • Katherine McCoun says:

      I don’t get why more didn’t jump off to waiting boats. Many around to rescue and yet people remained with the boat. Puzzling. I guess some people don’t learn basic floating, treading water &/or dog paddle but surely that many couldn’t all not known how to swim. Why didn’t they jump to waiting rescuers?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Janie M. says:

        Katherine, before I reported to boot camp at Parris Island, I was provided with a list of items to bring with me. Can’t recall what was on that list now (too many years have passed) but I remember one of the items was a swim suit. I thought great, we get to go swimming.

        About 3 weeks into boot camp, we were taken to an indoor swimming pool. In addition to our swim suits, we were wearing utility shirts (short sleeve, w/buttons, cotton shirt – actually a Navy uniform item), over our swim suits. A group of us were instructed to jump, feet first, into the pool, walk towards the deep end, where we then had to tread water.

        We were instructed to remove our shirts, making sure all of it was wet. Then, put it behind us and holding the left and right side of the shirt in our corresponding hands (so it would be spread out); we had to quickly bring it over our heads, so it would trap air. Once it was in front of us, we quickly gathered the fabric together and it was like a large blue bubble – a flotation device. Very clever. Don’t think I’ll ever find the necessity to use this method… but I’ve never forgotten it.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Mikayla825 says:

          Janie, as a child of a Marine Corps D.I. your post made me smile. I have heard enough of dad’s stories to get a chuckle when I read “we *get* to go swimming*.
          Thank you.

          Liked by 4 people

          • Janie M. says:

            Mikayla, if your dad was a DI at PI back in Feb. 1970, he very well could have been my classroom (military history, etc) instructor and actual drill instructor (marching, etc.). Oh… and he presided over us when we went into the gas chamber. He was much nicer than the female DI (Gunny) we encountered on a daily basis. She often yelled and informed us her 2 German Shepherds were smarter than we were. All good, I survived. 😉

            Liked by 2 people

            • Mikayla825 says:

              Wow! That sounds just like my dad 😉 but alas we were on the wrong side of the country. He was a DI at MCRD San Diego in Feb 1970 having returned from Viet Nam the year before (2nd tour)
              This is really bringing back fond memories, again, Thank you.

              Liked by 1 person

              • Janie M. says:

                God bless your dad for making it through those 2 tours, Mikayla. I was sent to Camp Lejeune for school after PI and transferred to my permanent duty station, Camp Pendleton, in the fall or winter of ’70. Enjoyed being in CA, many happy memories – even served on a ceremonial detail in April, 1971 for President Nixon when he visited Camp Pendleton to welcome back the 1st Division Marines from Vietnam. Interesting times.

                Liked by 1 person

        • dayallaxeded says:

          Never heard of that with a shirt before, but long pants make pretty good “water wings” if you can keep yourself going long enough to get ’em off, tie the legs and fill ’em with air. Honestly, if you know how to float and tread water properly, it’s so easy and low energy, even if you’re not in great shape, you could do it for several hours, if the water conditions aren’t too bad. That’s what makes the casualties of this event so very sad on so many levels.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Janie M. says:

            I was shocked to find it worked, dayallaxeded. You’re correct, if you can’t tread water for an extended period, floating on your back for a while, to save energy, works. Panic is your worst enemy.

            Liked by 2 people

  6. fleporeblog says:

    I am having a difficult time comprehending how so many people may have died with so many vessels near by. The only conclusion I can come to is that folks did a lot of drinking on that boat. Probably rum. The sun was out so the temperature must have been close to 100+ degrees since Columbia is near the equator. That makes alcohol consumption even stronger on the human body. Also many may not know how to swim.

    Like

    • G. Combs says:

      If you do not know how to swim or do not swim well put on your darn VEST! — ESPECIALLY if you are planning to drink.

      I hate wearing one but I always wore one when out on the water. Had that drilled into me before I went to kindergarten.

      That said, panic, chaos and people getting injured is a likely addition to the problem of no life jackets.

      Liked by 2 people

      • fuzzi says:

        Even if someone could swim in this situation, a panicked person could have pushed them both under and to their deaths. It’s happened before.

