Harvard Announces 100% Virtual Classes For Students Both On and Off Campus – ICE Announces Exchange Students No Longer Qualify For Visas…

Earlier today Harvard University announced all classes this year and next will be taught virtually.  Incoming Freshman will have dorms, but no classes will have in-person instruction; all classes will be virtual.  The total student body on campus will be kept under a forty percent threshold due to COVID-19 efforts.

MASSACHUSETTS – “In addition to freshmen, Harvard will host as many students who “must be on campus to progress academically” this fall as it can without exceeding the 40 percent threshold. All courses will be taught virtually for students both on and off campus.”

Additionally, Harvard will not be making any adjustments to their tuition rates.

A few hours later U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced any foreign student who attends a U.S. university with only virtual classes will lose their student visa.

ICE Announcement – […] Nonimmigrant F-1 and M-1 students attending schools operating entirely online may not take a full online course load and remain in the United States.

The U.S. Department of State will not issue visas to students enrolled in schools and/or programs that are fully online for the fall semester nor will U.S. Customs and Border Protection permit these students to enter the United States.

Active students currently in the United States enrolled in such programs must depart the country or take other measures, such as transferring to a school with in-person instruction to remain in lawful status. If not, they may face immigration consequences including, but not limited to, the initiation of removal proceedings. (more)

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426 Responses to Harvard Announces 100% Virtual Classes For Students Both On and Off Campus – ICE Announces Exchange Students No Longer Qualify For Visas…

  1. Sonia says:

    This is really about education, journalism, and other cultural institutions using the coronavirus as a weapon to destabilise the country.

    Trump called them out at the weekend for the ‘predictable result of (their) years of extreme indoctrination and bias’.

    The destruction of society is mere collateral damage in their war against the Trump administration.

    Liked by 8 people

  2. WeThePeople2016 says:

    Liked by 13 people

  3. fangdog says:

    Colleges to a large degree is nothing but a scam. Colleges are centers for student indoctrination and a place for Professors who can’t do anything else. Basically, these institutions are Anti-America and communist democrat inspired strongholds.

    Liked by 19 people

    • Harvey Lipschitz says:

      Our daughter is working on her second engineering doctorate. She attended a Magnet High school, was class valedictorian and finished high school with 30 university credit hours. The University was 1 block away. The core was liberal indoctrination. Her engineering firm allowed her to work from home 400 miles from the office. So she could run in the mountains and do ultra marathons. Hawvud was NOT an option for her. She is a track star and the Ivy league suxs. Her team was NCAA champions.

      Liked by 14 people

      • jeans2nd says:

        You are blessed to have such an outstanding daughter, Harvey.
        Congratulation, and well done, sir!

        Liked by 3 people

      • Guessed says:

        What was wrong with the first engineering doctorate? Seriously, once you have a doctorate in a subject, why a second? I am not anti-education, and have an MD and PhD in Biochemistry, but multiple doctorate or masters degrees does not compute for me.

        Like

        • Jimmy Jack says:

          I have more than two Master’s degrees myself only because I decided to change career fields. Some people do this. Others have employers who pay for it and enjoy learning. I’d imagine you’re research driven which in practice means you have more than one doctorate.

          Like

    • Sunshine says:

      True.
      Before, aka many many years ago, we went from high school to university.
      And then… college showed up.
      I don’t see any benefit to be had, other than paying money for nothing, by sending your kids to college.

      Liked by 1 person

      • evergreen says:

        Used to be that school would produce a functioning citizen. Testing as a job application was made illegal, so the college degree became a universal-enough proxy to screen for higher competence than a declining-value high school diploma. Now, here we are.

        Like

  4. Bubby says:

    So all the cost savings that Harvard will enjoy with no students on campus is not passed along to the students in lower tuition? How privileged!

    Liked by 13 people

    • Harvey Lipschitz says:

      There is plenty demand for a Hawvud diploma. I interviewed a black female MBA from Hawvud. I enjoyed our job interview.
      I asked her what was the most significant element of value she obtained at Hawvud.

