Republican Senator Ron Johnson Tells President Trump “it makes no sense to try and bring back high labor manufacturing jobs”…

Yesterday President Trump invited the media to keep their cameras on during a round-table discussion on trade.  He did this for a reason.  President Trump wanted the American voters to watch Republican politicians demand that he stop trying to bring manufacturing jobs to the United States.

In essence, Trump doing what Trump does best, played the role of Toto and pulled back the curtain on the Republican anti-American corporate business agenda.  The republicans in attendance never paused to reflect upon the sunlight or the reason for their specific invitations. They are comfortable back-room deals and POTUS Toto relaxed them perfectly.

One by one the Republicans took-the-bait and fully exposed themselves.  Lamar Alexander, Mike Lee, Pat Toomey and Roy Blout all took turns telling POTUS to quit trying to save American high-wage jobs, drop the national economic view and just accept multinational corporate globalism.

The subsequent full-throated establishment display stands as one of the greatest plays of the Trump administration to date. However, it was Republican Senator Ron Johnson from Wisconsin who really went the full distance:

[Transcript] […] In Wisconsin, a big manufacturing state, in seven years I have not visited one manufacturer that could hire enough people. That was certainly my experience in the last 20, 25 years. For a host of reasons, we tell our kids you have to get a four-year degree. We pay people not to work. So we do need to be concerned about, in such a tight labor market, do we have enough workers in manufacturing.

So my final point is, it makes no sense for me to try and bring back high labor-content manufacturing to America. We need to do the value added things. And so I would just say, proceed with real caution there.  (more)

Most people are becoming increasingly aware of the Republican agenda to keep the interests of multinational corporations at the top of their priority list; however, it is still rather remarkable to listen to an entire room of them admit, openly, their agenda is to work against the U.S. middle-class, support mass immigration, and keep the U.S. economy on the “service-driven” path.

Within trade policy is where President Trump breaks away from the modern Republican views. This is the heart of MAGA.  Trade and immigration is where President Trump fractures the party apparatus of both Republicans and Democrats.

Lastly, don’t expect the “corporate conservative media”, Fox News, Ingraham, Hannity, Rush Limbaugh, Mark Levin, Salem Media etc, to showcase these revelations; it is against their financial interests to do so.

Senator Johnson’s eye-opening remarks begin around 32:00 of the video below [prompted, just hit play]:  {transcript here}

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This entry was posted in Big Government, Big Stupid Government, Decepticons, Dem Hypocrisy, Economy, Election 2018, media bias, President Trump, Professional Idiots, propaganda, Trade Deal, Uncategorized, US dept of agriculture, US Treasury, USA. Bookmark the permalink.

904 Responses to Republican Senator Ron Johnson Tells President Trump “it makes no sense to try and bring back high labor manufacturing jobs”…

  1. Jeff says:

    Good eye Sundance ! Johnson caught touting the multinational corporate line ” Jobs American’s won’t do ”

    President Trump and his cabinet are gaining ground on the DEEP STATE SHADOW GOVERNMENT every day . The more jobs and people he can get back to work the less influence the politics of VICTIM plays at the polls .

    OPTICS is everything . President Trump pointing out that a labor pool of 100 million is held captive inside SHADOW GOVERNMENT Cloward & Piven “entitlement ” invisible fence .

    NO worker would leave the safety net . Unless of course working a job pays more than voting for entitlements . Mr Trump being very careful not to make those 100 million FEAR the loss of their safety net but to capture their attention . As he says many of those 100 million would like to work . Implying that not all of them are deadbeats . IN fact many are not even American citizens !

    SINCE THE REVOLUTION raging behind the scenes is not televised there is another element not discussed in this round table discussion .

    In the Qanon coded communications we are told the Oval Office prays for divine providence to complete JFK’s mission . That mission being to take out the SHADOW GOVERNMENT secret societies and the “. Monolithic and ruthless conspiratcy “. The CIA and THE FED !!

    Restoring sound Constitutional money !!!! And eventually the repeal of the 16th and 17th amendments .

    This round table discussion is Trump and LIghthizer pointing out who is attempting to put the monkey wrench in the gears of AMERICA FIRST and its engine of CAPITALISM firing up and on all 8 cylinders .

    Trump has make us well aware of the need for infrastructure improvements . With AMERICAN STEEL , AMERICAN ENERGY , AMERICAN WORKERS ,and AMERICAN industry to meet that need . President Trump wants the money taxpayers invest in that infrastructure to wherever possible go to pay AMERICANS and AMERICAN COMPANIES .

    While the uniparty calls Trump a protectionist it seem what we witness here is the UNIPARTY playing protectionists themselves for the multinational corporations that own THEM !!

    Trump’s a master troll !!! He sells rope to his enemies and the enemies of AMERICA FIRST . They climb up on a chair and tie their own noose . He simple allows them to JUMP !!

    Liked by 19 people

    • KittyKat says:

      “Sound money” did not prevent the Great Depression.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Jeff says:

        The Federal Reserve act was 1913 . The Great Depession 1929 to 1941 . Another depression was 1920 to 1923 but History hides that one because Harding and Coolidge were doing then what Trump is doing now .

        Sound money is STATE MONEY as was the case in America before the FED ACT handing control of our money to a private group of banksters .

        SOUND MONEY was proir to 1913 .

        Liked by 4 people

        • KittyKat says:

          I thought “sound money” meant currency backed by gold.

          Like

          • Jeff says:

            Watch the video Please for the answer . Sound money is STATE money . Not individual states but TREASURY MONEY . The only STATE money today are coins printed at the mints .