        I live in NC, and we’ve had several rip tide deaths already this year, mainly due to people ignoring the “don’t go in the water” warnings, but having a floatation item might have prevented these deaths. One young man died trying to help others. A fire/rescue personnel interviewed said even a pool “noodle” can save you, don’t try to help anyone in distress without taking a floating device.

        Like

      • maiingankwe says:

        The boats I’ve been on that are similar to this one had all of their vests in one box in the front. They didn’t have them scatterered around like I would’ve thought. It’s not like they took up any space since they were in a container under the seats.

        I could never figure out how they would make sure everyone got one if something like this happened. There are far too many people thrown in like sardines. I remember counting 48 of us and that was just in the front bottom half of the boat. There were far more people behind us, which was further away from the vests, and I have no idea how many were on the top deck.

        This really breaks my heart since I truly believe lives could’ve been saved if done and prepared differently. I know I wasn’t there and I do not know where the vests were stored or how they attempted to get the vests to the people. I am only going on what I remember from my experiences. My heart is just really sad this happened.

        Like

    • That’s the first thing I thought as well… that might also explain the lack of attempting to do much of anything for so long. I can’t imagine that many people sober not “freaking” out and jumping into more action, for better or worse.

      It’s all a bit odd to me, what a would a boat that could go down so easily be doing in service of tourists?

      Liked by 1 person

    • lacy says:

      I read the full article, it said most of the deaths were people on the bottom floor which went under fairly quickly and trapped people inside.

      Liked by 2 people

      • dayallaxeded says:

        Ah, that explains a lot–also suggests a fairly massive hull breach–boat must’ve been in pretty god-awful condition. Past time for Columbia Coast Guard to get serious with inspections.

        Like

  7. lisaginnz says:

    Geeebus… I would be so donning a life vest (if one was available) and GETTING OFF THE BOAT. … yikes…. swim to nearby helping boat…. scary video

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Garavaglia says:

    How do we know there were enough lifevests for everyone? We don’t. Do people walk around on cruise ships constantly wearing vests? No. Cut these people some slack. We all do dangerous things every day. These poor people were involved in a tragedy…nothing more..nothing less.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Killdozer says:

    https://youtu.be/Q3_l2o4BLw0 ,These people are all stupid because you dont work water crafts like that it`s a science I should know because I’m from Bangor Maine and run with a real crew of water people , The Kenduskeag 13 ,we are the craftsmen of the sea as you can see from my link and we are feared not like these clowns

    Liked by 2 people

  10. MOA says:

    Another triumph of Latin American commercial boat survey is the actual cause of the deaths.

    Like

  11. Scotty19541 says:

    I’m afraid I have to respectfully disagree with our superb host Sundance here. We do actually have all we need to survive our environment it is just that we have mostly become spoiled and complacent. We do not NEED electricity, automobiles, i-phones, computers, grocery stores or any of the modern gadgetry we have all become so used to. Mankind survived for thousands and thousands of years WITHOUT any of them! I was taught at a very young age how to hunt and build shelter and basically survive. When young I would spend (when not in school) every waking hour out in the woods with my neighborhood friends and we all knew the basics. It is so very sad that what I consider essential knowledge is scorned and ignored by ‘modern’ people.

    Liked by 3 people

  12. Texian says:

    Uhh.. jump in the water and swim to shore? Maybe just swim to one of the other boats, or to the guy on the jet ski? Incredible.. Tourists, if you can’t swim – don’t go on the water.

    Even this product probably wouldn’t have saved those Darwin award winners.. For the rest of you, if you go on a boat get one of these, it’s cheap insurance (if you are smart enough to learn how to use it). Give yourself a fighting chance. Clip it to your belt or bunk. Available online or at your better dive shops.

    Liked by 4 people

  13. scott467 says:

    Oh, man….

    Riding a tourist boat off the cost of Colombia was going to be part of my summer vacation, along with hiking in the mountains of Afghanistan, a bicycle tour of the Syrian countryside, a cultural exchange program with Boko-Haram and handing out Bibles in North Korea.

    I guess maybe I should rethink the tourist boat thing…

    .

    Liked by 10 people

  14. Honest Abbey says:

    This reminds me of a similar “Tourist Boat” accident that happened a couple of years ago on Lake George in upstate New York. It’s horrifying.

