President Trump Announces “PREVENTS” Task Force Roadmap – 2:15pm ET

This afternoon President Trump announces the PREVENTS Task Force Roadmap which highlights the admin’s work to prevent veteran suicide and offer mental health resources to veterans. Anticipated Start Time 2:15pm ET  [Video Added]

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51 Responses to President Trump Announces “PREVENTS” Task Force Roadmap – 2:15pm ET

  1. T2020 says:

    Excellent!! 👍🏻⭐️🇺🇸👍🏻⭐️🇺🇸😁

    Liked by 2 people

  2. helmhood says:

    “You’re Fired, get out!”

    That’s what the VA secretary will say to any employee that mistreats our Veterans. This is classic Trump.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Patience says:

    A beautiful mind and heart
    in words
    in actions.

    Promises made
    Promises keeping

    I do love me MY President Donald J Trump

    Liked by 8 people

  4. avocadodipp says:

    This President is non-stop action! Trump makes all the others of my lifetime look like a bunch of anemic wimps (especially Mr Mom Pants).

    Liked by 6 people

  5. Eddd888 says:

    I haven’t called the VA in several years. It would be interesting to see if their phone answering robot has changed. Previously, for the first 10 minutes of the call, the robot would give out lots of information about who to call if you were suicidal. By the time you got through to an actual living person, you WERE suicidal.

    So cynical me- I asked myself, does the VA get a budget increase if more Vets commit suicide? It seems like a reasonable question.
    The VA. Giving Vets a second chance to die for their country since 1930.

    Liked by 1 person

    • navysquid says:

      Eddddd….that’s some dark humor…but I get it and have to laugh because that’s how many of us cope, right? I totally agree with you on the Phone Tree H*ll we all go through just to ask a simple question. I love any business where you call and an actual human being answers first.

      Liked by 2 people

    • woodstuff says:

      Edd, Garfield is alive and well, answering the phone with his real voice.

      Like

  6. Real prevention would include:
    – Restoration of Morals, see https://www.thewaytohappiness.org/about-us/
    – Drug prevention and education – http://www.drugfreeworld.org
    – Removing mind altering drugs from the market place since most (if not all) of the mass shooters used them and they are documented to cause violence – https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mental-health-watchdog-releases-new-report-on-link-between-psychotropic-drugs–schoolmass-shootings-300618265.html

    Like

    • Nan says:

      Scientology front groups aren’t going to help anybody…

      Liked by 1 person

      • Correct. Scientology just makes the above look “not real” when there’s plenty of non-scientology sources.

        In light of above I’m not very impressed by Trumps new campaign …

        “For patients with diagnosed SMI who do receive care, appropriate and expedited clinical treatment may significantly reduce the risk for suicide.443For example, individuals receiving antipsychotic medication and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) had a lower suicide risk.”

        Click to access PREVENTS-Supplemental-Materials-for-the-Roadmap.pdf

        The field is endemic with pharma corruption. Look at the opioid issue. Studies such as the one through the reference above (443) cannot be trusted because so many medical personnel are on the pharma pay roll.

        So many veterans have lost their life’s DUE to psychiatric drugs. Stop drugging if you want to stop suicides. But, no. We get the same droll “stigma” nonsense and “MH” rather than actually talking about the real issues – psychiatry and the pharmaceutical companies. I went through the PREVENTS documents. No where does it cover that,

        Trump should close down the VA and start talking to people like Peter Levine (see the top of my website in the following link).. The suicides will continue until someone wakes up and sticks their head above the water.

        https://michaelzfreeman.org/finish-the-fight-warfighters-unmask-a-previously-hidden-enemy/

        Like

      • wondering999 says:

        Well, the group gets terrible press, and is almost unbelievably aggressive in conflicts — but does help some people, depending on their problem and willingness to tackle it. Many people injured by working in the ruins of the WTC said that the SCN sauna&supplement protocol helped them.

        Like

  7. Nan says:

    The problem with mental health care for veterans, IMO, starts when they’re in the military.

    The military , like any big organization, has to find corporate answers for complex little human problems. They basically revert to one-size-fits-all solutions and that is extremely unhelpful when it comes to mental health. I can’t tell you how many briefings I was subjected to over the years that were essentially telling us “if you just talk to a suicidal person, they won’t be suicidal anymore.” Crap like that.

    The military is very good at fixing you mechanically; muscle, tendon, bone injuries are all very straightforward. You can see what the damage is, leadership can understand what the damage is, your buddies get it. There’s support. And if they can’t fix you mechanically, it’s pretty obvious and while still emotionally painful, the medical out processing process is relatively easy to navigate.

