PPE Shortage Forecast in Food Manufacturing – Additionally, Worlds Largest Retailer Limits Shoppers…

Two topics of interest to average people appear in headlines.  The first is a report the food manufacturing industry might run out of PPE; the second is a remarkable shift by WalMart for shoppers in a new response to COVID-19.

First, there’s a hyped-up report about the food manufacturing industry possibly facing a shortage of gloves and masks as the nationwide PPE shortage continues. [SEE HERE]

However, there is nothing to be alarmed about in that report.

“I want to assure you that our food supply chain is sound,” Sonny Perdue, the secretary of agriculture, said on March 20.

That, however, could change if the people who make, package and deliver food lack personal protective equipment, or PPE, including face masks and gloves, according to the internal document shared with Yahoo News. (Link)

The three common PPE needs in food processing are: (1) hair restraints; (2) masks, and (3) gloves.  All food manufacturing and processing is regulated and inspected by the FDA and USDA.  The issues of mask and glove shortages are not critical within the industry.  Under the current National Emergency guidelines the USDA can modify regulations to keep the food supply-chain flowing without any health risk at all.

Most industrial food production is automated now.  The human element is not as influential as it once was.  Additionally, due to their purpose, masks can be modified to any facial covering; it is more convenient, but not critical that particular masks be worn.

Gloves are not as important as hand washing, and any industrial food sanitation expert will tell you that gloves are mostly a public relations issue.  Frequent hand washing in food processing is far more valuable, even preferred, to the wearing of gloves.  Hair covering is not in short supply, and if that ever became critical there are alternate options possible with modified interim USDA guidelines.

The U.S. has the greatest food production safety standards in the world.  Food-borne illnesses are rarely an issue of manufacturing or processing.  90 percent of food-borne issues (ecoli) are related to fresh products (lettuce, potatoes, melons, row crops).  The processing issues of botulism, salmonella and listeria are very rare with modern strict protocols. It would be exceptionally rare, almost impossible, for a food-borne pathogen to come from a PPE issue.  Stunningly so.

Nothing related to PPE will interfere with the food safety of Americans; and no shortage of PPE would ever impede the food supply chain.  There are shortages of raw material and supplies that might be a problem; but PPE is not a critical component within industrial food supplies; and all PPE regulations can be modified easily to avoid disruption.

On the second report, it is actually quite remarkable to see WalMart, the world’s largest retailer, modify shopping rules with very deliberate limits on customer density:

WalMart – Starting Saturday, we will limit the number of customers who can be in a store at once. Stores will now allow no more than five customers for each 1,000 square feet at a given time, roughly 20 percent of a store’s capacity.

To manage this restriction, the associates at a store will mark a queue at a single-entry door (in most cases the Grocery entrance) and direct arriving customers there, where they will be admitted one-by-one and counted. Associates and signage will remind customers of the importance of social distancing while they’re waiting to enter a store – especially before it opens in the morning.

Once a store reaches its capacity, customers will be admitted inside on a “1-out-1-in” basis.  (read more)

The average WalMart Supercenter is 200,000 sq ft.  5 per 1,000/sq ft would mean a limit of 1,000 people at any one time total store.  The average WalMart Neighborhood store is 40,000 sq ft.  That would mean a limit of 200 people at any one time total store.

Big Picture– Most consumers are not aware total food consumption in the U.S. was a 60/40 proposition. Approximately 60% of all food was consumed “outside the home” (or food away from home), and 40% of all food consumed was food “inside the home” (traditional grocery shoppers).

Food ‘outside the home’ included: restaurants, fast-food locales, schools, corporate cafeterias, university lunchrooms, manufacturing cafeterias, hotels, food trucks, park and amusement food sellers and many more.  Many of those venues are not thought about when people evaluate the overall U.S. food delivery system; however, this network was approximately 60 percent of all food consumption on a daily basis.

The ‘food away from home‘ channel has its own supply chain.  Very few restaurants and venues (cited above) purchase food products from retail grocery outlets.   As a result of the coronavirus mitigation effort the ‘food away from home’ channel has been reduced by more than half of daily food delivery operations.  However, people still need to eat.

That means retail food outlets, grocers, are seeing sales increases of 25 to 50 percent, depending on the area.  This, along with some panic shopping, is the reason why supermarkets are overwhelmed and their supply chain is out of stock on many items.

There is enough food capacity in the overall food supply chain, and no-one should worry about the U.S. ever running out of the ability to feed itself.  However, the total food supply chain is based on two channels: food at home and food away from home.

The seismic shift toward ‘food at home‘ is what has caused the shortages, and that supply chain is not likely to recover full service of products again until the ‘food away from home’ sector gets back to normal.   No need to panic, but there will be long-term shortages.

There are going to be category driven empty shelves, and many varieties of items will remain out of stock.  Manufacturers are focusing on the top most-demanded items within their portfolios; they will not restart all varieties of products until production capacity on their top branded items drop to a manageable level.

Toilet paper is two sides of a slightly different product, commercial and consumer channels. Commercial TP demand is down 40% while consumer TP demand is up 40%. The TP you use at home is not the same as the stuff you used at the office, school, restaurant, public restroom etc. Both products manufactured differently; both packaged differently; both manufactured to fit different dispensing equipment.

Consumer (home use) TP sales now up 40% in demand. The industrial, big roll, individually wrapped, less appealing commercial TP not-so-much. That is likely why the lack of toilet tissue has remained for so long…  Similar for paper towels.  Who knew.

Big manufacturing soap and chemical users have also been challenged with the extreme demand for sanitary products. Hand soap, hand sanitizing, personal hygiene and also surface sanitizing products are beyond extreme demand. Here I would place a note of caution… Again, prioritization has to happen.

When given a choice between laundry/dish detergent and personal hygiene products we can expect the manufacturers will prioritize production of the latter first.

This *could* lead to a shortage in laundry and dish soaps. Just keep that in mind if you are seeing some of your favorite brands in those sectors missing.

Think of a massive segment within our economy that was already working near capacity…. now demand has increased 40% overall within that industry…. It’s incredible we have not seen more widespread shortages considering the scale of this increase.

This entry was posted in Coronavirus, Economy, media bias, propaganda, Uncategorized, US dept of agriculture, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

277 Responses to PPE Shortage Forecast in Food Manufacturing – Additionally, Worlds Largest Retailer Limits Shoppers…

  1. cheryl says:

    Went to Sam’s Club last weekend and they were requiring all shoppers to get a shopping cart to enforce a 6-foot rule. I refused and told the woman I had just rolled out of bed and then rode in the same car with my husband and we didn’t need two shopping carts to keep us 6 feet apart. I guess they didn’t take into account that people pass each other in the aisles either.

    Liked by 17 people

    • Deplorable_Infidel says:

      “I guess they didn’t take into account that people pass each other in the aisles either.”

      Some places with capacity restrictions have also converted their aisles to one-way traffic. I believe that was done at a local WNY supermarket chain.

      I will find other places to patronize because I don’t need anything from either of them that bad.

      We are being conditioned to accept lines and waiting for life’s necessities.

      Grovel and comply, peasants.

      Liked by 31 people

      • sturmudgeon says:

        Winco in North Spokane, WA. a week ago Saturday had a ‘counter’ at the entrance.. 200 persons in the store at any time… I understand ‘corporate’ had instituted the ‘in and out’ numbering.. stocks in store were normal.. a few people wearing gloves or masks..

        Liked by 4 people

        • Bill Durham says:

          ihme predictions deaths
          4/4 1360 actual 1331
          4/5 1529 actual tbd 990 so far
          There death numbers have been on point the last few dayst. But the hospital number are way higher than actual. Peak is 2644 on 4/16. 91,000 deaths by June.
          I think Trump needs to get a game plan for a start up by April. This can’t go on. These are h1n1 numbers not Spanish flu numbers.

          Liked by 3 people

          • jnr2d2 says:

            They flipped-flop the April 3rd w the 4th. They did give a reason, but it was indecipherable.
            Also, at the early point in their curves it is a very small range — only in the next 7-10 days will we know if we are on the average curve or the Hi or low curve. My bet is the low curve for most states.

            Liked by 1 person

          • chemman says:

            The Spanish flu was a variant of H1N1 with a segment of Avian RNA. The Swine flu of 2009 was H1N1 with a segment of swine RNA

            Liked by 1 person

      • freepetta says:

        Went to Dollar General today figured they would have packaged ham, turkey, cheese and so on. But guess what!
        The shelves were bare. I refuse to buy meats and cheeses in deli departments because who knows who sneezed or spit on your deli sliced meat and cheese.
        Afterall I’m in NY and people are completely crazed.

