“The Art of The Deal” – Donald Trump “Talks” To New York Times Editorial Board….

This is what happens when the sharpest deal maker in modern U.S. history, who happens to be the sharpest deal-maker in current Presidential Politics, sits down to discuss economics and business with the Park Row elite.

trump general

Donald Trump will probably make headlines for saying today that he “favors a 45% import tariff on a Chinese Imports”.   What the headlines will miss, is Trump moving from a primary election discussion toward a general election mandate.

The backdrop is a simple one, yet almost all will conveniently overlook it.

Donald Trump’s primary concern is the U.S. economy, U.S. jobs, and the welfare of the U.S. middle class.   Knowing the most substantial economic issue is the current Trans-Pacific Trade Deal (TPP), and knowing that China will use the intentionally designed “back door entry” into the trade pact, Trump positions the U.S. worker first and foremost.

Is 45% his number?  Those who have studied Donald Trump throughout the years he has negotiated successful contractual agreements will quickly understand exactly what Trump is doing.   The rest of the MSM, in their ideological rush to fill column inches will entirely miss it.

New York Times –  Donald J. Trump said he would favor a 45 percent tariff on Chinese exports to the United States, proposing the idea during a wide-ranging meeting with members of the editorial board of The New York Times.

Mr. Trump also spoke at length about the standoff with armed protesters who last Saturday seized the headquarters at a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon, suggesting that he would have called the leader of the group to try to make a deal to end it — and would have acted against them if negotiations failed because “you cannot let people take over federal property.”

In addressing the trade imbalance with China, Mr. Trump addressed an issue that has been a focus of his speeches going back to 2011, when he considered running for president when President Obama was seeking re-election. In the editorial board meeting, which was held Tuesday, Mr. Trump said that the relationship with China needs to be restructured.

“The only power that we have with China,” Mr. Trump said, “is massive trade.”

“I would tax China on products coming in,” Mr. Trump said. “I would do a tariff, yes — and they do it to us.”

Mr. Trump added that he’s “a free trader,” but that “it’s got to be reasonably fair.”

“I would do a tax. and the tax, let me tell you what the tax should be … the tax should be 45 percent,” Mr. Trump said.

trump hard hat

Subtle like a brick through a window; a Soji window.

Brilliant Trump strategy.  Campaigning for President, but more importantly campaigning for a strengthened U.S. manufacturing base and putting the largest economic adversary on notice.

Why today?  In case you haven’t noticed the Chinese stock market is in a severe state of contraction.  Right now the financial monolith that is China is back-on-its-heels and in a severe state of crisis.  If the Chinese manufacturing base was ever vulnerable, right now is the time to deal.

When a borrower owes a lender a million dollars, it’s the borrowers problem. When the borrower owes a lender a trillion dollars, it’s the lenders problem.

[…]  China is on a path this year to surpass Canada as the biggest single trading partner of the United States, and its factories provide American consumers with lower-cost products ranging from clothing to computers, so such steep tariffs could hurt the pocketbooks of many Americans.

In early November, Mr. Trump released a little-noticed plan about changing the United States economic dynamic with China. The tariff number was not featured in the plan, but Mr. Trump called for, among other proposals, pressing to give “American workers a level playing field” to restore the manufacturing base.   (read more)

The “Art of the Deal” is all about leverage, and knowing exactly when to use it to your advantage.  If there’s one thing a vulnerable Chinese economy could not withstand at the moment, it’s the risk of U.S. tariff expansion….

Trump thumbs up

Amazing instincts.

….Now, for the Chinese delegation, how about we compromise a little, maybe to 42.5%, maybe to 35%, but before we talk trade – we’ve got this little North Korean Nuclear concern we need your help with….

…Nudge, nudge – wink wink !

US President Barack Obama (R) listens to

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281 Responses to “The Art of The Deal” – Donald Trump “Talks” To New York Times Editorial Board….

  1. Folks, things are a’changin

    Liked by 18 people

  2. stringy theory says:

    Boy, a 45% tariff on Chinese goods will really have the TPP crowd in a dither. OMG, he might win and he will ruin us. But Trump is thinking of the average American, not Wall Street, the CoC, the Uniparty &c. Now the media can ask Cruz and the rest of the GOP hangers-on what they think of a tax on Chinese and other imports. Fun, fun, fun.

    Liked by 21 people

    • KBR says:

      We don’t have the factories yet, up and running and producing what we get from China.
      So high tariffs would “hurt the pocketbooks” of all of us for a while. Are you ready to put your money where your mouths are, to tighten the belt, make do, to stand by Trump through the “tightening” until all is put right?
      Or are you looking for instant magic easy?

      Liked by 9 people

      • runthetable says:

        The terrorists want your neck, you willing to give in to their blade?

        Liked by 7 people

        • In the long run it’s cheaper because of the better quality. I bought some US made Case kitchen knives, each knife averaged $35. They are the best I have ever owned. Edges don’t chip, hold an edge better than any kitchen knife I have ever owned…. Chinese crap wears out and gets to the point you have to regrind the edge….. The Chinese crap just is not worth the initial savings.

          Liked by 4 people

          • justfactsplz says:

            Case does make the best knives, hands down.

            Liked by 1 person

          • notamemberofanyorganizedpolicital says:

            Chinese crap at 45% higher would still be cheap. Haven’t you seen all the Chinese stuff and food in the dollar stores…..

            Besides there are lots of developing countries who would love to take away the business from China. Their production costs are cheaper than China’s. Plus all the broke and depressed E.U. countries are flooding our markets with their products and could provide more volume. More volume lowers costs…

            Like

      • stringy theory says:

        I’m absolutely ready to pay more for good old American goods like we used to have. Our national security is at risk here, indeed our very country is at risk. This is no time to worry about your pocketbook. The Chinese military budget is almost funded each year just out of the interest payments we make to them. They are not our friend and they are not a dependable economic partner.

        Liked by 17 people

        • tempo150101 says:

          In Europe they pay a VAT and the prices for everyday goods are high. They live good — maybe even better than Americans do.

          I look at it like Beverly Hills. You pay high prices because that’s what it costs to have a nice area. I’m at the point where I’m willing to pay a premium to keep this nation a premium country.

          Liked by 4 people

          • WSB says:

            Sorry, but they don’t live better than Americans by any means. Usually when someone has a comment about the European life style, I remind them that I prefer NOT to live with my in laws…in a 5-floor walk up.

            Liked by 2 people

            • WSB says:

              Let me clarify an opinion on the crux of the issue. We need to have reasonable wages, reasonable minimum wages and jobs for teens, crack down on union retirement funds so consumers can afford ‘American-made’, and demand American manufacturing to blossom again.

              Liked by 1 person

              • rayzorback says:

                “Minimum” wage will ALWAYS be…. “MINIMUM” wage!
                EVERYTHING else will just COST MORE!
                ps.
                The Gov’t will just get MORE $$$ in TAXES!
                Dumb Masses…… sheesh

                Like

            • tempo150101 says:

              Depends where you’re at in Europe. Southern Europe is like the American South used to be. But the standards in Northern Europe are very high. Yes, they have smaller places to live in, but the cities are largely clean, they don’t waddle around like fat Americans do and the lifestyle in general is better. If only American freeways could be as pristine and trash free as the freeway between Amsterdam and The Hague.

              Like

        • Mike says:

          It’s not even a “sacrifice” to pay more for American goods anyway. Chinese goods are cheap, break down and wear out quickly and you have to go back out and buy the stuff again. It ends up costing you more in the long run. “You get what you pay for.”

          Liked by 7 people

          • judyw says:

            “costing more in the long run” also includes the health hazards. From toothpaste to toy trains to tilapia, Chinese imports accounted for more than 60 percent of the recalls announced by the Consumer Product Safety Commission this year. Here’s a highlight of those potentially hazardous products.
            http://www.boston.com/business/gallery/china_watchlist/

            Liked by 2 people

            • ediegrey says:

              I cannot all those dogs and cats killed by their horrible Chinese pet food. We did just fine when everything was made in the USA – and we had strong families. Women didn’t have to work. Things may cost more, but people will make more. It’s a good thing.

              Liked by 2 people

          • anon says:

            This is so true. The quality of everything I’ve seen from China lately is just crap. It used to be some of it at least was reasonable. It IS cheaper in the long run to buy quality that lasts longer.

