Harvard Announces 100% Virtual Classes For Students Both On and Off Campus – ICE Announces Exchange Students No Longer Qualify For Visas…

Earlier today Harvard University announced all classes this year and next will be taught virtually.  Incoming Freshman will have dorms, but no classes will have in-person instruction; all classes will be virtual.  The total student body on campus will be kept under a forty percent threshold due to COVID-19 efforts.

MASSACHUSETTS – “In addition to freshmen, Harvard will host as many students who “must be on campus to progress academically” this fall as it can without exceeding the 40 percent threshold. All courses will be taught virtually for students both on and off campus.”

Additionally, Harvard will not be making any adjustments to their tuition rates.

A few hours later U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced any foreign student who attends a U.S. university with only virtual classes will lose their student visa.

ICE Announcement – […] Nonimmigrant F-1 and M-1 students attending schools operating entirely online may not take a full online course load and remain in the United States.

The U.S. Department of State will not issue visas to students enrolled in schools and/or programs that are fully online for the fall semester nor will U.S. Customs and Border Protection permit these students to enter the United States.

Active students currently in the United States enrolled in such programs must depart the country or take other measures, such as transferring to a school with in-person instruction to remain in lawful status. If not, they may face immigration consequences including, but not limited to, the initiation of removal proceedings. (more)

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426 Responses to Harvard Announces 100% Virtual Classes For Students Both On and Off Campus – ICE Announces Exchange Students No Longer Qualify For Visas…

  1. jay says:

    For the life of me, I cannot envision college or university or law school spewing out of a monitor. How does one build relationships with other students or teachers? How are exams implemented? There is something very sterile and anti-social about this new world and technology.

    There is a zoom craze now – which is odd. Lunch meetings on zoom?! Why?? To watch everyone eat their own grub on a monitor? Getting Food between the teeth? Ugh. maybe I am old. I just don’t get it.

    Liked by 8 people

    • evergreen says:

      I don’t know. I rather like this development. It puts higher education in a pickle in many ways. It also is a doozie for K-12 now that homeschooling becomes the state-sanctioned norm. Imagine that!

      As to Harvard in particular, I’m curious to see their reaction. I think right now they are in a state best described thusly: the Harvard grad is told to go sit down in the corner of a round room. Observe and enjoy.

      Liked by 2 people

      • zozz1 says:

        Average major university has 5.5% foreign students…big hit if they lose 5.5% of tuition income… Ahhhh…the Law of Unintended Consequences!

        Liked by 7 people

        • lftpm says:

          Harvard and Yale have over $30 Billion endowments. If each lost 1000 foreign students, the that would be about $45 Million in lost tuition per year, a drop in the bucket. The leading major public universities have multibillion dollar endowments: Texas A&M 13.5, Michigan 12.4, Virginia 9, UCLA 5.3, Ohio State 5.2, North Carolina 5, Berkeley 4.8, Texas-Austin 4, Wisconsin 3.2, Penn State 3, Michigan State 3.

          Moreover, everyone of these schools rejects more qualified applicants than they accept, so if foreign students stop coming, they will be quickly replaced by American students.

          But then too, the best private and public universities

          Liked by 3 people

        • Those foreign will pay about twice the tuition of in-state students at a public/state university. They are a cash cow.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Bill says:

          It is an even bigger hit than 5.5% because these students are full pay, whereas a majority of the US students have their tuition “discounted” in order to get them to enroll and then continue. In other words, colleges and universities charge international students more to offset the discount – think of airline travel as an example: business travelers pay more, because their companies can afford the expense, so they can charge less to get personal travelers to book flights so their planes are full. As Instapundit points out this morning – these schools need international students to make their “nut” and if they don’t open up this fall they stand to lose BIG, which will necessitate laying off democratic donors. I call that a WIN!

          Liked by 3 people

        • namberak says:

          Solid observation. One of my daughters-in-law teaches at State U’s med school. Going back to the fall of ’17, their number of foreign students started going down and the number of Chinese students went over a cliff last fall. They have means to help smooth the bumps but it was a bit rocky for them for awhile. Blowing out the grievance studies department, who cares? But the med school, a place where so much research is done across the country, that’s a different animal.

          Liked by 2 people

    • WSB says:

      Zoom is Chinese army.

      Liked by 9 people

    • Scarlet says:

      Honestly, We homeschool. It’s a lot of computer work and a lot of parent / child interaction. We use Calvert Academy. It’s the gold standard. Classical curriculum. Very challenging.
      There is no in person classroom. That’s correct.
      But, what we also don’t have to deal with is ;
      No Bullying
      No Wasted time
      No Wasted classroom discussion to bring the dumb ones up to speed
      No peer pressure
      No liberal indoctrination
      No one view is the only view
      No glossing over something harder to grasp. Time can be spent to make sure it’s understood and mastered
      The abolition of reading a novel or any book. Reading is encouraged
      No political stances, riots, walk outs or sit ins
      No 20 minutes to get to the cafeteria and eat your lunch
      No bathroom bans. You can go whenever you want
      No being picked on for being smart
      No needed day care
      No buses
      No 6 am wake up call
      No clothing pressure
      No pressure to drink / do drugs
      No sex pressure
      No stupid class requirements like, environmental damage by the USA or history declaring the USA was founded by Muslims. ( yes. This is in common core curricula. The theory is that North Africans were predominantly Muslim when they were sold into slavery and brought the muslim religion to North America )
      No standardized testing
      No required mental Health assessment
      No filling out home information reports ( how many guns are in your household ? , who lives with you ? Is there alcohol in your home ? Do you feel safe ? )
      No mandated HPV vaccination.

      I could go on and on.

