President Trump Participates in Dialogue on Safe School Reopening – 3:00pm Livestream

President Trump and First Lady Melania Trump participate in a National Dialogue on Safely Reopening America’s Schools. Anticipated start time 3:00pm ET

White House – Today at 3:00 p.m., President Trump, First Lady Melania Trump, several administration officials, and teachers, administrators, and students from around the country will participate in a roundtable discussion on the safe reopening of schools, with respect to the holistic health and learning needs of America’s students.

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168 Responses to President Trump Participates in Dialogue on Safe School Reopening – 3:00pm Livestream

  1. Dutchman says:

    Given the well deserved and 40 years overdue lambasting of the educational systems liberal bent that PDJT dished out at Mt. Rushmore, hard to imagine the educators attending won’t be walking in, with a YUGE chip on their shoulder.

    I wonder if they will be able to mask their hostility.
    SCHOOL CHOICE, its an IMPERATIVE.

    Charter schools was a 1/2 measure, we need vouchers, or disband Fed Dept of Education.

    Liked by 14 people

    • Ausonius says:

      Vouchers AND disband ALL Departments of Education. Back to neighborhood school boards and no unions in sight!

      I know: nice fantasy! You can’t turn back the clock, put the genie back into the bottle, go home again, etc.

      But I really would like to try!

      Liked by 9 people

      • Bill Durham says:

        The democrats control the teacher unions. The unions will refuse to teach live classes. Only online classes. The democrat govenors will support this. Any kid in a live class that gets covid will be blamed on the orange man bad. College kids leftist will fight live classes. The mask and lockdown have become part of the resistance movement. More time to demonstrate.

        Liked by 4 people

        • Mary Wilson says:

          Parents don’t want the on-line classes like their kids got this year.
          A fair number of parents won’t be sending their kids back.

          Liked by 5 people

          • Bill Durham says:

            Parents in Massachusetts love masks, social distancing, and lockdown. Whatever Trump wants they are against. So they are all for virtual classes and no more sports. Sad. We threw tea in Boston Harbor. Now we have no problem surrendering our rights. They will only change their minds if Biden is elected. Then its back to normal.

            Liked by 5 people

            • Wisc says:

              Open choice schools to voluntary attendance, and let the people with hutzpah send their children to school. Let the rest of them fall behind while they hide out at home, and fade into irrelevance, if they wish. We need to lead by example, and give parents the option.

              Liked by 4 people

            • Jlwary says:

              As a parent in MA, the pandemic and “systemic racism” has pushed me to want to homeschool. I don’t want my kids wearing a mask for 40 hrs/WK and I don’t want them to endure the uptick and sjw bs…
              Most parents are prob as u say, some not so much.

              Liked by 4 people

            • donnieboy71 says:

              single mothers, single mothers, single mothers, single mothers, single mothers. did i leave anything out?

              Liked by 1 person

            • GB Bari says:

              Maybe parents with one stay-at-home mom or dad are ok with it, but in my experience no single working parents nor parents where both work outside the home like this arrangement. .They don’t even like teacher conference days because kids are off of school. Daycare is outrageously costly in my area.

              Up until COVID, the latter two situations applied to the majority of families where I live. I have yet to hear a parent in my town, who isn’t already a home-school teacher or advocate, express a preference for kids staying at home full time to attend school. They all have to work to make ends meet.

              With all the upsides to home schooling, and there are several significant benefits, this being suddenly forced on families puts a major financial burden on those families.

              Liked by 6 people

            • sat0422 says:

              Neighborhood schools may start to pop up as day care centers. There are plenty of retired teachers in most families. Who says we need some Teach for America radical in the classroom anyway.
              I remember in 1979, I was asked to join our Local Education Association and I said Yes. Then, I was informed that my dues would be split three ways: the local, state, and national associations. Then, I said NO WAY and I never looked back. That was my 7th year of teaching and I retired after 42 years.

              Liked by 1 person

        • I know college students who want to go back to school and have live inperson classes; my 15 year old neighbor wants to go back to school..it’s not just education it’s the socialization,friends, sports…etc.

          Liked by 9 people

        • Just MHO – I believe all grade schools should re-open. Almost all students in grade schools are from the local area/district. Prep schools/boarding schools and Colleges/Universities should remain closed as long as any state in the country has a lock down/restrictions in place. That includes mandatory quarantines on persons from out of state coming into a state, My experience has been that college students travel home, other colleges to see friends, sport events, etc. I do not believe that can be controlled, therefore they stay closed.

          Like

          • PatriotKate says:

            Just curious. Did you advocate all this when your children had a cold? Because that’s essentially what we’re dealing with. Somewhere between the common cold and the flu. Did you advocate for shutting down life because of the flu?

            This has never been about a virus, for pete’s sake!

            Liked by 2 people

            • I am totally aware this has never been about a virus! My “opinion” is to put pressure on those politicians/states dictating said decrees. Imagine the backlash from merchants in college towns due to loss of revenue, upset students not able to attend, faculty and workers not able to work, etc. Do you not believe this would have a huge impact on politicians decisions? Especially if it were applied nationwide.

              Like

      • Dutchman says:

        Well, it may be fantasy,..but I envision a modern version of the one room schoolhouse.
        Grades 1-8, with all the textbooks on a shelf, and each kid learned at their own pace.
        (Side note; can you think of any other organised human activity, where individuals are divided into groups, based on their “year” the way we do in education?)

        Anyway, this “one room schoolhouse” was the model for primary education, that resulted in the U.S. being recognised as having the best public educational system in the world. And then we modernised it, and its been downhill ever since.

        So, a system where every American citisen, can engage in lifetime learning, via the internet and with MUCH smaller brick and mortar locations for handling those things that can not be done via the internet.

        Although, since I can learn from u-tube videos how to reload ammo or bake a cake, etc. seems like such hands on instruction would be limited.

        If I can file my tax returns on line, make purchases with my credit cards, a system COULD be developed.
        We HAVE such systems now, for K-12 and University instruction.

        Anyway, its moving forward, technologically, while also embracing what worked originally, and that we have gotten away from.

        Largely self directed learning, with a little guidance.

        Truth is, it is genetically wired into us to learn; watch any two year old for 5 minutes.
        It takes an awful lot of work to try to kill that innate, instinctive desire; look at the extremes they have had to go to.

        Liked by 7 people

        • Mr e-man says:

          In my day kids were “held back” a year so their classmates were actually a year younger than them. They usually did it because the kid didn’t do well in first grade so they did it over.

          They also did it in places like Massilon Ohio so that the Seniors on the football team were actually old enough to be college freshman. That allowed them to win championships.

          Sometime they did it so siblings would go to the same school and classes together.

          I think they pass all kids nowadays regardless of ability but I think the football thing still happens. BTW, when one community fails all their first graders and wins the championships in later years, other communities do the same in order to compete.

          Liked by 2 people

          • TarsTarkas says:

            Holding back future stars in many sports in middle school is a nation-wide pratice, in fact it might be a world-wide practice. Some of that has to do with age-grouping in sports leagues, someone born Dec. 31 (I’m just using that date as an example) lumped in with a Jan 1 kid. The older kid, especially at early ages, will be considerably better than the younger, and as a result will tend to get more coaching than the younger kid, giving the older children an even greater advantage. Plus children do not develop physically and mentally at the same rate. Repeating a grade thus can have a considerable beneficial effect on the child. Malcolm Gladwell detailed much of this in his book Outliers.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Jerry Joe says:

          Dutchman,

          Couldn’t agree more with 1 room schools. All kids walk to schools (allowance for those who are uable to walk); Public education stops when your old enough to drive and get to work on your own.

          Let the older kids set the example (both examples – good and bad) for the younger ones. Might even bring out some real creativity with our teachers.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Dutchman says:

            I suspect there was actually LESS bullying, rather than more.

            Older ones helped the teacher, tutoring the younger ones.

            And you should see the tests, from the 8th grade, 1800’s, that todays college graduates couldn’t pass!

            Reading, ‘Riting and Rithmatic, became “Reading, Retention and Regurgitation”, with NO analyses or critical thinking.

            See and say learning was thrown out entirely, in favor of phonetics.
            I got no problem with phonetics, per say as 1/2 of teaching reading.
            But, 99% of the time when we read, we read by ‘see and say’, and only use phonetics occasionally, to sound out unfamiliar words.

            And, see and say builds confidence, that the child CAN read, and even “look what I can do!” Pride.
            Should teach BOTH. Bring back the Macguffy reader, along with Dick and Jane.

            Make learning satisfying and fun, and then stand back. Kids will naturally become what we were,all intended to be; lifetime learners.

            Liked by 5 people

            • Jerry Joe says:

              Yep,

              The older kids helping the teacher with the younger ones – no better way of reinforcing what was correctly learned than by trying to teach the same (a bonus in developing, at an earlier age, the concept of patience!) In addition to being helped along by the older, the transition to helping the younger will come naturally – agree that probably a whole lot less bullying would occur in such an environment. It would also seem to keep a little pressure on the older kids to stay ahead of the really bright, younger ones.

              Liked by 3 people

              • Dutchman says:

                A good system, totally discarded in favor if warehousing and mass production.
                Mass production IS the most efficient way to produce cars, washing machines or widgets;
                NOT the best way to treat humans.
                Done in hospitals and schools,…

                Liked by 3 people

            • wondering999 says:

              Dutchman, it’s interesting that particular methods are emphasized while others get thrown out. Was told by a reading specialist that up to 1/3 of children will not learn to read well if phonics is left out of their reading instruction. Read elsewhere that boys are disproportionately affected when phonics is left out of their instruction.