      She said “I learned how to work a room”. They are a breeding ground for Washington and politics.

      Liked by 17 people

    • El Torito says:

      Truly, an uninformed statement. My wife has worked as an Instructional designer for 20 years, at the 3rd largest University in the USA.Never has she worked so hard in her life, and you need to understand that every single Professor has to learn how to convert their classes into on-line courses. Further, the ID’s and Professors AND students all have to do a large amount of classwork in a group session, and there is plenty of live stuff as well. Just what exactly do you think the Universities are doing? With regards to fees such as parking and housing, those are required to be returned – the schools don’t get to keep them. What are the cost savings that you speak of?

      Like

      • Bubby says:

        I never implied it was easy for the professors to do online courses. I thought that costly tuition amount included room and boarding which apparently it doesn’t! When I went to college in the 60’s it was all inclusive. I still think it’s cheaper overall for Harvard to go virtual than to have on campus classes but that’s just a guess. But nontheless the tuition isn’t worth it to me that’s my opinion.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Carly says:

          Bubby, I’ve seen some of the courses and judging by the prices it’s overpriced. So, agreed.
          And if universities create on-demand courses, then that would reduce the demand for instructors and assistants to monitor and manage a classroom.

          The learning would be asynchronous and likely become a more peer-driven model, which is cheaper and takes the burden off the already taxed instructor. Peers can be invaluable to learning, so that’s not a bad thing. Question is, does the institution pass along the savings? We’ll see.

          There are a lot of competitors in the wings with inventive programs and pricing. Check out Lambda, which doesn’t charge anything until you get your first related job out of college, then the fee is 2% of your salary, provided it’s over $57K, and then that fee lasts for only two years, then you’re through — no loans. That beats $15k, 6-month boot camp with no interest in your graduating or getting a job.

          And there’s also Credly, which is working with businesses to create affordable, relevant credentialing for employees.

          A lot of competition for universities operating on the old 4-year undergrad model of paying upfront with no guarantees versus a student that could be working in the field now and acquiring the skills to move up. I’m excited to hear about these changes.

          Liked by 4 people

        • Issy says:

          I don’t see how it couldn’t be less expensive to not maintain classrooms.

          Liked by 3 people

      • Carly says:

        I think the impression is that once the courses are created and captured with something like Panopto, the course can be on-demand. On-demand doesn’t require an instructor or assistants to monitor learners. Some universities are moving to more peer review/feedback and making the courses less instructor-driven, although there is a heavy writing workload.
        Which translates into plenty of work for your wife (I’m in the field as well), but fewer instructors. Is your wife a SME as well? And a designer? Does she wear many hats as an instructional designer?

        Liked by 2 people

        • El Torito says:

          Her department has 13 ID’S who do not wear other hats. Plus, all the online courses are live, or have live content with teacher/student interactions. Every class. So there is zero reduction of Professors. I laugh at how people think the classroom is converted to a correspondence course.

          Like

          • Carly says:

            Watch the market and the trends in this space. Pay attention to the leading indicators. No one in any field should ever assume there aren’t disruptive technologies or sudden shifts that narrow their career horizons. The world is constantly evolving. In my field alone, I’ve had to adapt and move across sectors and acquire skills — all while seeing colleagues get phased out while my profession assumed those duties. If it saves money, an employer will collapse many jobs into one position. Adapt or die.

            Like

        • WSB says:

          When I attended RISD, I only took studios by visiting instructors from firms all over the US. Maybe that is how I saved my soul.

          If I were a student or parent right now, I would claw at only online courses by experts in each field who were currently practicing.

          That could be great new niche work. Expert curricula.

          Like

      • Nepanyrush says:

        Only the first time converting a class to online is time consuming. Wait and see how much easier it will be the 2nd semester and the third. I do both on-campus and online university courses and have done both for many years. Once you have the online course set up, it goes much, much easier.