      The indoctrination is very very real.

      Liked by 30 people

      • jay says:

        That is quite a list!
        I understand this means a keen focus on studies. It’s is Commendable! hopefully more knowledge sinks in.
        But when and where is human interaction learned if life is spent in front of a monitor?

        Like

        • Scarlet says:

          There is a tremendous Amount of human interaction,
          She still plays team sports through the high school, she volunteers , she has a part time job, she does athletic camps and she tutors
          Her ambition is to be a professional equestrian in the dressage discipline.
          At 16, she has amassed enough points to “ go pro “ within the next year, Hard decision. Its a tough life, hard work and long hours. Shes not afraid of either.
          She will graduate this fall . I’m allowing an apprenticeship with an Olympic rider that we know and trust. She will groom, ride , learn and still take part time college classes online.
          We put the hard work in. It’s paying off. She’s exceptional. An avowed virgin until marriage.
          A disciplined , accomplished , athletic girl.
          Her friends are just like her and they are numerous.
          My point? There is hope for a few exceptional Generation Z kids.
          She proudly wears her Trump 2020 sweatshirts and bracelets daily,
          And her debating skills are impressive.
          Keep the faith. Some of us have raised moral, educated , hard working patriots.
          There’s still a little hope!

          Liked by 14 people

          • Scarlet says:

            She’s also an exceptional marksman. She can clay target shoot, can fast load a WALTHER 380 semi auto pistol and is good at archery

            Liked by 9 people

          • DonaldsonLJ says:

            Hi Scarlet – your daughter is a credit to you. It is not easy raising a kid the right way. I am a Brit and compete on the USA winter equesrtrian circuit down in Florida, have done so for 10 years now. If you ever need to ascertain who is who and what is what etc, let me know. The horse world is quite challenging, that is the politest way l can say it !

            Liked by 1 person

          • doyouseemyvision says:

            You probably already know this but a visit to the Royal Andalusian School in Jerez, Spain is a standout. It blew us away and we are not necessarily horse people. Only certain days of the week do they do dressage shows, and before the show, they have a good hour or more of equestrians and their horses performing dressage training which the general public can watch. The shows are very inexpensive. I would love to see it again it was that good.

            Our next favorite dressage show is in Slovenia where they have a Lippanzer stud farm. They also so have a very, very nice show that was so poignant I was in tears. We learned a lot. I would go again if in the area.

            Our least favorite was the famous Spanish Riding School in Vienna that was exorbitantly expensive, and the show was minimal in our opinion. Of course, when in Vienna and if you are interested in dressage, by all means go, but the other 2 were exceptional in the order of our favorite.

            Like

          • jimmy2times says:

            Wow very impressive. Nice work. And I was feeling very proud of training my step daughters dog to give me his paw. And he’s still an untrained idioso!…Oh well lol

            Like

      • YeahYouRight says:

        Scarlet, please dismount off your high horse for just a moment. You described what happens in some classes or schools in some places sometimes. That’s all.

        Glad you’re happy, but you are missing some important components of school, which have only been deferred until later. Hopefully your kids will have someone in their lives to help them navigate.

        Like

        • phillip jeffreys says:

          And you have zero data to back your implied claims.

          As someone who has endurred the trying experience of hiring today’s and yesterday’s entrants to the job market, my encounters with the products of public and private education have not been encouraging.

          Liked by 3 people

        • Risa says:

          Which important components of school do you deem to have been missed by this young woman?

          Both of my children were physically bullied in public schools, with the schools refusing to intervene. Yet if a child fought back, rather than continuing to submit, the victim was disciplined as well as the aggressor. The solution in one instance was my child gave up recess and worked as an aide to a teacher during that time. So many students now come from dysfunctional homes or have been raised in daycare centers that bullies are not uncommon. Three years ago, our middle school had a boy kill himself after prolonged bullying.

          While there were some good dedicated teachers along the way, many were lazy or incompetent, often both. We had a high school chemistry teacher who showed reruns of “Crocodile Hunter” instead of teaching chemistry. A middle school English teacher had never seen the word “equine” and marked it as incorrect in an essay. One teacher took naps after handing out assignments. A high school computer science instructor was distracted by having an affair with the football coach. We have a distant relative who teaches, and she continued teaching during two unwed pregnancies. A great role model for her students.

          We were fortunate to have the means to supply our children with positive educational, cultural and social experiences outside of school to counterbalance the miserable failure of the public schools. There were no private schools within driving distance, and I didn’t know anything about homeschooling at that time, so those weren’t options. Thank the Lord, both are now successful, well-adjusted adults, but it is in spite of public school. Both are engineers, with one also having an MBA and a law degree.

          My grandchildren are homeschooled. They have a wonderful range of interactions with other homeschooled children and work ahead of grade level. They compete in competitive sports, take ballet and art, and are read to and have access to the classic works of literature and history the SJWs have purged from the schools. They study the Bible as part of their coursework. As they get older they will take college courses, have internships and volunteer, not constrained by the arbitrary schedule of a school.

          So I have seen, “up close and personal”, public school and homeschooling. I wish to goodness I had known about and had the resources for homeschooling, even though we were able to pull our children through. I feel nothing but admiration for parents who have opted out of the public schools.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Scarlet says:

          Yeah…I’m basing my writing on our own experiences within two different local public school districts. I’m also basing my writing on the encounters I have with numerous children who are her age that I come into contact with.
          I don’t see any exceptionalism coming out of either public or private schools. Sorry. I don’t.
          Now, if you’ll excuse me, I have a few high horses to exercise. 😂

          Liked by 3 people

        • snailmailtrucker says:

          YeahyouRight

          Go eat some more Schiff !