            Like

        • Steele81 says:

          Our family is in manufacturing. Govt regs are a huge problem. o has regulated this country into oblivion. I am hopeful that President Trump will look at the regulations strangling small business and get rid of them.

          Liked by 8 people

        • judyw says:

          “good old American goods” have that Made In America tag and I’ve noticed several advertisements since Trump brought that up recently with that line added at the end. I realized some time ago we never heard that anymore so am glad he brought it up and don’t you think most of us would choose “Made in America” products if we see we have a choice even if they cost a bit more. A sense of American pride and support of our economy would become a higher priority than $ and support the transition.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Beenthere says:

          There’s no reason to pay more for American goods. Lower the high state & federal taxes & fees & eliminate all unnecessary regulations. If we did this even foreign companies would build factories here. All companies prefer to work & reside in a politically country stable with low taxes & minimum amt of regulations. 9 times out of 10 that’s the USA.

          Building factories in China is a necessary evil if foreign companies want to sell their products to 1 billion+ potential customers. Trump is right; China has great negotiators.

          Liked by 2 people

        • stringy theory, I hate to tell you that the good old American goods are gone. Try buying a new washing machine that’s Made in America. They’re garbage, mainly because of government regulations. Trump talked about the water restrictions – low flow shower heads and toilets – in one of his recent rallies. It’s the same for washing machines. The machine, not you, determines how much water you need. And the door on the washing machine locks so you can’t add an item after you start it. I guess that’s to keep someone’s 2 year old from jumping into the washer and drowning. We’re not going to get quality until we get the government out of our lives.

          Liked by 4 people

          • Jo McIntyre says:

            I never realized just how really, really bad and stupid govt regulations were until I had to do a news story about a local employer in a battle with Oregon OSHA. Among his many ‘violations’ was the fact that he didn’t give his employees lessons on, … wait for it… how to wear ear plugs!

            Liked by 1 person

            • Curly Dave says:

              This is not a dumb as it sounds to you.

              As a shooter, I can tell you that there is a very definite technique for using ear plugs. Once you know it you will be amazed at the effectiveness. If you don’t you will lose your hearing.

              Like

      • BobW462 says:

        I already do always buy American anytime I have a choice. Even though it does generally cost me more up front, I almost always get my money’s worth in quality.

        Liked by 4 people

        • dondeg says:

          My sister in law used a GE refrigerator from 1959 until 2000. I bought a new stove at Bestbuy a year ago and the circuit board that controls it died in a year. Yes I would pay more for something that works. Duh.

          Liked by 6 people

          • tempo150101 says:

            My brother gave my parents his old stainless steel fridge and the one they had in the basement got pitched. It was a GM/Frigidaire side-by-side from 1971. Frigidaire made top-end mainstream appliances in those days and that thing was built like a tank. The Frigidaire of today has nothing to do with the Frigidaire of yore — It’s basically junk.

            Liked by 3 people

            • rayzorback says:

              Frigidaire is made by Whirlpool….
              They left our town a couple of years back and went to….
              MEXICO!
              Go figure.
              It’s not just Ford and Nabisco!

              Like

            • dondeg says:

              Sad but true. I love it when Trump talks about “Made in America”. My father, who is now 85 (and me 50) has a stacked oven (sorry, can’t remember the brand) he bought when I was 12. We cooked Christmas ham in it a week ago.

              Like

          • WSB says:

            I just had to replace the same thing last week. I was told by my repairman that the lifespan for parts has intentionally been reduced for to increase revenue.

            That is sad.

            Liked by 2 people

        • Beenthere says:

          Many American goods are made in China. Heck, even my garlic I get from the local supermarket comes from China.

          Like

      • MfM says:

        I’m already buying as much American made goods as I can, even at a premium. Is he talking about phasing it in? That would give time for production to get up and running.

        Liked by 4 people

        • Sentient says:

          He’s shooting across their bow. People don’t understand that when Trump wants one loaf, he first demands three. Also, even if his 45% tariff is enacted, it’s a tariff on the wholesale price. The retail price may only be affected by, say, 20% depending on the item. A plastic deck chair might go from $10 to $12 – and that’s if the entire 45% were assessed – which it probably wouldn’t be.

          Liked by 1 person

      • NCPatrick says:

        I am more than ready, KBR .. you better believe it! If Trump is President and says we need to tighten our belts and wait a little longer for our “must haves”, then that is AOK with me! My people homesteaded on the plains of Dakota Territory and they taught me how to do stuff. Among those teachings was never to borrow money, and I’ve done my best all my life to remain debt free. I have a feeling a lot of us at the Treehouse were taught the same.

        Liked by 8 people

      • mariner says:

        Yes. I am.

        You?

        I believe that’s what it will take to stand up our manufacturing again.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Melania for 1st Lady says:

        When the jobs – good, blue-collar manufacturing jobs that a man can raise a family on – are brought back from China and Mexico and Japan and everywhere else Americans will have more money in their pockets. The current situation is reminiscent of the “company towns” owned by coal mines back in the day. Instead of getting money, miners would get certificates with which they could only buy goods at the “company store” (you move sixteen tons and whaddaya get…). Now the only jobs available are low-pay Wal-Mart mcjobs. It’s either that or food stamps for millions of Americans. With their meager paychecks (and/or gov’t cheese) the only place these people can afford to shop is…Wal-Mart! The tariff makes Red Chinese goods more expensive, yes, but it means that American goods will be on an even playing field. That, plus President Trump’s tax plan, will be an incentive for business to bring the factories – and the jobs – back from overseas.

        Liked by 4 people

        • amjean says:

          Half of what Americans purchase are
          items that most of us do not need.

          Liked by 7 people

        • Beenthere says:

          Your ideas are dated. Can not bring back the past. A town or city can not depend upon 1 company to keep it afloat; having independent & diverse businesses is good for a town.

          Once Obama leaves & Trump is sworn in there’s going to be another business revolution creating new companies in new industries. The coal mining & textile manufacturing days are over in the USA. Sorry, but the fabric coming from Vietnam is very nice.

          Like

          • Jo McIntyre says:

            Re-read MelaniaforFirstLady’s post. That isn’t what she said. Also, coal mining will not leave the U.S. because THAT IS WHERE THE COAL IS! Duh! Now, as to fabric, you could be right. Vietnam may have a competitive advantage over the US in fabric manufacturing.

            Like

            • Beenthere says:

              Only rebutted 1 or 2 of her points not the main idea which is bring back manufacturing jobs from overseas.

              Now regarding your post—-And how many coal mines are still opened since the 1960s? Obama only administered the coup de grace in that dying industry. Even China is slowly eliminating its dependence on coal.

              Like

      • TPW says:

        US is a consumer nation…….so what do we consume …..Junk and lots of it. Need new wardrobe every season ..done. Need new everything all the time ..done. So I asked myself years ago..do I really need to waste all that money to keep up with the Jones.. Ask yourself ..what is needed and not what is wanted…..Tariffs on China will have little effect on me but a whole lot on China!

        Liked by 3 people

        • Man, there is a lot of junk out there isn’t there. No accident. It will be nice to have higher quality items and jobs back! No problem for me –

          Liked by 3 people

        • WSB says:

          After the Chinese stock market stopped selling for the second time I two days, Trump suggested that the Chinese are probably headed for a bubble burst, and that we are as well. We need to restructure our country, however, China may not be the force it was. Will be a very interesting 2016

          Liked by 1 person

      • Rick says:

        Let’s just say for arguments sake it settles @ 30%. American consumers could cut back 15% on consumption until factory production catches up. With Trump’s tax plan, American companies bringing back several TRILLION $ into our country would go into many facets of our economy.

        Even short term if perishable goods go up 15-20% in price, the American consumer would spend their money much more wisely, instead of using irresponsible credit raising debt throughout AMERICA.

        MADE IN AMERICA, would mean something again. No one better at branding quality than TRUMP. American ingenuity would take over and America would freeze China, Japan, Korea, Germany, etc…and limit imports. American factories would be offering jobs. With 95M out of the job market, Unions would not have to be negotiators for unrealistic, and non-competitive wages to make us uncompetitive like they have done over the past 50 years.

