Chinese Math Quiz

Chinese elementary school math quiz.  Can you figure it out?

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TWO HINTS:

  • 1) Each element has an individual value.
  • 2) Chinese are sneaky.

ANSWER BELOW.

10 + 10 + 10 = 30

10 + 5 + 5 = 20

5 + 4 + 4 = 13

10 + (3 x 2) = 16

[Each cat is 3 each whistle is 2]

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324 Responses to Chinese Math Quiz

  1. Grandma Covfefe says:

    Hey, Sundance! I thought Sundance Univeristy is closed for Thanksgiving holidays!

    Liked by 3 people

  2. MIKE says:

    I was whistle-punked

    Liked by 8 people

    • The Devilbat says:

      I never saw the X. Dahhhh

      Liked by 5 people

    • Tom says:

      The answer is not 16. The answer is 20.

      Each cat is 5. Each whistle is 2.

      Liked by 5 people

      • That’s what I have too

        Liked by 2 people

      • navysquid says:

        Tom…are you counting the whistles around the cats neck in the photos and the one’s that are NOT present in the other? I think you are missing those…

        Like SD said…sneaky.

        Liked by 7 people

        • Patriot1783 says:

          Hahaha thought item around the cat neck was a tie!

          Note: Need eyes checked 🤓

          Liked by 4 people

        • DGC says:

          At the risk of being too rigorous in my analysis, the first three pictorial equations represent three linear algebraic equations with three independent and unknown variables that can be solved simultaneously. Once the value of each pictorial character is determined, the fourth pictorial equation is easily solved giving priority to multiplication over addition. In terms of variables, let x represent the sneakers, y represent the cat and z represent the whistle. Then we have:

          1) x+x+x = 30, or x = 10;
          2) x+2y+2z = 20;
          3) y+5z = 13

          First, rearrange equation 3 to solve for y:

          y= 13-5z

          Combining equations 2 and 3, we get:

          x+2y+2z = x+2(13-5z)+2z = 20.

          After plugging in x=10 we get z=2. Finally, one substitutes the calculated values for z and x in either equations 2 or 3 to get y=3.

          Of course, we are interested in the solution to the last equation, which can be written as follows:

          4) x+(y*z) = 10+(3*2) = 16

          Sometimes it’s hard to not think like an engineer.

          Cheers!

          Like

      • Daniel says:

        The cat has a whistle above and below the cat is without a whistle.

        That is a seriously sneaky test. Now, don’t feel bad for not getting that because WE are not members of their class. Within the class, they are TAUGHT this. We see no obvious distinction between cat pictures and therefore did not know to assign distinct values to the symbols. The “double whistle” was also a thing I didn’t notice at first.

        Keep in mind also, their written language is STRONG and heavy on symbology while we use a loosely based sound-character system with no intrinsic meaning for each character. In the Chinese written language, characters are often composed of other characters which serve to augment meaning the way we have compound words, roots, suffixes and prefixes.

        If we were briefed on the types of analyses required to solve the puzzle, we would have jumped into the correct answer without hesitation.

        We are meant to feel inferior but we should not. We operate under completely different framing and standards. Once the framing and standards are known, we’re fine.

        THE CHILDREN WERE TAUGHT this specific task just as our children are taught in a specific manner.

        Our main problem is that we allow our standards to be reduced by lowering the standards to meet a lower-IQ population whether they are black, hispanic or middle-eastern. All of them, as group averages, have fairly low IQs compared to white and east Asian people.

        For individual children with higher than average IQs (whether black, hispanic, middle eastern, white or east-asian it DOES NOT MATTER individually) they should be placed in a certain band of education to allow them to advance to their potential. For those with average IQ, the same and those with low IQ, the same. As things stand, unless you’re in a special program or have rich parents, your educational standards will be limited by the LEAST intelligent children around you. Sounds fair right?