          Like

        • MMA says:

          There are NO important components of public school, period. Peer groups and liberal adults are not good guidance for children and young adults. The foundations are NOT covered in school, only indoctrination. I homeschooled my kids through sixth grade back in the day (1995-2002), and they were light years ahead of the kids in their classes when I put them in public school for junior high. I only did that because I went through a horrible divorce and had to go to work full time after 21 years at home raising my family.

          I’m glad my kids got a solid grounding in phonics, and knew their math facts well from outer curriculum. We had no busy work and we were very focused on science and history. Both my kids tested at a senior college student’s reading and writing level in just the sixth grade, when I had them take standardized tests to figure out the appropriate grade to start them in when I put them in public school.

          Kids don’t need anyone to help them “navigate”…..what a condescending way to imply that they will be socially backasswards and need help! Homeschooled kids put the vast majority of all kids to shame educationally, many are exceptional musicians, and they run mental circles around them. And it’s been proven to be that way for decades, now!

          Your comment is stereotypical and has NO basis in any objective fact.

          Like

      • Amy1212 says:

        Love Calvert homeschooling program. It gave my child a great foundation for his academic success. It uses phonics, classic subject material. Mine Began reading at 3. Fast forward 14 years and Perfect scores on subject SATs, missed a point on the ACTs, full ride scholarships for private undergrad and grad school. Calvert made the difference. I have bought it as gift for many. They see a difference too. As for life in front of a monitor, Calvert doesn’t mean you sit still. Learning occurs everywhere. Outside, on bikes, walking trails, building projects. Still interact with lots of kids, just not bullied or indoctrinated.

        Liked by 1 person

      • negasht7 says:

        Scarlet – thanks for the heads up on Calvert! It seems reasonably priced too (but i do wish there were school vouchers or waving my $6000 yearly property tax). There’s plenty of options for socialization outside of conventional school settings.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Scarlet says:

          It’s been the gold standard for years. It’s been the program that Ambassadors children have used over the past 5-6 decades. It’s cohesive and classical. It is challenging but it’s also rewarding. It’s apolitical and colorblind.
          Last year they were bought out by Odysseyware , so we will see how that goes. I’m hoping they stay autonomous and don’t cave to the education mobs.

          Liked by 2 people

      • GC says:

        Scarlett – which Calvert Academy? There’s CalvertAcademy.com and CalvertEducation.com which features a Calvert Academy section?

        Re the poster who raised the issue of interaction: anecdotal, but knowing two families who homeschool, I have been very impressed at how well their kids are socialized. One family has three kids, the other four and in all cases – especially the four-kid family that lives across the street from me – those are some really well-adjusted, bright children. Well-mannered, well-spoken, they hold their heads up and look people in the eye – it’s a noticeable difference to me. Again, anecdotal, FWIW.

        Like

    • stripmallgrackle says:

      I present AOC, poster child for higher education in the age of social media. Big screen, flat panel vision, 320 lines per frame, with a dial-up connection.

      Liked by 3 people

    • diogenes says:

      I earned both my bachelors’ and masters’ degrees online at a purely digital campus. That so-called “student engagement” is wildly overrated. Exams were administered either at a proctored third party site near me, or via proctored webcam at home. For my money not having to listen to the same morons asking material that was covered in lecture thirty damn times because THEY JUST DID NOT GET IT alone was worth the digital lessons.

      Liked by 5 people

      • YeahYouRight says:

        Uh huh. I used to teach distance learning at a top university, and it is not the same. Promise.

        Some majors may get along as all distance, but not many.

        Had your teeth filled by a distance-educated dentist?

        Didn’t think so.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Esperanza says:

          I’m currently teaching online CoVid oblige. For a lot of things it’s better. We’re currently doing coaching for an English exam they need to take. It’s way better than in person.

          We have missed oral this year, it’s hard to do online, technology is too slow.

          Best thing would be, in my opinion, a mix.

          Like the the previous commenter I attended a famous British university which is and always has been all online. Some courses did have a one week in person course. This was fun as we were in bricks and mortar universities over the summer and got to see what they were like. But even that was debatable, one in London, we couldn’t leave the campus, the area was so dangerous. Really enjoyed the one in Manchester though.

          Personally I will be sad when it ends. I’m going to develop my private lessons online though.

          Like

    • lotbusyexec says:

      It’s not natural — that is what the left desires. SNAFU on steroids

      Like

    • garavaglia1 says:

      It’s terrible. I’m about to have to try to make it work (music at that). I will do my best, but it’s depressing. All I can do is be of service (I am a university teacher). I fear I will be required to wear a mask, but that’s not a hill I am willing to die on.

      Like

    • Garrison Hall says:

      Online, virtual classrooms only work well if—and only if—you are already well versed in the course material and are using the required course to fill in the blanks you need to complete your course of study. They don’t work very well as ways of learning new material or, in particular, developing the kind of theoretical skills set you need to work within a demanding academic discipline. Speaking from the standpoint of a professor (now mercifully retired) you just can’t develop essential critical thinking skills in the essentially one-dimensional environment a a computer monitor and a speaker. What will happen is that colleges and universities will dumb-down their courses. The result will be poorly prepared graduates—who will take their places among all the other poorly prepared graduates. The schools that do this will, of course, brag about how successful they are. Been there, done that.

      Like

      • phillip jeffreys says:

        I disagaree. Decades ago I marched through required differential and integral calculus courses. Finished near the top of my classes. I had little clue about the underlying theory. A while ago, with some idle time, I picked up a book on calculus that intertwined theory and the personal histories of famous mathematicians engaged in defining key concepts leading into “the calculus”. The book marched from key concepts defining the number line (natural numbers, zero, integers, ratiuonal numbers, irrational numbers) through functions, limits, derivatives, etc. All the concepts came alive for me. The connection between functions and real world processes (i.e., science) sunk in. The experience has been so positive that I am pressng on to other more advanced mathematics out of simple interest to see how far I can take it.