        I don’t understand exactly how long Harvard is doing this for, but the note above says “this year and next.” If that is for Fall 2020 and Spring 2021, then there will be an adjustment time setting up the courses. If it includes Fall 2021 and Spring 2022, then the faculty will find it a breeze the second year.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Jimmy Jack says:

          The Ivies has a jump start on this because they were behind Coursera. Yale has offered free online classes independently of Coursera for over a decade now.

          Coursera was their beta test for this.

          Like

      • warrprin1 says:

        Uh, “an instructional designer”??? Please translate – and understand that I have advanced degrees in non-English languages. In street vernacular, we refer to those who design and deliver instruction as “teachers” – at the level of higher education there are other titles, but “instructional designer” is not one of them. More system garbage-speak.

        Does your wife actually teach students in the 3rd largest university in the USA? Which one is it? Or does she “design instruction” for full professors, associate professors, assistant professors, and “instructors” who can’t, or won’t, do this for themselves? University “Education Dept.” perhaps? These are the people who must be held responsible for the massive under performance of our K-12 American students.

        I’m a teacher, retired, and not buying what you’re selling. Sick to death of higher ed B.S. It has failed in its declared mission.

        Liked by 5 people

        • warrprin1 says:

          Adding… Most teachers in higher ed started converting their curriculum delivery to an online format in the early 2000’s. I was a non-traditional graduate student at the time, and lived it. This is 2020. There is no way in hell that this is new news to higher ed “teachers”.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Dwayne Diesel says:

            Exactly, I obtained my undergrad while serving in the military full time in early 2000. It was pretty smooth then and even smoother when I got my graduate work completed in 2012.

            Thanks for calling out the BS.

            Like

        • Carly says:

          warrprin1, instructional designers (ISDs or IDs) have been around for a long time. I’m not one, but I can share a little about what they do.

          Think of a person who has teaching, writing, design, presentation, software (Canvas, Adobe, etc.), sometimes coding experience. Some design learning games. They’re employed to develop training for all ages and sectors — the most lucrative positions are in the government or business. If you have ever learned anything in a classroom, an ID worked on it. And if you ever watched even a 3-min professionally created how-to video, an ID worked on it. Just like any field, there are lousy IDs (think government) and brilliant IDs (think private industry). Salaries can be quite attractive.

          If you have a specialty and a gift for teaching, it’s a field I recommend.

          Like

      • I beg to differ, but my experience at 3 very prestigious schools was entirely different (engineering and law). The teachers use TAs to do the real teaching. A couple of time per wk, the professors just regurgitate the prior year’s lecture from their own book. The professors spend all of their time getting research grants to fund the research done by their graduate students. Almost none of their time is spent teaching. You will find pretty much the same thing described in a book called ProfScam.

        Putting materials online would be done entirely by the graduate students and the professors would barely know it was being done, if they knew at all.

        Of course, the experience as an associate professor are entirely different.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Carly says:

          You make an excellent point. Yes, it would make sense for the assistants to maintain and support the course created by the experts. That would save the institution a lot of money, savings that might or might not be passed along.

          Like

    • Issy says:

      Bubby: The article said Freshmen would have dorms but no in person classes. Boy, are these kids going to have a good time.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Jim Comey is a weasel_Doug says:

    Can’t fuel a riot with all the rioters in class now can we?

    Liked by 5 people

    • Lottacats says:

      Yes, You’d think it’d be telling to those parents who fork out the dough for a well rounded education. (surely there are some?) In fact they’re paying through the nose screwing up their own children. It’s an Indocrination factory.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. TexSwede says:

    This is actually using Rules for Radicals against them – make them live up to the rules they set for you. The elites at Harvard and in higher education along with our Democrat governors, mayors, etc., have been shutting down businesses without having to experience any of the pain they cause. I live in Austin and our Marxist mayor loves shutting down businesses, yet the city and county haven’t cut back on anything. All the city employees and the mayor are getting their salaries during shutdowns. If they are required to live for 30 days without pay and jobs their support for shutdowns would drop considerably. Harvard needs to be hit hard financially due to the Coronavirus just like the regular small businesses. This ICE rule highlight heads that direction.