        Liked by 9 people

      • I cam up with 17!
        cat is 5
        10 plus 5 + 2 = 17

        Like

      • Bert Darrell says:

        You missed that the cat on the last equation lost his whistle. Look again. Cat (5) – whistle (2) = 3

        Like

      • Leslie says:

        The cats are wearing whistles when they represent 5 and the final cat is not wearing a whistle, therefore it equals 3. Very sneaky.

        Like

    • WSB says:

      I thought the whistles were steaks, so how am I doing?!

      Like

  3. Alison says:

    Is this gonna be on my citizenship test???? Think I’ll just cross the border illegally …

    Liked by 6 people

  4. Wow, that IS sneaky.
    It’s a good thing our trade reps have their eyes open because if I was one of them I would have mistakenly given away the store….LOL

    Liked by 4 people

    • Daniel says:

      It’s not sneaky. It’s what they were taught to look at. The breakdown is the fact that we aren’t taught to look at certain details.

      But hey, there are details to be missed even AFTER this cat-whistle analysis — How about the relative SIZES of the whistles? The absolutely minuscule whistle of the cat does not quite compare to the larger whistles we’re expected to value at 2 each. Plus, can we honestly value a used cat whistle the same as a new whistle?

      This is all relative to the depth of the analysis in which you’re expected to engage.

      Liked by 1 person

      • BeePee says:

        It’s sneaky.

        Liked by 1 person

        • vladdy says:

          Upon showing it to the Dude of the House, he pointed out that the answer is, the Chinese are poor artists, as they can’t draw a whistle that doesn’t look like a bean. (Someone else thought they were steaks, and I didn’t even try to figure out WHAT they were, just thiking what number they were worth, so totally missed that the same thing was around the cat’s neck in most pictures. (P.S. That “engineer” description? Never thought engineers were so verbal. I’m really verbal, but do math like this in my head by intuition, not by putting into words and the putting the words into complex steps.)

          Like

    • piper567 says:

      When you read sundance’s analysis of, say, the specific challenges US trade negotiators make to an agreement such as NAFTA, its easy to overlook the fact they catch this level of deception on a daily basis.
      We have the luxury of admiring them in hindsight, but the Wolverines are Really Brilliant.
      Thy ALWAYS see the whistle around Kitty’s neck, ha!

      Liked by 3 people

  5. I totally got it correct, (after I looked at the answer). My eyes didn’t make out the multiplication symbol till afterwards lol

    Liked by 3 people

  6. rumpole2 says:

    Another Great Divide

    How can I figure this equation, if multiplication’s the rule
    You keep subtracting me from you, and it just doesn’t add up at all

    Liked by 3 people

  7. Doug says:

    How come the cat is 5 in the first equations then only 3 in the last? The answer should be 20, isn’t it?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Cyber says:

      Yeah, the answer part is wrong. It’s 10 + (5*2) = 20.

      Liked by 1 person

    • AM says:

      Because the cat in the previous pictures was wearing a whistle (2) but he was not in the last set of problems. So the cat was worth (5-2) or 3

      Sundance is correct: the Chinese are very sneaky. Or perhaps better phrased, too clever for their own good.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Cuppa Covfefe says:

        Catty, at least 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

      • They are neither sneaky nor too smart.

        I got the answer wrong. Twice.
        Why? Because I made assumptions that were not true, I did not pay attention to information that was plainly visible. Suppose this were a contract and I made those same erroneous assumptions … or a treaty.

        The Chinese were not too smart for their own good … I was.

        The lesson is that nothing is insignificant.

        Liked by 2 people

        • WSB says:

          While working on the Great Wall Hotel, the US company I worked for also created plans for one small support hotel to house designers, consultants and workers.

          The Chinese stole concrete from the concrete factories the US company built for The Great Wall Hotel, flipped the plans 180 degrees for the small support hotel. and built one additional hotel from the proprietary plans and stolen concrete.

          ⛩ + 📐+ 🏢 =📉💣💥

          Like

    • Cyber says:

      Never mind. Cat with whistle is 5. Cat without is only 3. That is just stupid in that the whistles are barely recognizable on the cat and honestly this reminds me of a FORTRAN test I had decades ago where they’d toss in a comma where a period was supposed to be to “getcha” but the mimeograph tests were so hard to read already you’d just assume it was a defect in the copy.