        The onus isn’t on the medium. It’s on the teacher. It’s on communication – the alignment and structuring of pedagogical information that reaches the student. It’s on the full set of tools that can be used to advance a student: computers/connectivity, parents/strong families, safe environments, great books, labs, multimedia, great professors, guest speakers who are luminaries in their respective fields, a society that can distinguish learning from memorization or political correctness. Society can adapt. Socialization venues can be created as complementary pieces of overall maturation. Yes, there are tradeoffs. Yes, there are opportuntity costs.

        The current educational system doesn’t work – it’s been co-opted. Until such time as this condition is either remediated or eliminated, responsible parents have a duty to seek out viable, proven alternatives.

        Liked by 3 people

      • garavaglia1 says:

        Yep. This is an instrumental music class (violin, cello, etc.) for students who have never played one. A big part of it is applied (they learn the basics of PLAYING the instrument. The problems begin with just distributing them. They have to be tuned (which the students are not equipped to do) regularly. Only the instructor can do that. Remove contact of he teacher (tuner) to the student (instrument) well..you get the idea. Also, basic fundamentals (intonation, tone, dynamics, etc. are skewed online. As I said before, I will do my best to be of service. I don’t write the rules yet.

        Like

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      You can’t. It’s just not the same. I say that as one who has taught and as a lifetime student. It’s rare to nonexistent that the caliber of instruction is the same. And how does one build a professional network like this, without social relationships or any social cues and body language?

      Like

      • Harvey Lipschitz says:

        There is the complete “school” of learning styles.
        The academics in psychology and education know students differ in how they learn and retain information.

        Visual, auditory, kinesthetic,reading/writing modality of learning.
        I was taught how to tie single handed surgeons knots by 2 Cuban docs who came over and had to redo their internships and residencies.
        Wonder how they could “teach that” by handing out a audio cassette tape?
        …….and their Spanish was very much different from the Mexican Spanish I speak.

        Case. Our daughter, an engineer borrowed an aeronautical engineering textbook. Read chapters and took the final for an “A”. Full credit. Never even met the professor. No class attendance. She has NOT been prepared to contribute to aeronautical engineering.

        And Boeing has the 737 Max grounded and it wuz developed by engineers who just were not good enough. Large cube farms of degreed engineers.

        We will pay a big price for shortcuts in learning/education.

        President Trump has displayed Dr FaoChi and Scarf who don’t know shinola about practicing medicine.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Sportyclays says:

      This is a generation that relinquished all their privacy for free shipping and vomits their innermost thoughts onto social media. I’m surprised they don’t Zoom from the crapper.

      Like

  2. deplorableintx says:

    So how do these foreign-born Visa holders game the system to remain in the US? That’s their goal. Our adversaries, (China for one) need them to remain at “prestigious” universities and eventually become employed with the US. How often have we read about these “citizen soldiers” stealing intellectual property for the mother country? They often don’t want to return to their country as well.

    Can they remain enrolled at Harvard, yet also be a full time student at the local Community, or Jr. College? Does Federal Immigration law allow this scenario or something similar?

    Like

    • WSB says:

      Nah, just keep them out.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mac says:

        Just one more reason to absolutely LOVE President Trump! Excellent move, just excellent! Run them all back to where they came from and bankrupt the leftist indoctrination centers that depend on that sweet, sweet full-tuition foreign money!

        Make no mistake, this is a thunder kick square to the groin of the higher educational establishment. I sincerely hope it proves financially fatal to a lot of members of that group. PDJT knows exactly who his enemies are and he ALWAYS pays them back in kind–or more!

        Liked by 8 people

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      Some universities allow or even encourage students to take some classes at local community colleges to free professors from teaching weed out classes (UT Austin engineering school definitely does this) so yes, that may be a possibility.

      They can also have babies here and that allows them to stay same as with people who have H1Bs who manage time bring entire families here via chain migration from an anchor baby born to an HiB visa holder’s foreign wife (I see this in tech w Indians all the time – get a job here, go to India to get a wife and bring her here, baby born here hs next and presto they are qualified to become citizens bc of the baby and to bring a large number of relatives (grand parents, siblings etc) with them over time.

      Like

      • Sportyclays says:

        …And then buy a “vacation house” house in Bangalore with a household staff of 10 lower caste domestics they pay $40 a week. Must be nice…

        Like

    • doyouseemyvision says:

      To answer deplorableintx, here’s how they work the system. All is perfectly legal.
      1. Get into US study program sponsored by university on F-1 visa.

      2. The foreign student can remain in US for graduate studies, but need to update their visa for this purpose.

      3. Upon graduation, the foreign student can get a visa modification to work in the US for a limited number of years as long as they have an employer to sponsor their employment after college. I don’t remember what the name of the visa is, but my employer hired tons of these out of the Boston area because our colleges are inundated with them, and they can hire them on with lower salaries.

      4. One guy from South Korea was on a work visa after graduating from Notre Dame. He was very good, but had to undergo an immigration interview as his current work visa was expiring. Immigration turned him down for the visa extension and he had to go back to SK. This was just a few years ago under Trump so it appeared the administration was trying to rectify this a few years ago. Although he wasn’t married, if they are married, they can bring spouses under yet another kind of visa, and they can get employment.