        It would be like AMERICAN industry and commerce would rise from the ashes like a Phoenix. That’s what Trump could do for all of us. It all starts with jobs. Without the ability for family income, Government GROWS! It’s been this way for the NWO over the last half century. Dumb down the populace, reduce the middle class, export jobs with crazy trade deals so only the rich get richer, and control the MSM and the narrative. Oh, and feed them cake by producing dumb reality TV. They go to sleep, laughing but a bit dumber and a little less wealthy each day.

        TRUMP 2016

        Liked by 6 people

        • Mike says:

          Yep. The combination of tariffs AND Trump’s tax plan would turn things around quickly.

          Liked by 4 people

        • WSB says:

          And maybe then we can EXPORT ‘Made in America’ once more.

          Like

        • Beenthere says:

          What you are describing is not what Trump wants. He believes in the free market system. He wants to put tariffs on Chinese goods because they put huge amount of tariffs on American goods imported to China.He doesn’t say anything about limiting imports to USA.

          As I said in prior post, reduce state & fed taxes and unnecessary regs & foreign companies would be banging on our door. All companies prefer to place operations in politically stable environments having at least a decently fair rule of law.

          Like

      • Matt says:

        It is highly probable that any increase in prices of goods imported from China will be insignificant and completely offset by Don’s tax plan to cut rates for the middle class AND businesses. Pocketbook preserved!

        Many of his plans are related to one another although none are totally dependent on the other to succeed. For example, immigration issues need to be resolved in order for the rest of his plans to have their highest and best use, however that does not mean his other plans cannot be highly successful on their own. This is why he led with immigration. It has such a rippling effect on everything else. He is such a fantastic big picture guy, it is so incredibly refreshing.

        Also, he has already began negotiations and the many parties that will ultimately be giving him what he wants do not even know it yet. By the time he gets into office he will have created an even stronger negotiation position than our country already has. #MAGA

        Liked by 5 people

        • Spar Harmon says:

          Yes, rick and matt, yes and thanks for mentioning how Trumps carefully proffered plans fit together. Personal discretionary resources, business discretionary resources enhanced by fundamental tax reform. Opening banks around operational loans so essential to businesses leveraging growth. etc etc

          Like

        • WSB says:

          George Will excoriated Trump’s tariff idea, hardening back to the FDR days. However, I believe Tump understands that we are nowhere near an equilibrium. George does doesn’t get it…doesn’t want to and will not hold his nose to vote for ‘our boy’. Bye, George.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Benson II says:

        My belt is already so tight it’s cutting off circulation let the frickin libs tighten their belt maybe it would cut off the whining.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Jett Black says:

        It’s part of a deal–not an embargo. In all likelihood, Trump would be out of office for nearly a decade before really big changes in manufacturing and trade imbalance were well along. Trump is talking about how to get the ball rolling in the right direction, instead of down on all our heads. It’s a longer-range view, with an understanding of how to conduct negotiations, rather than the last 50 years of capitulations.

        Liked by 1 person

        • KBR says:

          I’m just talking about this time now/very soon and before Trump gets us back rolling again. Heck before the elections maybe!

          He told us we were in a big bubble, and it couldn’t last forever. He laughed a bit and said he hoped it didn’t burst the week he took office cause the Media would blame him!

          He was warning us without panicking us, I think.

          The bubble is so fat and so critical that any manipulations in the market could pop it, heck nearly anything could. It’s like a huge soap bubble, very fragile, a breath could pop it.

          Don’t fret, don’t panic, plan! and cut unneeded expenses where you can.

          (We need to also get working in our communities to recreate/plan helping-others ways before things are desperate. Some are already wearing belts too tight! Know your neighbors! Prepare to help if you possibly can.)

          Liked by 4 people

        • WSB says:

          When FDR was president and he was clueless about how to create manufacturing being faced with WWII, he asked advice of an estute capitalist. It worked within 1 year.

          Trump can sell of Federal lands, buildings to developers, negotiate oil and natural gas to Europian (Eastern European countries Melania can assist with) and get the ball rolling while cutting off OPEC and Russia. Sweet!

          Like

      • Paco Loco says:

        Take your consumerism down a notch. Most everything you need is made in the US, Canada or Mexico. We can easily get buy without having to buy Chinese made goods.

        Liked by 2 people

      • KBR says:

        China has devalued its yuan which affects our currency. Japan, Europe and the US (in that order) are the main traders with China.
        It’s all pretty complex, and it’s all globalism IMO.
        Trump suggested a tariff which would help balance out the dollar against the yen (as well as send a message.)
        Bush earlier today called Trump an “isolationist” which is a “bad word” to globalists. Trump says he is a free trader but wants “free trade” to be “fair trade.”

        As for me, I remember when Americans made the best goods, and Americans bought the goods we made here, and also sent our goods to be traded elsewhere. We did receive goods from other countries, but not so much and a lot of what we imported were “unnecessary” trinkets and some “unnecessary” luxury goods.

        Today such a situation would be labeled “isolationist” by the globalists.
        I don’t care!
        I am a believer that basic necessities need to be produced at home, in the USA, so the necessities of life aren’t cut off by the whim of some dictatorial coup in a foreign country, or the devaluing of currency by a foreign nation!

        Food! Clothes! Shelter! (and the materials that we need to build and repair our homes, including all heating elements, wiring, circuitry, needed appliances) Heat! Transport! Electricity/gas/oil (and all transformers, wiring, furnaces, parts, electronics, circuits and fuels to make it all work.) These are survival!

        Do you know how few of these things we actually produce here anymore?
        Where was your car manufactured? Where do the parts ship from?

        Isolationist? Nationalist? To me that is putting our own people first. It isn’t denying anyone else the right to do the same, nor refusing them goods nor refusing to trade. It’s just using common sense! I don’t build a house and depend on my next door neighbor for the toilet! Nor for the kitchen! Nor for water! Necessities! Our nation has to get back to common sense, and not be dependent on “neighbors” for basic needs, just like we do as individuals. What’s gonna happen when the neighbor gets into a bad mood with you?

        Almost all affordable inexpensive clothing comes from China. So if they don’t send us clothes will we be “naked and afraid?” Good grief at the stupidity of the greed of globalists!

        Okay, off the soapbox. Looks like a bad recession is coming very soon. Goods might get more expensive, dollars will buy less. If you NEED things like clothes for growing kids you might want to go ahead and take advantage of after Christmas sales for NEEDS, but not on credit, and don’t spend too much. Go ahead and buy the Chinese or whatever stuff for now, because you need to conserve your pennies.
        Plan for the future to:
        Get out the darning needle and learn to mend play clothes, yours and theirs! A needle and thread are cheaper than a new clothing item,moor buy some iron on patches at the dollar store. Stock staples: and I mean evaluate needs and costs to determine what real staples are. You might do without your favorite pricey face cream but not without a way to wipe your hiney. Consider washable cloths instead of the ever-constant paper towel purchases, and keep in mind the costs of the washing detergent and water: don’t be a foolish budgeter.
        (My mom, bless her, will drive out a dollar of gas to save 5 cents at a different grocery way across town)
        I know most people know how to tighten their belts but a plan-ahead might take some stress out of things. And if it doesn’t hit too hard, planning maybe kept ya from worrying. Remember what is important: love, life, liberty!

        Liked by 2 people

        • justfactsplz says:

          Moms, learn to sew. I used to make clothes for my girls and costumes for the school plays. They were very nice clothes, too. Adults, if you have a good coat and a nice suit or two (even women), you can get by in the work place. If you shoe heels are worn down, don’t buy a new pair. Instead repair them and polish them up. They will be good as new. During the war Americans tightened their belts and we can do it again.

          Liked by 2 people

        • USA Patriot says:

          You are dead right. Also when did moving entire factories and American labor become trade “goods” — Wall Street silver tongue spinners.

          In addition there are no free markets or supply and demand in the USA under our Constitution and business laws because we are now citizens of the World with each country having different rules, including dictators and enemy states — suicide economics to enrich the Elites and decimate our middle class.

          Like

      • The difference between Trump and pretty much everyone else is that Trump looks for solutions. Most people take your approach and get hung up on the problems.

        Your pocketbook is already being crushed friend.

        Basic economics. The Chinese will lower their prices to compensate for the tariffs. This shifts the burden to them and off of the average American. Trump is brilliant because he understands how this works.