              Agree that children should be taught in ways that work for them, and whatever works should be utilized as a practical matter.

              Liked by 1 person

              • Dutchman says:

                Again, I look at how you and I read; we NEED phonics, cause we are ALWAYS going to encounter unfamiliar words.

                On the other hand, as you start reading this sentence, you are NOT using phonics, you are using “see and say”; you recognise the words, don’t need to ‘sound it out’.

                Taught my kid to read, at 18 mos to 2 years. I started out teaching her the name of the letters, AND the sound.

                Then we read books, where she learned by repetition to recognise the words.

                Once she recognised the word in the books, if she saw it on a cereal package or a billboard, she recognised it, i.e. ‘see and say’.

                Liked by 1 person

        • PatriotKate says:

          This concept is precisely why I sent my children to a Montesorri school. They loved it. When my youngest son was only 4, his Montesorri teacher recognized his math gift and simply went over to the elementary side of the building and retrieved 4th grade level math materials for him.

          It was also my biggest disappointment when we transferred them to public school and we regretted the move. At the first teacher conference and she was complaining about his “disruptions” (i.e. boredom), I had to be the one to tell her he was gifted in math. Terrible!

          I’m with you and I’ve already offered to home school my infant twin granddaughters when the time comes.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Dutchman says:

            Thats why I homeschooled. My eldest daughter was reading, and I mean picking up something she had never seen before and READING it,,at 2 years.
            It took about 2 months, 2 hrs or less/day, using BOTH “See and say” and phonetics.

            My regrets are many, but one is her mother and I divorced when she was 8, and she and her sister went into public school, under mothers custody.

            When each turned 12, they insisted on coming to live with me, and I went to court and fought for custody.

            My younger was struggling in high school, while older did good, and had 2 years AP classes, when she graduated.

            So, I put youngest in a charter school, all on computer, go at your own pace. She graduated within a year, she was just bored.

            Liked by 2 people

    • mikeyboo says:

      It bears repeating: school choice is imperative!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      The federal Department of Education should be immediately disbanded. It does nothing. It steal money from the state coffers and create policies that hinder education.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Dutchman says:

        Much worse than nothing; nothing would be a definite improvement, and the process has been excelerating, what with “All children left behind”, followed by “Race to the bottom”, and such BRILLIANT ideas (SARC) as “New math”, to “prevent the high school to prison pipeline” b.s. program that Obama used as a cover, to funnel 10’s of millions of $ to places like Broward and Palm Beach counties, to pay off ballot fraud.
        And, that resulted in trayvon martin and stoneman school shooting, of coarse.

        Yeah, Defund the Dept of Education.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Charlie says:

      The problem with education today lies in the high stakes testing. These “tests” items are arbitrarily chosen by those who work extra during the summer, and that is why you have millions of dollars and much precious time wasted teaching some obscure way to multiply, for example, when the old way worked fine and is the way people acutally multiply. Teachers are forced to teach it. Students are forced to endure it. Parents are forced to comply all because of the money chain. There is the difference between state tests and national ability test. They are most definitely not the same. Administrators in some states I know are given personal bonuses of thousands of dollars if some segments of their school population improves or reaches this goal. Teachers do not get the bonuses in most cases. They get to keep their jobs. Administrators reward those young teachers who go along and promote the agenda with fewer problem students, money for extra work, more comfortable room assignments, etc. Been there, saw it. The way to break this chain of waste and failure is to do away with high stake state tests and go back to using ability tests, such as the Iowa Test of Basic Skills, that has been used and updated for years and is reliable. There are others just as good. It’s the ridiculous items on state tests that are put there by uneducated, uninformed teachers who just happen to like certain items or processes. Ask any parent who has struggled to teach their children for weeks to multiply in a new way for absolutely no reason except that it is “on the state test”. Administrators bonuses given to them by state legislatures is the fuel for the adherence to these ridiculous items taught and with wasted time. Years ago it was mandated that teachers stop teaching social studies, history, civics, citizenship, etc and spend more time letting students read library books and take computerized tests on them. Science and social studies were taught only a few hours a month because the time for them was spent on reading library books instead of reading instruction. Then there are students who absolutely have no intention of trying or dong well in school. Their culture tells them to reject it, and they do. Capable students and those who have the ability to reach higher than the state test objectives are forced to endure the same instruction as those who refuse to try or do assignments. You cannot group by ability in public schools so instruction has to be geared to the lowest achieving students. This does not refer to students who have learning problems or reading problems. It refers to those who refuse to try. Ask some students why they do not do their assignments and they will often tell you that they do not want to be seen as trying hard or dong well because their “peers” bully them because of their achievement. This is true. Teachers are judged on whether or not all these students do well on these state tests. Do away with poorly designed state tests, high benefits for adminstrators whose schools teach only these limited objectives, and reward the schools (not just the administrators) in their students score well on national achievement tests. Use any money given to be used for supplies so teachers do not have to buy these themselves.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dutchman says:

        Wow, Charlie!
        I hung in as long as I could, and you seem to have a number of valuable points.

        Might I request that you go to the home page, and click on “guidelines for posting comments”.

        At some point, it asks that posters write there comments in short paragraphs, and double space, like you see me doing in this responce.

        This is because many treepers (like myself) are on an idiotic “smart” phone, and its is much easier to read this way, and virtually impossible to read, otherwise.

        Many of us would appreciate it, as your critisisms are valuable, and we would love to be able to read them in theier entirety.

        Its just with this little screen, its hard without the spacing.
        And yes, leave all children behind, followed by race to the bottom, were Federal over-reach attempts to “fix” education, which made it worse.

        But STATES bear much of the responsibility, but,..so do we.

        I’m 65, and ever since I was delivering papers at 14, I have seen news stories; “American public schools get D’s and F’s”

        And every year or two the same story, as things degenerated, more and more. And we didn’t DO anything about it.

        We SAW the creeping conmunism, turning American Public Education into marxist indoctrination,..and we did NOTHING.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Frankie says:

    Watch the teacher unions (groups that molest tens of thousands of children a year and provide crappy instruction) demand big raises for doing the jobs they haven’t been doing competently for decades.

    Beef up the parochial schools and charter schools and establish more of them to take up the tens of millions of refugees from the public schools with a national voucher program. Make the states participate.

    Liked by 6 people

    • petszmom says:

      Wow. As a retired teacher that never molested a child while I was a member of a teacher organization, I take issue with your blanket statement. What proof do you have? Please link. Perhaps you are thinking of the catholic church. My fellow teachers were not child molestors and we taught what we were told to teach. We never demanded pay raises. We became teachers knowing the pay scale. Remember Bush’s No Child Left Behind? That was the beginning of the end for adequate instruction. Whatever teacher organization we joined was more about protecting our rights. What an insulting statement.

      Liked by 9 people

      • Sue says:

        I, too, am a retired teacher. No Child Left Behind and Common Core destroyed public education in this country. Those two programs led to massive changes in curriculum, teaching materials, and teaching techniques. Many experienced teachers left the profession.
        As a special education teacher, government paperwork took up much of my work day. IEP’s became unwieldy at 40 pages per child!
        Frankly, I don’t hold out much hope for public schools.

        Liked by 11 people

        • petszmom says:

          So true. I taught sp.ed. one year and it was difficult to tailor individual instruction to so many kids due to so much paperwork. Even as a homeroom teacher a simple referral to the program took a week or so to fill out. And don’t get me started on ARDs!

          Like

          • SMR says:

            Why didn’t the teachers’ unions resist No Child Left Behind and Common Core if everyone KNEW they were so destructive? Who’s interests have the unions truly been looking out for? Whose rights were the unions protecting again?

            Liked by 3 people

            • TradeBait says:

              They did in many states. Fought it tooth and nail. It did not matter because administrators and politicians did not want to lose federal funding for not implementing federal directives.

              Liked by 2 people

        • Jimmy Jack says:

          I also left teaching and I hate to break it to you. It the schools were already destroyed by the time NCLB was implemented. Obama policies have just turned them into abject disasters.

          Liked by 6 people

          • wondering999 says:

            Jimmy Jack is right. Look for the 1955 bestseller “Why Johnny Can’t Read, and What You Can Do About It” by Rudolf Flesch. I remember neighborhood moms discussing this book.

            Back in the 1950s, Rudolf Flesch, and immigrant [from Austria?] complained that his grandchild was not being taught to read properly; in fact, his grandchild’s literacy was being impeded by a “new system” that sought to teach English as if it were Chinese. Flesch laid out his system for imparting literacy to your children, so that they would not fall behind.

            Many older teachers, using “old methods” were successful. Parents with children who could read easily because of this traditional teaching (like my Mom) scoffed at Flesch. What was his problem? Well, it depended on where your kids went to school, if you had a problem or not. Now most of the U.S. has Flesch’s “problem” — you have to tutor your kids if you want them to read with confidence and proficiency.

            Liked by 1 person

            • wondering999 says:

              A bit about Rudolf Flesch. Yes, it’s Wikipedia. 🙂 I did not know what Flesch’s teachings inspired Dr. Seuss’ “Cat in the Hat” 🙂

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudolf_Flesch

              “….in 1955 he published what became his most famous book, Why Johnny Can’t Read: And What You Can Do About It. The book was a critique of the then-trendy practice of teaching reading by sight, often called the “look-say” method. The flaw of this method, according to Flesch, was that it required brute force memorization with no theory behind it so that when confronted with an unknown word, the learner became confused. As a solution, Flesch advocated a revival of the phonics method, the teaching of reading by teaching learners to sound out words using rules. The book inspired Dr. Seuss to write The Cat in the Hat (1957).”