        Liked by 6 people

        • chemman says:

          I have a home deli slicer. I just buy a whole unopened roast from the deli then I don’t have that issue. Costs a bit more but I can slice, vacuum seal and freeze the meat. Thaw as needed.

          Liked by 8 people

          • freepetta says:

            Great idea definitely worth investing. I never owned a deli slicer.

            Liked by 1 person

            • daylight58 says:

              A near commercial grade slicer from Cabelas was one of my first purchases when I moved here to Alaska – along with a top end consumer vacuum sealer, a dehydrator and a good sized chest freezer.

              It is a 3-day long supply chain by freighter between Western Washington and Anchorage.

              Liked by 4 people

              • jello333 says:

                Bringing back childhood memories. Two things that always creeped me out were those deli slicers and the paper cutters, I think they’re call “guillotines”? Anyway, yeah, just never wanted to get near either of them… honestly, I’m STILL not a fan! 🙂 Yeah, I’m weird.

                Liked by 1 person

          • bruzedorange says:

            We’ve missed you, Kramer!
            Say hi to Jerry and Elaine for us (and tell Newman to wash his hands after he hides the mail).

            Like

        • jnr2d2 says:

          You elect these idiots that don’t replenish their inventory of respirators, masks etc after 2010 — but spend on their Democratic pet projects. So now Cuomo wants the average USA citizen’s taxes to bale out their financial/health-care incompetence. NY has only 718 ICU beds. But need 12,342! According to IHME. All beds at 13,010, but needs 69,175!!!!
          Then there is Red Texas with four times the needed ICU beds, and ten times the needed beds!!!!! Competition not restricted development of hospital and other emergency facilities is the cause.
          To be fair to blue states, the west coast states are generally in good shape, But the blue states of the accela corridor are a nightmare!!

          Liked by 1 person

          • freepetta says:

            I don’t elect any of these morons. I take that personally, no reason for that.
            So everyone you vote for wins?

            Liked by 3 people

            • Hey freepetta; it’s not personal, it’s politics.

              Liked by 1 person

              • freepetta says:

                Not my politics abigail. I can’t help who the imbeciles in NYC vote for. They have the population to rule politics in this state. When you accuse me of voting in these libs it’s personal. It ain’t me!!

                Liked by 1 person

                • Thumbs up freepetta; I’m with ya all the way……

                  Liked by 1 person

                • freepetta says:

                  I work very hard at trying to change things in this state abigail. You and I think the same!!💁🏻‍♀️ But I’m sad to say when I retire I’m so outta here.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • We left 6 years ago and thank God everyday for making that choice.
                  Everyday, (even the bad ones), is truly a blessing living in the woods, on a lake, beautiful cove, great neighbors….perfect retirement!
                  Stay well and hang in there.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • freepetta says:

                  As they say abigail when you live in NY you can’t imagine living anywhere else, when you leave NY you never want to come back.
                  I was in Tennessee for many years, coming back here for work and family reasons was a decision I regret everyday, but it was necessary.
                  Now I can’t wait to leave again💁🏻‍♀️.

                  Liked by 1 person

      • vikingmom says:

        “We are being conditioned to accept lines and waiting for life’s necessities.”

        Exactly!! “Here is your allotment of bread for today – now go wait in that line for your toilet paper!”

        And the number of people I know who are willingly going along with it scares me far more than any virus ever could!!

        Liked by 9 people

        • Kate says:

          I have worked in a local supermarket for many years and the one thing I noticed is that most people will find a line to join while not noticing there are several check stands open .
          We are a military town though so that could explain some of this.
          My husband is a 27 year AF vet and I have often teased him about always finding a line to join whether shopping or out driving.

          Liked by 5 people

          • MNcarrypermitholder says:

            Your store is doing it wrong. Dedicated queues for each checkout line is the least efficient way to run things. The most efficient way is to have a single queue that feeds “the next available” checkout. The definition of “the next available” can vary a bit – for a belt-fed grocery checkout, a line becomes available when there is belt space open behind the current customer.

            The argument I’ve always heard against using this system is that people aren’t familiar with it and will get confused. This seems like a BS excuse to me – it has been over 20 years since I’ve stepped boot into a bank lobby that wasn’t organized around a single “wait for the next available teller” queue.

            Like

      • MfM says:

        One of the local stores with fairly narrow aisles has done the one way routing. Most people actually hope it will last past the Wuhan Virus!

        Liked by 1 person

        • bruzedorange says:

          Maybe this will bring back walking BEHIND your cart, rather than beside it.

          Anybody ever hear an explanation for why “strolling beside your cart” came to be a trend in shopping? My only guess is it must leave a hand free for the sacrosanct cellphone.

          (I mean, I can understand why Sisyphus might enjoy the change of position, but…)

          Like

      • The Devilbat says:

        They started by making us take our shoes off at the airport.

        Liked by 7 people

      • Lately, we order on-line and have everything delivered or we pick-up “outside” at their venues.
        I personally am not afraid of the virus by going inside as much as I am at a possible violent reaction that I may have interacting with a$$holes.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Vegas Guy says:

      I suspect that this will be a short lived idea. As individual shoppers start to notice that couples & / or those with children start to “take up” capacity ….. the complaints will skyrocket & hell will ensue at the que lines. You can count on that. Human nature or some such silly thing. The mentality of …” I’m here alone…why are you with your significant other OR with those unruly children….”

      Multiple persons included in the que do not impact capacity BUT certainly do impact concentration….Again a not so well thought out solution….

      Just MHO but I don’t think I am missing the mark.

      Liked by 8 people

      • Bill Durham says:

        Massachusetts governor said recently- “well it’s not like we are closing down grocery stores certain days of the week.”
        That was not a slip of the tongue. They are thinking about it. Open one day, sanitize the next day. Bank on it.

        Liked by 5 people

        • PS says:

          I just remarked at home, they could do what they did in the 1970s oil embargo days:

          People with last name A-M shop on even days, N-Z shop on odd days.

          Then you will know that we have collectively lost our minds.

          Liked by 4 people

          • Vegas Guy says:

            An idea with some merit except what is the point of odd / even shopping days when there is no supply of needed merchandise available….?

            What will be next….will some outlet decide that maybe they should take requests for specific merchandise & notify you via an app when it’s in stock & you then have an appointment to stroll in & pick it up…?

            We are all in this together & we must all make equal sacrifices & stand united. This entire so called “crisis” should have awoken all of us to the Dem dream of a Socialist economy….
            How’s that working out for ya….?

            I’ll bet that Bernie & Co have access to all the TP they will ever need & you can also bet that nether they nor any of their family members are ever spotted in a grocery store scrambling to find necessities like the rest of us peons.

            Liked by 4 people

            • buzzybee says:

              Vegas, good point. It’s my understanding that in China, the government elites get first dibs. They even have their own gardens, unlike the lower quality gardens of the peasants.

              I hope POTUS is seeing what’s going on in the corporate world and in our supply chain (I’m sure he does) and realizes what it’s doing to the thinking of the general public.

              Liked by 1 person

            • annieoakley says:

              I know someone who is doing that. She puts her order into the store and pays for it. They fill it with what she gets and she is mad because she still has to get out of the car to go get it.

              Like

          • buzzybee says:

            Well, PS, we already know Pelosi and her cronies have lost theirs. Maybe it’s contagious?

            Like

          • bud says:

            Ya, that has promise. Like during the oil embargo. Even/odd and use our ss’s. No ss$? no shopping.

            Like

        • buzzybee says:

          This would not surprise me in the least, Bill D. Time will tell and it will get interesting.

          Like

        • Jorizabeth says:

          Some people today are too young to remember Blue Laws. One of the more pleasant ones: Stores closed on Sunday. All of them. Wouldn’t hurt to bring that back in a lot of ways.

          Liked by 4 people

        • daylight58 says:

          Stand by for an updated version of the old “evens and odds” from the 1970s.

          Like

      • Sassy says:

        Some stores are instituting a “one shopper per household” rule. This, of course, makes sense, all things considered. Children are out of school so they don’t infect each other and then their families; they’re not out of school so they can grocery shop with grandma during the senior citizen hours and potentially infect the most vulnerable population.