        Liked by 4 people

      • seabrznsun says:

        Those needed factories will not be phased in; they’ll come in ahead of schedule and under budget.

        Liked by 4 people

      • jackphatz says:

        This is why he could never do that 45% all at once. Our individual economies are terrible, we will need time to understand what must take place. Sadly, the media and the Repugnant Party “folk’s” will not go along with this.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linden says:

        Tariffs are leverage. He is simply going after the currency manipulation. You really should read his book about the Art of the Deal. He is concerned about fair trade, currency manipulation, cyber crime, and sneaking in the back door in a way that is not good for the US. You use the leverage you have, to get the other things, and then you can back off on the leverage.

        Strategy. Tactics. Chess, which is what the Chinese play while Obutthead is still reading the instructions for checkers.

        Liked by 2 people

        • WSB says:

          Instructions on how to open the box.

          Like

        • Jo McIntyre says:

          Actually, it is the Russians who play chess – involves ‘killing’ people on the other side until you can threaten the Queen with death – then you win.. Chinese play the game named Go – involves careful placement of ‘stones’ to seal off territory. I believe a Go player can take all the stones that get ‘caught’ inside an area sealed off by his opponent.
          Both games are highly complex. What is the American national board game? It used to be Monopoly, but I don’t know what it is these days.

          Like

      • BigMamaTEA says:

        We must. Our economy and our dollar are in such sad shape, there is going to be a lot of belt-tightening necessary, (tariffs on China or not.)

        All of the BRICS banks have set up a new means to process payments, and are doing dry-runs now. At some point, the rest of the World is going to give the bird to the US, and our Dollar. Saudi, through previous arrangement with Nixon/Kissinger, used to exclusively use the Dollar to process oil purchases. Now they are beginning to accept others. AND , Congress is obviously making no cuts in spending, and we’ve already taken the first hit on our credit rating.

        Our days are numbered anyway. Let’s get a business man in there, and begin the torturous steps that are necessary. We are fast losing our ability to have any control on any of this.

        Liked by 1 person

      • margarite1 says:

        But there will also be taxes lowered so some of the cost would be offset.

        Like

      • razor1 says:

        KBR-sorry dude but you need to update your thinking. Most of the stuff we buy from china is component assembly products…you can do it by piece work in your garage…just like they do in china! In fact we could do it better here and save the shipping cost. Doing so at a rate that’s a livable wage. The chinese don’t have any big magic, they have lots of people and are less industrialized than you might think. Their greatness is making a copy….not the real thing!

        That said when you fight a fellow with both your hands tied the opponent is going to look pretty good scoring points for the win.

        Like

        • auscitizenmom says:

          A few years ago, I read an interview with a business owner. He said he had moved his business to China. The labor cost was extremely low, but the learning curve to put out a product he would accept was very large. When they were finally trained, they wanted a higher wage. That, along with the shipping costs which made it too expensive to build there. He was bringing his business back to the States.

          Like

      • mscynlynn says:

        It won’t take long for the shuttered buildings and laid off workers to be back in business. I try to buy made in the USA items, they aren’t much more expensive and the quality is good. http://madeinusaforever.com/

        Like

      • USA Patriot says:

        Building up “Communist” China’s manufacturing base and their massive military while decimating our own was the biggest suicide and treasonus policy the US ever made. Time for “Made in America” on all Walmart shelves and back to a Superpower military.

        Like

    • El Torito says:

      Cruz will say he was for it before Trump and wants a 90% tariff

      Liked by 1 person

    • lou Ann Watson says:

      when you are going to bargain with the chinese, you set the bar way higher than you would actually approve, and then work from there. you have to put a little fear in them…let us remember their economy is in deep trouble.

      Like

  3. Too, he needs to convene a U S Navy Captains Mast to try Lt. John F. Kerry for treason.

    There is no statute of limitations on treason.

    Liked by 4 people

  4. TwoLaine says:

    “We don’t win anymore. It’s not going to happen, not with me. Not anymore. We’re going to start winning again. You’ll get sick of winning.”

    #TRUMP2016
    #MakeAmericaGreatAgain

    Liked by 15 people

  5. Tampa2 says:

    The Art of the Deal.. Like Iran, “Start WITH the prisoners and then work down. Great post SD.

    Liked by 7 people

  6. rashamon says:

    I haven’t read the above post, but am laughing at all the TV coverage of Trump giving out too many tickets for his Burlington, VT, rally. Stampede time and the local police have no idea how to handle the thousands of supporters wanting to see their hero. Yuck, yuck.

    I DO hope the LEOs can handle this safely, but secretly enjoy that those stuffy New Englanders are getting a taste of freedom…which I think they went to war over not too many centuries ago.

    Liked by 11 people

    • rashamon says:

      OK, now I have read your post, SD. Spot on.

      Like

    • Bluto says:

      I haven’t TV for years, so I have to live vicariously thru reports like yours. Thank you! I too am now sufficiently amused at the One-Two punch of Trump’s Genius + The Media’s Slavish Response. He’s beating them like the proverbial Red-Headed Step-Child and they beg for more.

      Liked by 3 people

      • don welch says:

        i don’t have any idea what is coming and am still not convinced trump will be the nominee but i am certain that if the election were held tomorrow, trump would beat hillary 60-40.

        Liked by 1 person

      • rashamon says:

        Ha! Would you believe I had a marketing/public relations/business development shop for years and never watched TV or listened to radio? Hired people to do such. The media muddles one’s brain.

        This is the first political campaign ever to entrance me…and I mean ENTRANCE. I have watched Mr. Trump for decades as several of my clients were involved in real estate. He is a natural leader, displaying skills not easy learned in a classroom, so we shall see how he uses those talents to bring our country back to respecting the individual and state rights. I know many people who have worked for or with him; all suggest he has the orchestrating skills necessary to run a country and trim back the waste.

        Anyway, it’s worth the ride. I’m on board. No other candidates match his successful back story nor enthusiasm for making his country great again.

        Always enjoy your insights, Bluto.

        Liked by 10 people

        • jackphatz says:

          A natural leader is not someone we’re used to seeing. Usually what we are given to view is that overly polished, fake persona labeled as our political leaders. Trump is not easily understood.

          Liked by 2 people

          • judyw says:

            “not easily understood”…is so on point and I believe it is because he functions at a higher level than most of us…his whole life experience if we look at it gives him solid reasons for his willingness to put himself “out there” as say what he thinks. What he thinks has served him very well so far and resonates with many who had stopped even considering what they thought.

            Liked by 2 people

            • jackphatz says:

              For those of us who have worked within a corporate or other “office” type environments knows these people are not the greedy B’s “out to rip people off”so many on the left assume (on purpose). They are business leaders. We need to educate people.

              Liked by 3 people

    • auscitizenmom says:

      When I read that line, “Trump giving out too many tickets for his Burlington, VT, rally” my thought was, “I wonder what he has planned there.” I don’t believe that it was just a mistake. He must be doing it for a reason.

      Liked by 2 people

      • don welch says:

        trump uses slow fuses for his stink bombs. it takes days for the ‘crats to even figure out what he is talking about. great theater.

        Liked by 3 people

      • TPW says:

        Bernie supporters were getting tickets but planning on leaving empty seats at the rally.

        Liked by 3 people

        • auscitizenmom says:

          Ooooohhhh. That is what is going on. 🙂

          Like

        • Linden says:

          There you see, on full display, the brain-deadness of the Sanders crowd, and the arrogance. They actually thought that when their all-important selves didn’t show up, that the seats would be vacant! HA!!

          Like

          • auscitizenmom says:

            Obviously they haven’t been following the news. There are hundreds or thousands left outside at all his events who could fill any empty seats.

            Like

      • Ellie says:

        He is. Rumor has it that the Sanders supporters are going to take the free tickets and not show up for the rally. Those Vermonters up there, especially in Burlington can be real kooky. Trump is definitely going into enemy territory.

        There are also a lot of down to earth Yankee farmers that are very tired of all the liberalism up there. I hope trump has a good turnout and the natives appreciate all the effort he is expending on behalf of all decent hard working Americans.