    Mental health problems aren’t like that. They’re messy. They’re inconvenient. And healing from that kind of issue may mean you’re a different person on the other side. You might be somebody who’s not compatible with the military anymore.

    For example, my last year in, I developed a bad anxiety issue that was aggravated by exactly the kind of “counseling” situation leadership tends to use to address problems. If I had a broken leg, I could beg out of, say, an event where you stood at attention for a long period of time, but that anxiety? I couldn’t tell my supervisor that he couldn’t close the door to talk to me. Wouldn’t be allowed, or understood. Rank and courtesies get in the way. Everything I tried through official channels made my situation worse.

    I came out of that hating counselors and distrusting my bosses. I still have issues with it. I have fertility problems now because of the extreme stress.

    What EVERYONE seems to miss is that the suicide rate is higher for non-combat veterans. The problems that need to be addressed are home station stressors, first and foremost. The pressure of our “one mistake” military needs to be eliminated.

    Anyway, it sets up a culture where you don’t want to get help when you get out. And even if you do want to get help, there are a lot of very weird things that go on in the military that are hard to explain to a civilian counselor. It’s hard to explain them to somebody in your same service but perhaps in a different career field. The issues become so specific that they’re almost impossible to share.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Ordinaryman says:

      Once you share with your Higher Power (God) you will find it easier to share with others that may feel as you do and will benefit both you and them by discussing your feelings. Sometimes you have to get out in Nature and talk to a plant.

      Like

      • Nan says:

        What helped was my cat. Everyone should have a pet.

        But I’m going to strenuously disagree with you on the religious angle. Having a relationship with Jesus or asking God to help you carry the burden is beneficial in other ways, but does literally nothing to help explain military-specific problems to civilians.

        And as far as I know, there are no support groups for military vets who got chewed up by the rampant, unending insanity at their regular duty station, as opposed to what happens on deployment. The true lack of support is for what happens at home station. Even my family doesn’t want to hear about it; my mom’s told me she’d rather be proud of what I did than hear about all the problems. Like I said, the suicide rate is higher for that demographic, and nobody cares. Nobody wants to know that the military is, by and large, an insanely dysfunctional bureaucratic nightmare that only functions when it’s focused directly on combat missions.

        Liked by 6 people

        • Eddd888 says:

          I’ve seen really good results here. https://k9sonthefrontline.org/
          We went through their program about three years ago. I know almost all the people in the video – be sure to watch it.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Got it; I really do and no one will in all likelihood ever know why.
          You make a great point and too often it is dismissed by those closest to you.
          I don’t have any answers, just move along as best you can day by day and hopefully one day an opportunity will present itself.
          That’s what a family, I know of, is going through and has for the last 10 years.
          Mental health issues take their toll on everyone involved and there are no easy answers.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Nan says:

            Mental health is tough. I think my mom blames herself for some of the problems I’ve had, like she should have stopped me from enlisting.

            But that’s what makes mental health difficult. It’s hard to see the origin point, it’s hard to see what an end healthy state is, and while it’s a deeply personal problem, it affects everyone around you.

            I don’t have any answers on it either. What I do know is that veteran mental health begins in the service.

            Liked by 2 people

            • True!
              Perhaps “veteran mental health” is more prominent and recognized in the service.

              Treatment and resolution of that should begin in the service and continued as a Veteran.

              But, I don’t write policy….damn!

              Like

        • Eddd888 says:

          “”And as far as I know, there are no support groups for military vets who got chewed up by the rampant, unending insanity at their regular duty station, …..””

          Perhaps there’s a mission here for you , Nan.

          Like

          • Nan says:

            I don’t know. Maybe there will be more support for “inconvenient” truths about the military on the other side of the current craziness. It seems like there’s a lot of reflexive, automatic support for the military that isn’t necessarily beneficial. But maybe with all the generals saying and doing crazy stuff, the right will figure out we’ve got our own problems.

            I’d like to figure out a way to help with some of the ignored issues. The fear, of course, is that what good things are left might get broken in the attempt.

            Like

        • petszmom says:

          So agree with your post. I can’t begin to tell you how much harm religion did to me. I was suicidal and prayed daily for help. Little did I know I needed professional help. I would have died remaining a Christian. Then I found through therapy that my purpose was rescuing animals. In turn I was rescued umpteen times by every dog and cat I saved. I wish people would just stop with the I will pray for you nonsense. How many times I would have appreciated a ‘i want to help you find the right help’ instead of the prayer cop out. So many years wasted!

          Like

          • Nan says:

            I was not saying religion harmed me. My faith is very important to me.

            What I’m saying is that it doesn’t help *other people* understand the very odd little issues that come with military service. That would take increased public awareness, as well as a willingness on both sides to listen rather than co-opt the military for talking points. Realistically, it doesn’t matter all that much, except when you’re a vet trying to deal with civilian counselors or friends.