              Like

              • peace says:

                @wonderring – yes you are correct and Bush’s No Child Left Behind was wonderful for children in that it brought phonics and phonological awareness back into the schools. Prior to this, schools had the Whole Language Program push on them by liberal minded folks like Ken Goodman. As a teacher, I thought it was the best thing Bush did during his administration.

                Liked by 2 people

      • vikingmom says:

        Petszmom,

        Thank you for what you do! Demonizing any profession because of the bad actions of a few is a dangerous path to take and helps no one! My younger son is currently getting his Masters in Teaching and wants to teach Jr High English, bless his heart!

        I agree that No Child Left Behind was a disaster, as is Common Core, IMHO, but the vast majority of teachers are doing the best job they can, with the kids, parents, and administrators with whom they must deal everyday, all wanting something different from them! I think the unions are a double-edged sword because they do protect the rights of their members from unfair practices but they also have a tendency to get involved in issues that are not necessarily beneficial to the teachers in the classroom. (Both my husband and son are members of a union and there are pros and cons to that affiliation but it is a requirement for their jobs in the area in which we live.)

        I actually homeschooled my two sons through high school and it was a good option for us but I fully realize that it does not work for everyone. I also think there are a fair number of people who should NOT be the main provider of their child’s education, for many different reasons. I greatly appreciate all of the good teachers out there and hope that we can figure out a way to come together and find common areas of agreement, in this matter, AND in many others. The only ones who benefit from all of the current sniping and division are the politicians and the activists who are diverting our attention away from their misdeeds by getting us so angry with each other that we aren’t watching them anymore.

        Liked by 7 people

        • petszmom says:

          Great post! Your son is going to be very successful because he has chosen a challenging profession, that means so much dedication. Things were very much on the decline when I retired 10 years ago. There was no reason to keep working. You are correct. All the teachers I knew during my career were the best. They faced so many challenges but kept on without complaint. What is incredibly sad also, is what this place has become. I spent about 5 years here and never saw such ugliness. There were so many kind, thoughtful, wise posters. While I still see one or two names I still recognize, most are gone. I will not engage and lower myself but I just had to speak out on this post by ‘Frankie’. Very unkind.

          Liked by 1 person

          • vikingmom says:

            Petszmom,

            There are always a couple people who just like to stir up trouble and badmouth everyone. I very seldom engage them either – not worth the energy or the effort. I actually suspect some specifically came here to stir up division because Sundance was getting too effective in pointing out the truth and those in positions of power, who govern by using fear and deception, were getting concerned!

            I am very much hoping that the schools will be able to fully reopen in the fall, for everyone’s sake!

            Liked by 2 people

            • petszmom says:

              I have a granddaughter going into fifth grade. I truly believe she needs to be in school with her friends. All her teachers have been outstanding. Her principal is also grade A.
              I agree about the trolls. Many want to disrupt discussion in some way and others actually get paid for each reply. I prefer putting my energy in reading the thoughtful, calm, incisive posts.

              Liked by 2 people

      • billygoat65 says:

        Children are 100 times more likely to be molested at school than by a priest.

        https://www.cbsnews.com/news/has-media-ignored-sex-abuse-in-school/

        Like

        • GB Bari says:

          Interesting that CBS published that article.

          The authors noted that despite the study that found child molestation several magnitudes greater in public schools than in churches, the MSM essentially spiked that alarming statistic and kept the focus on the Roman Catholic Church.

          This makes perfect sense since the communist Left was already well underway in their takeover of education so as to indoctrinate young minds, and well underway in poisoning the Christian church with false teachings by poorly taught pastors, so as to turn believers away from Gods Word as truthfully represented in the Scriptures. We can see the results of the Lefts effort (and Christians’ failure to stop them) by simply looking at where both institutions are today.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Lulu says:

        I’m thrilled to know that an anti-Catholic bigot taught impressionable children.

        Like

      • jus wundrin says:

        “In the United States, “roughly 290,000 students experienced some sort of physical sexual abuse by a public school employee from 1991 to 2000—a single decade, compared with the roughly five-decade period examined in the study of Catholic priests.”

        A federal report estimated that in the state of California, “422,000 California public-school students would be victims before graduation”.

        The United States Department of Education withheld US$4 million from Chicago Public Schools “for what federal officials say is a failure to protect students from sexual abuse.”

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sexual_abuse_in_primary_and_secondary_schools

        Some would say thats an epidemic.

        As a former school board trustee of a large school district in MT, we did not hear of any reports like that in our district, BUT the larger district next to us had several incidents of teacher pedophilia where in one case the child committed suicide.

        Just because you say you never saw or heard of it, doesnt mean that it never happens.

        Liked by 2 people

      • mike says:

        One bad teacher does a lot of damage. Probably for other teachers too.
        A lot of school districts ***are*** money burning basket cases, regardless of whose fault it is. I’m willing to spread the credit there.

        I left high school in the early 70s because of prolonged abuse by one dedicated crypto Stalinist. I liked most of my teachers and vice versa. Fortunately I already had won 4 yr scholarships in earlier grades than most and beamed out to a pvt college a year early.

        At least two of my son’s secondary school teachers, in a public school, were removed for, ahem, gay student overactivity… For another kid, it took a lot of my effort to arrange an almost first class college prep education from an unwilling school administration.

        Like

      • Frankie says:

        Petszmom, your name, your singling out of Bush 43 (who can color inside the lines of his presidential coloring book) as the main cause of your profession’s mass underachievement, and your anti-Catholic bigotry indicate you were a teacher because you couldn’t earn an honest living.

        The various studies say about 4000 Catholic priests molested about 12,000 children and teens from 1950 to 2002. That’s totally unacceptable.

        Stats say your professional cohorts molest about 30,000 children a year. Do some math, Petszmom. If you can. Spread over 50 years, that rate is about 1,500,000 child victims. Teachers owe Catholic priests an apology.

        Investigator Kevin Sherlock in 2003 presented the Education Dept with a study based on state crime and FBI statistics. I quote his 2017 book “How to be Your Own Detective.”

        “In doing my investigation work on sex offenders in schools, I contacted lawmen in all 50 states to get crime statistics, victim statistics, and perpetrator statistics. Here are some of these statistics on sex offenders and their victims, courtesy of the FBI and crime statistics bureaus of the states, and (because crime and victim reporting is not uniform across the country) my forensic math:

        More than half (62% to 64%) of all victims of rape and other sex offenses are girls and boys younger than 18.

        Of total rape victims, about 50% to 51% are girls. Another 12% to 13% are boys. Females 18 or older are about 35% of rape victims. Adult males are the rest of the victims (about 2%).

        These numbers do not count rapes which occur in prisons or juvenile facilities or mental institutions. The vast majority of rapists in these facilities sexually abuse victims of the same sex. (Likewise, since it became legal for professed homosexuals to serve in the military, the number of military male rape victims skyrocketed.)

        Of female victims, girls 11 or younger are about 16% of victims, girls 12 to 15 are about 24% of victims, and girls 16 and 17 are about 11% of victims. Most adult female victims are 18 to 30.

        Of male victims, about 55% are boys 11 or younger, and about 30% are boys 12 to 17.

        About 1/4 of all perpetrators are committing incest on their own children, sisters or brothers or stepsisters, cousins, nieces, or grandchildren, or are raping the daughter(s) or son(s) of the woman they are sleeping with.

        Five of every six sex offenders are 18 or older. About 90% are male. Most rape girls, but many rape boys. (The vast majority of victims of female sex offenders are girls.)

        These numbers don’t lie. Most perpetrators are adults, and most victims are children. Guess what schools have plenty of.

        Although reporting is inexact, public school teachers and other school employees as a group probably molest more children than any other group of professions. Most professions don’t defend their child rapists. Teachers’ unions defend their molesters. Most companies are OK with firing one of their employees who molests children. School boards like to keep money they’ve extorted from taxpayers instead of fighting teachers’ union lawyers or settling with victims, so they enable many child-molesting teachers and administrators.

        The average adult female rape victim is victimized once. Many many child rape victims are victimized dozens or hundreds of times. Children are far less likely to report being sexually abused than an adult woman is. Women usually know their rights, and what is wrong. They know a rapist is over-the-top evil; some women will fight back. Children are easier to intimidate and keep quiet. Most child rape victims know and trusted their rapists. Some children are told and convinced it’s their natural role to submit sexually to an adult.

        I got statistics from the two states which reported violators’ professions at the time of my research that about 2% of all sex offenders in their states were teachers. The two states, Indiana and Virginia, are in the top 20 of states populationwise, so I reckon their figures apply across the country.

        There are about 230 million people in the United States older than 18. Of these, three million are teachers, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (as of 2012). This means 1.3% of all adults are teachers. This also implies teachers (at 2% of all sex offenders divided by 1.3% of adults being teachers divided by 75% of sex offenders who are 22 to 55) are at least twice as prone to commit sex offenses as the average adult.

        Since teachers have much more access to children than most other adults, it would be no stretch to estimate those 2% of all sex offenders commit 6% to 10% of all sexual assaults on children each year. I have seen estimates of up to 10% of all sexual assaults of children take place at a school, mostly by adults.

        A school publication noted at least 70% of all adults who committed sex abuses at schools were teachers and administrators, and the rest were non-teachers like janitors, bus drivers (like Ariel Castro), and clerical workers. I also saw numbers saying at least 80% of all children sexually assaulted at school were abused by adults.

        The numbers I just laid out point to this:

        As many as 8% of all children (80% of 10% abused at schools) fall victim to sexual predators who are school employees. Of these, at least 70% are licensed teachers. This doesn’t count college degreed administrators or other licensed school personnel (like the psychologists). This means teachers (not counting other white collar school employees) may be sexually abusing on school grounds each year at least 6% to 7% of all children in this country who are sexual offense victims.

