“With the new gender thinking, … It’s not a boy or a girl thing, it’s a toy for children.”

(Sweden)  “For several years, we have found that the gender debate has grown so strong in the Swedish market that we … have had to adjust,” Jan Nyberg, director of sales at Top Toy, franchise-holder for US toy chain Toys R Us, said.

The country’s advertising watchdog reprimanded the company for gender discrimination three years ago following complaints over outdated gender roles in the 2008 Christmas catalogue, which featured boys dressed as superheroes and girls playing princess.

A comparison between this year’s Toys R Us catalogues in Sweden and Denmark, where Top Toy is also the franchisee, showed that a boy wielding a toy machine gun in the Danish edition had been replaced by a girl in Sweden.

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Elsewhere, a girl was Photoshopped out of the “Hello Kitty” page, a girl holding a baby doll was replaced by a boy, and, in sister chain BR’s catalogue, a young girl’s pink T-shirt was turned light blue.

Top Toy, Sweden’s largest toy retailer by number of stores, said it had received “training and guidance” from the Swedish advertising watchdog, which is a self-regulatory agency.

“We have produced the catalogues for both BR and Toys R Us in a completely different way this year,” Nyberg said.

“With the new gender thinking, there is nothing that is right or wrong. It’s not a boy or a girl thing, it’s a toy for children.”

Elsewhere, a girl was Photoshopped out of the “Hello Kitty” page, a girl holding a baby doll was replaced by a boy, and, in sister chain BR’s catalogue, a young girl’s pink T-shirt was turned light blue.

Top Toy, Sweden’s largest toy retailer by number of stores, said it had received “training and guidance” from the Swedish advertising watchdog, which is a self-regulatory agency.

“We have produced the catalogues for both BR and Toys R Us in a completely different way this year,” Nyberg said.

“With the new gender thinking, there is nothing that is right or wrong. It’s not a boy or a girl thing, it’s a toy for children.”  (read more)

Another Perspective - Genders are to some extent social inventions. Men and women invest each other  with what Edmund Burke described as “the wardrobe” of our imagination. We see  each other through social and esthetic lenses, and this may influence the power  of erotic attraction as much as our hormones do. If our caring-sharing  government or unisexual social elites aim at making genders indistinguishable,  this would probably make women less desirable sexually.   In Burke’s phrase they  have been “stripped” of the identity that had been attached to them.  (continue reading)

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15 Responses to “With the new gender thinking, … It’s not a boy or a girl thing, it’s a toy for children.”

  1. lovemygirl says:

    I only had girls, I did help raise 2 grandsons for a while. The difference is amazing. It has nothing to do with parental influence. The sexual “deviants” in the English language definition that push this bull on all of society are sick.

    • Patriot Dreamer says:

      Their brains are different, because their hormones are different. It’s biology. When will the Swedes get this? They are just nuts with their social engineering.

  2. LandauMurphyFan says:

    Ah yes, my younger sister (very much a prog at the time) insisted on raising her 2 children this way. She gave them unisex names and a unisex upbringing, e.g., we would be instructed to buy the little girl a farm set for her birthday and the little boy would be given a doll. Even the books she read them nightly were carefully selected for appropriate role models. (I should point out, however, that she was and still is married to their father.) She was utterly convinced that gender was a social construct and that her children would be free of it and therefore free to be themselves.

    The result?

    Her little girl liked to wear pink frilly dresses and sparkly jewelry and play at sweeping the floor with a broom, while her little boy’s idea of a good time was to hit things until they fell apart, preferably with a loud noise and/or pieces flying everywhere.
    :-D :-D :-D

    • ZurichMike says:

      I love experiments like that ! LOL! Although I have one niece who, even as a toddler, hated wearing dresses, and still prefers watching sports than cartoons. But she also wanted a cute haircut for school and likes Justin Bieber. Whatever.

    • Patriot Dreamer says:

      Hahahaha! :D

  3. lovemygirl says:

    My sister loved her Dolls. I loved cutting off their hair and using it as part of the flies I tied to fish with. My wife loved her Barbies, her brother liked putting them in toy trucks with M80s, lighting the fuse and pushing them down a hill and watching them blow up. We were not taught this “difference”.

  4. lovemygirl says:

    I just told my daughter she had some Viking blood this year when she started learning about Medival times. The Viking blood today has been diluted quite a bit.

  5. TandCrumpettes says:

    There’s only one thing about toys that “bothers” me.

    Its when they screw around with the classics. There’s not just “Little Snoopy” any more, but rather “regular” Little Snoopy on one shelf and a truckload of prissy pink ones for the girls. As if the “original” wasn’t good enough.

    Same goes for the little Fisher Price xylophone or stacking rings – “rainbow” colors aren’t good enough. Gotta make ‘em in pink too.

    I don’t understand it because I always felt like these toys were neutral. I never saw the need to make a batch in a different color just to appeal to a girl. And I can’t believe parents actually buy this stuff thinking that a girl MUST like it better because its pink!