    Liked by 12 people

    • William the Comptroller says:

      Exactamundo!!!!muhahahaha!

      Like

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      Fellow Austinite cheering for you from NC.

      Another reason they won’t shut down government salaries since they have acted as de facto affirmative action jobs programs for decades.

      Like

  7. Oldretiredguy says:

    That’s great news regarding revoking student visas. Easy to track the theft of intellectual property when it done online

    Liked by 9 people

    • mimbler says:

      Harvard is having campus teaching for about 40 percent of their students to have social distancing made possible. It is the 60 percent that lose out on that that are getting on-line courses.

      I predict Harvard will give precedence to their foreign students to get the on-campus instruction so they won’t lose their visas.

      It will be fun to see how the liberal American Harvard students react to their spots being given to foreigners 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

  8. aisheschayal says:

    Actually, I think Harvard just shot themselves in the foot, half the prestige of getting a Harvard degree is attending that grand old campus and walking in the footsteps of some great leaders. They must have been drunk on the Covid Socialist Greed punch when they made that decision. What kid wants to boast about staying at home with their parents all day while attending “havad college”. Ha, what fools they be!

    Liked by 7 people

    • Harvey Lipschitz says:

      What parents want to cough up the big bucks for blogging school?

      The top schools use online for athletes who have heavy travel schedules and are provided tutors.

      Liked by 3 people

    • doyouseemyvision says:

      Great point. Who wants to cough up all that money for a Harvard online degree? That’s eventually going to come up in a job interview down the road, and the Harvard online degree won’t make the graduate so job-market ‘competitive’ anymore.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jimmy Jack says:

      They don’t want to walk around anymore bc of all the rayyyycissts who attending and built the university with their racist slave and sexist homophobic anti Semite bucks.

      Like

  9. Merkin Muffley says:

    It’s a little harder to indoctrinate on Zoom.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. wondering999 says:

    This might cut down on student suicides.
    On the other hand, aren’t a lot of those first-year students?
    https://www.govst.edu/suicide-prevention/

    Liked by 1 person

  11. TonyE says:

    Well, this is good. AWESOME actually.

    It means that traffic around UCI (Irvine) won’t be the usual clusterf&%&%k that it becomes when all those exchange students that come the Middle Kingdom come here and get behind the wheel of their Corollas.

    Who knows, maybe the UC might have to cut back?

    BUT, this is the really awesome part:

    In California, college students are considered residents where they’re college is, if they have to physically move there.

    This means that we’ll have FAR less students available for “ballot harvesting” this fall. If there are no students on campus, then they don’t get to vote in Irvine. they get to vote in wherever they live ( trust me, no one is gonna move to Irvine if they don’t have to… it’s a pricey proposition ), likely with their parents elsewhere.

    Same thing up at Cal State Fullerton.

    The commies stole our Irvine and Fullerton in ’18. Good luck finding the bodies this time.

    This is AWESOME NEWS.

    Liked by 7 people

  12. Puzzled says:

    It’s been obvious for a long time that a college degree should be able to be obtained very inexpensively via recorded interactive courses. You don’t need 10000 psychology professors when a $ 19.99 web course will be better. Break up the Education mafia.

    Liked by 7 people

  13. Risa says:

    It is possible that Harvard professors don’t want the potential COVID19 exposure from the students.

    The professors are often in the age range that has been more vulnerable to the virus, according to the jumbled info we try to sort through.

    But I read an interesting theory that much of the virus exposure comes from fecal matter in bathrooms and on other public surfaces, and since we are all aware the typical Ivy League elitist is full of crap, there very well may be an increased risk in a Harvard classroom.