      Liked by 3 people

      • AM says:

        Yeah, this is not a test of the student’s knowledge, but to show how clever the test designer is. Less than impressed.

        Liked by 2 people

        • piper567 says:

          I kindly disagree AM…the kids are being taught, not only within their system of writing as Daniel ^^^ pointed out, but their learning is being reinforced by their success or failure.
          The Chinese, from what I have gleaned, do not consider competition to be the evil our libtards would have it be.
          I see this as a weeding-out process.
          Kids are not going to get a problem like this wrong more than once.

          Liked by 1 person

      • cjzak says:

        Ok, they got me too. I saw the whistles on the cats but never gave them a thought that they were part of the equation and never paid attention to the fact the one at the end was not wearing one. Tricky is an understatement. Guess I should pay attention to details much more closely. I’d be a bad witness in a trial.

        Liked by 2 people

        • piper567 says:

          Remember at one of the rallies, when Trump was mocking the US negotiators of our “disastrous” Trade Treaties…and he made a BIG POINT of saying that our adversaries read Every Dot, Every Comma, Every Word???
          He mocked our negotiators for being lazy and stupid.
          See, these kids are simply being well trained.
          If you look at the problem this way, its not tricky at all…its just focused differently than we may focus our similar problems.
          I think the problem is an excellent example of a way to teach actual observation skills.
          btw, I didn’t factor in kittywhistles either, ha!

          Liked by 1 person

      • Bert Darrell says:

        Consider the whistle the fine print that most people ignore.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Pdcovfefe says:

      Because the last cat is missing the whistle around it’s neck.

      Like

    • Derek of Florida says:

      To be fair, there is no equation, prior to the last open ended equation, demonstrating the value of the whistle.

      Like

    • CaptainNonno says:

      No whistle around the neck

      Like

  8. PgtSndThinker says:

    Such a good exercise Sundance. It exposes us Treepers for who we really are beneath the surface. Now if we would only take responsibility for our deficiencies in observational and mathematical skills, we could make forward progress on MAGA.

    Liked by 4 people

  9. progpoker says:

    Had I caught the addition of a new operator, I probably would have gotten it. Damn sneaky!! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Maquis says:

    AA egos hardest hit.

    Like

  11. One problem with the suggested solution is that the value of the string that is used to hold a whistle around a cat’s neck is assumed to be zero.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. E, ROBOT says:

    Cat with whistle = 5
    Cat minus whistle (worth 2) = 3
    10 + (3×2)
    10 + 6
    16

    Like

    • Coast says:

      No. there are not two items with 3 points. The cat without whistle is 3, but the whistle is only 2.

      Like

      • The solution as presented is correct. You are still missing the obvious multiplication operator and haven’t noticed that the kids are doing algebra.

        Yep, this is representational math. Try it again as
        X, (Y+Z), Y, Z for, shoes, cat + whictle, cat alone, whistle alone
        the final line is thus X+(YZ)=?

        There is a heirarchy of operations in algebra (which is exactly what this is) and the multiplication is applied first. Thus: cat times whistle plus tennis shoes or tennis shoes plus the sum of cat times whistle.

        I missed it because I didn’t see the problem for what it was. I got it wrong twice. I haven’t taken an algebra class since 1970 and have barely used it since.

        Like

    • BeePee says:

      (10+3) x 2
      13 x2
      26

      Like

  13. YvonneMarie says:

    Got it😉. Soooo “the definition of the word ‘is’ depends” on the dictator, not God.
    Communism!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. lastinillinois says:

    Dang it!
    Missed the “x” sign.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. joeknuckles says:

    26, because you perform operations from left to right.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. lepanto says:

    Very sneaky.
    But the artwork is unclear to the point of unintelligibility.
    If those things were “cats”, I could not understand why they had “noses” on the forehead.
    I thought those red disks with the white center were steaks.
    In no way did I identify those tiny little “whistles” around the “cat’s” necks with the big red “steaks” in the other pictures.
    The pricing was absurd, but that may be OK in China.
    Who would sell a live cat for 5 (dollars), but sell 2 steaks for 4 (dollars).
    (Oh, no. I just had a bad idea about Chinese restaurants.)