        This doesn’t count rapes and other sexual assaults that take place away from schools. Teachers commit incest and rapes in their homes and elsewhere outside of schools. They also meet and molest pupils away from schools. Double the 6% to 7% estimate for extracurricular sexual abuse activity, and you get 12% to 14%. Teachers (not counting other college-degreed school employees) may be committing 12% to 14% of all sexual assaults on children. So 6% to 10% isn’t such a high estimate at all.

        And we aren’t even counting other school employees or the former school employees and retirees still evil and spry enough (like Jerry Sandusky) to commit rape and other sex offenses on campus and off campus.

        At a toll of 380,000 to 440,000 rape and other sexual abuse victims 17 or younger each year (63% or so of all rape victims are children), times about 75% of all children being in school times 10% of all children likely sexually abused by school employees, this means as many as 28,000 to 33,000 children are the victims of teachers, administrators, and other public school payrollers each year.

        This also means at least 2% of the perpetrators of sex crimes each year – at least 2000 to 2300 scumbags – are teachers and administrators and other degreed school employees, and another several hundred perps are non-white collar staffers like janitors, maintenance people, bus drivers, clerks, and cafeteria workers.”

        There’s the record in black and white. Teacher unions make police unions look like children when it comes to protecting their scumbags.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Mr e-man says:

          Unfortunately, if you sexually abuse children, you will be drawn to jobs and activities where those children are present. Teaching, churches, little league, gymnastics, day care, etc. These people are sick and do not reflect the whole but that is where they go.

          Liked by 1 person

        • TGB says:

          Your point about access to the victim is an important one. The same is found in medical profession. Medical professionals are more likely to divert (abuse) controlled substances. Why because they have easier access to the controlled substances because they are the gatekeepers of them.

          Like

      • mimbler says:

        Studies show that schools and all organizations with authority over children (scout leaders, priests, pastors, rabbis, etc. molest them at approximately the same rate. The Catholic church appears over represented because it is a favorite target of the media, but its rate is right in line with all the others.

        Liked by 1 person

        • wondering999 says:

          Because I spent five years in an EXCELLENT tiny parochial school, where we were NOT abused, I would also like to add that the Catholic school taught many items that had been dropped already from the public curriculum: Cursive handwriting practice; English grammar; Geography; and of course we prayed about five times a day, after Mass every morning.

          I am not Catholic and never will be because of fundamental disagreements over top-down hierarchies and outside interference in family planning, which I see as the responsibility of individual couples, not an outside organization. However, the education that I received from a handful of Sisters of Mercy and a collection of lay teachers plus parent volunteers was something invaluable. I am so grateful that my parents provided this for me and for my siblings!

          Liked by 1 person

          • wondering999 says:

            Apologies for an unclear sentence above. I should have followed the posting guidelines and looked more carefully before posting.

            We had Mass every morning together, the entire school. Then, we also had prayers to start our school day, along with the Pledge of Allegiance. We had Noontime prayers before lunch, and after recess; prayers before going home, and some other prayer times added in there as occasion would recommend. We had time for self-reflection, and thinking about ethics. This was a huge gift to us as a daily habit.

            Liked by 2 people

      • KellyAnne says:

        As a teacher I agree with everything in this response!! While I agree with most conservative view points, school of choice is not one that I can fully support. Charter schools often perform just as poorly as the schools within the community. Remember in most situations it is not the school or the teacher it is the home environment of the student.

        Bush’s policy virtually destroyed public education and I honestly believe it was done on purpose. Teachers and schools should never hold more accountability than the parent and student.

        Liked by 1 person

    • petszmom says:

      I am also curious, Frankie. What do you do to provide a better school system? I understand you want and demand certain things but what do YOU do? Do you volunteer at the local schools? Do you tutor on the side? What about mentoring a youngster? What results have you achieved at the local level? Any thing you could share? There are so many avenues to explore instead of just throwing out incendiary bombs.

      Liked by 3 people

      • negasht7 says:

        Petzmom – my church had an after-school program for 15 years. I volunteered m-f. Picked up a group of kids that was originally 5 then grew as large as 40. It was free and i spent hundreds of dollars a month on snacks, meals, supplies, groceries, etc. The first few years when we only had 15-20 kids the school worked with us.

        As we grew tension started to grow because families were no longer enrolling their kids in the publicly funded programs, which affected the schools funding. They made it so we could no longer pick up kids and walk them 300 yards to our church. They knew the parents weren’t going to pick up kids from school and drop off at church.

        I’m not saying it’s like that everywhere. Also, i don’t believe teachers are child predators. I think the overwhelming majority of teachers (liberal included) have big hearts for kids and i do my best to show appreciation.

        I also think LAUSD, along with other tax funded entities, is going to bankrupt our state. But there are few alternatives. I’d rather keep my $6k in annual property tax and pay for my daughter’s education the same way i pay for her food, clothing, and entertainment and help someone i know personally who is struggling financially with tuition.

        I am thankful for my daughter’s teachers.

        Liked by 3 people

        • negasht7 says:

          Correction: 12 years not 15

          Liked by 1 person

        • petszmom says:

          What is LAUSD? We are being taxed to death here in my part of Texas. And I do believe many people agree with you. Let me be the judge of where my taxes go!

          Like

          • daylight58 says:

            Los Angeles Underfed (hah – always searching for more money) School District….

            Like

            • petszmom says:

              Ahhhhh. Thanks.

              Like

            • warrprin1 says:

              Cute, daylight. LAUSD: Los Angeles Unified School District.

              Like

              • Beau Geste says:

                I think I remember the LA public schools dropping calculus (higher math) just a few years ago, because some students could not understand it? Penalizing capable students, for no reason. This was despite the success of teacher Jaime Escalante with minority students in an LA Highschool (Stand and Deliver).

                The public school monopoly needs competition.
                Vote for Vouchers, for every student, to enroll in a non-public school. The Voucher would be the same funding amount applied to the student in the public school, and would be deducted from the public school funding upon enrolling in the non-public school.

                If the public school improved, which is possible with competition, the public school could win the students back in subsequent years.

                Like

        • deannalaurence says:

          should not be looking for tax credit for private school. the know it all in the public system would use that, drive a truck through it, and interfere bigly with and ruin private schools.

          Like

      • Frankie says:

        See above, o bigoted government payroller.

        Most public schools, like the FBI, need to be smashed.

        We will have to start anew.

        I recommend vouchers, religious schools, charter schools, and non-religion based private schools as alternatives to your dishonest monopoly. I have volunteered time and many thousands of dollars to parochial schools.

        Teachers from K thru graduate school have been poisoning the minds of children and youths and young adults for generations.

        Like

        • deannalaurence says:

          private school or home school. dont ruin with vouchers. charter schools should expanded in public system.

          Like

    • FrankieZee says:

      The teachers down in Florida are already calling for hazard pay.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Lulu says:

        Don’t forget they get Summer off, Spring Brak, Christmas break, Thanksgiving break, federal holidays, sick leave. Then there’s the early very generous retirement at 50 or so while the taxpayers work 12 months a year with two weeks vacation until they are 70.

        Liked by 2 people

        • vikingmom says:

          Lulu – Most teachers work until age 65 and most “taxpayers” do not work until age 70 with only two weeks vacation per year…also, teachers are taxpayers, too, in case you didn’t know that.

          Your numbers are way off base and are simply intended to create division. Please stop trying to stir the pot and pit us against each other! Treepers are smart enough to see a troll from a mile away, so go back home and leave us alone, please.

          Like

          • Lulu says:

            Sorry but every current school teacher I know – all middle-aged – make six figures and plan to retire in their 50s. The retired teachers I know family, friends, and acquaintances all retired by 55, and have very generous pensions.

            The vast majority of the private sector have no pension. Public employees in most states/cities are eligible for full retirement after 20 or 30 years. Facts are just facts should not be divisive.

            I did notice that you cheer-leaded a post and poster that attacked the Catholic Church in this thread – that would be divisive. I however believe in free thought and speech so you do you and I’ll do me.

            If anyone is curious what their children’s teacher or your teacher neighbors or family members earn in salary, you can look that up for most states because it’s public record.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Mr e-man says:

            Do teachers pay social security tax?

            Like

            • Lulu says:

              A lot do. There are some very lucky municipal employees whose local governments opted out years ago. Chicago teachers don’t pay SS and get very generous pensions – Illinois is so going bankrupt on their public employee pensions.

              There was a news story years ago on a city in TX that had opted out and invested the SS match in the stock market. Those workers had really good returns far better than SS. I can’t remember the city off the top of my head.

              Like

            • TGB says:

              No.
              They are also not eligible for it.

              Like

              • annieoakley says:

                I always thought the same but it depends. They reduce your SS by deducting 1/2 of your public pension/ month. I suppose if you worked for 30 years in a now Union school district, your pension would be such you wouldn’t want to apply for SS.

                Like

              • mimbler says:

                Depends on where you are. My wife always paid into SS as a teacher and administrator.

                Like

              • nationalboardertified2001 says:

                Retired SC teacher here…YES, we do pay social security. Not all states are alike. Our pensions are pitiful compared to many other states. Summers off is a joke. I took more coursework to stay abreast of state dept of education demands, taught summer school, and ran an enrichment program for gifted and talented students grades 7-12.

                Three weeks before school started most of us were in our classrooms preparing for the upcoming year because we couldn’t do it all in the one “teacher work day” the districts so proudly awarded us. Thanksgiving, Christmas, and spring breaks were often spent grading the 150 essays or research papers. Planning around those special times wasn’t a luxury. My students expected a quick return on their work, and they deserved it. Weekends off? In my dreams!