            Like

          • asdf says:

            BERNANKE: FEDERAL RESERVE CAUSED GREAT DEPRESSION
            Fed chief says, ‘We did it. … very sorry, won’t do it again’

            http://www.wnd.com/2008/03/59405/

            Liked by 2 people

          • Jeff says:

            What has TRUELY backed the not federal and no reserve note for a long time is the US MILITARY !!

            One has to understand first the dynamic of what is the DEEP STATE and SHADOW GOVERNMENT .

            America as founded is what POTUS is attempting to restore . What America became is USA CORPORATION owned by the SHADOW GOVERNMENT .

            Vietnam wasn’t about defeating communists . It was because DEEP STATE , Standard Oil , wanted Ho Chi Minh to let them drill for oil in the gulf of Tonkin .

            IN fact if you look at Bill Ayres WEATHER UNDERGROUND MANIFESTO you will see the plan to bring down America will undeclared war . ” two , three , many Vietnams” to ultimate bankrupt America .

            THE FED owners profit from ALL WARS . they fund both sides !!

            Q . What is the #1 thing that backs up the FED green back ?

            A. The US MILITARY !!

            Ghadaffi tried to sell oil for EUROS and GOLD and BUSH slid a cruise missile down his chimney . Killed his wife and kid . HE immediately stopped sellling oil for anything other than the FEDS fiat currency .

            He gave up his nukes too !!

            Then along comes Saddam Hussein tried the same thing. Another NWO puppet BUSH cries WMD !! BOOM there goes another guy attempting too sell oil for EUROS and Gold .

            And NOW who is commander in Chief ? What will back our return to sound money ?

            A. CAPITAL in the form of all the unconstitutionally stolen land , rare earth minerals protected by the junk yard dog EPA for the future NWO , domestic energy , and THE UNITED STATES MILITARY !!

            A military now restored to the command of a man of the people , president Donald J Trump .

            Liked by 3 people

            • Alligator Gar says:

              Reminds me of a sarcastic song I liked in college: “There’s a man of the people sayin’ keep hope alive. We’ve got gas to bun. We’ve got roads to drive.”

              Absolutely agree with all that you have said. I remember in US history prior to the revolution, the Brits found out that the colonists were doing quite well for themselves by having a controlled state issued currency where the supply expanded with the economy and contracted if needed, funded public works as needed, etc. To crush the happy independent colonists, the Brits started a tax scheme and then a war.

              If we think stopping this Leviathan will be any easier this time around, we are deluded.

              Like

              • PS says:

                It wasn’t just imposing a tax scheme on the colonists to pay for the wars against the French, they regulated the American Tea sellers to have to move their product through “preferred vendors” associated with the East India Tea company. And, they gave tax credits to British based tea sellers when it was time to sell Tea back to the colonists, which under-cut the prices of domestic (colonist) farmers. It was what we would now call crony capitalism backed by an over-regulating government.

                Like

    • BobInFL says:

      Really is eye-opening to see this display of COC talking points. Do the Rinos still not understand what put VSGPDJT above the pack of repub wannabees like Jeb! and L’il Marco? Good paying jobs for the middle class and a screeching halt on illegal immigration. I have heard from politicians, ad nauseum, since Nafta was shoved down our throats, that “these jobs are just never coming back”. Well now that the jobs are coming back (no surprise to any of us and no help from Rinos – they were all just full of Schiff) now the refrain will be that no American wants a good paying manufacturing job.

      Sounds like a winning message from those who have been bought and paid for by the COC and their ilk. SPIT

      Liked by 1 person

  2. harrietht3 says:

    So, I’m coming to the party late. What exactly does Sen. Johnson mean by “we need to do the value added things”?

    Otherwise, it’s clear as crystal that the thrust of his remarks reveal an almost visceral contempt for the middle class manufacturing worker — whom he’d just as soon be relegated to the dust-heap of history.

    America, in future, will be a global coordinate, as identified on the map by longitude and latitude, having no other identifiable markers with which to distinguish its geography from other land masses, having no particular people, nor culture, nor civilization — least of all of a Christian character — and all together will sing as programmed: We are the world.

    Liked by 3 people

    • KittyKat says:

      Can you imagine how boring and horrible it will be to travel? Same population mix in every nation, and the same big chain stores. Yawn.

      Like

    • deplorable says:

      What exactly does Sen. Johnson mean by “we need to do the value added things”?

      Kind of vague – isn’t it? Don’t worry son, when you grow up you can make a career out of doing “value added things” to raise a family, buy a house, and pay the bills.

      These “value added things” are just talking points given him by the US Chamber of Commerce.

      Liked by 3 people

      • abstain says:

        Yeah, the value added things that go along with the value added tax.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Frankly Ben says:

          Senator Johnson, according to Wikipedia, sold his family business (after guiding a small family business into a very successful, multi-million dollar company). He self-financed his 2010 senate run that cost him many millions of his family fortune, running as a Tea Party candidate, although he never joined the Tea Party Caucus.

          For his re-election bid he learned his lesson. Again, according to Wikipedia, he stated he would not self finance in 2016.

          As Sundance would say, his new paymasters now own him. Lock. Stock. And barrel.

          Liked by 4 people

        • PS says:

          Ding ding ding, we have a winner!

          Like

      • Ditch Mitch says:

        deplorable, value added comment there. Agreed CoC talking point. They have to get those key words “value added” in.

        Compare how much value is added to the economy when I take a taxi to when my neighbor forges steel into a car.