      5. Many who are able to get visa extensions for work, then get the employer to sponsor them for green cards. My employer did this by the thousands. Once the green card, then the whole family, kids, grandparents, etc move in. Actually, that could happen before the green card, I believe. Green cards are good for 10 years and must be renewed.

      Green cards (legal residents) are powerful. The only thing that differentiates a green card holder from a US citizen is that a US citizen can legally vote. You will recall that when processing through US immigration when arriving from a foreign country, legal residents (green card holders) and US citizens stand in the same line.

      Like

  3. bayoukiki says:

    This will be so interesting. So does Elizabeth Warren get a cut in pay???

    Like

  4. Palatapus says:

    50 thousand a semester for this, I will sent my kids to community college!

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Pew-Anon says:

    It is quite ironic that higher learning is still delivered through what amounts to Middle Ages technology in the form of college. The entire endeavor needs examination and rethinking.

    Liked by 3 people

    • islandpalmtrees says:

      Virtual Classes will allow you to travel. In effect, you will become a Road Scholar. Great if you are a self-teacher.

      Liked by 2 people

      • islandpalmtrees says:

        All you have to do is end up with the total number of transferable credits. Plan, your universities, if you want to make it interesting. The ability to reason will win over any degree from any university. Choose, the best instructors from across the universities.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Jimmy Jack says:

          There’s no continuity in programming that way. Sound fun but won’t produce the same results as a cohesive education. I do agree that travel is great educator however.

          Liked by 1 person

          • islandpalmtrees says:

            Yes, I agree, I want better results. I have had multiple candidates from multiple universities with advanced degrees that didn’t measure up.

            If you think I am unique, then check with other employers.

            Like

      • stripmallgrackle says:

        Or is that Rogue Scholar? It worked for Bill Clinton.

        Like

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      I have to disagree. There’s nothing like learning in person. The a sense of social cues and body language or spontaneity severely impedes the learning process. That said it is an institution that needs a massive overhaul.

      I hope this leads to the elimination of classes one doesn’t need to master the skills and content of their major. Why should an engineering student be forced to take an African American history class instead of using that time and money to add another technical engineering class? If you eliminate enough of these nonsense classes for technical majors they could have entire other specialization or save the cost and time required for those classes instead.

      Like

      • Pew-Anon says:

        I’ve learned more than I ever did in any class by simply reading on my own. The whole body language/visual cues aspect might have merit for younger learners who are still somewhat developmental and impressionable, but for adult learners the idea of sitting in a class and being lectured by some “expert” is of little value.

        I would like to see the realm of peer review overhauled and made more accessible and relevant. If a discipline is to be considered worthy by society of doctoral status it must be made to demonstrate a meaningful contribution to that society in a transparent and accessible way. In short, scholars and academics need to do much more direct work for — and outreach to — the public than they currently do in the form of “college”. They need to write much more for the public than they currently do, synthesizing their discipline with historical context, and explaining its contributions to — and significance for — the larger body of higher human knowledge. If a discipline can’t do that, then it probably doesn’t need to exist. The college system perpetuates a cloistered and opaque academia that is the opposite of my suggestion, which was the best that could be done in the Middle Ages, but not now.

        Liked by 1 person

        • islandpalmtrees says:

          While we are on the point of education. I want engineers who write to the point, using only the words needed. Time is money.

          Like

      • islandpalmtrees says:

        Spoon feeding, is not what I want. I want problem solvers! Need a class take it, but get the job done on time.

        “If you eliminate enough of these nonsense classes for technical majors they could have entire other specialization or save the cost and time required for those classes instead.”

        Employers needing engineers don’t want to train their employees again.

        Like

  6. billrla says:

    “The Decline and Fall of the Harvard Empire”, now available as an e-book, on Kindle, or from dozens of bootleg websites.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. MAGADJT says:

    We’ve been lied to. For years, the “Conservative, Inc.” punditry (National Review, Weekly Standard, et al) told us that the only reason Dems opposed school choice was because they were in bed with the teachers’ unions. This is BS.

    They don’t want school choice because there would be many charter and private school options that teach foundational American history, traditional values, and institute discipline in the school. That is what they are trying to stop with their opposition to school choice; it has nothing to do with the teachers’ unions. Just my opinion.

    Liked by 6 people

  8. Linda K. says:

    What is tuition for this type of learning? Who needs it? You can’t become a doctor or lawyer without discussion in a class and hands on experience.

    Like

    • YeahYouRight says:

      No, it’s fine. Is saw on YouTube that your liver should be right about hefe, so hold still…

      Like

    • phillip jeffreys says:

      Wow! I didn’t realize undergraduates were hands on! Thanks for the insight! Are they licensed?

      And you’re right. No way, for example, logistics could be re-imagined to say, “amazon” circuit board materials to aspiring computer science students. Nope. Gotta be tenured professors (or more likely their teaching assistants) who are always available for their students and live for the pure joy of teaching. And why pass on university or state funded (i.e., taxpayer) travel to conferences sponsored by peers/friends to “enhance” the academic lifestyle.

      Not.

      Like

  9. Wethal says:

    Instapundit had the best take on what Trump just did:

    “This is a big financial blow to the many universities that depend on a lot of full-freight-paying foreign students to make their nut. Then on the gripping hand, there’s this email from a friend: “Trump has just kicked out all Chinese University students by hiding it in a sea of ejected international students. . . . Universities can either help Trump get re-elected by returning to in-person classes or going bankrupt and cutting off money from the Democratic Party.”

    Trump’s usual strategy is to bluster against his enemies on Twitter, than do something subtle that leaves them facing economic wreckage.”

    Liked by 4 people

    • stripmallgrackle says:

      When liberals and democrats start whining, and crying, and demanding everything stop until they get their way because of something Trump did, it reminds me of what my parents said from time to time while I was growing up. “You brought this on yourself.”