                After teaching middle school for 40 years, I know a bit about the dedication it takes to allow the opportunity for young people to reach their optimal learning levels and then pushing them beyond those levels. My response to those who think they know what we really do as educators: Come on in; the water is warm! My bet is most wouldn’t last a week.

                Like

          • StuckInIllinoisForNow says:

            Here in Illinois our teachers are overpaid. The Superintendents even worse. Some teachers work into their 60’s but many retire before that. Being that teachers do not work the demanding hours and have much time off, it is understandable that they would work into their mid 60’s. There are some very good teachers who work hard and go above and beyond, but there are a lot of bad apples. Our public schools have become indoctrination centers – not learning centers. Many teachers in Dupage County are making 6 plus figures. The average starting pension is $70,000. a year, plus a 3% cola every year. It is out of control in Illinois. And are kids are not getting any smarter. Maybe other States are not operated with the corrupt hand of the Crooked Democrats and Teachers Union like Illinois. But they have bankrupted the State of Illinois and continue to make greedy demands, even during COVID.

            Like

            • uafanct says:

              First time commenter, though been coming here thanks to SD’s brilliance and the support for President Trump and our country. I am currently teaching special education in public school, and am about to start my second year in my current district. For 8 years prior to going back in the classroom I worked for a private corporation in a residential facility for boys who had been sexually abused – some of the most horrific stories ever. I ran the school there, and could have stayed, but chose to move back closer to aging parents. So back in the classroom I go. I got into teaching because I’m good at it – very good at connecting with kids and adults (also taught adults part-time for 16 years prior to moving), which is necessary if you want them to learn. I got into special education specifically to help kids with similar issues that I worked with in the residential facility. They are truly the forgotten in our society.

              I would hope that those who have so much venom towards teachers specifically would remember that some of us conservatives are working to effect those needed changes within the system we have as it is now. I consider myself to be a conservative rebel within the system, and use my time with students chipping away at the lefty/Marxist/Socialist indoctrination as often as I possibly can. I read comments from several teachers/retired teachers on here I’ll bet they do/did the same. Isn’t that what we need?

              I despise so much about the education system and have since I became a teacher. As a conservative, it is even more overwhelming to deal with the facts of working in such a mammoth, let alone lefty bureaucracy. I understand and agree with many of the complaints about the system (the time off, overpaid {even though I know I work 6-7 days a week, 12+ hour days}, and the unions {to which I refuse to join}, tenure is an evil policy IMO, etc.). However I will say that unless you have been a teacher, you honestly can’t quite grasp the challenges of it. It is impossible to explain the enormous demands on teachers unless you are one. I can hope/wish/pray constantly that the DOE will be abolished, but until then, I’ll be a conservative saboteur.

              Liked by 3 people

              • Ad rem says:

                Welcome to the Treehouse uafanct! 😀

                If you continue to get stuck in our “moderation”, I refer you to a comment I made on the first page of today’s Presidential Open.

                Like

          • ladyliberty11 says:

            Vikingmom, really like the vast majority of your posts, however, teachers do get paid very good salaries and do get time off in the summer and many holidays. When my children were in school, there were also very frequent (and I mean very frequent) days off for training, etc. (not saying anything against training, just noting a fact).

            Many teachers are wonderful, dedicated and hard-working, but most parents spent countless hours trying to get their children into the classes with “good” teachers because too many were sub-par. Promotion was based on longevity in our district, not merit. Teachers often, too often, taught subjects, including AP Chemistry, Biololgy, etc., for which they had no background or training.

            One of my children became a doctor. She took AP Chemistry in high school and essentially taught herself the subject. The teacher had never taught it before and it showed. (Later, our daughter became a TA in chemistry in college, where she had an excellent professor).

            Her AP Biology teacher in high school had never taught biology (AP or otherwise). Luckily, that teacher was a wonderful person and after my daughter kept pointing out in class that the teacher’s lectures were erroneous and contradicted by information in the textbook, the teacher had my daughter help her teach the class. Note: I was mortified when my daughter told me what she was doing; thought the teacher would be offended and seek retribution.

            Same story (poor instruction) in the high school Physics class. Somehow my daughter caught up in that subject in college and ending up tutoring others (no thanks to her high school experience).

            Not all children have the fortitude to do what she accomplished (doubt I would). This all occurred in a public high school that was ranked No. 2 in the state (not a small state).
            The teachers unions protect the teachers first, not students, and they admit it. Our public schools are failing and this is one of but many reasons why it is allowed to continue.

            Liked by 1 person

            • vikingmom says:

              Lady Liberty,

              Thank you for your post! I appreciate a polite response and always welcome constructive dialogue with anyone in the Treehouse.

              My specific answer to Petszmom was because she felt attacked by another poster who basically intimated that all teachers do a crappy job and many are child molesters. I do not like blanket generalizations of any profession and so I responded.

              I do know many good teachers and they are tired, discouraged, and frustrated right now and those are the ones that I was referencing. I also know that there are lousy, lazy, incompetent teachers and that many are protected by a union system that is more interested in national politics than in the actual education of children! I would love to see the Department of Education completely disbanded and much more local control but even that is dependent on the parents within any particular area or district.

              As I said in my response, I homeschooled my own children because I was concerned enough about the education they would receive at our local school. However, it is not for everyone, and the pubic schools do play a necessary role in our society so we should all be doing what we can to support them and help the good teachers! I think there are a lot of reasons why schools are failing many children but it shouldn’t all be laid at the feet of the teachers, IMHO!

              I am equally frustrated by the people blaming police officers for all of the problems when they are often the very last point of contact in a justice system that has allowed far too many people to fall through the cracks for decades!

              In a nutshell, I will defer to Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn when he was asked what led to the downfall of his homeland…I believe that we are in the same place today in America

              “If I were asked today to formulate as concisely as possible what was the main cause of the ruinous revolution that swallowed up some 60 million of our people, I could not put it more accurately than to repeat: ‘Men had forgotten God; that is why all this has happened.'”

              Liked by 3 people

              • ladyliberty11 says:

                Agree wholeheartedly with everything you said! So wish I could have homeschooled my children (was not possible).

                All but one ended up indoctrinated by their Marxist teachers and professors of the “hate America” crowd. Sending your children to public or private school and to most colleges today is dangerous to their critical thinking skills.

                If this Covid-19 nightmare wakes up some parents to this reality, it may be help lead to changes (or to the demise) of some of these intolerant institutions.

                Liked by 1 person

                • vikingmom says:

                  LadyLiberty,

                  The culture is VERY strong and is determined to destroy our kids ability to think logically. Even though I homeschooled mine, one has gone hard left anyway,which breaks my heart but also drives me to my knees. He knows the truth but is choosing to believe the lies because it’s easier to live his life in the way he wants when there is no objective standard.

                  I cling to this verse and the promise that even those who have fallen far from what they knew can return and that God can use it all!

                  “Simon, Simon, Satan has asked to sift each of you like wheat. But I have prayed for you, Simon, that your faith will not fail. And when you have turned back, strengthen your brothers.” Luke 22:31-32

                  Liked by 1 person

        • Dana W Accola says:

          If you had to teach under conditions of teacher today are held to you would also need that much time off since they get blamed by parents and administators. To many administrators with tje only goal of making easier for kids.

          Like

          • wondering999 says:

            Dana, I understand the problem of difficult teaching conditions, but this is something that should be openly addressed. How can teachers teach effectively when conditions are hostile/dangerous/disrupted?

            The specific problems need to be shouted out, and corrections need to be demanded and implemented. I am friend of a friend of a teacher who was stabbed in the stomach while teaching in the City of Cleveland. How can anyone be expected to work under those conditions? Further, what can be done to improve conditions?

            Liked by 1 person

    • deannalaurence says:

      not a good idea. it would symply ruin the good private schools. the know it all left public officials would interfere with the private schools and ruin them just like they did the public.

      Liked by 1 person

      • wondering999 says:

        In earlier days there were many private organizations that backed and developed excellent schools. We need high standards for students as well as teachers, plus resources for children who cannot thrive in regular schools.

        A bloated bureaucracy at the City/County level cannot not do much to improve the classroom experience for teachers and students, and since founding of the Federal Department of Education we have had a huge expansion of central offices in smaller cities, as well as in Washington DC.

        Like

  3. fred5678 says:

    Azar, in a looooong list of therapeutics, had to avoid mention of HCQ recent news to appease presstitutes.

    Liked by 4 people

    • joebkonobi says:

      I noticed that also. Azar the Coward. He mentioned remdesiver which is much less effective than HCQ.

      Liked by 2 people

      • SanJac says:

        Not to mention with insurance that medication requires up to six treatments at a cost of over $4200 per individual versus under $100 for HDQ.

        Liked by 1 person

      • mimbler says:

        Yes, a 30 percent shorter time to recover with remdesivir but zero reduction in mortality while hydroxy has more than 50 percent reduction in mortality.

        I should probably be more cynical by now, but I’m floored that they are withholding this cure and allowing people to die by tens of thousands that could be helped.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Marc says:

        Lobbyist $$$ are why he and the administration are pimping Remdesivir. Pres. Trump knows HCQ works and he needs to say so in a setting outside of Twitter. Make the MSM talk about it and the new study. A chopper presser would work well or jump in on a daily briefing with Kayleigh.

        Like

  4. SR says:

    No physical school then no federal education fund to state or townships. Same for colleges too. There is no point to make these folks happy who hate you and will never agree/vote for you.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Gunner says:

    Look at your future, U.S.A. Pretty damn pathetic…an entire generation of humans being raised to stay at home, turn on electronics for learning and entertainment, fear breathing air and getting hands dirty, and being coddled and protected from life.