        GO TRUMP

        Liked by 1 person

      • El Torito says:

        There was a bunch of chatter that Bernie supporters were ordering tickets to not show to cause empty seats. I think Trump team flooded the zone…

        Liked by 1 person

        • Linden says:

          Those childish spoiled brats would do something like that, which means they have the maturity of a 6-year old. Typical. Makes you want to have each one a diaper and a pacifier and tell them to go practice Thier potty training.

          Like

      • Betty says:

        I think he got wind of the Sanders campaign telling their people to get tickets and not show up so that Mr. Trump would be embarrassed. And also that the pajama boy from MSNBC (?) who is “all in” is going to broadcast live from the humiliating event.

        That is why the Trump campaign issued 20.000 tickets and told everyone to get there early because it was going to be first come first served.

        I can’t wait – what fun !

        Liked by 1 person

      • Believe in Trump. Everything he does is for a reason.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jo McIntyre says:

        See my post above, where I suggest the reason may have been to find enough real supporters in that Vermont soup of bat-sh*t crazy libs! I saw an ABC reporter interviewing people waiting in line. He only found one Trump supporter in about 10 people.

        Ticket takers were selecting for Trump supporters, tossing out the on-the-fence (wink, wink) and non-supporters. Given the high number of liars in the libtard world, it seems that a large group of protesters/libs got inside anyway, but Trump made mincemeat of them.

        So you are right, Auscitizenmom, he had a reason.

        Like

    • mariner says:

      I grew up with the image of flinty, independent, New Englanders. It was both a shock and a disappointment to find, when they elected Sanders, that they were no longer the majority.

      Liked by 2 people

      • rashamon says:

        Oh, the Puritans have always taken a path that frustrates others not appreciating their dedication. A wing of our family settled in Goffstown, NH, and the smart ones — after fighting the French and battling the Brits — took off for the Midwest where tales could be tailored to suit one’s purposes. Scots all. Independent? Yes. Actually, they were ship builders, so if you are seriously a mariner, you know the attitude in the DNA.

        Liked by 3 people

      • 2x4x8 says:

        Norman Rockwell moved out
        George Lincoln Rockwell moved in

        Like

    • Dr. Bogus Pachysandra says:

      I read an article linked on Drudge, that the bernie people were calling to reserve huge amounts of tickets. The plan is, they don’t show uo, and the tv shows lots of empty seats.

      Liked by 3 people

    • lou Ann Watson says:

      deep in the heart of commieville

      Like

  7. yakmaster2 says:

    American voters are getting an education this Presidential election. It’s good some shadowy things are being dragged into the sunlight for examination, discussion, and just possibly some disinfecting. The more the msm, including some so-called Conservatives keep saying there’s nothing to see or talk about, the more it’s talked about.
    Thank you, Mr. Trump.

    Liked by 11 people

  8. Bluto says:

    Oh boy! Another week of shrieks that “Trump is Finished” followed by a bump in the polls.
    Fantastic! 😀

    Liked by 17 people

  9. Pops says:

    Re-post from an earlier thread.

    The only way to get jobs back in the USA (and Europe) is to throttle the Chinese tiger. Can you imagine the boost to the economy of California if Apple were to produce 60 or 70 million iPhones there instead of in some Chinese sweat-shop? Okay, the Apple-bots will have to pay a few bucks more for their trinkets (nowhere near 45%), but it would be worth it.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Boy, am I gonna lose sleep about trendies paying more for their Apple watches so more Americans can have jobs.

      Liked by 7 people

      • auscitizenmom says:

        Yeah, that’ll be foremost in my thoughts, too.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Benson II says:

        You mean someones’ buying them. Apple stock down. Iphone represent 60 some percent of profits and is falling off. They’re not going to be able to replace that with watches. I wonder if the new CEO is going to be able to cope since the most important thing to him seems to be the fact he’s gay.

        Liked by 1 person

        • tempo150101 says:

          Android does everything you need, and you can get a decent (not great, but still decent) phone for $29 with no contract.

          My LG/Google Nexus 4 crapped out and I started looking for a new phone. I was planning to pay another $400 for a phone when I decided to try an LG Leon for $29. I figured if I don’t like it, so what? It’s not the greatest or fastest phone in the world and it doesn’t have the best camera ………. BUT IT DOES EVERYTHING ELSE I NEED!!!

          That’s where I believe the market is going.

          Liked by 1 person

        • WSB says:

          The reason that Apple is in a bad spot is that, like Trump, Jobs was an ‘It’ person. No more.

          Like

    • rashamon says:

      At another post, I covered Oregon’s initiative to mount more vocational schools to address the state’s need for metal workers. Trump should shut down the Dept. of Education and direct all those snowflakes in that over-blown bureaucracy to go home, go home, and develop vocational schools per territory per need.

      Jeez. This is not brain surgery; it’s picking up the bloody phone and asking your three biggest employers what they need. Put the kids in a barn with one smart leader, develop internships, remove minimum wage requirements so intelligent 12-year-olds can tutor not-so-intelligent 18-year-olds in basic reading and math.

      This is doable. Easily. Immediately.

      What’s amusing is that Trump is changing policy without winning the presidency. He opens his mouth and all the others jump. I love it.

      Liked by 9 people

      • Dr. Bogus Pachysandra says:

        When I was in Grade School during the Fifties, all the big boys ( Juniors and Seniors) did a half day at out school, and went to Cuyahoga Heights school in the afternoons. That school offered Trade School stuff. Most of these guys wanted to be tool and die makers.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Benson II says:

          My dad made good bucks being a tool and die maker always in demand back then. You could move practically anywhere and get a job.

          Like

        • rashamon says:

          Wasn’t it incredibly stupid to dismantle those programs? My grandson has an MBA with multiple credits toward a PhD in naval engineering and an internship from overseas. Cannot find a job stateside as the U.S. has shutdown such construction. I’ve watched steel mills disappear to Germany and Asia.

          This is serious. Who is going to rally in the manufacturing trades if some idiot nukes Europe or North Asia? Huh? Your cell phone and social media addicts have not one brain cell to reconstruct our country. Not to mention the social justice PhDs who are truly clueless.

          Liked by 4 people

          • lastConservinIllinois? says:

            I was working at Prosser High School (rasha knows that one, I bet) in Chicago 3 years ago and the woodshop teacher there told me he had the last woodshop classes left in all of Chicago Public School System

            I couldn’t believe it.

            Not sure if the program is still alive.

            Like

          • beth60497 says:

            hate hearing that.. my 17 year old is a freshman at the community college with an eye towards Naval Engineering. Where did he go to school? D is looking at starting here in MO at UM-Rolla, or I guess it’s now called Missouri school of science & technology, then transferring Jr year to University of New Orleans?
            Rolla is a great engineering school.. Top 3 in nation in many areas, but no naval emphasis.
            Our plan is to get general ed credits at the community college. Basic Engineering at the state school then finish out within a specialized school.
            But.. he’s only 17.. I changed majors 3x before getting my BS-BA in accounting.

            Like

            • Jo McIntyre says:

              Beware community colleges. Some are nothing but extensions of high school and DO NOT prepare for college. And that is probably especially true for engineering majors. My daughter found a great ART department at a community college in Santa Monica and her daughter now has a four-year college degree in ART and a job in fabric design. A rare success for a CC. So, some CCs are good, others are terrible.
              Oh, yes, I went to a CC for two years back in the late 50s. Entered CalBerkeley as a Junior. Flunked out. Had no clue about actual college level classes. A mid-term and a final? Two or three “questions” per test and you have to write an essay to answer the question? That’s all? Your whole grade depends on how you did on those two tests?
              My CC gave True/False and multiple choice questions that any reasonably alert student can ace easily.

              Like

          • El Torito says:

            That is a great point. I would like to add to it – during wartime, these factories and metalworks made guns and ammo, etc for the military. Who will do that now?

            Like

      • WSB says:

        My grandfather was the superintendent of schools in a large PA town until 1970 or so. He was such an advocate of vocational training and was seeing the transformation. He was very upset because he knew that the great kids in his high school would not have an alternative. He was right. You’re right. We can turn this around.

        Like

        • El Torito says:

          If we bring the manufacturing back, there will be a need for trade schools again. How awesome would that be? Additionally, these tool & die specialty shops would be popping up all over the place as well. I’m 56. As a kid, this is how it was. I would love to see it come back again.