        The taxi driver may be hard working and have a place in a growing economy, but nothing adds greater value than making something.

        Like

        • Mk10108 says:

          It’s not a deep state government but deep state manufacturing.

          Your truck chassis steel is being forged in China, shipped to Mexico where it’s shaped, welded, painted, stacked and strapped on rail cars rolling north to US plants for assembly. Don’t believe me, drive south to Laredo TX via I-35 to Uniroyal drive, late afternoon a train pulling 50 cars pulling frames north.

          This is what highly capitalized US manufacturers are doing. Lowering labor across the build spectrum.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Alligator Gar says:

            So glad my nearly 20 y.o. 2001 GMC Sierra 2500HD was actually made at Pontiac East–American made and still going. It’s a beast. God willing, I will own that truck till I die and will leave it to my son (who loves it.)

            The Dodge 150 I owned prior to buying the GMC was stamped Made in Mexico. It was a 1994. Now let that sink in.

            Like

      • solomonpal says:

        I believe he meant to say “value added thingies”

        Like

      • Bert Darrell says:

        Here is Mr. Johnson’s definition of “value added” explained in very simple words for the benefit of the “non-educated” American (his voters):

        Import the pre-assembled guts of a lousy washing machine (motor pump, gears, belts, wiring, etc.) from the Chinese (or South Koreans). Buy the outer shell, the lid and screws from the South Koreans (or the Chinese). Here, in America, screw the shell around the guts, put the lid on it, wrap it in a carton made in Mexico, and sell it for a little more than you paid the Chinese, South Koreans, and Mexicans. That “little more” is the value added that you will be living on while the Chinese, South Koreans, and Mexicans laugh all the way to the bank.

        Thank you, Mr. Johnson, and be glad I don’t vote in Wisconsin.

        Liked by 2 people

      • ibobland08 says:

        Value added means manufacturing processes that add value to a product. For example Toyota and other Japanese automakers have assembly plants. The parts are not made there (what Johnson is calling “content manufacturing”), but they are assembled there.

        Read all of Johnson’s statement. If you actually understand manufacturing processes what he’s saying is a respectable position, though one could still argue against it.

        What determines a manufacturing employees wage is how much value their labor adds to a product. What Johnson is saying is we want high value added manufacturing jobs. Not content manufacturing jobs that don’t pay well.

        Johnson’s fear is that if content manufacturing jobs came back to America, wages for these jobs would be so high because you’d have to pay workers a lot to work them. After all who would rather work in a hot factory around dangerous equipment for minimum wage when they can work at Walmart or a grocery store and be in air conditioning all day for the same wage? This would result in large price increases all for jobs that aren’t particularly desirable.

        So Johnson wants America to have the high paying, skilled manufacturing jobs. This is Germany’s model. Sundance did not include this qoute: “Now, let me add just another dimension to this nobody has really talked about. We’ve talked about jobs; absolutely, we want the highest paying jobs. I think tax reform is going to juice the economy. And with such a tight labor market, I think wages are already increasing.”

        What did Trump say after Johnson said this? “You’re right, Ron. I agree.”

        I’m not defending Johnson though his position isn’t anti-American.

        Like

        • wanthetruth says:

          You neglected to mention where those “content manufactured” parts are made. Who cares who “assembles” the product if the parts going into the product are subpar? Have you read the comments in this thread of “parts” that make the whole worthless. These things done without America First quality aren’t worth the paper the warranty is written on.

          Seems to me what Sen Johnson is saying, is that he wants his high value “credit” without passing on any “high value” to the American worker. Also, his “with such a tight labor market”…what’s he talking about and where are his figures to back that up?

          Yes, heaven forbid that all parts are made w/an investment in American workers…they might then have to pay a fair wage. Cheap labor – CoC talking points indeed.

          Like

          • ibobland08 says:

            I wasn’t being deceiving by not mentioning content manufacturing is done foreign countries. Its implied.

            As I said you can make the argument that we need low value added manufacturing (what content manufacturing is), but I think the argument for only pursuing high value manufacturing is valid too.

            I think we can agree a auto plant is more valuable to us in America than a paperclip factory.

            Like

      • kaste668 says:

        Value add are service jobs. Jobs that do not really create anything, only “serve” others. Typically low paying, usually thought of as second income jobs.

        Definition – What does Value-Added Service (VAS) mean?

        A value-added service (VAS) is a term used in telecommunications to describe non-core feature

        Like

        • ibobland08 says:

          No. Value added means the difference between production price and sales price. If a company makes widget B from 3 widget As for $10 a piece. Widget B sells for $40. The value added is $10 in this case. 40-30=10

          In manufacturing, the higher the value added, the higher paid the workers in general. This is what Johnson means by high value added jobs. It means manufacturing where low cost goods are turned into high cost goods. Auto manufacturing is a perfect example.

          Like

    • big bad mike says:

      He means that American Manufacturing must produce.proprietary.items that add value. Unfortunately, these items are soon copied by China and mass produced. He means by “high labor” jobs, jobs that are labor intensive. What he forgets is that American Manufacturing can compete making labor intensive products by providing better value through superior craftsmanship and raw materials. The product should be flexible with options that are not easy to copy.or simply superior, but affordable. People will pay more for quality, and with sophisticated equipment.today, American.Manufacturers can provide superior products at an affordable.price that Chinese ,buy it 5 Times , poorly made junk cannot compete with.

      Liked by 6 people

    • USMCLt says:

      Simply stated, the “value added things” will be Americans crawling around American landfills sorting through all the foreign manufactured junk looking for anything that might still be useful. It is a tragic picture, but this is our politician’s promised Land. I think the hemp rope industry needs to make a comeback. What say you all?