    A democrat/socialist wet dream.

    Liked by 6 people

  6. I Hear You Now says:

    listening live and it’s an excellent Discussion

    Like

    • I Hear You Now says:

      I’ve loving watching President Trump’s facial reactions while he absorbs all this feedback … 😊

      Liked by 3 people

      • Remington says:

        He’s just the best of the best….As an aside, look at the opening pic of that video above. See the way PT looks at his wife….You can feel the love he has for her.

        Liked by 1 person

      • old deplorable owl says:

        I was also quite impressed with Mrs. VP! (I’m loathe to use her first name.) 😁😁😁
        She was very much involved and attentive, not a table decoration. The more I see of her, the more I like her.

        Liked by 1 person

    • nats1mom says:

      I agree, I Hear You; also listening/watching live. It’s been very informative and also refreshing to watch people express their views without interruption.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Are we headed into a bifurcated system in which some school districts find a way to return to in-class teaching formats and others go a different direction?

    Good discussion.

    Liked by 3 people

    • cheryl says:

      It’s time to get the kids back to school. They need the social interaction. Home schooling is not for everybody. Some parents don’t have the education or patience or knowledge for it. Parents need kids to go back to school so they can go to work.

      Liked by 4 people

      • wondering999 says:

        A grandchild has just begun going to a private nursery/daycare at 16 months, for a few hours every day. The school has been sending videos to the parents, who are watching her progress and forwarding the videos to me.

        I am thrilled with what I see. The toddlers are attentive, well behaved, and the teachers have organized an excellent preschool curriculum. They put together lunches and snacks that are nutritious and teach the children how to eat in a civilized way. There are songs in three different languages (the teachers are fluent in all three) and small lessons and teaching games. It is wonderful to watch. I wish all families could have this kind of resource if they CHOOSE it.

        Liked by 1 person

    • cheryl says:

      Don’t know how my response got under your comment. sorry. Meant to post it as a stand-alone.

      Like

  8. jus wundrin says:

    I wish the President would use the dims lockdown meme against them by locking down the gubment school system, and promoting home schooling. When they start to whine, he should just look at them in the face and say “Its for the children!”

    Like

    • wondering999 says:

      They will then create some horrendous anti-homeschooling PR using their stable of crisis actors. Let’s keep straight on this path of freedom and choice for all without their mind games, which sometimes kill children. This last Spring was the first springtime in years that we did not have school shooters (because the kids weren’t in school)

      Like

  9. mandy says:

    Homeschool, homeschool, homeschool.

    🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • Victor Laszlo says:

      I homeschool my son, and it’s great. I get to correct all the PC revisionist history, common core, climate change garbage. For me, it’s not the teachers in public schools, it’s the curriculum.
      Even homeschooled, it’s not history, but social studies, not english but language arts, etc. They treat climate change as fact. Every history lesson has to mention how the poor oppressed black people were affected. Hell, one year they combined WWI and WWII into one lesson, then had about six lessons on the civil rights movement. The short story reading in english is all from foreign authors, to be diverse of course. Instead of the red badge of courage, it’s some story about a traffic jam in India ( the truck finally moves out of the way, and the cars start moving again – how exciting!).
      His teachers are mostly green know-nothings, but at least they speak english. Still, homeschooling is wonderful. It’s the company that writes the curriculum that needs major adjustment

      Liked by 7 people

    • jus wundrin says:

      YES, YES, YES!!!!!

      Liked by 2 people

  10. tuskyou says:

    Best remarks so far from Jenny Beth Martin when she noted school start up in the fall is normal for everyone including non parents. The school calendar really does impact our daily lives.

    Liked by 4 people

    • old deplorable owl says:

      When I was in high school in the Willamette Valley of Orygone, the school year started after Labor Day weekend. When the strawberries were ripe, the school year ended! It had always been thus. (Thousands of acres) Then some unemployable Sociology degrees wormed their way into Salem, and suddenly we had a nightmare tangle of child labor laws that forbade hundreds of kids picking crops. That had been our malt shop, school clothes and longed-for car money.
      A pox on all bureaucrats!!!

      Liked by 5 people

      • dd_sc says:

        We went to HS in the same general area.

        I remember those laws. A lot of my friends lost their summer employment.

        Liked by 2 people

        • old deplorable owl says:

          When and where? if i’m not being intrusive. I was what came to be called Hillsburrito, ’61.
          I wound up working at a small engine/bicycle shop my last summer as a stewdint.

          Liked by 1 person

          • dd_sc says:

            I was in Milwaukie.

            Still have family in the Portland metro area. My nephew is dating one of Portland’s Finest so I get a dispatch from the front every now and then. She and some other cops actually had to search for IED’s.

            Portland is going off the rails.

            Liked by 1 person

      • wondering999 says:

        My mother commented on the crushing of child agricultural labor, also in relationship to strawberries.

        I’m all for safe working conditions in fields — wouldn’t want my kids sprayed with poisons. But I’m also all for safe work for children old enough to do the work, earn and learn from it, and begin to feel like they are on the path to adulthood and self-sufficiency.

        Liked by 1 person

        • old deplorable owl says:

          I’m sure some pesticides must have been used, but those fields were under almost constant irrigation during the day. If we weren’t picking a field, it was being watered. Never heard of anybody getting sick, other than from consuming too much of what they picked.

          Liked by 2 people

  11. El_Gran_Jamon says:

    Pretty sad, and I must add, un Christian statements about teachers. I taught 25 years in an urban California district. Seen a lot of things come and go. There were and for sure are bad actors in those schools, gangs, fraud, theft, assault and the occasional sexual predator. (Staff, student or parent)

    However, the average teacher I worked with was dedicated. Not the sharpest tools, but dedicated.Tried very hard to get thru and help. Social problems many are not aware of, gang, domestic violence, drugs, disease and poverty, and always diminishing resources during times of plenty and shortage. (to fund more administrators and consultant programs)

    On Disease.. many kids are sick day to day. Often parents sent them to school knowing it. That includes things liketuberculosis, 2 cases I remember meningitis, usual lice, flu. Schools are a petri dish- which is wise they were initially closed for covid19 when it was unknown. Many readers don’t understand many students live in multi generation households. When little Johnny or Juan gets a disease, or covid19 for example; gramma will also. Gramma’s likelyngot diabetes or high cholesterol or other comorbidities but she’s the one reliably watching the kids. Maybe the actual guardian. They are scared.

    On the staff side, more than a half, possibly 2/3rds of my colleagues were over 50, many over 60. Majority of those were overweight, many morbidly so. Anecdotal conversations with them revealed many health issues which are comorbidities to covid19. These teachers tried distance learning, and will hopefully do better next year with new technology. Due to the litigious nature of the school environment, many teachers did not do zoom face to face instruction and only handed out work as described. (Union and district officials told them students and others were recording and altering, disrupting meetings to entrap teachers and report. No protection was to be provided. Many opted out)

    Things will get worse be fore better, but any decision about opening schools needs to take health of all parties into account.

    El_Gran_Jamon

    Liked by 3 people

  12. Beau Geste says:

    It is clear and incontestable that the big-city public schools are abominable propaganda mills, where children do not learn competency. The monopoly aspect of the big city school systems, with gigantic political administration costs, dictatorial curriculum and preservation of ‘inoperative’ teachers, necessarily produces very poor results in terms of student achievement and accomplishment.
    Imagine being a big-city parent forced to send your children to your mal-performing locl school, knowing your children are doomed…. You would be angry and depressed, and feel powerless, like the powerless big-city ‘communities’ do feel. Especially if you and your children can be shot, robbed, and assaulted by gangs on the way to school.

    Public vouchers are the only way forward. Vouchers to pay for non-public schooling which competes with the dysfunctional monopoly, gigantic-overhead, propagandizing-instead-of-teaching public school system. And vouchers for private security to-and-from, and at the non-public schools.

    Faced with competition and better student learning at their competition, the public schools mith improve.

    Then again, the corruption may be too deep, so most students would leave, and the corrupt public system would shrink away.

    Black Minds Matter !!!

    Liked by 3 people

    • mikeyboo says:

      Beau-I agree with your post AND all minds matter even though most public schools, for a variety of reasons, don’t appear to be doing much to educate and strengthen minds. And that is the case up to and including what passes for “higher education”.

      Like

      • Beau Geste says:

        I know a highschool teacher in a very good “rich” highschool.
        Very leftist propaganda slant. My children had the zinn history book, which is truly bizarre. I didn’t know it until later, or I would have substituted reading. An english teacher was far-far left, with grades (and disparagement) based on acceptance (or denial) of the propaganda. “Activists” seek to control the Board of Education. I think the only wayfor parents to stop this crap is to have vouchers so that parents can pick schools that do not teach propaganda.

        Liked by 2 people

  13. Bunny says:

    On the way to pick up my grooming
    mower from the shop this morning,
    I noticed a young man waving at me
    from a table in his front yard. It was a
    Lemonade stand! I had to back up my
    whole rig, put on my emergency blinkers
    and get out in the middle of the road.
    He had the lemonade out and a sign
    with four to six other items listed including
    rice crispy treats which he said weren’t
    out yet.

    I handed him a ten, took a cup of lemon-
    ade and told him to keep the change I
    think I’ll go back later and get a twenty
    dollar cup!

    Gives me hope for the future!