    On a side note, I found the music in this video to be inappropriate. It was loud & obnoxious and sounded more like a promotional score for a celebration, rather than something somber that would reflect the magnitude of this tragedy.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Some people are pretty terrible when it comes to their backing audio on videos, I too found this to be likely the worst selection I have ever heard… Wow.

      You nailed it with the sort of promotional score for an event of some kind, not a tragedy.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Bakokitty says:

    Having enjoyed water sking/boating on very large lakes( Lake Mead, Lake Powell,and others)for 25years I never understand how anyone who gets on boat without a life jacket when they don’t know how to swim. Worse yet and do this under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Responsible boat owner don’t let them aboard, or insist they wear a life jacket.
    It seems the majority of death involve those two primary factors. The main factor is dangerous operation of the boat.
    We humans seem to love over estimating our skills,luck, and sadly we often pay for it the hard way.
    The other dumb one is going in a fast river with poor or no swiming skill, and even those who have strongs skill sometimes over estimate the their skill vs the situation.
    Prayers for those died.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. dutzie60 says:

    I watched this video in absolute amazement that people weren’t jumping, diving off that boat. Okay, maybe some couldn’t swim but All? The water would have to be infested with circling sharks to keep me on that thing. I might not be able to make it to shore but I sure can tread water.
    What a tragedy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Katherine McCoun says:

      Sorry, didn’t see this comment when I posted almost the same thing above. I will be more careful about redundant postings. Don’t want to sound like the reporters at the press conferences! haha

      Liked by 2 people

  17. Bakokitty says:

    Here is a rescue of a ten year old on the Kern River this past month. Even with a rafting company is can be dangerous when the water is above historic levels and flow. Hope it is ok to share, it points out even parents unwittingly place their kid in harms way. The river is 11x faster, and at historic high depths. Over time, The Kern River has claimed over 280 deaths so far.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Mikayla825 says:

      I lived in Bakersfield twenty-five or so years ago, it seemed like every summer at least 2 or 3 people (mostly from out of the area) drowned in the Kern River. Sad.

      Liked by 1 person

    • dayallaxeded says:

      Got flipped in the wink of an eye on one of these on the Chiriqui Viejo in Panama in July (rainy or as marketers like to call it “green” season, so river much higher than usual–several Category III-IV stretches) a few years back. Not to minimize what’s in the video, but we saw much larger, more abrupt “features” and rocks. Of the 5 of us in our boat, all got thrown out at least once, then, at one point, everyone and everything went under, including my son. Fortunately, our guide was great (“Tini” sounds like “Teeny”–he’s worked with Chiriqui River and Boquete Mountain rafting companies, so ask around if you want him for your guide) and immediately grabbed my son and the raft, pulling him to the surface and shortly righting the raft.

      I found myself under one of the other rafts in our party and discovered the crotch strap on the life vest wasn’t tight enough, b/c it floated up over my face and made it difficult to swim. I hadn’t been able to catch a breath before getting flipped, so I was working on residual air. Managed to scratch my way to the side of the raft and got a hand up to let them know I was there and they pulled me in. Then started paddling like crazy to help my son and the guide, stranded across the river. Two other riders, a 40ish couple, had similar experiences–woman got a little banged up on rocks and thought she’d lost her man for a few minutes–don’t think they were as appreciative of the adventure aspect as my son and I were. No doubt angels were helping us. Great experience, though seriously frightening at that moment.

      In short, respecting white water rafting and pretty much any activity on water–wear a life vest properly sized and adjusted to fit tightly and stay there–test it with a dip under water, while it’s safe, if you can. Don’t think that your awesome youthful swimming ability is still with you, despite 20 years of desk riding. Vet your guide as best you can through local contacts (we got the recommendation through both online reviews and two third-party local references). Pray without ceasing!

      Liked by 1 person

  18. keeler says:

    Drowning is the number one cause of death in national parks, causing nearly twice as many deaths as the second and third leading causes (vehicle accidents, falls) combined.

    Often victims can swim, but overestimate their ability and underestimate environmental factors such as water temperature, current, and wind. Few people realize that the survival rate for swimming to shore from 100 yards out in cold water is low; strong swimmers have died after swimming less than 100 feet in 40F water.