      Liked by 10 people

      • mossback says:

        I am presently working on a prototype new scuba diving regulator, manufactured here in the USA. My associate is funding the entire project for exclusive marketing rights. The regulator will cost 2.8 times what it would cost just to buy one from China and my manufacturing cost is just for all the pieces to be assembled, and not including my labor. To sell to him alone I have been studying just how to arrive at a fair wholesale price so he can have a fair shot at sales profits. Online I found many different opinions and I was shocked! Where some say wholesale price is 2x’s manufacturing costs, most state 3x’s manufacturing costs for wholesale and retail is 3 times wholesale prices!…..a $20 dollar item to make, sells for $180.00. So imagine what it costs to build and ship from China and Mexico, nothing compared to here. in the end, a similar item costs less than what is built here but sold at the same price or even higher once the US built item is run out of business. Profits are maximized at the retail level, instead of 10-20% profit, they get 40-50% profits…….nothing but pure greed. No wonder major corporate heads do not want manufacturing back, their profit levels will be much, much less.

        Like

        • Alligator Gar says:

          I used to wear a lot of running shoes in the day when I ran competitively. This was in the ’80s. Most were still made here. I never paid $100 a pair. Now they are flimsy, cheap, don’t fit, and wear out after a few months of steady miles. And they cost well over $100 a pair.

          I use this personally experienced model in asking my students if they think they are better off buying Chinese made crap or American made items that last. The price wouldn’t change or not enough to disincentivize American consumers.

          Like

          • KittyKat says:

            Today’s qthletic shoes are among my biggest peeves. The asinine “improvements” like foam instead of rubber soles, memory foam insoles, netting on the outside that picks up flith, etc etc are horrible. To wear an athletic shoe nowdays is like tying two boards to your feet.

            Like

    • Flight93Gal says:

      For Harriet….What do Johnson’s comments on the “value added things” translate to? I believe his definition of “value add” is to continue the UNIPARTY PATH TO GLOBALISM, which was essentially implemented post WWII. The vision of Globalists is to diminish America’s standing in the world and share/spread its wealth to lower the risk of additional world wars incited by any economically oppressed country–especially those that possess military strength/nukes and an oppressed citizenry. And equally important, the Globalist vision is to turn the “management” of the wealth sharing over to a handful of elites who can fairly distribute US and wealthy countries’ shared assets. To deliver on this, Globalists promote open borders as a fundamental tactic. That’s why bringing manufacturing jobs home is not desired by Johnson et all. Instead he opts for the sharing strategy: turn US into service oriented economy only and enable open borders influx of low skilled workers to improve their “unfair” lot in life. I read somewhere that the optimal number of required new workers needed by US translates to up to 5 million workers/year. Of course the irony is that up to 70% of low skilled workers who illegally enter the US don’t take these service jobs anyway–they end up on the government dole, along with the family members that come in illegally after them. So while this is SICK…I wake up ECSTATIC every day that VSGPDJT is our President and that he remains unquestionably committed to MAGA.

      Liked by 1 person

    • jmclever says:

      @harrietht3
      What exactly does Sen. Johnson mean by “we need to do the value added things”?

      Exactly nothing. It sounds good and noble but in reality means nothing. They are words designed to confuse and distract the listener while giving the impression of his magnanimous care for the little people. Narcissistic abusers do this when their long-term victims begin to wake up in the hopes of lulling them back to sleep. And We the People have been abused by our leaders for decades!

      Like

  3. Mr_Henry says:

    As someone who lives in Wisconsin and works in heavy industry, much of what Senator Johnson is correct. I never thought I would see the day when we would have to recruit people to work at a paper mill, it it is here. We can’t fill all of the positions, and when people do start working, many leave within a few months. We are in the position of eliminating positions via automation because we don’t have the people to do them.

    What I believe he is trying to say, and President Trump states more effectively, is that we need to change the culture first. Having thousands of open positions with no workers will be highly disruptive.

    I am not always a fan of Senator Johnson, it he was a manufacturer in the private sector before becoming a politician. He isn’t a lawyer who can’t succeed elsewhere.

    Liked by 5 people

    • KittyKat says:

      Maybe if they reverted to older mechanisms and means of manufacture, instead of robotizing everything, people would find their work more satisfying.

      Like

      • benifranlkin says:

        Building robots and mechanizing is work in itself but is creative and innovative and makes work fun, so it’s no longer work! I personally would have a blast at it.

        Liked by 2 people

        • VVV says:

          Maybe, or maybe not so much….

          …what’s unnerving is that these eventually will be equipped with AI and they will sort out on their own how to open a door….among other things.

          Like

      • Frankly Ben says:

        No, KittyKat. Technology is a wealth multiplier. Should we do away with autos and trucks and return to horses and oxen? Candles instead of electric light?

        As technology advances it replaces human labor, far more efficiently than humans, removing us from the drudgery of 18-hours days of back-breaking labor.

        The challenge, and an ever-increasing one going forward, is the creation of new jobs, industries and careers that we enjoy, leveraging our increased wealth from technological improvements.