            Like

            • Eddd888 says:

              There are female civilian combat veteran Christian counselors somewhere out there, as I’m sure you know.

              Like

              • Nan says:

                I’m talking about non-combat vets. I’ve dealt with the mental health care system for a while, and it gets really discouraging after a while. If you’ve had a different experience, I’m happy for you.

                Like

            • petszmom says:

              I did not say it was harmful to you. I agreed that it harmed ME. I was referring to your second paragraph after you mention the cat. Other avenues need to be explored when it comes to mental illness.

              Like

        • wondering999 says:

          Nan, I’ve known people who loved being in the military. I’ve also listened to veterans complain about specifics. I remember one old man who told me that the mess chief for his Army group used to sell all their table salt on a black market, back in the 1960s before Vietnam. But I don’t think I’ve ever seen someone describe the military so succinctly as you just did. What you wrote is a keeper, and it is what happens just about every time the government gets involved in an organization also —
          “Nobody wants to know that the military is, by and large, an insanely dysfunctional bureaucratic nightmare that only functions when it’s focused directly on combat missions.”

          Like

        • woodstuff says:

          Upon return from Viet Nam, those who were awaiting discharge (and others) were assigned to the chaplains office on some mainland base where they reported in ever so often (or not). At least they had some semblance of help if they were so inclined.

          Like

  8. Patience says:

    As man is wrapped in God’s love
    Like a butterfly in its cocoon
    The United States is in its re-birth

    God, Continue to bless, guide and keep safe President Donald J Trump.
    >Amen

    Liked by 1 person

  9. 335blues says:

    I have a great idea for another “prevents” task force.
    Let’s have a task force on terrorist groups like black lives matter
    and other groups which are terrorizing our neighborhoods.
    It seems really urgent since people are getting very tired of these groups destroying property and
    sowing chaos and violence where we live.
    I can imagine at some point people will begin to believe the government will just not do anything to stop the chaos.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. FreyFelipe says:

    “to prevent veteran suicide and offer mental health resources to veterans.”

    From Gil Spencer:

    B.G. “Jug” Burkett wrote the book on Vietnam. Actually, the book on Vietnam veterans. It’s called “Stolen Valor”,” and it examines why so many Americans bought the image of that war’s vets as disaffected, disheveled, drug-addled, bitter and unemployable losers.

    The answer is quite simple. It’s because the national media bought it first and then sold it to the American people. But that stereotype was one that was built on a flatbed of misrepresentations, distortions and outright lies. Burkett knew differently and decided to prove it.

    The first place he went was to the Department of Labor. He asked for a breakdown of unemployment statistics. At the time, the unemployment rate for all males was 6 percent. Among all veterans it was 5.5 percent. But among Vietnam vets, it was 3.9 percent, the lowest of any demographic group.

    He also discovered that his fellow vets had the highest per capita income, the highest home-ownership rate, and were well among the best educated. When he ran the numbers on homelessness and the prison population, Vietnam vets showed up far below the national average. Vietnam Vets had one of the lowest suicide rates in America.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Eddd888 says:

      It is as you say. I’ve read the same thing, although not from Burkett’s book.

      The mainstream media should be classified as foreign, hostile misinformation and propaganda entities and not subject to the 1st Amendment freedoms.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Nan says:

      The media also convinced everyone that sexual assault is rampant in the military. I got asked about that multiple times at my first civilian job. All my female coworkers wanted to know about was if I’d ever experienced that.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Mike in a Truck says:

    Suicides of my fellow Veterans are on the hands of two of the most evil men we’ve ever hand in the Oval Office: Bush and Obama.The revolving door deployment of the same units in and out of theaters of operation caused irrepairable harm to the mental health of those troops.Along with that comes broken marriages,lost employment, homelessness, incarceration and drug abuse. From my generation of Vets to the current- ask them : was it worth it? Hell no! Why? Why? Because there was no victory that’s why. Just a bloodletting in the name of nationbuilding. Next time some shithead politicians (Cheney,Powell,Jarrett) wrap themselves in the Flag and HiHo us off to war the response should be: You First and your kids.

    Liked by 3 people

  12. FreyFelipe says:

    “This afternoon President Trump announces the PREVENTS Task Force Roadmap which highlights the admin’s work to prevent veteran suicide and offer mental health resources to veterans.”

    The most important action President Trump has taken to “PREVENTS” for the future was when he fired the blood thirsty war mongering chickenhawk misanthrope John Bolton.

    Like

  13. MicD says:

    from this vietnam vet, the word Disconnected stands out.

    Like

  14. Jason Ross says:

    This action will not get one iota of mention in the news

    Like

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