    Always wear a PFD. Water immersion can result in shock or physical injury that may make swimming impossible. Furthermore, hypothermia is a long-term process. Hypothermia makes swimming impossible long before it kills; PFDs extend the rescue window from minutes to hours.

    As to how so many people drowned with so many vessels nearby, a couple observations.

    1) It’s hard to tell to what degree the video is sped up, but the boat appears to have sunk quickly. Victims may been trapped below or been pulled under by the sinking vessel.

    2) Many vessels, many victims. That makes it difficult and dangerous to rush in without causing additional accidents, unless there is some coordination beforehand. You don’t want to crash into another vessel, turning your own passengers into victims, or run over victims already in the water.

    3) There may have been little to no ability to coordinate a rescue, and in any event such coordination may have taken several minutes.

    From what the video shows it appears there was no time for coordination. I see small, fast vessels such as jet-skis attempting to rescue individuals first, then medium sized vessels coming in, and finally the slower, same sized vessels approaching last. By the time the medium vessels reach the scene, the sinking vessel is already under water. Too late.

    4) Initially we see the vessel listing hard to starboard, then rocking side to side, and ultimately settling flat. This may have deterred the small vessel operators from approaching at first, as there was an apparent risk of the boat tipping over on them.

    5) It’s pretty difficult to pull a victim out of the water, even in a small vessel, and particularly if the victim is panicking. It’s likely none of the vessels responding had either the crew training or the equipment to deal with a mass rescue operation.

    As sprinklers are to fires, life jackets are to water. Don’t spend time in a building without sprinklers, and don’t spend time in a boat, canoe, or kayak without a PFD. And wear a brightly colored, highly visible one (orange, yellow, red) that isn’t the color of water (blue, black, green, purple), and isn’t going to blend into the environment.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Bakokitty says:

      You make excellent points, particularly about swimming even 100 yards in cold water.
      I learned to love and swim early as I lived on an island in my grandmothers house, the water was just steps away. But later at age 10, in order to spend more time in the pool at park I signed up for more advanced swimming skills. Later at age 14, I went camping to June Lake with my friend’s family. June Lake is in the Ca. Mountains, elevation over 7600 ft.
      I made an error in trying to swim across the small lake, the water warm then cold then warm spots. To my shock I got a full right side body cramp, I couldn’t swim, I start to feel scared thinking in this black they won’t find my body.( girls can be s bit dramatic) it was no joke. My friend swimming with wanted to help, but I felt it didn’t help. But what I did remember that saved me was what the RedCross swim instuctor had told us to do if that happened.
      You take a breath, hug both knees, and just float in a ball until you need air, then bring your arms up and push down it will bring your head up for ar, then hug knees and repeat. You can float just under the surface for hours or until the cramp goes away. It worked, but I learned a valuable lesson. Do not over estimate yourself. By then a canoe arrived and I greatfully accept a tow back to shore,I was tired.
      Even strong swimmers make mistakes.
      I first learned to swim in the ocean, and loved it but, I had a couple rogue wave smack around a few times and my peace relaxation on raft, wayout past the waves was stolen by that horrible movie Jaws…lol I never went way out there again without looking over my shoulder.

      Liked by 3 people

  19. Texian says:

    I have lots of sea stories..

    When I was a teenager vacationing in Panama City Beach FL. I got a wild hair and decided to swim across St. Andrews Channel to Shell Island just for fun. Jumped in around eight that morning at the State Park.. made it to the island.. I was exhausted to say the least. But, I was just half way.. I had to get back now. I rested for about an hour or so, then jumped in. In the middle of the channel, the tide is going out, oh great.. I’m gonna be swept out to sea for a really long swim. I took my bearings, and adjusted my angle and speed. The tide carried me out past the jetties, and I rode the outflow curl around the jetties that then swept parallel to the beach. I then started swimming back to the beach and ended up about a mile away from the hotel I was staying at on the “Miracle Mile.” It was around six in the evening when I made land.

    Don’t try this.. I visited PCB a few more times.. but never did that again..

    Liked by 4 people

  20. H.R. says:

    I thought it odd how the boat didn’t capsize with all the people on the top deck. It appeared that the boat filled from the bottom up, as if there were an opening in the bottom of the hull. If there was an opening in the bottom of the hull, how did it get there?