        It is an uncertain and challenging one, but one we are up to and one that promises to liberate humanity with great possibility for far more enjoyable “work”.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Tegan says:

        Technical schools!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Retired EE says:

        Well, probably not. I’ve spent my career designing products for a number of industries, everything from consumer products to government/defense to industrial systems. I’ve worked on the production line during pilot runs with the production people. Great people! Designing a product that is easy to manufacture is important. If the assembly work is interesting then the the production people find it more satisfying. Difficult or highly repetitive assembly leads to a lot of issues including errors when they loose focus and become bored. Where the product goes together well and they can see success the workplace is generally more satisfying. The production people I’ve worked with do get satisfaction from a job well done and quality products shipped out the door! Where automation can be added to remove some of the repetitive tasks it makes a better product (usually) and allows the worker to concentrate on things that require skill and thinking. Systems like CNC machines allow the products to be machined to much closer tolerances, produce parts that could not be made using purely manual machining, and lead to better, more reliable products. It reduces repetitive labor but puts the worker into a more varied environment.

        That said, I believe we in the USA could compete with anyone in the world by being a bit “smarter”. We have a lot of regulations that make it difficult or impossible to compete. The tax law changes will help but so many of the various agencies are weaponized against manufacturing, in fact most industry. The big problem is the attitude of TPTB such as indicated in the article. It is a war against us that needs to be won.

        Like

    • luke says:

      I tend to agree with you. We do not have the workforce at this point. We CANNOT start paying someone to pick lettuce for $25 an hour or a person in a factory $100 an hour (when current rate is $20 guessing to make a point) because we have no ine else available.

      That’s my opinion and I’m happy to be proven wrong but not at the expense of hyperinflation. Not concerned Pres. Trump is a Pragamatist of the 1st order; he’ll do what is right by America period….that’s what he does.

      Liked by 2 people

      • benifranlkin says:

        Yes, and our President will give the American people work and purpose and lift them up. That is his long goal. It is what made us and will again. This is how we heal broken homes and families.

        Liked by 3 people

      • wj2016 says:

        So we should wreck society by flooding our country with foreign labor just so we can have cheap lettuce? At a certain price you can get anyone to do a job, especially if you reduce their government entitlements.

        Liked by 2 people

        • tazz2293 says:

          Lettuce is Cheap?

          I buy a crappy head of Iceberg lettuce for $1.99 or a crappy head of Green Leaf lettuce for a $1.69. or a crappy bag of Romaine Lettuce for anywhere from $2.00 – $3.99. It is not cheap.

          The transportation costs from the field to the staging areas raises the price. The transportation and handling costs from the staging, packaging areas raises the cost. The cost of receiving, storing and stocking the lettuce on the shelves at the grocery store raises the cost.

          Just because you can pay .25 cents a head to pick it, that ain’t the price you’re paying.

          NAFTA and the Federal government with their regulations and other trade deals ruined the American Middle class and they care not on whit they did as their pockets were lined with green.

          This “Jobs Americans won’t do” bunk is to convince the sheeple that they are better off letting the government provide for them. Many Americans are lazy, while millions upon millions who want to work, just not picking lettuce, can’t find a decent job because said job is now located in China, Mexico, Canada or some other SE Asian location.

          Liked by 3 people

      • deplorable says:

        I’m sure picking lettuce 8-10 hours a day in the hot sun is hard back-breaking work. Therefore you should expect to have to pay higher wages to get somebody to do it. There are no “rights” in this country for cheap lettuce … and we always have the freedom to grow our own.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Charlie says:

      “people get paid more to stay home” = change welfare system!

      Liked by 15 people

      • dbobway says:

        I heard a man on the radio yesterday.
        He talked about his Dad left his Mom when he was 10. No child support and so forth.
        They went and got food stamps because they were tapped out. Once a month a social worker came by and made sure they were truly in need of help. Then he said this.
        “Being poor needs to suck”
        Every time that lady showed up at our door, it proved to him what poor was. He said if you had a TV in every room and a new car in the driveway? She would deny your benefits. If you needed more help, she offered it.,That happened well into the eighties and then it just stopped..
        This man took his poor life and turned it around 180 degrees.
        In some states, you can make $20 an hour, tax free, with free healthcare.
        That is 50 grand a year with free health insurance.

        Liked by 3 people

      • USMCLt says:

        FedGov, Inc needs to be taken through Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization. Sell ALL federal assets not required by the Constitution. Eliminate ALL agencies not required by the Constitution. Eliminate ALL federal pensions, except military. By golly, then we might have some people willing to take factory jobs.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Judy W says:

        Yess!

        Like

    • David A says:

      “We are in the position of eliminating positions via automation because we don’t have the people to do them.”

      That is a natural process of technology, ongoing from the IR forward. Indeed, it is the reason America can again compete in some areas. ( As such I think you mis-identify the cause) The speed of said progress causes temporary disruptions, yet overall benefits. There is no ultimate shortage of jobs, as there is no shortage of human desire, healthy or otherwise.

      One thing is certain, it makes ZERO sense to bring in unskilled workers with zero understanding of this nations founding principles ( often with antagonism and even hate towards this nation)
      and a strong inclination to vote for statism.

      Thus Trumps call to greatly increase the number of educated English speaking immigrants, while rapidly lowering the number of non- educated non- English speaking immigrants, and
      stop altogether the importing of those taught to hate, and his wise insistence that we can educate current citizens better as well.
      We waste billions with elitist education teaching social statism.

      Liked by 6 people

    • peace says:

      Welfare needs to end along with endless unemployment dollars. We need to stop paying people to not work. And we need to tap the teen labor market and get the young adults out of their parents basements and the teens up early on the weekends and away from the video games.

      Liked by 8 people

    • Bob Thoms says:

      What is the labor rate in your heavy industry sector?