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Coast says:

    The correct answer is 15. 10 plus 3 (cat minus whistle) plus 2 (whistle). 15 total.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Details..details.., as daddy told me. Never bet on the other man’s tricks.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Molly says:

    Moar Quizes, Sundance.
    Thanks. 😉

    Like

  20. quintrillion says:

    So pleased to figure out the values in 2. and then 3. that I blew right past the 3 changes in the 4th. so I had figured 19. Now I see what I missed. I missed no whistle, times & one less whistle.
    I would not have figured, however that the car without the whistle was 5-2 unless I assume one less whistle is 4-2, therefore, no whistle on the cat is also -2

    Note to self whistles are worth 2 on or off a cat.

    Liked by 2 people

  21. USA loves Melania says:

    Tell me….what do you do with witches?

    Burn ’em! Burn ’em up!

    What do you burn apart from witches?

    More witches! And tennis shoes! And wood!

    So, why do tennis shoes burn? Because they’re made of wood!

    So, how can we tell if Sundance is made of wood? We could build a bridge out of him but bridges can also be made of stone. See the problem with that logic? But let me ask you this: Does wood sink in water? No, it floats! What also floats in water? Bread…apples…very small rocks…cider…grape gravy…cherries…mud…ducks….I’ve got it – a cat with a whistle!!!! So, thinking logically now, if Sundance weighs the same as a cat WITHOUT a whistle, he must be….

    A WITCH!!!

    I’ll get the scale.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Cuppa Covfefe says:

      Q: What’s the difference between a violin and a viola?
      A: A viola burns longer.

      Q: What’s a violin good for?
      A: Lighting up a viola.

      Q: What do a violist’s fingers have in common with lightning?
      A: They never strike the same place twice…

      (ducks and runs from burning violas…)

      Liked by 3 people

  22. litlbit2 says:

    Common Core? Lol

    Liked by 2 people

  23. floridawoman4trump says:

    I thought the answer was 26, my daughter who just graduated from college this year said, 19, then 30 and my best friend from Canada who is an accountant said 19 too. LOL. Back to school for me for Math and more reading needed under Sundance’s tutelage for awareness. Enjoyed this, Sundance, thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Jenny R. says:

    Do I get a prize if I got it right?
    Almost made the mistake of not noticing the whistle though — thank goodness for remembering to check my work (thank you Mr. Sullivan, all that hard work of yours appeared to pay off).

    Like

  25. Why are the 3 and 2 in the last equation treated a multiplication rather than addition? Nothing in the picture indicates multiplication whereas previous equations are processed straight across from left to right, which is the customary way to run solutions — towards the equals sign — no? So, I get 10+3=13*2=26.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Because some fiend used a multiplication symbol … which most of us read as an addition symbol because the preceding lines had had an addition symbol in that location.

      Problems: you can’t solve them if you don’t know what they are.

      Like

  26. Grandma Covfefe says:

    Great Thread today. The comments and answers here are just hysterical. Thank you for the laughs. I mean the really hard teary laughs.
    As they say, “Laughter is the Best Medicine”.
    🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  27. highdezertgator says:

    Give the test to all the senators, if they get the answer wrong they have to pass (vote yes) tax reform with the removal of O’Bammy mandate! …It will pass easily!

    Liked by 2 people

  28. 6x47 says:

    I have to agree, this test is dishonest BS.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. daughnworks247 says:

    = We’re going to get better trade deals with China. Billions and BILLIONS of winning!!!!!

    Liked by 2 people

  30. Alison says:

    Wait!

    Since when do cats whistle? Obama was always dog whistling. And he’s sneakier than the Chinese.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Jacqueline Taylor Robson says:

    I’ve always hated math! Still do!