      Liked by 2 people

    • Mike Lee DelMarcelle says:

      The dems plandemic is bankrupting deep blue cities who were hoping for a bailout and didn’t get it. Their favorite country, China is on everyone’s schiff list. Now their liberal indoctrinators on campus will lose money. Dems NEVER think things through!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      This is a BRILLIANT move by Trump in many levels.

      Furthermore, this eliminates foreign control of university curriculum and research – look at who finds the entire Middle Eastern Department at Harvard – Saudis. Mohammed Bin Salmon IIRC. This is the case at universities across the country.

      Seriously, I’m legit giddy at the thought of the brilliance of this and it’s many applications.

      Like

  10. Vera says:

    This is perfect.
    The Don knows his Alinsky.
    Make the b**tards live up to their own rules for other people.
    Never apologise, always escalate…..the voice of A.Breitbart.

    How crucial is November.

    Liked by 5 people

  11. republicanvet91 says:

    So 40% of students on campus there will be foreign. Gotta keep that foreign cash flowing in.

    Like

  12. jay says:

    While on the topic of schools, this article from AT has several jaw dropping links.

    Who knew there was an annual White Privileged Conference where HS teachers and students attend. Hence, we’ll never be short on idiots who stand around on freeways, loot, burn, and froth insults at fully weaponized police. A new crop every year.

    Liberalism is a mental disease and it’s victims are multiplying.

    https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2020/07/what_causes_white_guilt.html

    Like

  13. Mello says:

    I’m hoping many of our institutions of higher education are gonna be taking a financial this fall, it’s the only thing that might shake them. What parent in their right mind is gonna send their high school senior… at full freight… to a out of town school for a non- classroom education they can get staying at home? Who can afford it after the lockdown? And the uncertainty of future viral outbreaks they’ve been promoting? These kids are supposed to start in 6 weeks. I’m sure there will be a few takers, but seriously, the schools are selling a product and it’s defective.

    Like

    • technoaesthete says:

      Physical learning campuses are analogous to mortar and brick retail establishments. Many will disappear, but some will remain. There is potential for effective learning techniques that are not possible in a classroom. Ultimately, it is up to the student to learn and absorb the information. The Ivy League schools have lost their exceptional quality. Sure, the special credential remains, but I think not for long. When they are turning out left wing idiots it will catch up to them eventually.

      Like

      • Jimmy Jack says:

        I’ve been thinking about this for about a decade now and actually think it could work in the reverse. The schools that close will be the smaller schools. We’ll see w consolidation of schools which I personally think is for the worse because it eliminates competition and the promotion of even less viewpoints.

        Private elite schools will be able to do whatever they want. I think what we will see is elites attending university and everyone else doing online and hybrid learning.

        I also think this will lead to the implementation of what else I’ve suspected is coming for public K-12 schools and what we’re seeing emerge from the spring shutdowns for fall entitlement is a harbinger for the future. Wealthy families who haven’t already will put their kids in private schools that already have small classes and can do what they want. Some will still want to avoid school will hire high end professional educators (adjunct professors, retired and laid off teachers, field experts wtc) to homeschool just like southern aristocratic families did pre 1900 industrial boom. Students from
        poor families will see their kids able to eat 3 meals a day at school (and some families will be fed as well) and have after care programs so they are in school all day while parents work low end essential jobs or are on welfare (soon to be UBI and if they have their way, reparations for some).

        It’s the middle class again who will be most squeeze and hurt bc they won’t be able to afford or compete with elite education methods and won’t be able to stay home to homeschool because they have to work. Online learning will their best alternative because they won’t need the kinds of services that are currently dominated by low income groups such as ESOL and Special Education (unpopular to say but that’s a fact – SpEd is disproportionally and heavily low income families as well as single parent families). The same kinds of racial reconciliation and disparate impact income programs that we’re seeing pushed with policing now will accelerate in schools. There will be no discipline and schools will fast disintegrate into dangerous hell holes. Parents who aren’t afraid of Covid or convinced a mass shooting will happen to their kids school at any moment will not want their kids in lawless schools with subpar education.

        Basically, the public schools will become a compete dumping ground and centers of government indoctrination daycares, the elites will continue to excel and the middle class will pay for it all.

        I saw this implosion coming over a decade ago and left the profession. I think I’ve said here before I think public education is an imploding institution unable to be fixed. I didn’t see a disease expediting it but that’s my take.

        Like

        • technoaesthete says:

          I think trade schools will have a resurgence. College isn’t for everyone. While robotics and automation will replace some jobs, there are still needs for plumbers, electricians, mechanics, construction workers, etc.

          I attended both very large public universities and small private universities. While you think the large ones will survive, I think that is unfortunate. I felt like I was just a cog in the large school. Sure, there was the smaller community of the department of my major field of study. OTOH, there was a tremendous amount of resources at the large school – multiple libraries, events, seminars, symposia, etc.

          Public schools no longer educate children. They now indoctrinate them. The teacher union has resisted any sort of measurement of their effectiveness. That is a part of the problem in the public sector. It is definitely not merit based and the students suffer.

          Like

    • rrick says:

      If you’re thinking they will come to their senses, you can forget about it. They’ll do what they always do; they’ll double down, they’ll project, and they’ll lie ever more fantastically.

      Like

  14. US says:

    Please start with the Harvard F-1 student visas from China.

    Like

  15. Laurie Walker says:

    Who are these students who MUST be on campus to but taught online?

    Like

    • Laurie Walker says:

      * to be taught

      Like

    • rrick says:

      Likely it is those students who paid for dorm housing and a meal ticket. The universities certainly would not return the money – if not yet paid, they’ll keep them in the dorms to collect the rent – so they’ll keep them on campus but offer a inferior product.