      Like

      • Mr_Henry says:

        I work in the paper industry. We are literally replacing fork lift drivers with robots because we can’t find people that will work for $20+ per hour with benefits to drive fork lifts. The economics are what they are, and paying people $50 an hour isn’t possible.

        We are in desperate need of skilled labor as well. Pushing everyone to college has gutted the workforce of electricians, millwrights, welders, etc.

        I agree we don’t need more unskilled immigrants. Wisconsin’s dairy industry is propped up by illegal aliens who are subsidized by welfare programs to work at low wages. Senator Johnson bends his ear to this group too much, but that fact doesn’t negate the fact that we are not able to fill current openings.

        I don’t post here much, but I have stated on earlier posts that if President Trump can get people off the couches and restore the dignity of a full day’s work, he will be the best president of my lifetime.

        Liked by 5 people

        • Bob Thoms says:

          Thanks. Good to hear real life situation from people in the trenches.

          Like

        • dutzie60 says:

          Mr._Henry, I think needs repeating over and over. Thank you.
          “We are in desperate need of skilled labor as well. Pushing everyone to college has gutted the workforce of electricians, millwrights, welders, etc.”

          Like

          • kaste668 says:

            I believe this was always the intent. Pushing people to college, so other labor could be brought in cheaper. Turn American into a “service” country, stop manufacturing, stop mining etc, let other countries come in and take our resources. Young people come out of college thinking they should immediately be making $60K per year because they have a degree. They don’t understand that even with a degree, you generally have to start at the bottom and work your way up.

            Like

        • frank says:

          Cut out all welfare and the couch will be empty all day,just like any working folks couch.

          Like

    • carole says:

      Mr_Henry: Right on the mark: We need to change the culture. Where I live in North Carolina, the textile mills have been silent for decades, as those jobs went to Mexico, Guatemala and Sri Lanka. Generations who did and would have worked in those mills have become so used to sitting around in their section 8 housing and collecting welfare, that now it is very hard to get them to work. A friend who owns a warehouse tried recruiting some of these young blacks. He gave them the clothing needed for the job, paid them $15/hr, trained them. Not one stayed. Some wouldn’t even show up for work when they found out they’d be working in an unheated warehouse. “I ain’t gonna freeze my a$$ off for $15/hr!” They can make more than than peddling drugs. We have a YUGE culture problem in this country. President Trump is for sure on the right track, but it’s going to take a LOT of work to get some of these people to think in terms of working again.

      Liked by 10 people

      • Bob Thoms says:

        Maybe. They would freeze their ass off for $20? Did your friend try that?

        I don’t like bashing American workers….it becomes THE excuse for bringing cheap labor here.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Bob Thoms says:

          Or out space heaters in his warehouse?

          Like

        • deplorable says:

          So true. Let the labor market determine the fair wage. Don’t expect workers to fall out of the sky at the wage you think they deserve. Don’t expect Congress to be your Human Resources department. A pay raise for the middle class is a good thing.

          Like

        • covfefe999 says:

          Excellent comment, Bob Thoms. That’s how it’s supposed to work. When there are jobs with an insufficient labor pool the wages are supposed to rise. If the guy started paying $20/hour he’d get more than just those blacks, I’m sure. That’s why when an auto plant opens there’s a line a mile long of applicants wanting jobs. Good paying with great benefits. There are people with college degrees who will work those jobs for the right pay.

          Like

      • Katherine McCoun says:

        I lived in NC in the ’90s and early 2000s. We had textile manufacturing in NC at that time. Not in the big cities but we still had it in the state then. I know because at one time I manufacturing safety incentive programs and had files of every major employer in every county. Kept loosing them until they were gone. The older workers couldn’t replace these jobs and many stopped looking or took minimum wage retail jobs which would be at least half of what they were making.

        Like

        • USMCLt says:

          Woodworking and furniture manufacturing was once a great NC industry as well. Many craftsmen made a decent living in that field until our federal government slowly strangled it through over regulation and adverse trade and tax policies. I am intimately aware of how it worked, as we lost a century old family woodworking business in the 90s, employing a couple hundred people. We were never large enough, nor had the inclination to, grease political skids, hence our demise. By the way, most of the awful wildfires out west are caused by forest mismanagement. Food for thought…

          Liked by 3 people

          • Katherine McCoun says:

            I went to high school in western NC and know a lot of highschool boys (and some girls) who worked their way through private high school with a part time job in furniture manufacturing. That is another aspect of low paying jobs – these days people do not understand starter jobs for entry into the work force.

            Like

      • talker2u says:

        There is, I believe, a “culture-changing” mechanism for the American workforce that has yet to be promoted as it very well could be. It us doable for any and every industry and economic segment. It can potentially change American workers’ attitude about work, job satisfaction, financial remuneration, career, and life.

        What is it? Employee-owned companies.

        Change the tax codes to entice and promote companies to form as employee-owned corporations. Promote this concept throughout the business community. Incentivize lifetime employment of every employee-owner. Create an internal culture of training the E-O’s in every aspect of the company’s operations. Place value on the job and career stability of such an arrangement. Share profits. Internally, seek economic stability and growth as a corporate entity but compete in the open marketplace as team, a corporate family.

        THIS will get people out of bed on Wednesday mornings.

        Liked by 1 person

    • mdaush says:

      You make a great point about ‘changing the culture’. As food stamps become bags of food, and satisfaction of work becomes appreciated, not criticized….people will return to work.
      We have plenty of young people coming out of high school that need jobs.