    Liked by 1 person

    • garavaglia1 says:

      I’m a college instructor. Fear of communicable disease is normal. But, if I am unwilling or unable to fulfill my responsibilities as directed, I should not be employed. Fear could be of an assault, gunshot, influenza, measles, tuberculosis. Sorry, can’t agree with you on this one.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Risa says:

        Did I write what you think you read? Uh, no. Did I take a position endorsing fear? Nope.
        Although I believe the typical Harvard professor has a nice lifestyle he/she/it would be loathe to risk.
        And by the way, my retired husband is an adjunct at a state university because he enjoys teaching, so we are dealing with this very issue. He had to finish the last part of the Spring semester on Zoom and he did NOT enjoy it.
        Administration is currently planning on resuming classroom teaching this Fall, with a long list of new protocols in place that, quite frankly, sound unworkable.

        Like

    • warrprin1 says:

      Risa, your screen name is perfecto! 😂😂😂

      Like

      • Risa says:

        I hope you are referring to the Spanish meaning of my name!
        My poor mother didn’t speak Spanish, she was trying to name me after the opera singer, Risë Stevens.

        Like

  14. wondering999 says:

    So far as preventing theft of intellectual property, this might well accelerate it, since all students will need access to the internet library services.

    There is limited, expensive access to JSTOR academic papers through universities (although most of the research was publicly funded, and the argument is that it should all be available to the general publical because of that).

    Some years ago there was a suicide involving a young man who had downloaded massive numbers of academic research papers from JSTOR, breaking the rules. I can’t remember his name offhand, and my searches aren’t turning it up. But unless I am wrong, there are intellectual property issues connected to this somehow.

    Like

    • wondering999 says:

      His name was Aaron Swartz, and he was at MIT when he downloaded a lot of JSTOR:
      https://newrepublic.com/article/112418/aaron-swartz-suicide-why-he-broke-jstor-and-mit

      Liked by 1 person

    • wondering999 says:

      From the New Republic article about Aaron Swartz:
      “lthough the federal indictment states matter-of-factly that “Swartz intended to distribute a significant portion of JSTOR’s archive,” the only real evidence of a motive or plan that prosecutors disclosed was a document he wrote in July 2008 called the “Guerilla Open Access Manifesto.” Swartz began that widely reported post by arguing that, “Information is power. But like all power, there are those who want to keep it for themselves.” He continued:

      “Providing scientific articles to those at elite universities in the First World, but not to children in the Global South? It’s outrageous and unacceptable. … We need to take information, wherever it is stored, make our copies and share them with the world. … We need to download scientific journals and upload them to file sharing networks. We need to fight for Guerilla Open Access.”

      Liked by 1 person

  15. CopperTop says:

    someone on a previous page said

    “pay with confederate money.”

    LOLOLOLOLOLOL

    Treeper humor is the best humor

    Liked by 4 people

  16. WeThePeople2016 says:

    This is going to affect the Community colleges as well. A lot of foreign students attend face-to-face classes and take online classes, some live in the U.S. and some are out of the country. Community colleges are doing the some f-f classes and many classes online for the Fall 2020. This is going to get very interesting now.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. William the Comptroller says:

    I am still pissed that the Football team would have won The Game last year at the Yale Bowl if not for the Fossil-fuel divestment losers from Harvard (and a few Yalies) protesting ON the field for a whole hour at halftime before FINALLY being led off the turf by the police. That killed the momentum going into second half. Also, since the Bowl doesn’t have any light, it was getting pretty dark out by the 2nd overtime. However, just from the standpoint of pure enthusiasm for the sport, it was only of the most thrilling games in the venerable series (going back to 1875). The Yale 4-year starter QB was on fire. The Harvard froshie RB had a wild game: 4 TD’s with almost 300 yards rushing. Potential Heisman candidate (first since Yale’s back won it in 1937).

    Can’t wait until the Marxists remove Elihu Yale’s name for the other big benefactor in the 1720s; Rev. Jeremiah Dummer (Harvard Class of 1699.). Yep… DUMMER UNIVERSITY!!!!!!!