        Liked by 1 person

        • buzzybee says:

          Sassy, I have to wonder how stores would enforce this rule. I’ve often said that while thoughtlessness and rudeness are undesirable behaviors, they should not be considered crimes in a free country. My hope is that average shoppers/American sheeple will truly begin to THINK.

          Like

          • Sassy says:

            I’m guessing that they station somebody at the door, anyway, to count the number going into the store. In my state, they’re limiting shoppers based upon the square footage of the store.

            The news article I read about this “one-shopper-per-family” rule said that they realize some people have no babysitters or need an assistant to help them shop, and that they’d take circumstances into consideration, but hope that people will at least try to honor their “request.” Being private property, I suppose they can make whatever rules they want. Like you, I certainly am concerned about our civil liberties.

            Liked by 1 person

        • coastermomohio says:

          I already hear complaints among my circle of acquaintances about more than one person shopping together. What if you have to bring your kids with you because you have no one to watch them while you shop? Believe me, between single moms and families scattered all over the country, there are a lot of people in this situation. I would never take a baby or young child in a store with this virus going around (or even the regular flu), but what if you have no other options?

          Liked by 1 person

      • buzzybee says:

        I think you’re right on, Vegas. Corporate thinking of these big box stores seems to have gone haywire. Since we are used to living in a free country, and this is an unprecedented event, corporate decision makers, who have their own form of bureaucracy, are basically ‘in training’.

        Mistakes are being made. I just wonder ‘who’ they get advice from. Although I think much of this is learning while doing. They’re trying to follow guidelines from CDC, etc.

        Apparently they’re having a tough time. I’ve noticed a huge difference in atmosphere between stores like Fred Meyer and Winco. I’ve been avoiding Walmart, and now will continue to do so for a long while.

        Like

        • Deplorable_Infidel says:

          “They’re trying to follow guidelines from CDC”

          ^^^ THIS [CDC] IS THE PROBLEM! ^^^

          Liked by 5 people

        • Sassy says:

          Yes. We DO have to take into consideration potential complicity here, as with social media giants who “cooperate” willingly with certain parts of the government and political spectrum to evade privacy rules whenever the “resistance” asks.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Adele Virtue says:

          they are pushing for more oline shopping with pick up at the stores. My son does Insta cart in Wichita, KS when he is not on duty at the air base. Last week he made over 1200 because people are afraid to shop there. He said mom it is crazy like, but people have put up signs on their doors, have virus, just leave food and then call. It seems things will e changing for a lot of people, no more going to the store, online order, instacart seem to be the new way of doing things. Weird really.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Catherine Thompson says:

          In my Walmart – Madison, Indiana they have sectioned off half of the store they deemed unessential and you can’t shop it. So that leaves them with 5 people per thousand feet only 50 people in the store at a time. What a cluster f—! Now they are deeming what is unessential for you. This is such a slippery slope Once they start the ball rolling it just keeps getting bigger! President Trump has got to see what the heck is going on out here, Seniors waiting in line to get in barely able to stand dropping off prescriptions then having to stand in line again to pick them up and possible get some food. This is NUTS!

          Liked by 3 people

          • jello333 says:

            For the last few years of her life, my mom had to get a cortisone shot for hip/leg pain about once every 6 months. It made a huge difference, allowing her to get up and around with no pain, sometimes even not needing a walker. Without it, she was basically bed-ridden with pain. So… if she was still alive now, they’d be telling her the shot wasn’t important enough and she’d just have to wait a few months? That the almighty Corona has spoken?! I really, really hate these scumbags!

            Liked by 3 people

          • buzzybee says:

            Yep, Catherine. When one talks about essential vs nonessential SOMEONE has to define those terms. A friend taught me that in any discussion to ask the other persons to define their terms. Let the corporations or CDC or whomever DEFINE what they mean by ‘essential’ or ‘nonessential’.

            Next question; what is essential to which people? Things that are essential to one person is not essential to me and vice versa.

            Like

      • Missy says:

        These stores are just trying to keep the lawsuits at bay. Lawyers and class-action toads are drooling at the possibility of huge legal fees. Unless you have worked in the corp world, you wouldn’t understand the amount of $$ spent on risk mitigation…Fortunes.

        This isn’t about caring for people, this is about legal risk mitigation.

        Liked by 5 people

      • Jakob says:

        Yes, in China only one household member leave the residence to go shopping. Coming to a city near you comrade.

        Liked by 1 person

    • jello333 says:

      There’s a video of Steven Harvey, at home, talking to his wife about the restrictions and stuff. At one point she says something like “Come here and give me a kiss”. He’s like “No, that’s not legal now. We gotta stay 6′ apart!” 🙂

      Liked by 5 people

    • TreeClimber says:

      If they try that crap with me, I know exactly where to tell them to stick that buggy! I push my baby’s stroller – and I don’t care what anyone says or thinks about me, never have I once left my children with a babysitter and I most assuredly am not about to start now! If they think they’re going to try and tell me to take my baby out of his stroller and put him in some maybe-half-assed-sanitized public buggy, they’ve got another think coming. Bad enough we already have to wait, in the heat, in the sun, with our little ones exposed to the elements, for four other people to finish shopping before we can go in!

      Liked by 5 people

      • AlinWonderland says:

        Buggy! You must be from the South. We lived in a mid-western state many years ago and I said “buggy” referring to a shopping cart and some lady laughed out loud!! I’m sure she thought I was some country bumpkin. 😂

        Liked by 4 people

    • Snellvillebob says:

      So people spent 30 minutes waiting in line catching the virus. If there were no lines people would go in an leave a lot faster. This morning I spent 30 minutes in Line at Sam’s and there were some close to the door parking spaces. There was no lines at the self checkout.

      Liked by 2 people

    • old45model says:

      We are already experiencing that, here in Australia (Central Queensland).
      Lines, marked standing points, packing our own shopping bags (but the checkout operators still handle all the items through the POS scanner).
      So much of it is totally illogical. And the fear/hysteria is palpable.
      What ‘amuses & amazes’ me is that, in air conditioned stores, no one seems to realize that the air-con distributes the aerosols far more widely – nor do they seem to appreciate that the lack of protective eye wear, notwithstanding any other protective equipment, does not preclude anyone from contact with such aerosols.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Mac says:

      The biggest problem with these occupancy restrictions is that the store personnel responsible for managing them are morons, and i am insulting morons with that comparison.

      Today, my wife and I arrived at one of the large club warehouse stores. You had to pick up your own cart in the parking lot, as they had none near the front doors. Then an employee came down the line, outside the front door, with a germicidal wipe, to disinfect the cart handle which my wife had been holding for the last five minutes. That was totally useless. But, it gets better. Assuming that the line was to manage the total number of shoppers in ths store at any given time, I expected the line to move rather quickly, as shoppers were continually leaving the store, after making their purchases. However, after some 30 people had exited, without anyone being allowed to enter, I went up and asked the security guard handling the if she was going to allow people to enter as others left. bher response was that she was not working that way. Hum, I continued to wait and finally, after some 40 people had exited the store, she allowed 15 people to enter. As I continued to wait, an additional 15 people exited the store. As, the guard showed no interest in allowing anyone else to enter, I requested that the manager come out and explain the protocol that the store was following. After near 50 people had exited the store, without anyone being allowed inside, the manager finally came out and was either unable or unwilling to tell me how many people were allowed in the store at one time, how they were determining when to allow people to enter, or really anything about the current program in effect there. At this point, there were nearly 100 people in line to enter the store. I asked if it would not be easier simply to allow the same number of people to enter as were leaving, and was met with a stunned dear-in-the-headlights look. Without answering, she simply walked away. After another 15 people exited without anyone being allowed to enter, my wife and I simply left, to try another day.

      The beginning of last week I arrived at the hospital, where I receive regular treatments for a potentially life threatening condition, for a scheduled appointment. My temperature was taken by pointing a non-contact thermometer at my forehead. The nurse told me that my temperature was too high and that I could not enter the facility. I asked them to verify the temperature reading with the second, similar thermometer which the other nurse present was holding. I was told that my temperature could not be taken more than once and that I would have to call my doctor to get authorization for admittance to the building. Now, I had taken my temperature with an inside-the-ear thermometer before leaving the car in the parking lot and got a reading of 98.4. I requested that they call a supervisor or my doctor themselves. They reluctantly did that and the nurse returned with an oral thermometer which showed my temperature to be 98.7. 2 degrees less than that of the stand-off thermometer she initially used. The problem was that the protocol, which has since been changed, did not allow for equipment failure or error and there was no one at the checkpoint who was authorized to make a decision under unusual circumstances and the nurse was not willing to do so, until heavily pressed..