      Like

    • doyouseemyvision says:

      Harvard freshmen, according to the article will have 100% online coursework. This means EVERY freshman FOREIGN STUDENT will be denied a visa at Harvard because Harvard cannot certify they are taking in-classroom studies PER HARVARD.

      Isn’t that great??

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Bulldog84 says:

    I’m not feeling sorry for the students.

    My daughter works overseas and has been needing services from the US consulate for months. They have been closed provide only limited emergency services, which apparently my daughter’s situation doesn’t meet, even though she needs documentation for her employer. The consulate sends regular email updates of “we’re still closed,” but recently sent one saying they would give priority to student visa interviews when they re-open. Prioritizing foreign student services over US citizen services? Yes, I know the colleges are American, but still — it stinks.

    Like

    • rrick says:

      Recently I read the lament of a man who says his American parents have been stuck in the Philippines for five months now. His parents are well into their 80s and are suffering in the heat. The hotel where they have been staying operates with a skeleton crew. The staff turned off the A/C and food has become restricted. Apparently there is some bureaucracy nightmare preventing them from flying home. The U.S, Embassy has been of no help.

      Another incident involving a different family may shed light on why the elderly couple cannot fly home. In this incident, an America family is in New Zealand but that country is not allowing them to fly back to the U.S.* Instead they are ordered to quarantine at their rented cabin in New Zealand.

      *Apparently, New Zealand requires a stamp in the passport in order for a non-New Zealander to fly. The country has refused to provide that stamp. If I am incorrect about that it is because I failed to understand the explanation provided by this family.

      Like

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      The universities are used to bring spies in the US. The consulates know this and are facilitating it.

      Like

  17. buanadha says:

    I’m late to things here, but a few thoughts:

    1. Harvard can afford to do this – they have an immense endowment and their hedge fund operations can carry them for now
    2. In anything non-stem, you’re getting an A at Harvard almost no matter how lousy your work may be anyway, so this doesn’t change the classroom instruction much
    3. STEM majors will be hurt as there is a lot you can’t learn remotely, and good luck replicating a Chem lab at home (obviously Harvard doesn’t care about them.. maybe they should wise up)
    4. The ICE decision can hurt them, but they have the dollars to deal with it. Most universities don’t, though

    Like

  18. all Those socialism liberal college’s are panic mood Because of without communist china’s Bigger paycheck’s,

    Like

  19. JoAnn Leichliter says:

    The announcement re foreign students makes perfect sense, if you stop and think about it. If your course work can be done online, you can do it in your pwn country.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Donzo says:

      You cannot enroll without the visa so they would not be able to get credit for taking these classes from their home country.

      Like

    • Donzo says:

      You cannot enroll without the visa so they would not be able to get credit for taking these classes from their home country.

      Like

  20. Winston says:

    Tuition better drop HUGELY and what’s going to become of the dorms and the many other extensive and expensive facilities?

    Considering the labs and expensive equipment required, I don’t see the degrees of actual value to the world (engineering, physics, medicine, etc.) going 100% virtual for quite a while.

    Like

    • Winston says:

      Which is a good thing since those are the students we want to remain here and the main way that happens is for them to go to school here and grow to like the US. However, ANY Chinese students allowed here should be required to commit to remaining here. How that could be enforced I do not know.

      The day we cease being the “brain drain” of the world is the day we lose.

      Like

  21. Dwayne Diesel says:

    I love it because there can be so many angles…but I love it. Sometimes you get what you push for Harvard…..you want to jump on the BS bandwagon, you too get to deal with the consequences.

    Now, with saying that, I think this decision has more to do with the Chinese. A large % of foreign students come from three countries (I’m just going off what I see and talks I had while in Asia for business…I did not look at stats): China, India, and S. Korea. Wtih China sending the most….they pay the tab…it’s a big competition in China and S. Korea at least, S. Korea for sure. I have colleagues in both countries that talked about competing to be chosen to go abroad. If a student works hard enough they can even try for high school.

    Like

  22. zombietimeshare says:

    “Harvard University announced all classes this year and next will be taught virtually… Additionally, Harvard will not be making any adjustments to their tuition rates.”

    Sure, can tuition be paid with virtual money?

    Like

  23. dwpender says:

    What sense does it make to have students living on campus at an institution where all classes are virtual?

    Are the 40% interacting on campus there to learn community organizing, professional protesting and rabble rousing, etc?

    Like

  24. Jimmy Jack says:

    This is a very interesting move for several reasons and is deeper than most realize.

    Our universities have become recruiting grounds for spies and deep state actors as well as ways to work around visa laws. George Webb has been exposing how American University (plus Georgettown and UVA) have been doing this for decades. I don’t know if he has any of this up on Parler yet but if I find something I’ll link it. Just look at the names of people – cabal members – associated with teaching etc at these schools – Brennan, Comey, Susan Rice, Nellie Ohr etc etc. I guarantee you there’s a significant global deep state draining Trump has at play here.

    And while it’s about the Chinese students and professors it’s not about them if that makes sense. It’s all of it, the Chinese are just the most obvious right now.

    I do think we will see that Chinese researchers at universities here played a significant role in the development of bioweapons including Covid19.

    Trump is also forcing university elites to say that additional students from Covid hotspots aren’t a threat – and if they aren’t no one is. The mental gymnastics and heads exploding must be off the charts over this. I’m seeing this happen now with a lib friend who is upset bc her foreign grad student bf can’t get into a program here now. She just set can’t believe he can be told no. Lol.

    This is a brilliant, brilliant move for so many reasons.