    Liked by 2 people

    • William the Comptroller says:

      The fossil fuel protestors had their arrests expunged at the New Haven precinct. If fossil fuels are soooooo evil, I would petition President Bacow to ban heating in the dorms, lecture halls, and dining rooms …and only let them have cold cuts for food. No toasters for bagels or Belgian waffles. I would have had them WALK back to Cambridge in the dark. See how long they would last before rallying in the Yard to dig an oil well by Stoughton or Hollis Hall…

      Liked by 5 people

  18. BestBets says:

    One thing is certain. Harvard Square in Cambridge, MA will be more pleasant to drive through and walk around in but many businesses and restaurants will be shuttered as a result.

    Liked by 5 people

    • keeler says:

      If other area colleges and universities follow this template, Boston may have some rough times ahead.

      For those unfamiliar with Boston, college students make up a huge proportion of the city’s demographics. There are more than 100 higher education institutions in the metro area, and the largest (Boston University) alone has 33,000 students. All told there are over 250,000 college students in a city whose permanent population is just under 700,000.

      Reducing colleges’ population capacity to 40% of capacity will significantly damage the small businesses which rely on college students. I imagine these businesses are already suffering from the lost spring semester of 2019, the dramatic reduction in tourism, and the state-imposed regulations which require operating at reduced capacity.

      This damage will, in turn trickle up to the city as food and amenity taxes decline.

      Liked by 2 people

  19. Liberals are going crazy, but I can’t see the problem. If classes are online, why wouldn’t foreign students just login from home? No need to be in US and incur additional expense of room and board.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Carly says:

      So perhaps they can study from abroad. But there is no need for a visa then.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Dutchman says:

      Exactly the point. Universities have adapted to foreign exchange students being a “cash cow” for them, many the children of CCP.
      No resident discount, andlots of fees for dorms, translators, etc.

      This is a WIN, although I agree with poster above they will try to give the on campus slots to foreign students who will have to self-deport, otherwise.

      There really is no reason ALL “public education” could not be done PRIMARILY on line, with a much smaller portion done in much smaller brick and mortar locations.

      It would require a much smaller administrative staff, which is one reason it hasn’t been done before now.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Judith says:

      President Trump is hitting Hahvid where it hurts: the pocketbook. And in doing so, he forces them to put their money where their mouth is.

      If they want that tuition money, then they must give up their Plandemic. Foreign students bring big bucks to campuses and they displace American students. Good riddance!

      Liked by 6 people

    • deplorableintx says:

      IIRC, a large number of foreign-born College students remain in the US after graduation taking jobs from US-born graduates, so this is a welcome double blow to Visa proponents!

      Liked by 1 person

  20. wondering999 says:

    NYC school are also wavering about beginning Fall classes.
    The feeling I get is that the overall education establishment is looking forward to having more time for Paid Revolution?
    https://nypost.com/2020/07/02/de-blasio-fall-school-opening-plan-is-premature-cuomo-teachers-union/

    Liked by 3 people

  21. El Torito says:

    I still think all this hyper cautious policy is simply to do as much economic damage as possible against Trump. The leftists that run the place care no more for human life than does your average CCP leader.

    Liked by 4 people

  22. Big Jake says:

    Unlawful injunction in 3-2-1.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
    TRUMP is the greatest. You don’t need to come into the USA to go to HARVARD then NO VISA for you.
    There is a god!
    Justice!
    Anyone that would hire a Harvard graduate is insane.

    Liked by 10 people

  24. todayistheday99 says:

    Good. The less indoctrination the better.

    Liked by 5 people

  25. dasantacroce says:

    Harvard? The Chinese spy agency? I hope they fall in a financial hole deeper than the Mariana Trench.

    Liked by 7 people

    • warrprin1 says:

      Your hope may materialize, dasanta. The Harvard powers-that-be will not spend a dollar of their endowment treasure to rescue themselves from the present circumstances.