          Like

    • Trust No One says:

      Maybe they could set up shop in the State of Jefferson. They do and will need the jobs. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Centinel2012 says:

    Reblogged this on Centinel2012 and commented:

    With the currency manipulation that goes on that’s a good starting pointy —- go for it Trump!

    Liked by 2 people

    • El Torito says:

      Trump should calculate the dollar amount of damage China has caused us and tell them he’s deducting it from the debt to them. Then sue them for $ damages to the USA from theft of designs, etc. Deduct it from our debt to them. Add up the loss to USA for every currency manipulation, deduct it from the debt. He can bankrupt them overnight. Their military budget alone is pd for on the interest we pay them on the debt. This is what our idiot leadership has allowed to happen, thanks to special interests and Super PACs.

      Like

  11. amjean says:

    I would like Trump to also mention that the
    federal Bureau of Land Management
    needs investigating. Or did he and I
    missed it?

    Liked by 4 people

    • New Vulgarian says:

      My concern as well… From what Sundance reported here, I’m not crazy about Trump’s stand on the Oregon ranch issue. Those protesters are there because of persecution by an out of control bureaucracy. The protesters aren’t the bad guys… the BLM and Obama appointed Federal Attorneys are.

      Liked by 5 people

      • auscitizenmom says:

        Don’t you think that in the negotiation with the Bundys, he would have found out what is going on and agreed to look into the BLM?

        Liked by 6 people

        • amjean says:

          Yes, however, he needs to say it. Trump has a bad
          habit of leaving out critical information that the low
          or no information voters need to hear. We political
          junkies read between the lines; many others do not.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Exactly. Art of the deal. When people trust your word, you get results.

          Liked by 5 people

          • His father, Fred Trump, paved the way for Donald, not with money but because of his reputation as a man of his word who always repaid his loans. This is how Donald managed to get loans from banks to finance his projects when others couldn’t get those loans.

            Liked by 1 person

            • WSB says:

              Donald recounts the story that he would accompany his father to collect the rent at his dad’s buildings when he was young. He asked his father why he would stand on the side of the door when knocking on it. His father told him it was in case the renter had a gun. Smart.

              Liked by 1 person

        • New Vulgarian says:

          I would like to think this is the case. The newly imprisoned ranchers were railroaded by an Obama federal attorney, whom Sundance reported on (bless him). I would hope that part of negotiations would be a new trial, etc. to give these people a fair chance to defend themselves. Trump seems fair-minded, so hopefully he would do such a thing. I’d just like to hear it.

          Liked by 1 person

      • ajbenius says:

        Trump said that he wants to enforce the law but that if he was president he would also meet with the leader of the group. That is way ahead of every other candidate’s stance on this.

        Liked by 5 people

      • mariner says:

        C’mon folks. Haven’t we seen this enough to know what to expect?

        This is another one of Trump’s “let’s you and him fight” statements. I firmly believe before it’s over millions and millions of Americans will be paying attention, who would not have even known about the situation before.

        Liked by 5 people

      • Ketch says:

        His response to call the leaders of the stand-up and find out what they want in order to try to make a deal would surely include investigating federal abuse of the BLM, etc.

        Liked by 6 people

      • SharonKinDC says:

        He does NOT want to encourage take over of Fed Buildings….granted this is a cabin in the middle of nowhere, but still. The point being, he would have contacted them & worked out a deal. Part of that deal would be to put an end to bogus BLM land grabs using lawfare against ranch owners. I think he’d be happy do to this!

        What Bundy should do is contact Trump NOW. Hammond spokesperson, too. Let Trump get the facts and issue before the public. He doesn’t have to make a determination…Simply ask the gov’t via the media, why is this happening. Bring up specific points which are damaging to the Fed spin put out thus far.

        Wouldn’t be surprised if there has already been behind the scenes contact and he’s got a file on the Hammond case.

        Liked by 7 people

    • Everyone has pet issues we want Trump to focus on. Right now, the only issue that matters is winning the nomination.

      Liked by 9 people

      • stella says:

        This is the quote, above:

        Mr. Trump also spoke at length about the standoff with armed protesters who last Saturday seized the headquarters at a federal wildlife refuge in Oregon, suggesting that he would have called the leader of the group to try to make a deal to end it — and would have acted against them if negotiations failed because “you cannot let people take over federal property.”

        That isn’t a response that makes me happy. Sorry. Government overreach and corruption aren’t “pet issues”.

        Liked by 2 people

        • ajbenius says:

          Trump said that he was not necessarily suggesting a large-scale military action. I doubt he would kill them all.

          Liked by 1 person

          • stella says:

            Who said anything about killing? I simply quoted the article.

            My question: Why doesn’t he acknowledge the problems with government agencies who are guilty of overreach and law breaking. See this YouTube video:

            Liked by 2 people

            • ajbenius says:

              “In addressing the Oregon standoff, Mr. Trump also spoke about the “great anger out there” that appears to be fueling the situation in Burns, Ore.”

              Unfortunately I do not have a transcript of the interview, but I would like to see the details of what he meant by “great anger”.

              Liked by 1 person

            • PatriotKate says:

              I watched this last night and called this Congressman’s office today because watching his frustration made me cry. They write the laws and then the damn overbearing and out-of-control beauracrats ignore them. Had a lengthy conversation with one of his aids. The frustration experienced by the people there and this Congressman is overwhelming. A lot of people do not know how bad it’s been and Mr. Trump may not as well until he investigates. I didn’t until the first Bundy standoff happened in 2014.

              However, what I suggested to the Congressman’s office was for him to lead a delegation of U.S. and State officials to meet with them, get the law enforcement the hell out of there and then head a delegation to the White House to demand Clemency for the Hammonds.

              Liked by 2 people

          • Trump would offer them a deal they would take, that would serve all interests except the crooks. That is his genius. Uphold all laws.

            Liked by 6 people

        • Trump is running to save the soul of America, so you will have to forgive him if his responses don’t always make you happy.

          He can’t do everything, or fix everything. Everyone has issues they feel strongly about. When I was a Ron Paul guy, auditing the FED was really important to me. I haven’t heard Trump say one word about the FED and I am 100% ok with that.

          Look at it from his perspective, today he has nothing to gain by getting stuck in the weeds of the argument in Oregon. His job is to get elected before anything else right now or all of our aspirations are just an unrealized dream.

          The stakes are bigger than corruption at the BLM. Not to be melodramatic but Western Civilization is on the line.

          Liked by 7 people

          • SharonKinDC says:

            ITA with your post. As an addition:

            A couple years back he accepted gold for a deposit on a building or unit… Everything has a time and place. I trust him to determine when and IF to raise certain issues.

            Liked by 3 people

          • stella says:

            If he is in favor of big government and federal control of land, that isn’t minor. I don’t think that questioning a candidate is beyond the pale. I see too much blind faith and following here, sometimes.

            Liked by 1 person

            • So, vote for Cruz then. Or Carson. Or Bush.

              He didn’t make the government big. He is talking about cutting it down to size.

              But if you want him to be perfect, he isn’t going to be.

              Like

            • You’re not the only one keeping an eye out for any sign of “Big Gov Trump”. I went full uppity on hearing that he was in favor of single payer, until I got the straight poop from Trump himself that it was “haters” pushing disinformation.

              Remember that Trump will not be able to rein in the comtard violence on the left, without telling people on the right the same thing. I’m OK with that. It needs to work both ways. Obama is all about selective law enforcement. Trump is about rule of law.

              Liked by 1 person

            • judyw says:

              “questioning a candidate” is the most healthy part of discernment and “blind faith” was the reason we began in 2008 down the “slippery slope”. I believe Trump would agree.

              Liked by 2 people

            • I’m guilty Stella. I’m going to trust Trump until he proves that he’s not worthy of that trust. But your comment is a good one.

              Like

            • WSB says:

              I certainly do not believe that Trump is for overreach of land that should be private. He just bought the PO in DC.

              Like

            • El Torito says:

              stella – your spinning this thread into “If he is in favor of big government and federal control of land, that isn’t minor.” is the most intellectually dishonest and insulting post I’ve seen on this site in the 1 year I’ve been hanging out here.