      Total incompetence has now become the norm, in this crisis. It exists from our political leadership through corporate America and down to the lowest personal level. The people making these decisions and implementing them are totally clueless about what they are doing. And, as they make things needlessly more and more inconvenient for the common man, the frustration level is just going to increase, until someone snaps. And that point is moving closer and closer.

      Liked by 5 people

      • allhail2 says:

        I have been ignoring totally useless and stupid instructions from store employees. They can’t do anything to you other than say “Sir, Sir.” (Keep walking, don’t look back, ever) If I need something in an aisle, I’m going to get it, pay and leave ASAP. I am not going to walk half way around the store in a one way crap train.

        HD is trying this. I put my lumber on a cart and usually leave it parked out of the way so I can move through the store to get the rest of my smaller items (caulk, nails, etc). Sometimes I make more than one trip back to my lumber cart. If I forget something, I’m sure as hell not getting in the conga line of ham and eggers who are trying to figure out whether they need blue tape, red tape, black tape or a kick in the ass. I’m going to get what I need the fastest way possible and get back to work.

        I will say this, I see more and more people rolling their eyes at the whole thing

        Liked by 4 people

      • jello333 says:

        At the store, I hope the friendly greeter was still there at least… “Welcome to Costco, I love you.”

        Like

      • cheryl says:

        They want this crap to be our new normal. I don’t think so.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Chris Wallace and Gov. Wretched Whitmer vs, President Trump on now…

    Like

    • Hans says:

      I noticed that Whitmer had a s***eating smile on… she could not stop it… Given her response to this crisis we will have Dumb and Dumber Running.. or Dumber and Dumb.. take your pick…

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Zephyrbreeze says:

    So for months we’ve been hustling and bustling together over the produce and deli and meat departments and there have been no major breakouts traced back to these stores…

    Now they think they need to do something. Meanwhile, more data shows that we may have already flattened the curve because the virus was here in NOVEMBER.

    View at Medium.com

    Liked by 17 people

    • “Now they need to do something”, interesting comment Zephyr.

      We now shop in stores that have little gestapo signs telling us we can only take one item of things that are displayed, or in Vermont buying displayed garden seeds is verbotten completely.

      Walmart and Safeway have removed the benches in their stores where you could sit and rest a bit and now are going to click us in and out like the gatekeepers do to the cows at the cattle auctions.

      20 heifers in at so much a head.

      Liked by 4 people

      • buzzybee says:

        So we have to get used to living like cattle? Great comment, Coloradochloe. Goes with what I said earlier about corporate decision making. Now I’m wondering about the mentality of corporate CEOs. But don’t they need groceries, etc. also?

        Liked by 1 person

    • swissik says:

      They need to follow the rules, remember the slip and falls attorneys are waiting like hungry vultures. Liability is on their minds. Lawyers NEVER lose in a crisis. Just my opinion.

      Liked by 2 people

    • alliwantissometruth says:

      Look away Zeph

      The “experts” tell us…

      The curve is not flat
      Chloroquine works but isn’t the answer
      All the other treatments and possible cures some doctors have said are close to being realized will instead need elaborate testing that might take years
      It’s going to be much, much worse in the coming months
      We need to shut down the entire country for many more months

      Funny, it almost sounds like the “experts” who are in place to help us are actually working to hurt us

      Liked by 1 person

    • roy1982blog says:

      This is why I’m beginning to really think Dr. Faucci is completely in on the deep state dissolving of the country as we know it. This guy needs to shut up. His perfect scenario is this lasts years which keeps him as the “sole” influence on this country’s success or demise. The media is with him and he and they love the thought of this lasting years.

      Liked by 3 people

      • buzzybee says:

        Yeah, roy, I’m beginning to wonder about the good doctor myself. He was a hillbill supporter, so of course I do not trust him. Would not be a surprise to find him as part of the swamp. BUT… how can we tell for sure?

        Like

      • cjzak says:

        Ok so he’s in bed with the Dems/left. What good is this going to do any of them if the country is in pieces around them? They all live here too. They won’t be able to get things running again for sure with their inability to run anything and their greedy grabs for power as their main goal. If it goes too long and somehow they gain the govt control they desire, do they think we will just sit around and march to their orders? Tell me they are not that stupid. I will never believe our military will go against the people either. They are just as much citizens as we all are. How Fauci and Birx supposedly helping the opposition is going to affect this whole bizarre and now dangerous situation makes no sense to me.

        In one second PT could stop this mess and start now getting us turned around no matter what Fauci says or doesn’t say. The question is will the Pres. be able to with stand and maintain his Presidency when the hot fire he would get from everyone who has bought into the ‘we must isolate everyone and everything to stop this disease’ agenda that has now firmly taken hold and that he has accepted for now too. I trust him to make the right decision but that is going to have to happen very soon, imo.

        As more people are deprived of the normalcy of their lives and denied food and other items they need and being able to obtain them freely, I think many of the ‘isolation’ crowd will begin to change their minds, especially with the numbers changing to show we might not need to do all of this crazy shutdown. I sure pray this all turns around before we have real big time issues dropping on our heads. It will make these last couple weeks look like the fun times of this whole debacle.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Sassy says:

      I can’t tell you how many people I know who say they had a mysterious illness with vague symptoms during Jan. and Feb., myself and spouse included. Shivers and dry cough, goose bumps on the head, vague intestinal pains and other gastrointestinal complaints that I’ll leave to your imagination. Felt like coming down with flu or a cold, but which never fully developed. Yet the dry cough took weeks to go away. In addition, noticed a distinct inability to flavor food well enough. Everything tasted blah, despite pouring on garlic and pepper.

      Wouldn’t it be a b-word if all these people already had it but have been cooped up, watching their investments tank or their jobs disappear, for no reason? These are the very people who, today, could be volunteering in hospitals or donating plasma to save the lives of the truly sick. Or going back to work to salvage whatever we can of this economy.

      Liked by 3 people

    • TMonroe says:

      The link now leads to a big 404 with this addition:
      “This post is under investigation or was found in violation of the Medium Rules.”

      Like

  4. namberak says:

    “The average WalMart Supercenter is 200,000 sq ft. 5 per 1,000/sq ft would mean a limit of 1,000 people at any one time total store. The average WalMart Neighborhood store is 40,000 sq ft. That would mean a limit of 200 people at any one time total store.” My youngest is a Walmart store manager in a rural area (not a super center). He told his mom and I last week that they were going to do this. That limit *also* includes associates in the store. They’re basing it on 20% of what the fire code says the building occupancy limit is. The local Neighborhood market, which is run by a good friend of our son’s, put out the word they were going to put in a one way traffic flow in each aisle. That would speed the whole thing up in and of itself. I was in there last Tuesday and the flow would frequently come to a halt because someone would freeze and not want to get past someone in their way. Me, I just barged along like usual. 🙂

    Liked by 11 people

    • James Carpenter aka "Felix" says:

      Taking issue with Draconia is a now civic duty. Be safe, use common sense and courtesy, but…
      Those who simply go along with full suites of crazy just to get along are slackers.

      Liked by 2 people

      • cheryl says:

        With Draconia in mind, I thought up a little poem to Gilligan’s Island.

        Just sit right down and you’ll hear a tale
        A tale of a fateful flu
        That started as a tiny bug
        Turned out to be another blue coup

        The POTUS was mighty business man
        The medical experts he thought were true
        Found out to be just deep state thugs
        And their pandemic model askew

        No jobs, no friends, no rides to town
        Not a single luxury
        The economy was taking a bump
        And the Democrats blamed Trump
        The Democrats blamed Trump

        So join us here each week, my friends
        Watch the Democrats so vile
        At the idiots named Mitt and Nancy and Schiff
        Here on Draconian Isle!

        Liked by 7 people

    • James says:

      This should not be a problem,as you never see one,”That limit *also* includes associates in the store”
      I told my wife we can forego waliworld for the time being.

      Liked by 1 person

    • c says:

      The problem is that people think incidental contact with another person can infect you. Just walking by a person who was infected won’t infect you. The research has shown it takes about 2.5 hours of close contact to do that. Now if someone coughed or sneezed directly in your face that would change the metric for infection.