      Like

  26. Thomas Holsinger says:

    So much for all the Chinese students. Well, the ones who don’t take lab courses.

    Liked by 3 people

  27. Drogers says:

    However in the world will the swells get over the disappointment.

    Like

  28. A few hours later U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced any foreign student who attends a U.S. university with only virtual classes will lose their student visa.

    Sweet!

    Liked by 3 people

  29. Richard Whitney says:

    Harvard will weasel out of this one. Think if this had happened when a certain foreign-born student matriculated.

    Liked by 2 people

  30. Jeffrey Coley says:

    If Harvard is giving 100% online classes, the foreign students can still attend remotely from their home country.

    Liked by 2 people

  31. JWC says:

    Unplanned obsolescence. Could sorta see this coming. Thank you, Covid-19.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Marshall says:

    This could have another silver lining, as the at-home set-up allows parents to counter-argue the college indoctrination in real time. No better inoculation to PC than a robust family dinner table. Break out your Thomas Sowell, folks!

    Liked by 1 person

    • 335blues says:

      Parents of college eligible students are starting to understand universities
      are indoctrination “institutes”,
      and are questioning enrollment.

      Like

      • LKAinLA says:

        Yes I just saw on Louisiana State University home page has Black Lives Matter posted front and center! If you click on the Black Lives Matter block it reads all the ways LSU will begin to prop up the black students. How can a public university get away with this?

        Like

  33. Jesus Schwarzkopf says:

    LEFTIST universities just got smacked in their wallet HARD!!! 21% OF hARVARD STUDENTS ARE INTERNATIONAL
    Yahoo

    Liked by 2 people

  34. If they can live in dorms, why can’t they have classes? Makes no sense.

    Liked by 2 people

  35. sarasotosfan says:

    I can see lots of college and university administrators squirming because by toeing the Plandemic line they just severed the illegal immigration life line to part of their student body.

    The cries from CA will certainly drown out the BLM protesters.

    Liked by 3 people

  36. 335blues says:

    Oh good.
    Send ALL of the ‘students’ from CCP communist china home.
    They are here to spy and steal technology.
    Send them home.

    Liked by 2 people

  37. dd_sc says:

    Long term, I wonder how this could effect people actually completing a degree. Will engineering or computer science students go online for their electives?

    A lot of people (Bill Gates, Clarence Birdseye (frozen food fame)) – never completed degrees before moving on and becoming successful.

    Like

  38. Barnestormer says:

    How do you monitor/proctor online exams?

    Liked by 1 person

    • keeler says:

      You don’t.

      https://nypost.com/2020/05/01/online-cheating-probes-underway-at-georgia-tech-boston-university/

      Sounds like investigators matched which students’ computers were logged into the exam site and the tutoring site at the same time. How they became aware of the cheating is unclear.

      So the answer is going to be this: universities will demand students install tracking software onto any computer accessing the university network.

      More Big Covid Brother.

      Liked by 2 people

      • dd_sc says:

        I bet there were a lot of smarter students that logged into the test on their computers and onto the tutoring site with their smartphones.

        Like

        • keeler says:

          That’s probably what most of them did.

          In the big picture the device doesn’t matter. The end result will still be that universities will require students to install tracking software. Phone tracking would be even worse, as it would allow the institutions the ability to track students locations and behavior outside of the learning environment.

          And that still wouldn’t solve the problem, as a student taking an exam could have a third party accessing the cheating material and passing along the info in person.

          Liked by 1 person

    • California Joe says:

      Everybody at Harvard gets an A anyway so it’s not a problem!

      Like

  39. jmclever says:

    No more cheating Chinese grad students.

    Like

  40. icanhasbailout says:

    I don’t see how any course involving a laboratory could be done in this way. But I suppose if all they are teaching is Marxism there’s no barrier to this change.