              Like

              • stella says:

                I’ve been admin here for almost five years. I’m not spinning anything – just asking questions. Problem is that many of you here will not and cannot question Trump in any way at all. I would like to know more about what he really thinks about the Oregon situation. Could be that what he believes will be in line with what I believe. Perhaps he is not yet knowledgeable about the situation and was shooting from the hip. I don’t know, and I would like to know. That is honest – and not insulting at all.

                ADD: It was amjean who first asked the question – not me. I replied to amjean’s original comment.

                And it is “you’re” (the contraction of you are), not your. Sorry to be a grammar nazi, but this is a pet peeve, as it seems that many people don’t know the difference between the two words – “your” (the possessive), and “you’re” (the contraction).

                Liked by 1 person

                • Jo McIntyre says:

                  Hi, stella – nice to see you again! I agree totally with the content of your post, but your grammar comment needs elucidation. I, too, am a grammar nazi, but I believe you are misconstruing the function of “spinning.” We could view that word as a noun.
                  From the all-knowing Internet, I found this: “A gerund is a noun made from a verb by adding “-ing.” The gerund form of the verb “read” is “reading.” You can use a gerund as the subject, the complement, or the object of a sentence.” So, El Torito, might have been refer to the spinning you were doing. It was yours.
                  I still agree with you that big government and federal control of land are HUGE issues and we deserve to learn what Mr. Trump’s views and principles are on those topics. I also agree with other posters slamming the NYT for not giving us more of what he said on the subject of the Oregon standoff during the interview.
                  I posted Greg Walden’s speech on the floor of the house kindly posted on this site yesterday all over my FB pages. Already got some shares and attaboys.

                  Like

                • stella says:

                  If the sentence read “your spinning OF this thread ….” I would agree with you!

                  I DO agree with you about the video. It is long, but clarifies the situation in Oregon.

                  Liked by 1 person

              • stella says:

                How much do you know about what is going on in the West? The BLM, FWS, and EPA are working to eliminate private development, and to take private property. Watch the video I posted earlier about the situation in Oregon. It is easy to take the position that the ranchers out there are law breakers, until you read and understand what has been going on. I separate the two situations – the Hammonds being sent to jail, and the occupation of Federal property by the Bundy group. One thing that can be said is that the Bundy group has brought national attention to the situation.

                If the government agencies were acting in eastern states as they are in the western states, there would be armed insurrection – with pitchforks AND guns!

                Liked by 2 people

          • singtune says:

            I was a Ron Paul lady and agree 100% with what you just said. There is So much to do~~! He has to go with “Priorities”~when he has the Power!

            If this Issue is still there he can Handle it when he has the Power to do so~! Already ~~he said he would TALK~~not Go Against them~~like all the rest. What else can he do NOW? Hopefully that~~~ & a few more comments like that~~will Defuse the OBAMA GOONS~!

            Liked by 1 person

        • KBR says:

          He “spoke at length” and we all we got was a very short phrase, not even a full sentence.

          I wish we knew all that he said “at length.” But of course they didn’t want to tell us.

          Do you think they left out so much just to rile us?

          Liked by 4 people

    • Dr. Bogus Pachysandra says:

      ““you cannot let people take over federal property.””

      It should not be federal property at all! I disagree with him due to that point.

      Liked by 3 people

      • KBR says:

        He “spoke at length” but they didn’t tell us what he said “at length.” Just that one measly phrase.

        Liked by 2 people

      • rashamon says:

        Teddy Roosevelt at work, I believe. Otherwise, inform me. This is not a good place to be. Thank you.

        Like

      • SharonKinDC says:

        KBR right on the limited info shared by the NYT. spits

        However, be honest. This wasn’t a question about whether or not the BLM should exist or that cabin be Fed property. It was about the stand-off and the bottom line, right or wrong, it is Federal property.

        Some would starve because the buffet doesn’t have enough selections.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Notmeagain says:

        However. Suppose he were somehow made president tomorrow. Part of the job description is upholding the law. Is it so important to you that government overreach in this case be stopped that he resort, like Obama, to acting by fiat? What does it gain us to immediately corrupt the new system? We believe we are on the high ground: so do Obama’s supporters. The only way to keep the high ground is to play by the rules, and change the rules as necessary in a proper process. So hate on me if you want, but I agree with Trump, you can’t have people taking over federal property and he would be remiss as a CEO to let it happen. He is telling BLM and La Raza and everyone else too, we will work together or you are outta here. Isn’t that good? Whether or how much the government should control is another issue. It may be related, but he wasn’t asked about that, he was asked what he would do in a specific, immediate case.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Jo McIntyre says:

          There IS a law, written by Repr. Greg Walden and passed, and BLM is breaking it with impunity! This is why farmers and ranchers are at their wits’ end! What do you do when the law IS on your side, but the agency supposedly limited by the law instead ignores it. Look at Repr. Walden’s video speech posted by Stella for enlightenment please.
          For everybody else, if you are not current on federal lands issues in the West, please try to get up to speed before forming opinions. You can be sure the MSM isn’t up to speed! You say you don’t believe the MSM, then turn around and believe them. Sheesh!

          Like

    • Benson II says:

      No he didn’t but if he gets into the real nuts and bolts of it hopefully he’ll rein back the Fed’s land grab. His solution was for the ranchers to make a deal with the gov’t, fat chance when you dealing with the criminals appointed by criminal #1. Trump hasn’t yet equated what he’s doing with what other Americans are doing and that’s standing up to the over reach and lawlessness of the Federal government. He’s never had to feel the unfairness of the heavy boot on the neck like those ranchers have. Not everybody has the wealth to pay them off so they leave you alone which doesn’t solve the problem as he’s finding out now.

      Liked by 1 person

      • rashamon says:

        I don’t disagree with you, but working in real estate development, Trump has felt the “heavy boot” in his industry. This should be interesting: NE manufacturing facing off again the rural interests. Isn’t this what started the war between the states? Don’t tell me we are finally going to address this issue?

        Like

      • SharonKinDC says:

        A deal could be a cease and desist from the Feds, restoration of the Hammond’s full rights, damages for a kangaroo court and conviction (and extension on specious charges) in exchange for the Feds not being totally embarrassed, gone after for their malfeasance, and, oh, and the Bundy’s going home.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Trust No One says:

          I think Trump is all about deals that are win/win. I’m not a deal maker but my opinion that is the only way you can be a successful deal maker. One can’t win on every deal but everyone has to be satisfied.

          Liked by 2 people

  12. Pat NOHAVEC says:

    tonight China or the Shang Hi Market is pulling off their circuit breaker of the 7% and it will more thanlikely go down to about 24% – which means that tomorrow we will more than likely see a market crashand the VIX, mob, old-establishment won’t be able to pull it out like in Dec.Trump more than likely knows this but can’t say it. So, this comment of import tariff will be a mutt topicif goes as expected “in my world”.I’m 100% for Trump so this isn’t a comment bashing him.

    Date: Thu, 7 Jan 2016 22:13:08 +0000 To: patnohavec1@msn.com

    Like

    • stringy theory says:

      The market is way over priced as it is–rising on nothing but feel good stuff and low Fed rates. It used to be that companies were graded on their long-term profit making and return to shareholders. Now the green eye shade boys runs everything and create the illusion of profits by cutting, cutting, cutting.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Ono says:

        False earning statements and BS advertisement never made a company strong. Value in production, sales and competitiveness do! Publish a false earning statement in a publicly owned company…Shut down the company and send their CEO and CFO to prison for life! Trump will, and I personal can’t wait!

        Trump 16

        Like

  13. Rondo says:

    I think they figured out Trump

    Liked by 3 people

  14. bullnuke says:

    The man continues to amaze. Trump controls the narrative so he controls the media. Never seen anything like it. Poor establishment types and the media haven’t got a clue how to deal with him.
    Make America Great Again, buddy.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Bluto says:

      One of my favorite aspects to all of this, is how the media, the pundits, and all the other candidates keep underestimating him. Good God! They have ZERO capability to learn.

      Liked by 11 people

      • And they are the opinion makers for the world. Scary.

        Liked by 5 people

      • sundance says:

        Trump has also been promoting his own underestimation.

        He’s been sandbagging for months, I just never realized how severely (and brilliantly) he was doing it, until recently. Just wait and see, it’s going to be a LOT OF FUN being a Trump supporter in 2016.

        Liked by 15 people

        • Bluto says:

          No!!! More Fun than the last SIX months??!?