    Liked by 4 people

    • Publius2016 says:

      thats very generous…

      call me cheap but I’d try to bargain two for one and see what he’d say…sometimes you get a really “salesman” personality or maybe someone who’d make the best doctor or nurse…

      Liked by 1 person

    • Phflipper says:

      Yep. Passed a lemonade stand earlier today as well. Like you, I stopped too. The best part I see in such a normal activity for kids on a hot summer day is the potential for just that, normalcy. Darn good lemonade too.

      Fortunately, some parents recognize there is much more to life than being fearful. May many more lemonade stands pop up everywhere.

      Liked by 1 person

      • old deplorable owl says:

        And there are noozpaper articles about kids (and their parents) being busted and fined for “unlicensed” lemonade stands in blue cities and towns!
        Ahhh! Utopia at last…..
        (Spit!)

        Liked by 1 person

  14. alliwantissometruth says:

    I feel for the teachers today who are dedicated and want to actually teach their students, but they’re up against a behemoth known as the Federal Education System

    The Treepers who are or have been teachers have a right to call out those who paint all teachers with the same brush, but we can’t dismiss the fact there’s a huge problem with many teachers

    That problem is many of them aren’t teachers at all, but indoctrination specialists. I know many of them, and there’s more and more of them entering our schools after they themselves have been thoroughly brainwashed and indoctrinated

    It’s criminal to brainwash and indoctrinate anyone, but more so when it’s children expecting an education

    Politics and ideology should be nowhere near any classroom until possibly the 11th or 12th grade, and then should be presented and taught in a fair manner with all sides being represented and with no bias toward one side or the other by the teacher

    Kids need an education, the traditional education of reading, writing and arithmetic to teach them the basics and work the “muscles” of their minds. Without that traditional education, they lose the formative building blocks of functioning in society

    Today, and for many past decades, traditional education has been injected with leftist ideology, to the point where the ideology becomes more important than the education, which results in a second rate education and a first class brainwashing and indoctrination

    I won’t even get into what’s going on in colleges

    We must remove ideology and politics from the curriculum of our schools when it comes to the actual “education”. It should not be allowed, and there should be severe consequences for those who seek to brainwash our children

    Removing the brainwashing and indoctrination specialists and getting back to educators would go a long way in the rejuvenation of this great country, and it would give the good teachers a chance to once again do what they do best

    Liked by 3 people

  15. I’ve voted in favor of every school referendum here for 20 years.
    Last was a $56M bond, including a state of the art swim center.
    Not even three years old, and closed.

    I sent an email to the school district yesterday morning.

    I am asking for an avenue to review what is being taught to these kids. Readings lists, and all.

    No reply, yet.

    Liked by 6 people

    • farmerren says:

      That is a great idea Tangled. I’m a member of a local ‘activist’ group. We get ‘our’ people to run for school boards, county and other commissions, tax assessor, state/local offices, etc.

      We have one conservative on the school board. He does what he can as he’s outnumbered. Next time he’s at a meeting (a regular), I’ll ask him what he can do to give us the “avenue to review what is being taught to these kids. Reading lists, and all.”

      Thank you!

      Liked by 5 people

  16. TreeClimber says:

    Or, here’s an idea, if you have kids, mind your responsibility to them and teach them yourself rather than palming them off on someone else…

    Like

    • wondering999 says:

      Yes, if you have the patience and heart for it.
      I posted above, how thrilled i am with what I see of my granddaughter’s preschool. The teachers are excellent and I can tell over the last month that she has learned a phenomenal amount of basic, good lessons in a safe and pleasant environment. There are all sorts of ways to do things!

      One major way to straighten things out would be to remove obstacles from homeschooling, deliberately placed there by bureaucrats trying to impede homeschoolers. I’ve heard from people who taught music to homeschoolers that these kids were a great joy to work with, filled with natural interest, courtesy and civil behavior. Fun for everyone, students and teachers alike.

      Like

      • TreeClimber says:

        If you don’t have the heart and patience to teach your own children, you have no business having kids in the first place.

        Like

        • wondering999 says:

          TreeClimber, I’m going to ask you to rethink what your position. It works for you, but not everyone else.

          I am thinking of a friend of mine whose mother passed away when she was still in elementary school, after years of serious illness.

          Some parents wrestle with alcoholism, others with mental illness, schizophrenia and bipolar illness. The grandson of a close friend is finally enrolled in a tiny school that is good for him. He is in his father’s sole custody; his mother is bipolar and does not function well as a parent. She is not an evil person, and if God does not condemn her it is not my place to do so either. But that child cannot be easily homeschooled.

          Those are extreme examples, but there are many milder examples. People become parents in many ways and at different times in their lives. Not everyone is well-equipped to homeschool. I want for homeschooling to be an easily available choice, but I would not command this important work for those who cannot do well at it; and I do not want for anyone to regret having become a parent. That veers into the arguments of abortion. I want to support good choices for everyone involved. That means homeschooling for those who can homeschool well, and other choices for parents who need other choices.

          Like

          • TreeClimber says:

            I understand that homeschooling – and nuclear families – is not always an option. But bad parenting is the reason the country is currently in the state it is: look at our youth. And so I most certainly can, and will, judge the parents who could do better for their children, but for the sake of their own convenience or comfort or luxury, choose not to. And I certainly believe homeschooling should be far more prevalent than it is.

            Liked by 1 person

  17. Listen to the head of the National Teachers Union (NEA) today on NPR All Things Considered. She sounded like a stark raving lunatic. And of course she’s dead set against schools reopening.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Beau Geste says:

    I posted this on a topic below, by mistake.

    George Washington had no formal or college education. He was self-taught. A relative wrote that an old “autograph of George Washington’s name is believed to be the earliest specimen of his handwriting, when he was probably not more than eight or nine years old.” During this period, too, there came into his possession the “Young Man’s Companion,” an English vade-mecum of then enormous popularity, written “in a plain and easy stile,” the title states, “that a young Man may attain the same, without a Tutor.” It would be easier to say what this little book did not teach than to catalogue what it did. How to read, write, and figure is but the introduction to the larger part of the work, which taught one to write letters, wills, deeds, and all legal forms, to measure, survey, and navigate, to build houses, to make ink and cider, and to plant and graft, how to address letters to people of quality, how to doctor the sick, and, finally, how to conduct one’s self in company. The evidence still exists of how carefully Washington studied this book, in the form of copybooks, in which are transcribed problem after problem and rule after rule, not to exclude the famous Rules of civility, which biographers of Washington have asserted were written by the boy himself. School-mates thought fit, after Washington became famous, to remember his “industry and assiduity at school as very remarkable,” and the copies certainly bear out the statement, but even these prove that the lad was as human as the man, for scattered here and there among the logarithms, geometrical problems, and legal forms are crude drawings of birds, faces, and other typical school-boy attempts.

    Thomas Jefferson, too, was largely self-taught. Jefferson was home-schooled until he was 9, whereupon he started French, Latin and Greek at a local school, then boarding school for 2 years and 2 years at college when 16 to 18 years old. The self-taught Jefferson accumulated thousands of books, reportedly saying “I cannot live without books.”

    Ben Franklin only received two years of schooling. Between the ages of eight and ten, Benjamin Franklin attended grammar school.

    Many Americans have been home schooled and self-taught, Andrew Carnegie, due to family circumstances, was forced to work as a child, so was largely self-taught. Thomas Edison attended school for only a few months, but was tutored by his mother and taught himself by reading on his own, believing in self-improvement throughout his life.

    Big-city public schools are propaganda mills that can paralyze minds, so parents need to provide alternative, unpolluted material. There is now an enormous amount of unpolluted, non-propagandized educational material available to parents, and school-age children, from kahn academy to ted talks, to gutenberg.org.

    BLACK MINDS MATTER !! DEFUND THE PUBLIC BIG CITY SCHOOLS. PROVIDE VOUCHERS SO PARENTS CAN SEND CHILDREN TO FUNCTIONING SCHOOLS, rathe than despair as their children are effectively disabled.

    If the public schools can’t improve and function, they should wither away.

    Liked by 3 people

  19. MicD says:

    I gotta share this story about bully’s.
    So I was 12 or 13 at a new school, in library class (no talking, only reading)
    Sitting opposite table was this big football jock, and he kicks me under the table and whispers
    “I’M GOING TO KICK YOUR ASS AFTER CLASS !! ”

    I stood right up and told the whole room what was going to happen and to be sure not to miss it.

    Didn’t happen, he was a No Show, never saw him again.
    LOL

    Liked by 4 people

    • Beau Geste says:

      MicD, I had a somewhat similar situation, but the ‘bully’ announced to the whole school he was going to kick my ass after school. I met him at the designated time/place, and kicked his ass in about 10 seconds, giving him the first swing (which I easily avoided before clocking him…)
      Fond memory.

      Today, you and I would be expelled from Public School for treating our respective antagonists insensitively, without sufficient empathy, snd for ‘taking matters into our own hands’.

      Liked by 2 people

    • MicD says:

      True story.
      Local comment –> “What would have happened if he DID SHOW UP?”
      I would have gotten my ass kicked, but I’d have left my marks on big boy.

      BTW…
      There is someone who lurks here on https://theconservativetreehouse.com/
      Someone that shall not be named but only displays as ‘1 person’

      MAGA MAGA MAGA

      Like

      • Beau Geste says:

        PS, a ‘bully’ at a private school can be given a chance to shape up, and if not, easily disinvited from continuing at the school.
        Public school bullies are perpetuated.

        Like

  20. sunnyflower5 says:

    Not sure this happened as I can’t find or see it on any of the above videos. 🤷‍♂️
    Chanel Rion OAN Retweeted

    Liked by 1 person

  21. laurelmarycecilia says:

    I well appreciated the Presidents remarks and opinions about opening schools. However, the best answer to your child’s education is homeschool ! Don’t say you can’t do it……… the resources are vast and easy to use and can be very inexpensive. If you want your child to have the culture of your home ….home school them…. otherwise they will have the culture that’s handed out in the public/private school. That’s often bad, or terrible, or anti-American, or anti-Christian or all of the above.