    Liked by 2 people

  41. evergreen says:

    Off-shore students come here in many cases with outsized tuitions–and why not, if you can afford it, the USA is the best thing going. So, there’s not likely a fire sale to get those students. I’ve always heard that they pay top tuition dollars. If all foreign students are now prohibited from participating at online Harvard, then the school just took a 2X cash flow hit: tuition and housing for the (probable) biggest spenders.

    Secondly, if Harvard has gone virtual, why does a student need to attend a dormitory? Seems to obviate the whole point of sequestration.

    Harvard can draw down its reserves now. Facilities overhead is going to be someone’s headache to have to justify for two years of no use. After two years, the world will have moved into a virtual education arena, in which case Harvard may become largely AI on a server farm.

    Liked by 1 person

    • SanJac says:

      And if this is all about the Kung Flu everybody knows freshman and gatherings happen every night which will do nothing to stop spreading anything.

      Liked by 1 person

  42. FPCHmom says:

    Liked by 5 people

  43. Arrest Soros says:

    I hope this is the beginning of the end for physical universities.
    Jordan Peterson and colleagues have been working on setting up on-line only universities for a couple of years now. Their biggest hurdle was accreditation.

    Cut out the middle man. Get rid of the administration. They are the reason why college education costs so much.

    Liked by 1 person

  44. SanJac says:

    When will the state department or the President issue an EO to remove ALL Chinese Nationals in every university and or scientific research facility ?

    Like

  45. Jon Brown says:

    So what happens to all the stuff on campus like dorms, classrooms, sports complex’s, etc? Why are they charging $50,000. for what? They could do what College of the Ozarks does and not charge anthing just have to work on campus, Harvard could give away from their endowments. I’m laughing at these idiots. College idiots.

    Liked by 1 person

  46. Harvard is a demonstrated indoctrination camp financed by communist china. It teaches students to become domestic terrorists and to otherwise hate America. it should be shut down for the steaming pile that it is.

    Liked by 2 people

  47. Adjudicator says:

    Why would any college student pay regular tuition for mere virtual instruction? Why go to the campus at all, when a student could watch the on-line lecture from home? Harvard is virtue signaling and has always been a Leftist indoctrination center. All of this is happening while the Covid-19 death rate decreases and we learn more about the corrupt CDC’s revised criteria for counting Covid-19 cases. The increased numbers are bogus, a hoax being driven Democrats and hyped by the mainstream media.

    Like

  48. Meems says:

    Maybe, just maybe it won’t be quite as easy to brainwash their students! And for big bucks!

    Liked by 1 person

  49. dallasdan says:

    SD:
    “Additionally, Harvard will not be making any adjustments to their tuition rates.”

    “A few hours later U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced any foreign student who attends a U.S. university with only virtual classes will lose their student visa.”

    The elite schools can get away with this because of the name on the diploma and the doors that it opens. The large majority of private schools and many state schools, particularly those that are very humbly endowed, are presently in crisis financially.

    The ICE announcement is, literally, a bombshell. I anticipate that the wording “with only virtual classes” will be the loophole that allows schools to maintain an on-campus census sufficient to keep the doors open while going virtual to the extent they desire. Look for Harvard to have on-campus, instructor-led classes only for English as a Second Language (ESL) to escape ICE’s mandate.

    Like

  50. evergreen says:

    Why is the federal government subsidizing student loans when the marketplace can step in to meet every student need at a competitive–unsubsidized–price? Subsidy keeps prices UP. Harvard NEEDS subsidy; otherwise, tuition undergoes natural deflation over time as competition carves away first mover and best in class advantages.

    It’s so insanely stupid. We have virtually free education available due to the prevalence of ubiquitous information. In the year 2020, we have information and knowledge from the days of Hammurabi and Socrates and the like all the way forward. Why is it necessary to have to visit a classroom only to get a PC-ified, corrupted version of that history? What a racket the Left has been running all these years. Indoctrination centers on the government dime.

    Liked by 3 people

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