          Holy Jumping-Jersey-Cows-on-Bath Salts!
          I don’t know if I can handle that much fun! 😉

          Liked by 9 people

        • mariner says:

          And all the right people are talking before they think.

          Liked by 3 people

        • bullnuke says:

          Never had this much fun watching the run up to the primary voting before. And pundits don’t think he has crossover appeal? It’s YUGE!!!

          Liked by 4 people

        • PremAmerica says:

          The tariff salvo was about running US foreign policy Sundance. Not just about trade.

          Trump started to run US Syria/ISIS policy by empowering Putin 8 weeks ago. He is starting to run US N. Korea policy by threatening China now.

          Everybody in DC acts like a chess piece in geopolitics. People like Rand and Sanders are Doves and want to be Pawns. People like Hillary and McCain are Hawks and want to be like Queens. That’s all they know and they see Putin and China as Queens.

          Trump is like the Grandmaster who plays WITH the Queens and Pawns.

          This isn’t just about Trade. This is Trump implementing US Foreign Policy in the region.

          Liked by 3 people

        • Trent Telenko says:

          Sundance,

          Trump has been building a Presidential organization withinb his buness empire for 20-years…and running a disinformation campaign against the political elites in NY City all his adult life.

          That Trump is getting 39%_ of the black male votrers polled in the Florida poll you posted earlier is a political :”Come to Jesus” moment for the GOPe consultant class.

          If Truimp gets a Richard Nixon class percentage of the black vote that turned out in 2012 in 2016. He will take 49 states..

          Liked by 2 people

      • stringy theory says:

        Even a myna bird can figure out how to talk the talk, something the turkeys in the media can’t seem to do.

        Liked by 1 person

  15. Pingback: “The Art of The Deal” – Donald Trump “Talks” To New York Times Editorial Board…. | Rifleman III Journal

  16. petszmom says:

    another brilliant article….sundance, you never disappoint and I look forward to these articles, just like if I were unearthing precious gems from the ground. I savor them, relish the education I get, and arm myself for battle with the trolls on facebook with all these beautiful facts and analysis.

    Liked by 4 people

  17. georgiafl says:

    Running a prosperous country is not rocket science – with the right policies (and corruption control) and morals, work ethics, a country prospers.
    We need to put more people back to work and off food stamps. Let them learn to contribute and quit playing around with drugs, making babies they allow to grow up wild, expecting everyone else to pay for their upbringing and for their hair extensions, fancy nails, and Louis Vuitton bags.
    Reality time, y’all.

    Liked by 5 people

    • mariner says:

      It’s a shame how even freedom-lovers have been brainwashed with the idea that we need someone to “run the country”.

      What we need is somebody to get the FedGov off our necks, so we can take care of ourselves and train up our children in the way they should go.

      (I don’t mean this personally and I hope you don’t take it that way.)

      Liked by 5 people

  18. daughnworks247 says:

    Leverage baby!

    Like

  19. daughnworks247 says:

    I do business in China every day and have been screaming about trade issues for over a decade. When we HAVE money and “restructure”, we can do a LOT more.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. This is why our Two Party Evil Money cult lust for the Mexican wage slaves.
    To compete with China’s wage slaves.
    Evil begets evil.

    Liked by 2 people

  21. China’s stock market and the reporting on said market is all fraud all the time.

    Keep in mind these people running China are all 100% commie/Marxist of the Little Red Book.

    They know the Red Book by heart, how to run a huge economy not so much.

    But they know how to lie and force others to bow to the lies.

    Liked by 3 people

  22. tz says:

    I just read that JCPenny’s same store sales are UP 3.7% – Macy’s was down, it wasn’t the weather ;).

    Liked by 6 people

  23. Ono says:

    When Trump talks of a trade imbalance of 500 billion (half a trillion)per year with China, that does not mean we do 1/2 trillion in trade, rather it means that they out perform us in that amount. A tariff (45% ) on the imbalance alone is almost a quarter trillion alone. that is 225billion dollars. per year!

    That combined with Japan, Mexico , India and Indo, would pretty much fund our governments lavish annual spending. Get rid of the Lavish aspect and the USA reigns supreme again!

    End free trade with countries that tariff the USA. The TPP is the death nail to the middle class. Trump will put China, and all the Globalist Cronies back where they belong…in second place!…or prison!

    Trump ’16

    Liked by 3 people

  24. rashamon says:

    Ah, McCain thinks Cruz’s eligibility might be at question. The carnival is just setting up the tents.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. NCPatriot says:

    The video above was great until they put Jeb ! on.

    I also don’t get how all the news media-(all of them) are talking about Cruz being ahead in Iowa, when all Iowa Polls are three weeks + old. Some also refer to Trump “in panic”, Really?

    Liked by 1 person

    • El Torito says:

      Bingo. It has become clear to me that Rush, Hannity, Levin are just reciting talking points for a paycheck. Really sad – there was a time where they were free to speak their thoughts and those days are gone. Now, I have less respect for them than your average lib-tard, because at the least, the average lib-tard believes what they are saying.

      Like

  26. bullnuke says:

    There is no doubt The Donald, while relaxing in the evening, conjures up thoughts as to what story he can force upon the unsuspecting media. I’m sure he chuckles and says “it’s just too easy”.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. seventhndr says:

    I’m already looking past the Trump presidency and wondering how do we keep strong leaders in the Whitehouse so that we don’t regress.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. The Boss says:

    Mrs. Boss was scrolling through the channels a short time ago. She hates George Will, and she found him sputtering about the 45% tariff on Chinese goods that Trump proposed with the NYT. Will came off like his usual prissy sissy nerdness. Moved on to OAN to see if they’ll carry the Trump event in Burlington.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Doodahdaze says:

    The soft underbelly of the progcom regime. Can anyone spell ANZIO!

    Like

  30. TexasDude says:

    There was a study from a college done in 1999s or so that broke down the cost of a Nike shoe. To produce in the US the cost I think was maybe $20/$30 more.

    Last year, a news org investigate cost of a generic Nike shoe and half or more of the cost was not from manufacturer, Nike, but from folks like wholesaler and retailer.

    http://www.bizjournals.com/portland/blog/threads_and_laces/2014/12/the-cost-breakdown-of-a-100-pair-of-sneakers.html?s=image_gallery

    Like

  31. And so we see once again, in absolutely stark contrast, the difference between know-nothing-Lifer-Government-talkers, and accomplished-private-sector-doers. D.Trump for POTUS.

    Liked by 2 people

  32. emet says:

    Any trade enforcement of tariffs must include, well, enforcement. This requires penalties and the knowlegde of how to assess them. When US Customs was mixed with INS and Agriculture, this knowledge begin to dissapate. But the downward spiral started earlier. In 1985 if an importer was caught undervaluing to evade duty. he might be prosecuted. Or, administatively, his shipment seized and a penalty assessed. By 1990, seizures were not used, just penalties (under 19USC 1592). By the late 1990s, these penalties were fewer and fewer. Add to this, importers’ purposely misclassifying imports under the tariff schedule, transshipping thru cojntries with NAFTA , GSP, or other duty free treatment, not including some dutiable costs in the declared value, etc etc etc etc Well, there goes billions of dollars. Yeah, its fixable, but almost not. If you asked 20 key people at DHS how to detect double invoicing, I’d wager none could say. And several at least would not understand the question

    Like

  33. Jill says:

    James Goldsmith warned America of the consequences of GATT (WTO, NAFTA, etc.) in this interview back in 1995 ( Goldsmith is also author of the book “the Trap ” which also includes his warnings )
    The interview is in 5 parts…

    Goldsmith also pleaded with the U.S. Senate…

    Liked by 1 person

  34. JohnS says:

    Gotta bail for a while again.
    I remember when this used to be a conservative site.
    China is not the problem. our government is.
    As a business owner I can tell you without any doubt or reservation that if ‘our’ government were to get out of our way the Chinese would starve trying to compete with us.
    Consider how recently there billion person economy surpassed the economy of just one state, California.
    Think about it, until very recent times, 50 million people (less than a quarter of them actually working) achieved more than a billion Chinese.
    We don’t need to worry about them, we need to worry about our internal enemies that are destroying our ability to do what comes naturally to us.
    Kick ass and take names.

    Liked by 2 people

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