      Like

  5. L&L says:

    NJ COVID-19 deaths 4/2 – 181 (Peak) deaths 4/3 – 113 deaths 4/4 – 87 deaths 4/5 – 71 deaths

    Liked by 3 people

    • IF those numbers are actually correct/true. From all the reports I’ve seen or heard from Project Veritas to people I actually know, the numbers are definitely being wildly manipulated.

      This includes from my nurse/lady friend who is telling me that she knows they are fudging the math. I’ve been to the hospital she works in and it is literally damn near empty.

      Yes, covid-19 was weaponized to be highly contagious. Yes, it is killing the elderly and or compromised otherwise. But, it’s not as lethal as the annual flu in that regard for sure.

      And yes, it is an evil globalist #WAR on mankind that must be dealt with. The “people” that brought this to us should all be put to death, period.

      Those that are surprised I would say such a thing aren’t paying attention.

      Liked by 7 people

    • paulashley says:

      See? Draconian lockdowns are working! We will continue this until all communicable disease is eradicated! Or society collapses and anarchy ensues. Whichever comes first. Wanna guess which?

      Liked by 2 people

  6. Julia Adams says:

    So, Americans, Rationing, long lines and shortages…cool!

    How’s that 30 day free trial of Socialism going for you now?

    Liked by 29 people

  7. James Carpenter aka "Felix" says:

    Draconia Island, who will we vote into isolation next?

    The “We’re-All-Gonna-Die-If-We-Don’t-Virtue-Signal-Commitment-To-Draconia” folks are also many of the TDS sufferers out there. Nine out of ten doctors all swear to this.
    But they aren’t the same doctors who swore by the plaque on their wall that Trump was a mental case and probably dangerous to boot.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Dances with Wolverines says:

    We have the greatest country on the face of the earth, don’t we folks?

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Chip Doctor says:

    Thanks Sundance, I just bought 40 cases of laundry detergent and 250 bottles of dish soap. 😏

    Liked by 5 people

    • swissik says:

      You do realize I hope, that soaps, detergents, shampoos, dishwashing detergents and such lose their effectiveness after a few months, don’t you?

      Liked by 1 person

    • trialbytruth says:

      My pantry looks like a hoarder when it comes to soap. I wait for the 20% sales at my local Big Lots and then pick up a years supply. My paycheck to paycheck kids sure appreciate it when they come to visit and bring their laundry.

      I also stocked up on anti bacterial soaps a couple years ago when they were removing the premier ingredient I cant remember what it was but I figured if the Obama EPA didn’t want me to have it it must be good for me.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Chip Doctor says:

        You do realize I hope, that soaps, detergents, shampoos, dishwashing detergents and such lose their effectiveness after a few months, don’t you?

        🤣🤣😂😂

        Liked by 6 people

      • Deplorable_Infidel says:

        “I also stocked up on anti bacterial soaps a couple years ago when they were removing the premier ingredient”

        I also did that with automatic dishwasher detergent several years ago when the last vestiges of TSP were slated to be removed.

        Trisodium Phosphate used to be an ingredient in almost all laundry and dishwashing detergents. It was responsible for the devastating algae blooms in the nation’s waterways in the late 1960’s.

        It was allowed to remain only for automatic dishwashers because there was no effective substitute.

        I never have owned one and none of my close friends at the time, or relatives, had dishwashers, either.

        When they were phasing out the old air conditioning refrigerants somewhere around 1990, I had three or four small children and didn’t have the money to stock up on some and stash it away.

        Like

      • technoaesthete says:

        If you mean Triclosan, that is bad news (a carcinogen). Regular soap and warm to hot water works just fine.

        Like

        • trialbytruth says:

          The.wrap on the chemical at the time was sent to was going to cause super bacteria to take over …..it get s base c quackery resistent microbes have always excisted they do not mutate a n response to a toxin it is just some.survive whos offspring May or.may not be inherit that particular trait. Based on this logic we should never use antibiotics because some organisms.mght live and reproduce

          Like

  10. andy says:

    Yesterday, for whatever reason, mcdonalrds was out of hamburger patties.
    fried meats available.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. BuckNutGuy says:

    Had cocktails last night with a neighbor who works for a major packaged food manufacturer. Can affirm on the ground that there is plenty of supply but its packaging that’s causing the problems. They can’t just flip a switch and turn one line from wholesale to retail packaging. They are actually now also worried that they don’t have enough packaging (styrofoam, shrink wrap, etc) for the retail product lines. She said producers are dumping milk and eggs. Dairies are slaughtering live stock because cannot afford to keep milking the cows.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Bob Lynch says:

    Sundance, your range of knowledge is astonishing. You are a national treasure. President Trump should make you a special counsel to advise him on the strategy to deal with all the complex problems facing the country. I read your website daily.

    Liked by 19 people

    • paulashley says:

      Sadly, it appears that Trump is listening to, and reading, beltway bureaucrats only. I hope I’m wrong but I’ve not seen a hint it’s not so. He must get out of the bubble, and pronto.

      Liked by 2 people

      • noswamp says:

        “Sadly, it appears that Trump is listening to, and reading, beltway bureaucrats only.”

        Paulashley,
        In the beginning perhaps, but his eyes were opened after DS pulled the Sessions stunt and after Rosenstein opened up Mueller. Along with a litany of occurrences.

        KellyAnne Conway reads this blog, as does Tucker and Laura and M. Levin. Many, many more silent ones also read, and are silent, but close to POTUS. IMO.

        As you can see with recent events, Trump is now moving quickly, because he now can. His hands are untied finally. I can say more but I won’t.

        Summer approaches. We are hopeful.

        Like

  13. Dances with Wolverines says:

    They need to make this social distancing rule about a foot longer than a taser’s reach, damn!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Zorro says:

      I thought this might be of interest…

      The water veggie thing is fantastic! You can basically regrow store-bought produce. You place cuttings from veggies in an inch of water for a couple of weeks, change the water every day, and lo and behold, they grow roots. Then you can continue to grow your little plant in water, or you transfer it to a pot with soil. I can’t wait to try this with Romaine lettuce! This will be super helpful, if the pandemic continues to cause food shortages. Here are some of the YouTube videos I found so far:

      Go Green
      Daisy Creek Farms with Jag Singh
      How to Regrow Everything

      Liked by 4 people

      • rashomon says:

        Yep. I have a bunch of stuff under grow-lights on 15-housr cycles. You can clip off the excess of herbs to flavor salad oils and marinades. The lettuces seem to keep up with daily consumption.

        Otherwise, living in a major metro, the distribution channel seemed to have taken a few ? to work out, but all is operating quite well now.

        Reports from my local med practitioners is: the media is scaring the wits out of people. This IS flu/allergy season. Stay home. “Germ”-infested hospitals are the last place to go.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sassy says:

        Works with celery!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Vince says:

        I just planed a small garden which includes garlic I didn’t get around to eating before it sprouted, a few left over potatoes, and dandelions.

        Like

  14. 4EDouglas says:

    My Wal Mart has TP and paper towel and the lane/People restrictions.Found disposable glove at the paint dept. using a black Bandana for the face- got to get my black Cowboy outfit washed..
    Hat, boots shirt and pants.-fits my mood..

    Liked by 11 people

    • James says:

      The antifa uniform,”using a black Bandana for the face”

      Liked by 2 people

    • Went to Home Depot yesterday, two black guys were in the cleaning aisle opening up EVERY package of gloves, putting them on, then stuffing them back in the packages.

      They were arrested. 😉

      Liked by 6 people

      • TreeClimber says:

        What kind of a person do you have to be, to even think of that, much less do it?

        Liked by 2 people

        • James Carpenter aka "Felix" says:

          “What kind of a person do you have to be, to even think of that, much less do it?”

          The kind that was “raised by a village”?

          Liked by 7 people

          • TreeClimber says:

            Funny thing, that sign was in the office of the ghetto apartment complex where I spent my adolescence. But the kids were tossed out before dawn and not let back inside until well after dark – there was no raising going on. Lots of violence and gangs and fights, though. Even by the age of two, they were soundly indoctrinated.

            Like

    • Dixie says:

      Mine too 4EDouglas. Been wearing solid black for two years. Even more reason to wear it now. Fits my mood and I’m dressed for my funeral….two birds, one stone.

      Liked by 4 people

    • ann says:

      Hahaha. 👍🏼🇺🇸

      “Who is that masked man?”🏇🏾

      Liked by 2 people

      • 4EDouglas says:

        Well. I met Jay Silverheels back in the late 60’s early 70’s he was a patron of the local “Indian Festival of Arts.”My Pop was supporter of that too. Jay and few other notables would shop at Pop’s western outfitters.
        Whole thing fell apart when the Chamber of Commerce got their hooks into it..the local University and Tribes have something call “Festival of arts .” that is a substitute but it doesn’t have the National presence that the Original did..
        Now wwhere did I put that silver bullet.?