    Liked by 3 people

  32. Chris Hiscock says:

    A cat with no whistle has no prior example to give it a value. Cat with a whistle is 5 if a whistle is 2
    Last line is 10 + Cat with no whistle (3) + 2 = 15

    Cheers

    Like

  33. Enlightened Vulgarian says:

    I’ve seen these puzzles before. Simple math. Each image represents a certain value. Take one line at a time. Look closely at each image. You’ll see a change. Look at that nice un-suspicious cat in the bottom row….I’m guessing that the correct answer is 26.

    Like

  34. tonyE says:

    17

    Shoes are worth 10 each: 3S = 30; S = (30 /3) = 10
    Cats are worth 5: 1S + 2C = 20… C = ( 20 – 10 ) /2 = 5
    Whistles are worth 2: C + 2W + 2W = 13; C + 4W = 13; W = (13 – 5) /4 = 2
    So…

    S + C + W = 10 + 5 + 2 =17

    Disclaimer: I got a degree in Physics and Math. But I could have done this in the 3rd grade! 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • tonyE says:

      20, perhaps… BUT, this is a cultural problem. In our Western system of symbols and mathematics there is NO solution to the problem because the cat with a whistle is a different symbol than the cat with whistle. You can NOT make the assumption that the cat with the whistle is the addtion of ( cat + whistle ).

      Damn Chinese.. they cheated…. I could easily argue that here is no real solution to the problem

      If all cats are worth the same, then it’s S + ( C * W) = 10 + (5 * 2) = 20

      But if the cats are different, then mathematically there is no real solution to the problem. I know the Chinese will say: (Oh, but those are pictures of a cat AND a whistle, therefore the value is an addition…).

      BS.

      Only a nation that uses their writing system would attempt such a bogus try. In western society, where our letters and numbers are absolute, and those cats are different and therefore there is not enough information to solve the problem.

      No wonder the Chinese are so bad at using mathematics that requires thinking… their caligraphy works against them.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Are you aware that they are making huge inroads in Latin America and Africa? Apparently they can “do the math” well enough.

        Like

        • The problem presented, IMHO, is the equivalent of a word problem in English such as the bus driver one. It uses characters as does their language and which they’re familiar with. I’m sure the Chinese have mastered Arabic numerals, zero as a place holder, and the order of operations. Read the fine print and MAGA

          Like

    • that’s what i came up with ! Look above!

      Like

  35. Rick H says:

    Where does the test indicate that a cat is 3 and a whistle is 2? Why can’t it be 3 for a whistle and 2 for a cat? Or 4 and 1?

    Like

  36. Not to worry, wasting all our time on sexual deviancy and common core is a sure fire recipe to encourage high IQ children to develop into dynamic adults.
    In other news an entire generation of white children is becoming autistic thanks to the lapdog media.

    Like

  37. WVPatriot says:

    Sundance, thank you for saying that the cat = 3…that solved the problem.

    Like

  38. treehouseron says:

    This cartoon is downright UnAmerican.

    I missed the whistle missing from his neck, but caught the double single whistle thing.

    Liked by 1 person

  39. JJ...the first one says:

    Shoe –10
    cat–5
    whistle–2

    so, shoe + cat = 15……. x 2 =30

    My experience teaching 3rd grade.
    There is no parentheses, so problem must be treated as read…shoe + cat x whistle

    Manufacturing a parentheses could be stated like this—(shoe + cat) x whistle

    Like

  40. unconqueredone says:

    Purple. Because aliens don’t wear hats.

    Like

  41. chiavarm says:

    The last cat does not have a whistle so the answer is 15 not 16.
    shoes + cat w/o whistle + whistle = 15
    10 + 3 + 2 = 15

    Like

  42. I’ll never get used to the metric system.

    Like

  43. free` says:

    What a great assignment. Not only does it teach math but also to be very observant.

    I would love to see this be a regular topic. Some obscure learning item once a week.

    Like

  44. I get a constellation prize for 19 since they changed the freaking picture on the last one!

    Like

  45. Cupcake says:

    The flipping whistle. Unbelievable.

    Like

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