    Liked by 1 person

  21. blazingnash says:

    Not sure how this pertains to anything, but I bet it was muh Russians fault, covfefe and maga and Trump etc. And anyway. Bush.

    Like

  22. Beverly says:

    It’s amazing to see that no one knew what to do. The captains of the other excursion vessels took forever to approach, and all the waterbugs/little craft and jetskis! buzzed around and got in the way!

    Compare that pathetic non-reaction to this: Passengers emerging in 30 seconds after the landing, in 1.5 minute! the first New York Ferry boat is making flank speed (from all the way downtown) for the airplane; she reached the plane in 3.5 minutes flat (slowing as she approached)….

    Then the captain did a very delicate, brilliant job of matching the course and speed of the plane. If he put her in forward gear too much, he could have upset the tenuous balance of the barely floating plane. But it was a strong ebb tide on the Hudson River at that time of day, and the plane was drifting along at a pretty good clip. His deckhands on the bow were throwing lines and life vests over, and the ferry nosed against the plane very gently to stay in contact.

    Two minutes later, another ferry came barreling across from the Jersey shore. Soon several would surround the stricken plane, and they managed to get all the people off without any further injuries. A very seamanlike, professional job.

    Bottom line: Americans know how to Get Things Done. Self reliance and a Can-Do attitude, and hardheaded practicality are a lot better than the mindset of those who aren’t free. The Colombians apparently don’t learn how to swim and don’t have the mindset that you can Get Things Done. So 25 people needlessly died. That boat sinking was slow enough that the skipper should have taken command and made them all put on life jackets, at the very least.

    Miracle on the Hudson? not a miracle: COMPETENCE.

    Liked by 3 people

  23. vexedmi says:

    Now for the rest of the story according to Fox News.
    The pleasure boat was packed with 160 passengers. (overloaded perhaps?)
    Survivors reports of a loud explosion near the men’s bathroom that knocked out the boats power.
    (terrorism perhaps?)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      The recent Colombia mall bombing (3 dead including one French woman) comes to mind. Neither ELN or FARC claimed credit yet ISIS did. There hasn’t been much coverage of this in the MSM, mostly links from foreign papers on Twitter.

      Could be.

      But I’m always suspicious of these events as being related to poor safety standards in these developing nations. They just don’t have the same kind of safety standards the US has.

      Like

  24. shadowcole says:

    3 Dead with 30 still missing is 33. Anyone here know the significance of the number 33?

    Like

  25. MfM says:

    One of the more amazing stories a couple of years ago was at Lake Mead. A woman was a on a jet ski and wanted to swim a little bit without the hassle of her life jacket. I very quick storm with no warning came up and she got separated from her husband, son and her jet ski. This story says three hours, but it was closer to four. What the story also didn’t say is that they were close to calling the search because of darkness when she was found.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/woman-treads-water-three-hours-in-lake-mead-storm/

    Like

  26. Mike diamond says:

    Looks like some of the jet skies just got in the way, this is a tragedy !

    Like

  27. yakmaster2 says:

    It seems to me that there were enough rescue boats there to have given everyone a ride. Those who drowned must have (1) not known how to swim and (2) despite not knowing how to swim refused to put on a life vest or couldn’t find a vest or life preserver.

    Like

  28. mimbler says:

    I think there is a good chance the 30 missing were rescued and just not accounted for in the confusing melee. I’m hoping that anyway,
    Mike

    Like

  29. dayallaxeded says:

    The report of an explosion below deck could account for the rapid sinking down to deck level, which might have trapped a significant number of people inside, where they would not be required to wear nor expect to need life vests. Wonder how long it will take to recover the vessel–apparently this reservoir is up to 85m deep! If you want to see why people go there and take the trip across:

    https://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g1087551-d596218-r148767342-Piedra_del_Penol-Guatape_Antioquia_Department.html#photos;geo=1087551&detail=596218&ff=97060969&albumViewMode=hero&aggregationId=101&albumid=101&baseMediaId=97060969&thumbnailMinWidth=50&cnt=30&offset=-1&filter=7

    Liked by 1 person

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