        Liked by 1 person

        • ann says:

          I had a crush on Zorro. Named my first pony Silver”, kemosabe Is a good term. Sounds solid like blood sisters, folk who can ride the river with you. 🦅🦉🦌🌲🌵

          Liked by 1 person

  15. Zydeco says:

    The Democommunists and their propagandists are pouring on the panic and creating unnecessary shortages until YOU submit to the solution to all of our problems, a totalitarian Democommunist state.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. trapper says:

    Thank you for these calm, reasoned analyses. Our network news hosts would do us all a service if they would just read your posts out loud on the air each evening.

    “That was the Sundance Report, and that’s the way it is.”

    Liked by 9 people

  17. FL_GUY says:

    The stupid is strong with Walmart. The virus has been here since Nov. Millions of people have been exposed to it already, who knows how many people have had the bad case of flu and gotten over it. It is like a Twilight Zone episode where nothing is as it seems.

    I for one, will not patronize Walmart with their PC police policy. Their competitors will get my business until the stupidity stops.

    Liked by 13 people

    • dwpender says:

      I’d urge some caution in criticizing Walmart. Management is in a VERY tough spot.

      The “great and good” experts running our country are out there creating a panic/hysteria making everybody want to avoid just about everybody else. They’re starting to sufficiently scare grocery and other food supply production, packaging, distribution, transportation and delivery personnel into calling in sick, refusing to work unless all sorts of new safety protocols are instituted, etc. I can’t really blame them. The workers are saying, “Why, with so many sitting home now getting government checks to do nothing, should I risk my health and my loved ones?”

      Top it off with the clueless Birx telling everybody today “Now is not the time to go to the grocery store.” SMH. The workers are saying, “Why shouldn’t I follow her advice?” The clueless Birx no doubt thinks we should all stay in our at home compounds, and have everything we need delivered. EXCEPT, she has no clue that she’s scaring/incenting all those involved in every stage of producing, preparing, transporting and delivering to stay home as well.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Dixie says:

        She and Pelosi must be sisters.

        Like

      • Peoria Jones says:

        Excellent post, DWP. I’m no fan of WallyWorld, but one must consider how they’re a huge target for lawsuits as well. At least they’re applying some guidelines in accordance with what PDJT and his team are suggesting.

        Like

      • cjzak says:

        Try getting groceries delivered these days. Almost impossible from the grocery stores around here. I have tried for 3 days to get a time slot to go pick up my groceries at the store curbside or have my order delivered. Not one time slot available. Said to keep checking in case a time slot opened up. Not likely but I guess if you sit at your computer all day you might get lucky. Now with stories like this running around the internet all hope is gone imo of ever getting my order delivered or otherwise. People will be running around with their hair on fire like they did in the great TP chase. I am pretty well stocked but wanted some perishables to replenish my day to day items. So I just might have to venture into one of the grocery stores which will be even more of a nightmare than they were last week. Wait times will be out of sight.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Rudolph says:

      Me, too. However, I fear Publix will do the same thing.

      Like

  18. Miller says:

    All the stupid liberals that wanted something-anything to hurt Trump has got their wish. Now they can suffer right along beside the rest of us.

    Liked by 6 people

    • The stupid and PHAKE “liberals” suffer daily and for their entire lives.

      Because they are miserable the rest of us often are subjected to suffering along with them.

      This is a problem that must be dealt with and we can start by making sure that WE change “the narrative”. The narrative perpetuates the utter bullsh!t.

      Liked by 3 people

    • steph_gray says:

      I don’t see suffering amongst the nanny-state types here in blue MA. They are thoroughly enjoying wearing their masks and gloves and glaring at any around them who do not COMPLY.

      There was a new round of panic buying this weekend – on Monday one store was beautifully stocked and I got my weeks’ worth easily, but this afternoon I had to go to 3 stores to get everything (luckily I have 3 in easy distance in my north of Boston suburb).

      Now that I have a chance to listen to Birx’s Two Minute Terror from yesterday’s briefing, I can see why this happened. I can’t believe she told people to go without groceries. She is a public menace.

      Couple of things I noticed – more masks but the majority were on women.

      As I was driving home through my little culdesac I saw a woman out on a walk in the fresh air, yards and yards away from any possible person (no one elase was out) – wearing a mask!

      That’s paranoia and hysteria bordering on the psychotic. Or TDS. But I repeat myself.

      Liked by 2 people

  19. mazziflol says:

    Its almost as if they keep trying to make things worse for us…

    Liked by 11 people

  20. paulashley says:

    We are all sheep and lemmings now it seems. For many, this distancing will continue for a long time after this is “over”. Half the country will be in perpetual crisis mode, alienating their fellow citizens. Ironically, a majority of those will likely be the same ones who want to welcome in third world illegals.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Landslide says:

    Local restaurants are selling ready-made via HEB grocery store. 5 stores carrying these so far. Great idea!👍🏻👍🏻👏🏼👏🏼

    https://www.mysanantonio.com/food/restaurants/article/H-E-B-selling-full-meals-from-San-Antonio-15172275.php

    Liked by 2 people

  22. TJ says:

    Walmart, Costco and Target stores are slowing down for the first time in weeks: “Once you have all the things you need, there is little need for more visits.”

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Richie says:

    More evidence the Chinese instigated biological warfare with us.

    Liked by 1 person

    • At the behest of their globalist masters. I don’t think Xi is involved with this crap though.

      DEEP STATE actors are worldwide folks, and frankly, their base of ops is HERE.

      Liked by 1 person

    • paulashley says:

      Sadly though, this may mean that the word is out about the cowardice and gullibility of half the population, including our politicians. The virus won’t kill us but fear jyst might, and ourvenemues count on that as well, and perhaps more.

      Liked by 1 person

    • James Carpenter aka "Felix" says:

      Not to quibble, but if we were going to arrest the usual suspects, operatives of the Globalists could also warrant scrutiny.
      Obviously the doom-and-death narrative is being ridden like a rented mule by some parties.
      If a crisis isn’t there to keep from going to waste, the creation of one, like success, could have more than one father.

      Like

  24. Chip Doctor says:

    I feel like I am in the twilight zone. Nothing we are being told is close to what we see in our actual lives. We are being lied to about everything. The number of actual CV deaths, the shortage of medical supplies, ventilators, effectiveness of HCQ…….everything. Haven’t we already sent 20 million masks to NYC? How many do they really need?

    I know the American people must be seeing this and scratching their heads. There is going to be an explosion of anger at some point. IMO, most Americans will give this until the 15th, after which point, if this keeps going on, there will be trouble.

    I saw a young couple in their late 20’s out for a jog…..wearing face masks and gloves. I went to Sams and the line was a hundred yards long. This is just nuts.

    Liked by 8 people

    • Kitty-Kat says:

      I have been ordering my groceries online for six years. Now I haven’t been able to schedule a grocery delivery for over a month, and all delivery dates for several weeks into the forseeable future are fully booked. There may be no breakdown between supplier and retailer, but there most certainly is a breakdown between retailer and customer.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Kitty-Kat says:

      “I feel like I am in the twilight zone. Nothing we are being told is close to what we see in our actual lives.”

      Exactly. The big wheel grocery retailers with their messages of how much they are doing to help, plus the political leaders who don’t have to worry about food supply, etc. do not have a clue.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Same thoughts and situations as I am seeing and having.

      Liked by 2 people

    • dougofthenorth says:

      you are surprised> When is the last time you believed anything the “news” media had to say? Surely you do not think they are going to start telling the truth all of a sudden because it is our national interests!!

      Liked by 3 people

  25. KItty-Kat says:

    On Amazon Canada, a can of Spam costs ten dollars. Three cans are selling as a 3 pack, for $29.99

    Liked by 2 people

    • John Good says:

      Back in Aug/19, I priced a California made tiny SS Infrared BBQ that heated up to 1100 degrees F on Amazon.com & it was about $200 USD & the same BBQ on Amazon.ca was between $600 to $700 CND!

      Like

  26. vikingmom says:

    This is just another test… How compliant will we be? How much will we allow them to control our behavior? The number of people I know who are willingly acquiescing to ever-increasing restrictions is staggering to me!