      Liked by 1 person

    • pyromancer76 says:

      Hard work is hard work. “Slaving away” for 8 hours a day is hard work — but everyone who is any decent soul finally gets it that that is what humans do after they leave the nest. It might take some time to finally realize that Mommy and Daddy did the same wherever they put their effort to make a living for their family.

      Some of us are more fortunate in that we are able to love our work and our efforts. We usually put in way more than the 8 hours a day, and often we “get ahead” because of desire — and maybe we were born with a little more creativity and love of productivity than many others. Even here, when we love our work, we find that each project we take on, if we are to accomplish it well, always takes five times more effort and hours than we first envisioned the task. Work is work.

      These two paragraphs are an intro into an issue that is going to be a hard one for a while. When people have “had it easy” – on the government dole – how do you get them to do hard work. This will take much imagination and a lot of “hard work” on the part of those who love to work — or love to be responsible and are willing to do what it takes.

      How did farm children in the 19th C, who worked by the seasons and had significant “time off,” become charged up, “reformed.” and ready and able to work by the clock for the amazing American economic engine? Inspiration. Often, “being saved.” Those religious revivals sweeping America over and over helped to transform young Americans into disciplined free enterprisers. Once they became inspired, and got a taste of what was possible (even with very hard work), they chose to work (and invent) even harder.

      I hope President Trump and his Cabinet and the real conservatives and real liberals who makeup the heart blood of this nation can realize that this effort will take inspiration — and imaginative transformations. It might take some of the Japanese methods of training the mind and body before, during, and after work in factories – creating a “community”. It might take tutoring of individuals – churches could involve themselves in this effort. It might take boot camps before being hired where there is a nice bonus for completing (the very inspired hard work of) boot camp. There probably are a myriad of other fascinating ideas, each directed to a population that “the successful” know well — and also know the many who are not yet prepared to work.

      President Trump is that kind of inspirational leader and I think he understands the enormity (immensity, not wickedness) of the task before us in transforming many into willing, working citizens. We need to go the inspirational route first; “getting religion” is often the turning point in a person’s life when they can finally agree internally that self discipline is better than self-destruction and dissipation. Love is also very important. The opportunity to establish one’s own family — but there will need to be some new personal developments here. What does it mean to say the vow “for better or worse” and stay the course as a couple learns to grow together — and stay together, if for no other reason than the children? Children need those parents if they are to grow up to be decent, working, loving citizens.

      It also will take a transformation of higher education. No longer something each young people “should experience,” where a BA is a ticket to “a job” and there is a general consensus of what an education should include and what a job is. There are too many evil purposes ensconsed within this system. Direct it to learning to do a job, not enrolling until one knows what one wants to be educated for, and working for the cost of that education might do the trick. Parents might stop believing they “owe” their kids “an education.” No more college loans. Work.

      Like

    • deplorable says:

      I never thought I would see the day when we would have to recruit people to work at a paper mill, it it is here.

      Why are you surprised you have to “recruit” and what’s so wrong with that? A long time ago manufacturers built affordable housing near their factories in order to recruit and keep workers. Why is now any different?

      Also, higher labor costs have a beneficial side effect in that they force greater automation and efficiency, making your business more competitive – just ask the Japanese who are great at automating.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Deb says:

        Industry has never had to recruit in Wisconsin before. There were always plenty of skilled workers competing for jobs. Everyone knew someone at the mill, and when a position opened up you would have plenty of applicants already lined up.

        That has changed, and it’s hard to even get applicants.

        This really is a cultural shift away from people valuing work. Socialism has crept into our schools and changed the mindset of the workforce. People would rather collect welfare and get high than work hard for a living.

        We really do need a cultural shift.

        Like

        • kaste668 says:

          The company I work for has a hard time recruiting for employees. WHY? 2 – reasons, 1 – the background checks that are now required…criminal, drug, credit etc. 2 – Welfare benefits make it easier for people to NOT work. They figure they make more sitting at home. Anyone on welfare, if physically able, should be required to work.

          Like

          • Alligator Gar says:

            I can’t for the life of me understand this “people make more on welfare than working.” As a lot of you know, I was out of work 8 months in 2016 through no fault of my own. I applied EVERYWHERE I thought might hire me–MickyD’s, Wendy’s, WalMart, Publix, CVS, Walgreens, the local co-op, ACE hardware, a local natural food place, a local farmer….no takers.

            I had to go on TANF and EBT, and I am not proud of it. No, I am still ashamed. I asked to pay it back once I was employed, but was told that was not possible.

            You can starve to death on EBT and TANF will not pay your electric bill. I got a combined $197 a month.

            Medicaid? What a joke. You can go to the local “community health clinic” and sit all day and hope to see a nurse, if you are lucky. I am very blessed that neither my son nor I were sick during that terrible time.

            Like

    • dbobway says:

      The corporations will NEVER willingly change the culture. They have to be forced by the simple arithmetic.

      So they bring in HB-1 immigrants and what does the company do with them. Train them, because they don’t know squat.
      An American citizen could follow that same path. But nothing in our educational system offers a way to follow that path. In fact our school systems hides that path.
      So companies have the system in place to train American citizens to do any job they need done. Quit letting the government subsidize companies with cheap controllable labor.

      That is slavery.

      Here is the rub.
      Americans are more demanding and the more of our citizens start making more money for better pay,
      This group then becomes a much more powerful voice in our government.
      More power means less control.
      Less control means more competition.
      Less control means more innovation.
      Less control means the elite has to work harder to make their money.
      In House energy and steel? It will help keep inflation down.

      Watching Trump in that meeting yesterday,
      Made me wish I was 25 again.