    Now, let’s see if Trump kneecaps the DEMs and announces some kind of. student loan bailout for the next stage of stimulus relief or as a campaign pledge. The Dems definitely plan to do this bc they need to keep the Bernie Bro’s support and student loan forgiveness programs are very popular with them. It’s also sellable to the middle class suburban independents and never Trump Republicans (not the egghead never Trump Goldberg/Kristol National Review ones) who know this is the only middle class break they will ever get and they really need it right now. No ones an ideologue when it hits them in the pocketbook.

    Normally I wouldn’t support this but I do think the days of conservative “we’re better than thatism” are over. We are in the fight for survival of the country and the middle class. We are staring into the abyss and soon possibly the barrel of a gun. Who even fitted from the 2008 bailouts? Banks and Wall Street, Goldman Sachs foreign investors. Certainly not the middle class who paid for that bailout money while seeing the loss of millions of middle class Americans homes. This also gives Trump an opportunity to show who Rinos sell is out to their corporate friends.

    Expose the Uniparty and save working Americans President Trump .

    Like

    • doyouseemyvision says:

      Can you just imagine the meetings going on at Harvard executive levels today trying to figure this out? At other universities, too?!?! It must be CRAZY……………..

      Like

  25. Jaap Titulaer says:

    What if not all exams can be/will be done online?
    Then those foreign students have an issue.

    Like

  26. solomonpal says:

    Please check all the tumble weed pictures.

    Captcha

    Like

  27. Remote education, in my view, is alienating of human interaction, on a very fundamental level. It’s just like “shooter games”, where the player is desensitized to the violence by not actually doing it in real life. I remember when I was young, I was bullied once…well, he tried. I lost my temper at the injustice of it, and grabbed him by the shirt front, and snarled “You want to fight me?”, and he instantly turned into my friend. And that was about 7th grade; I was bullied momentarily by a VERY large classmate around the 5th grade, and I just whaled into him…his stomach, that is, which was the highest I could reach on him. I didn’t hurt him at all, but he was so tickled by my fight, he also became my instant friend.

    Things like that cannot be done, at least properly, by computer. I think Donald Trump would agree with me…hands-on is necessary.

    And I don’t see how anyone can learn in a lab that isn’t right there, needing your fondling of the apparatus (“fondling” — I’m kidding, that’s just my subconscious’s way of saying I loved labs, like a lady loves shopping for clothes by trying them on).

    Like

  28. who in their right mind would pay harvard’s tuition, when the local jr. college could offer the same?

    Like

  29. MikeN says:

    They need to also disallow student visas to attend a college in or near a sanctuary city or state.

    Like

  30. The speed with which this new ICE rule is amazing and it truly pleases me. The fact that there are consequences to this ridiculous lockdown pleases me to no end. I’m sure that the left are gnashing their teeth and wringing their hands.

    Like

  31. ThePrimordialOrderedPair says:

    “Nonimmigrant F-1 and M-1 students attending schools operating entirely online may not take a full online course load and remain in the United States.”

    If the courses are all online, then outside of those doing lab courses, why do they even need to be in the US, or on Earth, for that matter?

    Hah-vahd, and the rest of these schools, might actually figure out that, if students are dumb enough to pay full tuition for online school then there is no limit to how many “students” they can get to pay for classes. They can have tens of thousands in a class. There are no physical limits. The tests can all be simple and computer graded – even the essay questions can be graded by AI (who cares if the grading is accurate, everyone at Hah-vahd gets nothing lower than a “B” in anything, anyway (for those classes that aren’t just P/F … if there are any). These schools can make billions!

    Like

  32. JMC says:

    Some recent ratings below for Calvert Academy supposedly from parents. Obviously everything should be critically taken with a grain of salt, but it appears things have changed for the worse, especially with the transfer of ownership:
    https://www.thehomeschoolmom.com/homeschool-curriculum-reviews/calvert/

    Like

  33. Donzo says:

    What is the policy strategy of the Administration in excluding foreign student visas when only online classes are provided? I don’t think this is going to sway schools like Harvard to change direction and open all classrooms.

    Like

  34. Deplorable CheckIN says:

    Say goodbye to Chineese Communist Party Money. A very large percent of foreign students are from China and with China censorship they won’t be able to virtually attend school from China. Also makes it difficult for them to enter the country for the purpose of spying.

    Colleges are really in a bind now lol.

    Like

  35. itsy_bitsy says:

    So your parents will continue to pay out huge amounts of money for you to sit in their basement in front of a computer. Why should they pay? You would do that anyway! They should save their dollars and send you to the local Jr. College. Maybe by then you will have grown up enough to decide to attend a lower cost local college or even a trade school instead of that expensive, but radicalizing “NAME” college! Mom and dad will save money and you might actually be able to get a job when you finish school.

    Like

  36. Donzo says:

    It’s time to start cracking down on all the public research funding if colleges go ahead and charge full tuition for cut rate services.

    Like

  37. Donzo says:

    When it comes to changing minds about paying full tuition for online classes, remember that most students are not incoming freshman and are already invested in getting their degrees. Even if they disagree with the policy they and their parents are already looking at the exit door and will pony up walk through it.

    Like

  38. Donzo says:

    I didn’t realize that this “no all online course policy” is not new. It was temporarily suspended for last spring and this summer, but will be back in place for this fall under when the temporary suspension expires.

    From ICE Website:

    “Due to COVID-19, SEVP instituted a temporary exemption regarding online courses for the spring and summer semesters. This policy permitted nonimmigrant students to take more online courses than normally permitted by federal regulation to maintain their nonimmigrant status during the COVID-19 emergency.”

    Like

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