    And the number of friends I have who are sanctimonious Lee posting on Facebook about what good little citizens they are and how anyone who challenges the status quo just doesn’t understand how serious this is!

    I keep thinking back to the scene in 1984 when a little boy turns his parents in for subversive actions and the dad can’t stop going on about how proud he is of his son…

    Liked by 11 people

    • James Carpenter aka "Felix" says:

      Sanctimony to save “even one life” is as rampant as the number of TDS sufferers.
      It is no accident that Biden/Hillary/Obama supporters are at the front of battle lines to “flatten the curve”. Rather shortsighted of them. They’ll flatten the economy in effort to flatten Trump while their own homes and lives will suffer some flattening as well.
      Pyrrhic victory, with liberty and social justice for all?

      Liked by 3 people

      • steph_gray says:

        I love whoever said on here yesterday that there is a new church to go with the High Church of Climate Change: the High Church of Flattenology.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Wergood2go says:

      Who is John Galt?

      Liked by 1 person

  27. tlhoward says:

    I have still not been able to buy toilet paper in my stores. I even get up early, stand in line for store openings at 6, but the store managers have no particular hours of stocking.

    I ordered some tp on line, Amazon two weeks ago, and the description said it would be delivered some time between Apr 14 and 20th, but when I dug deeper, I discovered the tracking was through some outfit I’d never heard of. I looked it up and discovered my shipment is “snail shipping” and that my tp is coming from ……CHINA.

    I want to cancel the order but customer service of Amazon is impossible to get through to.

    I don’t trust anything from China.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Carly says:

      When you search Amazon, add “made in America” or “made in USA” to your search string. That helps filter a bit.

      Liked by 2 people

    • James Carpenter aka "Felix" says:

      If your TP comes from China, take heart. Most everything they produce has a close connection to scheiße.

      Like

    • old45model says:

      TLH – and when you do eventually receive it, it may well be a disappointing one-ply. (The voice of experience – although purchased here in Oz from a suburban supermarket as the big chains were out at the time).

      Like

    • steph_gray says:

      I also don’t trust anything from China/

      That said, Amazon does have a good interface for canceling orders online without having to make a phone call.Just look through the menus, it’s easy to find.

      Before the Virusapocalypse they even took returns at Kohls, without any need for shipping or even wrapping, and Kohls gave you a credit in addition.

      Like

      • jello333 says:

        Dawn of the Dead, despite how scary it would be in real life, I always thought how cool it would be to be stuck in a big shopping mall. I mean if you HAD to try to survive the apocalypse, with just a few family members, what better place? So now I’m thinking… our local good-sized modern mall is basically shut down, even to “mall walkers” now. The place is just sitting there going to waste. So yeah… you think they’d mind… ?? 🙂

        Like

  28. James Street says:

    I went to a Seattle suburb Walmart yesterday to buy some extra cat food (thanks Sundance) and the line from their customer restrictions was so long I went back this morning right when they opened at 7:00am.

    All entrances except one were closed. I got there right when they opened and there were 100 people in line, not practicing social distancing. It took 10 minutes for all of us to get in when it opened because they let in a few at a time to prevent people from bunching up.

    The customers at this store are mostly immigrants and minorities, and the surprising thing is almost all were wearing those official surgical face masks. Where did they get them?

    Liked by 2 people

  29. scrap1ron says:

    So, if aisles are one way and I forget something and I pass it, I’ll have to take another lap around the store to get back to it? Yeah, right.

    Liked by 1 person

    • allhail2 says:

      Not gonna happen

      Like

    • steph_gray says:

      Yep. But being retired, I look upon that as a chance to get more time on my pedometer. Anything for a little more more movement and exercise…

      Not having my health club open is not just a luxury for me – it’s critical to prevent worsening of my arthritis in general and specifically a neck condition called occipital neuralgia. Certain weight machines prevent my bad shoulder from triggering nerve impingement and headaches.

      Nowhere near as the loss of a job of course, or of a person, but one does hate to lose ground medically…

      Liked by 1 person

  30. Mike says:

    I provide equipment for food processing and concur with SD observations. Washing hands in food processing is almost a religion and required by maintenance personnel as well.

    What C-19 demonstrates that government and industry will use a minor crisis to control the behavior of the nation. In effect constricting individual liberty and ending lawful self protectIon. The mask of governance is dropped and shown its true self.

    Now one can connect King George with our deep state and understand what our founding fathers had to endure.

    Liked by 2 people

  31. Mike in a Truck says:

    April 30: People fighting in lines as they que up. May 15: people frazzled by lack of funds,loss of government provideded babysitters ( teachers), and tired of Socialism light, will openly defy house arrest. May 30: At witts end and the beginning of the Summer season the serfs will now be demanding a “living wage”. June 1: Unorganized militia openly engage police and National Guard ( aka Nasty Girls) in skimishes. July 1: Democrat “Leadership” call for U.N. Peacekeeping troops. August 1: Former service members create Organized Militia and engage U.N. and Government Nationalized Police. Mr. President open this country up!

    Liked by 3 people

    • buzzybee says:

      Whew! Mike, I hope we never see this nightmare. But I understand the thought.

      Like

    • steph_gray says:

      The wonderful President you call “Mr.” stated several times today, unequivocally, that we have to open the country back up.

      He also highlighted the HCQ solution with even greater conviction.

      He knows and sees the whole. I am sitting tight.

      Like

  32. The Listener says:

    I’ve seen a few stories in the news where employees are suing employers who are not enforcing social distancing guidelines and they feel they are being put at risk on the job. I wonder if Walmart is thinking about mitigating potential lawsuits should their employees get Coronavirus from customers or other employees and blame the lack of enforcement of social distancing guidelines?

    Liked by 2 people

  33. Vince says:

    Seems to me that the better strategy would be to continue hoarding. If you buy three to four weeks worth of food at a time, you don’t have to go to the store more than once every month, which would cut down on the number of people in the store at any time.

    Also, with long artificial lines formed at the grocery stores, all this will do is send people back to the drive through restaurants, which will benefit them

    Like

    • WSB says:

      I have been doing that since March 1st, and already had a pretty well stocked home. It just makes sense to buy at least two of everything, just to stay out of the stores more.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Guyski says:

      When things get back to ‘normal’ people should actually look at the flyers that get thrown on their lawns. The grocery stores always have a can week, a box pasta sale couple times a year, TP and paper towel special twice a year. With these flyers you actually save money while stocking up. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • Rudolph says:

        I don’t get the paper delivered anymore. I don’t think most people shop by flyers anymore. I get the ad through my Publix app. Publix also keeps plenty of paper flyers at their front door entrance.

        Like

    • mimbler says:

      I wouldn’t call that hoarding. Just reducing the number of your shopping trips.

      Liked by 2 people

    • steph_gray says:

      I must confess. I cannot stand the guilt any more.

      Right now I am the owner of 6 packages of sugarfree tapioca pudding. Went to 3 stores today to find it.

      😆😆😆😆

      Liked by 2 people

  34. john says:

    WARNING: SCATOLOGICAL COMMENT COMING….
    May I say something kind of gross and that maybe a lot of you are already aware of? I had never taken a fiber supplement under about a year ago. I also stopped using it because it just seemed like a waste of money. But I’m going to start again. I was amazed, shocked even, at the difference it made in the amount and number of times one has to use TP when you are fibered-up! Literally can make the difference between a roll lasting a few days or lasting a week. I never knew. Never had an A/B comparison before. Now it’s suddenly worth the added expense to my grocery budget when TP is getting hard to find or nonexistent. And I’m not BS’ing you. : )

    Like

    • John Good says:

      Although I never have tried fibre supplements, I have noticed that I trend to use a lot of TP myself, unless I have the occasional bout of “where I could sh*t thru the eye of a needle at 50 paces”!

      I noticed back in my Commercial Driving days, that the Middle-Eastern drivers at Truck Stop restrooms would always grab some water & paper towels before entering the stalls.

      Now I do the same thing & I feel much more sanitary afterwards.

      Liked by 1 person

  35. dustahll says:

    You can use 30-50 year old soap and it is fine, I have quite a bit of soap that old, same with detergents, Some of the soap is better than present day, phosphate content and so forth

    Like

    • annieoakley says:

      You can save slivers of soap and add a little water to them when you heat them in a pan. Melt them down and make a bar or a ball to use it all.

      Liked by 2 people

      • TarsTarkas says:

        We are current using an old hoard of soap slivers saved from decades ago found in a closet. It should last us some time. My wife also does the soap sliver rendering thing.