    Liked by 4 people

  22. farmerren says:

    Just wondering if a non family member or a retired teacher per se, could home school someone’s kids. Likely state by state? But who is gonna know???

    I’m not familiar with the rules of home schooling.

    Liked by 1 person

    • annieoakley says:

      I think you can. My neighbor’s daughter teaches a group of children being home schooled together in one persons home. No idea the ages or anything else but she is certified to teach (elementary) and drives to the home 3 days a week. It sounds as though it is a sort of home school co-op.

      Liked by 3 people

      • dd_sc says:

        I can see something like home school co-ops catching on. My sister-in-law is a retired elementary and special ed school teacher, and my nephew is a HS teacher. I’ve asked both if they have thought about home school tutoring.

        I’ve only checked a couple times, but states usually allow ~5 children before you have to file as a day care facility. So getting a tutor for a few children would be an option for working parents.

        Liked by 3 people

        • farmerren says:

          DD, this co-op idea is exciting. Thank you for the info. I’m pleased to see there are people out there already co-op schooling (as Annie said) and that people (you) are trying to recruit more tutors.
          I do hope word gets out to working parents. thx again.

          Like

      • farmerren says:

        Appreciate your reply Annie, I really like the idea of the ‘home school co-op’.
        Maybe this virus mess will produce some benefits for educating kids after all.

        Like

  23. SanJac says:

    We ALL have been graded from the time we first stepped into education until we left it.
    The teachers union all the way down the line should be graded the exact same way and penalties should apply to them ALL for the continuing of pumping out tree stumps. When they strike and hold Red for Ed strikes again pull the plug because we have stuffed way to many pensions with hundreds of billions for no good reason.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. nosheepallowed says:

    As a teacher, I sincerely hope the schools open. Online education can work for the motivated-self learner types. Others, however, just do the bare minimum, cheating along the way, and learning absolutely nothing.

    Like

    • donnieboy71 says:

      well….judging by the direction america is headed i would say they aren’t learning anything (useful) inside the schools either. 93% of the k-12 teaching staff are female and probably 90%+ of those are feminist. same goes for the administration.

      what could go wrong?

      Like

  25. The way I look at it is that our kids got a break from a Marxist indoctrination at least this year. That’s one school year when parents could have made a difference and actually offer true education and history without a marxist slant and haterade towards our country. I would say, keep it closed another year and roll back property taxes supporting various ISDs. Why pay if school is not in session

    Like

    • Beau Geste says:

      cdbm,
      in a way, we are as isolated as early rural America a hundred or two hundred years ago. The little house on the prairie, except for TV and the internet, but largely without the socialization of sam clemen’s Tom Sawyer church services.

      communism requires forced socialization with heavy-handed propaganda which the group must all accept or be excommunicated or punished. The meetings and watercooler gossip where voluble ‘group-think’ opinions are announced as if disagreement is impermissible, are reduced. The leftist loudmouths in book clubs and discussion groups are less dominant over zoom. Many of the hollyweird narcissists are slowly going broke, as the theaters are closed, and their celebrity and therefor credibility, diminish.

      The propaganda effects of public school are also much diminished. While there is still ‘social media’ and zoom, the direct crowd-herd-effects of communist memes by ‘teacher-authority-figures”, hollyweird, ‘influencers’ and ‘thought leaders’, pro-sports geniuses, and the monopoly fake news is significantly reduced. So the herd is becoming untrained in groupthink. More individual thoughts can creep out. The fear of reduction of calculated herd-thought-uniformity requires mass ‘protests’ which are a too-blunt instrument that can backfire in the perception of individuals not participating in the mass violence and craziness.

      So, this can be an opportunity. Students, their parent(s) and other adults are not mesmerized by wasting their time and thoughts literally consumed by ‘pro’ sports. There is time to reflect in isolation and small family settings. This is an opportunity and respite from the otherwise constant propaganda. We can use it wisely by providing students with non-propaganda opportunities, histories, biographies, discussions, and role models other than propaganda-meister teachers.

      We can also work to demand that parents get vouchers to send their children to non-public schools that WILL be open. The big public school monopoly is more vulnerable than it has ever been. Contact your legislators to demand Vouchers for school choice. The funding should come from, and be the same per-student as the amount allocated to the local Public School. This Voucher funding should be subtracted from the Public School when the Voucher-student departs, and enrolls in a non-public school or home-school association.

      Like

  26. paulashley says:

    I want to see common sense, adult, boldness. There is simply no reason to not open schools and conduct business as usual.

    Like

  27. One Adam-12 says:

    Luke 9: 51b “Jesus set out resolutely to go to Jerusalem” (resolutely=Grk “he set his face,” a Semitic idiom that speaks of a firm, unshakable resolve to do something)

    Republic To Keep

    Like

  28. wondering999 says:

    Finally watching the video closely. I really liked what our First Lady said. Karen Pence is also an experienced teacher.

    It was difficult to catch everyone’s name. I did note that Penny Schwinn from Tennessee spoke. Governor Lee has Penny Schwinn working with the Tennessee Board of Regents.

    Penny Schwinn has an interesting and broad background. She has worked in Baltimore and Texas, and was educated in California: “Commissioner Schwinn earned her Bachelor of Arts from the University of California-Berkeley, her Master of Arts in Teaching from Johns Hopkins University, and her PhD in Education Policy from Claremont Graduate University in California. She is the proud parent of two daughters.”
    https://www.tbr.edu/board/members/pschwinn

    Liked by 1 person

  29. wondering999 says:

    Kellyanne Conway looks great. 🙂 She spoke well about how we can put a man on the moon, build the Panama Canal — surely we can create an effective school system.

    The Tea Party lady brings up the problems of leaving middle school students unsupervised on social media, where bullying runs rampant. She gives the example of an employee with five children, wife is a dental hygienist… and trying to homeschool also.

    She cleaned houses for a while during a deep family financial crisis. She is now a single mom. Every single person in this country is essential. Every one of us is essential, every one of us important. Not every single family can afford a computer so their children can be online, or WiFi. Families are suffering, education is suffering. You cannot be in two places at once, physically and mentally. She is doing everything she possibly can, but it’s impossible to do what she needs to do. She wants the schools open. She has a list of 800? doctors who advise a healthy respect for the virus, but continuing to live our lives.

    Like

  30. wondering999 says:

    Dr. Lisa Piercy, Tennessee Commisioner of a Health and a Pediatrician, spoke. She said that education and the economy are key drivers of health, and we need to get our schools and economy open. Brief and to the point. 🙂

    Like

  31. wondering999 says:

    Tennessee very well represented in this meeting. Delanie McDonald is Student Government Association leader at Middle Tennessee State University. She was homeschooled all her earlier life. Really liked the way she presented herself and by extension, homeschooled students 🙂
    https://mtsunews.com/delanie-mcdonald-sga-president-2019-20/

    Like

  32. wondering999 says:

    Right after Delanie McDonald, we have the President of Middle Tennessee State University, Dr. Sidney McPhee. Dr. McPhee first brags on MTSU and its history since 1911. He goes on to talk about how diverse their student body is, and why they never closed during the pandemic because so many of MTSU students had nowhere else to do. Thus Dr. McPhee feels they have the experience to reopen, and students and parents were surveyed, and want to keep MTSU open. They recognize the challenges and are planning to address issues that affect students.

    Dr. McPhee has an interesting bio. Seems to be doing a great job
    https://mtsu.edu/about/exec.php

    Like

  33. wondering999 says:

    President Trump concludes by saying that he has a big meeting with the Mexican President “tomorrow” (it’s already July 8 where I am). Wonder what will happen tomorrow. I hope it is a very successful meeting.

    Like

  34. wondering999 says:

    Something that I never hear mentioned, even with a lot of pediatricians present, is the role of Vitamin D in all this. You’d think that if Vitamin D has even a minor role in preventing the overwhelming inflammation associated with some Covid infections, that pediatricians would be all over Vitamin D testing and supplementation for vulnerable kids and teachers. But I never heard it mentioned, and after I mentioned it in a few places I noticed articles beginning to appear that pooh-pooh Vitamin D the same way they dismiss hydroxychloroquine plus zinc.

    Vitamin D is reputed to have a role in preventing obesity (a Covid risk factor), asthma, and many other problems. Here’s a link about children and Vitamin D:
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/05/200507121353.htm

    “Backman said this correlation might help explain the many mysteries surrounding COVID-19, such as why children are less likely to die. Children do not yet have a fully developed acquired immune system, which is the immune system’s second line of defense and more likely to overreact…Backman is careful to note that people should not take excessive doses of vitamin D, which might come with negative side effects….”It is hard to say which dose is most beneficial for COVID-19,” Backman said. “However, it is clear that vitamin D deficiency is harmful, and it can be easily addressed with appropriate supplementation. This might be another key to helping protect vulnerable populations, such as African-American and elderly patients, who have a prevalence of vitamin D deficiency.”

    Maybe I’ll send this link to Dr. McPhee of MTSU, he seems like a practical man, or Delanie McDonald

    Like

  35. ubfreeblog says:

    Does anyone have an opinion on the new SEVP announcement regarding no waiver being available to forgein students at colleges that are offering online only classes for the fall semester? I think these students played by the rules and are now being forced to return home if their college is not going to offer on premises classes in the fall. I am very disappointed since President Trump has said in the past he would want those students who play by the rules to be able to come in the country.

    Like

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