    I’m not even the type who complains about gender neutrality. I have always believed that children will play with whatever they like and no persuasion can change that. My child likes to play with action figures, whether they be Barbie or He-Man. As long as we can hold them and “make them talk,” (as she puts it) she doesn’t care.

    Sure, she likes poofy puppies, princesses, unicorns and all that jazz, but she also likes Hot Wheels, train sets, electric racing cars, and Tonka.

    I might even venture to say she likes “boys” toys better. Boys’ toys “do” more – they stack, roll, have a remote, come with a million pieces, make noise, fly, walk, etc.

    If a girls’ toy “does” something, it wets itself.

    So we buy a lot of boys’ stuff around here. Still, I don’t expect any of it to come in pink “just for her.” Why should the Tonka steamroller be pink and purple? When was the last time you saw a pink backhoe at a construction site? A pink racing car on a purple street?

    Anyway, I don’t think that simply owning pink toys does any damage. I believe its the parents’ insistence that they SHOULD be pink “for their little princess” and buy up everything that is available in those colors. Its called being a “princess parent,” and ugh, I am not gong to go down that pink and purple road with my daughter.

    But I can’t help but imagine every time I go to Home Depot and see a women’s tool kit in pink…that’s the parent who started all this. You can’t just have a regular tool kit, can ya?

  6. ytz4mee says:

    The roving bands of Muslims (press code word: “Asian”) who gang rape blonde, blue eyed native born Swedish women aren’t “gender neutral”.
    http://www.iris.org.il/blog/archives/757-Pan-European-Arab-Muslim-Gang-Rape-Epidemic.html

  7. michellc says:

    I will say my daughter was always kind of a tom girl(still is) and wasn’t much into playing with dolls or wearing dresses and she has always hated the color pink. Barbie dolls was about as far as she went when it came to playing with dolls because she liked to brush their hair. Although she did always like jewelry and playing dress up. She much preferred cars and trucks and tractors and dozers and guns. She was just as likely to see what she could blow up or how many frogs she could catch in a day as my boys were.
    When my youngest son was a toddler he liked to play with barbie dolls, much to the frustration of his Daddy. I would always tell him to quit making a big deal out of it and one day he’d put them down in favor of his trucks.(We didn’t buy him barbie dolls, he played with his sister’s) Then when he was about 4 he decided one day like most boys do it would be fun to pull off their head and limbs. His daddy was so proud, I told him I really didn’t get being proud of dismembering a body.lol
    As a joke every year since then our son gets a barbie doll in his stocking, he doesn’t like to be reminded he liked to play with barbie dolls.
    If they had painted the trucks and guns pink, my daughter would not have played with them. Girls may play with boy’s toys but they don’t need them marketed to them.

    Yet my daughter was raised as a girl and my boys were raised as boys. Girls went to the girl’s restroom and boy’s went to the boy’s restroom. Girls wore dresses to church and boys wore ties. Girls wore bows in their hair and boys had their hair lick wetted down, sometimes with a little spit.lol

  8. Menagerie says:

    Children are either boys or they are girls. It seems to me that trying to blank out their identity is what will really confuse them. Let them be what they are, and enjoy it. We have built a fake world for them, and a huge market for politically correct toys, or even worse, the awful trashy marketing targeting very young girls. Why would parents let their beautiful young daughters be exposed to toys and clothes that look like something a hooker would wear? I see little girls who might be 8 years old out in makeup and ridiculous clothes that are very sexy. Why? Why can’t they just be a child? Parents have lost their minds.

    • michellc says:

      I want to go smack parents when I see little girls wearing shorts with their bottoms hanging out and bikini tops, dyed hair and makeup.
      What has happened to parents? When did dressing like a child become outdated? When did telling a child she couldn’t wear makeup until she was a teen become out of date?
      When did Daddy’s quit caring what their little girls wore out of the house?

      When did it become normal for 12 year old girls to go on dates?

      I feel like such a dinosaur sometimes, that my daughter was never allowed to wear revealing clothes at any time much less when she was 8 years old. She wasn’t allowed to wear makeup until she was 13 and then she was taught how to wear it without looking like a clown or a hooker. She wasn’t allowed to go on car dates until she was 16, she would have been 25 if her Daddy had gotten his way.lol

      I remember way back when how outraged I was when I realized people were dressing their daughters up in revealing clothes and makeup and big hair for pageants. Now I see it in everyday life.

      • wag o' the western plains says:

        I have sixth grade twins. Their grades are good and they have no discipline issues at school, but they have been called ‘immature’ by their teachers, and I’m flattered. They do not dress (short shorts, go go boots over the knee, skimpy tops with bra straps hanging out) or wear make-up like the rest of the little trollops at their school, and they don’t want to. One of them said she ‘likes keeping her goodies covered.’ I hope they remain that way at least through high-school.

  9. czarowniczy says:

    Works for me, I got tired of the S&W pastel-colored pistols, I bought my male and female grandchildren gender-neutral ARs to become proficient with.

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