        Like

  36. littleflower481 says:

    I was in our Walmart yesterday and it was a real disaster in the making. Yes, they only had one door open with an in and out aisle. I had no wait, really not that busy for a Saturday probably because since everyone is out of work they either have no money or can shop any day they want. They aisles were limited to 5 people at a time; once again no problem. The real problem is they have the other doors closed (two other entrances and exits) and there is no one standing by the door who knows how to open it. A woman convinced a clerk that she had to go out it and clerk went over to open it and she could not do it! There was no one else around. ARE YOU KIDDING ME!!! A real fire danger and threat to life if suddenly people need to get out fast.

    Across from the Walmart is a Lowe’s. I only went to the Garden Center. They had two doors open; one for in and one for out. They had someone at the in door. Similar type of thing, keep people separated but really not that many people there (average frost free date is April 15). On the way out I talked to a cashier and he said if they get even one complaint that social distancing is not being maintained they will close down the garden center. I told him about Walmart and closed doors and he said they only have one open door for the rest of the store but they have a manager standing by the closed doors.

    Really Walmart better smarten up….I don’t know if I will go back in there if they don’t have someone by those doors who knows how to open them.

    Liked by 2 people

    • coastermomohio says:

      Reminds me of a concert years ago, thinking it was The Who, where people were trampled by a crowd trying to get in the only open entrance.

      Like

    • jahealy says:

      The more desperate people become, because they’re out of money, out of toilet paper, or out of their minds from being isolated, the more dicey it will get out there. Plus, add in the prisoners being released. I don’t want to be in a one-door, one-way-aisles Walmart when the first dude or dudette goes postal.

      In all seriousness, folks, keep your head on a swivel. I’m not sure what the level of danger will be in the suburbs as this nonsense goes on and on, but I know in the bigger cities, business owners have boarded up their closed stores and in some places, the crime spree is beginning.

      Like

  37. weirdflunky says:

    Forget Wallyworld

    My question is when are the churches going to revolt and start back having services?

    Liked by 1 person

  38. buzzybee says:

    This is a bit off topic, but related. I looked at our state health website to track Covid-19 reported numbers and decided to look up flu numbers and make comparisons. Also looked at numbers of STDs. I was amazed. In our state, there is 3 times as many flu cases reported as Covid-19. But the numbers of STDs were waaay more.

    If EVERYONE stays 6 feet apart, that should lower the incidence of STDs, right? That should make health bureaucrats happy. Save a life, start living with good morals. No promiscuity, etc.

    And BTW, since the flu is also a known killer, and is also contagious, why weren’t mitigation efforts with groceries and supplies began with that? Is Covid-19 that much worse i.e. more contagious and more deadly? Maybe it is, but since the truth is hard to come by, I wonder.

    STDs of course is a no brainer. My point has to do with liberal thinking. They don’t seem bothered by promiscuity, but are bothered by grocery shopping within six feet of each other. In other words, liberals seem bothered by some diseases, but not others. Meanwhile, here we are.

    Like

    • buzzybee says:

      One more comment. Treepers, remember the Harvard professor who was arrested late last January for lying to the feds about what he was up to? Remember that he was setting up a lab in China? Guess where? Yep!

      Also, remember his student colleagues turned out to be Chinese spies who were also arrested? This can be found as a press release on the Fed. Justice Dept. website.

      One of the spies was arrested last November with vials of chemicals in suitcase. Now we have the virus here after that lab leak in Wuhan. Just pondering all of this…..

      Liked by 2 people

      • James Carpenter aka "Felix" says:

        People who collect, recall and connect the dots do not endear themselves to their betters. You are supposed to feed at the trough of public narrative, “all the news fit to print” and develop amnesia immediately after.

        Liked by 1 person

  39. Brant says:

    I wonder how they are going to try and really put boot on throat of us in the country who frankly couldn’t care less that the city folks are cooped up in their 500sf apartment for who knows how long? They expected us to get the first taste of totalitarianism, but it’s them. We have acreage, ponds, yards to hang out in, weeds/gardens to tend and we avoid people anyway. Heck, pre/post shelter in place for me and my family is little different. Those city folk will soon get pretty antsy and squirmy. How will they covertly/overtly insist we in the country who have cows as neighbors start to feel this but good?

    Liked by 4 people

    • buzzybee says:

      Good question, Brant. We are also rural. A few months ago we started seeing shortages early because city people came out to our small town rural stores to shop. I’m starting to feel a bit antsy myself, but not for the same reasons.

      Like

  40. MfM says:

    What is crazy about this is that before this happened, I would go at the slowest time in grocery stores. Often only one register was open.

    I’d shop the sales, stock up and be home barely seeing anyone. Now there is no slow time.

    Like

    • Kitty-Kat says:

      Bottom line: people are more scared of starvation than the virus, and imo, and rightly so if the virus threat continues to turn the nation upside-down.

      Liked by 2 people

  41. Harvey Lipschitz says:

    I saw an error last week. Meat plants run 3 shifts. The graveyard shift doesn’t produce meat. They take apart equipment and wash everything. Everything. That can’t be done with workers on the floor and meat out.

    Like

  42. fangdog says:

    You know the Left-Wing are inspired by the “lock-down” and the US economy taking a tank. Where are the Left-Wing protesters and rioters?

    Trump has two Libtard scientist leading the Task Force and tanking Trump’s US economy, So it is a dream come true for all the anti-American, anti-Trump Communist Democrat A-holes.

    Like

    • Brant says:

      Yes, I would think the antifa folks would be getting frisky. But maybe they just went back to their folks’ basement and are playing dungeons and dragons.

      Like

  43. chemman says:

    Read your article on supply chains on Friday. Did biweekly shopping yesterday at the local (ha, ha 45 miles away) Safeway. Found the store to be stocked just the way you predicted. Nice Job.

    Like

  44. DM says:

    My husband works at a processed cheese factory. Weeks ago his company was sounding an internal alarm that PPE was in short supply, and though they were scrambling, much of what was usually in the supply chain had already been snapped up for medical use. I am not sure where the execs stand on this now, but early on, there was talk of shutting down any plant that had a single employee contract COVID19. I am sure his industry is not the only one hit by this shortage. But there is something else going on. His company’s biggest market is for restaurants, and demand has fallen off a cliff. And while the retail market has seen an increase, it is not near the level of the decrease. Plants are now laying off and cutting shifts. Will they ever re-open? What about the farmers who sell to the dairy product industry?

    Liked by 1 person

    • dwpender says:

      More “unintended consequences” when narrow “experts” who have NO IDEA about the broader consequences of their actions are running our country.

      Like

  45. jeans2nd says:

    Joshua Phillip, award-winning Senior investigative reporter for the Epoch Times and long-time reporting on all things China and CCP human rights abuses, is reporting China is the country seeing a real food crisis.

    “Panic in China Over Alleged Food Crisis; Social Unrest Grows Over Regime’s Virus Response CCP Virus”
    “Chinese citizens are panic buying food after two alleged government documents were leaked online warning communist party members to keep months worth of food on the stockpile.”

    “Social unrest is growing in China as residents face financial troubles, unmet government promises, and continued shutdowns.”

    Major food producers such as the U.S. are making certain their citizens are fed, and have not a worry about feeding China.

    We’d best make absolutely certain that our Gubmint goes no further than what they’ve already taken from us, and work feverishly to roll back the rights they’ve already stolen from us.
    Unless we want to end up like China, that is. 18:46

    Like

  46. Patchman2076 says:

    We are coming up on summer months, this needs to stop soon.

    Like

  47. Sharon says:

    I have done a portion of my shopping at Walmart for the sake of convenience and some savings, but I won’t be going there again until both doors are unlocked. There are a dozen kind of emergencies that could block the single exit. I don’t care to put myself in that kind of situation.

    So today I took my little list to Safeway on the far side of town. There have been a couple of online rumbles that maybe Safeway was going to shut down to one door as well. If they were going to do that, I was hoping to get ahead of the event to pick up some fresh produce. Costs a little more but (at least today) I’m still treated like a paying customer there, not like someone who’s being detained for questioning.

    The Safeway parking lot was VERY quiet. Inside the store was even quieter.

    Liked by 1 person

  48. Thank you. Interesting information – horrid times.

    Like

  49. CM-TX says:

    This is all I keep picturing… [pats head] “be a good little ant!”

    Please WAKE UP 🇺🇸!!

    Liked by 1 person

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