      Like

    • deplorable says:

      We can’t fill all of the positions, and when people do start working, many leave within a few months.

      What is it about those positions that you think is causing many people to leave within a few months? Could you provide more information about the pay, benefits, and working conditions for those said positions?

      I ask this because often times, when a new auto factory opens or a more recent example is Amazon opening a warehouse, people gather in huge lines just for the opportunity to apply for a position.

      Like

      • dutzie60 says:

        I don’t know how small or large this business is, but comparing it to Amazon or a large auto manufacturer doesn’t seem equitable to me. How much are small businesses expected to compete with the giants of industry?
        Thats not rhetorical I’m asking because I don’t know.

        Like

    • Mr_Henry, while what you are saying maybe true “currently”, how long it will take to change the equation? Like anything, people train themselves based on supply and demand. If they start seeing job openings that will pay much better, do you think highschoolers, who do not intend to go to college, will line up for McDonalds, $10 Amazon or for manufacturing jobs?
      What is glaringly lacking though is the work ethics among the younger lot. I am not saying that entire new generation is rotten but majority has the chip on the shoulder that they are owed. I do not see the drive to work hard and learn the skills required to excel in their job. I am from IT so my experience is limited to younger lot I see in my field – most of them think that they are there to put in 8 hours of the day on “work premise” and then head back to where they would prefer. Point to note – I am using ‘On work premise” since this includes 1 hour or more lunch time plus of course coffee breaks, water cooler breaks, potty breaks, cell-phone-social-media-updates-breaks, etc. Counting all these breaks you get the drift in terms of how much time they are actually putting in real work. Now obviously since my line of work has folks with 12+4 years of education (minimum), my observation is for this group. Maybe someone who works with younger generation from another group might be able to share their experience with the younger lot.
      Once again – I am not saying ALL are bad, there are few from younger lot that are good and show respect for, and to, their work.

      Like

    • daizeez says:

      I don’t buy that. I worked in the paper industry and many union shops in WI were paying extremely good money to work in the mills and converting plants. The automation isn’t because there aren’t people willing to work there, it’s because like the auto industry, the unions priced themselves out of the market. Automation was cheaper.

      Like

    • Stick says:

      Agree with u completely. Couple points. It makes no sense to insult people who are on our side. Sean, and Rush could not be more on our side in regards to restoring our country. Both have talked extensively about losing our manufacturing base. I’m no fan of Johnson, but he is partially right. I’ve worked extensively in construction industry, and sadly the only people who are dependable and want to work are Latino’s. Not the dreamers or Lation’s children. They have been Americanized and have become worthless lazy gangster type people. Our culture and politician’s reward laziness with every social and welfare program. Until u change that, we will never have a great workforce again. The apostle Paul put it perfectly, if a man doesn’t work, he should not eat. I’m not sure what the perfect answer is. This is one thing about this website that bugs me, is the constant insults to people who are on our side. Is sundance slightly jealous that he doesn’t get the notoriety of Sean or Rush. Sundance, if you are listening, we love u and appreciate all your hard work and spectacular insight. Keep up the good work. Someday, your moment to shine will come.

      Like

    • Rockindubya says:

      Agreed, two points:
      It’s education, or lack thereof. I grew up in a time of wood shop, metal shop,auto shop, vocational education (part-time work after school.) My first jobs out of high school were related to many of the skills I learned in those programs. Eventually, a career as an electro-mechanical master mechanic/engineer resulted. As the decades passed, I was amazed at what high school graduates DIDN’T know. Perhaps my innate curiosity motivated me, but it is a sad state of affairs when your entire prospect pool for a new position doesn’t know the difference between a screwdriver and a pair of pliers. But they all want to pursue a career in video game design. And bring their phone to the workstation. (Do you have Wi-Fi?)
      The mindset of planned obsolescence has eliminated an entire repair industry in most segments of manufacturing. Design it so the enclosure is destroyed if one attempts to disassemble it. (See innate curiosity above.) Do not supply any replacement parts, or the customer service expertise to assist a repair tech, or a DIYer.
      We can get it back, but the road back is ever bit as long as the one to get here.

      Like

    • Coldeadhands says:

      The work force is being educated for the preferred jobs of the anti capitalist higher education of the Globalists and leftists. As POTUS pointed out yesterday, for now, it may be more lucrative for some to collect from government than enter the workforce.
      The Trumpian goal of expanding vocational training and apprenticeships is essential in reestablishing manufacturing in the U.S.
      The Globalists / Leftists prefer dependence on the state vs the dynamic of the creative power of a gainfully employed populace.
      Reduce viable jobs. Erode the work ethic. Increase dependence on the state. Erode the health of the population. Sounds like Cloward-Piven.
      Wisconsin and other states need workers to fill the jobs that our educational system is failing to supply. Where have we been getting that labor force, up to now? Immigrants.
      Immigrants with limited education and zero esteem for this country. These immigrants are often trained on the job to eventually be higher skilled workers. Tacit apprenticeship at lower cost than skilled union labor…and the people who get the education for skilled jobs find themselves competing with educated immigrant workers who will take those jobs for less pay. (India, Philippines, etc.)

      Like

    • Mk10108 says:

      I just finished an install for new processing plant in a southern state. Spent 30 days trying to train a non mechanical guy (non us) left is a loose and right is tight. Informed the owner of his inability and the need to hire a new person (US). Owner asked me to evaluate him during a interview. His resume was poor but noted a few pearls and he was weak in math. During the interview I explained a principle about time, temperature and pressure he never heard of. Then asked him a question and he correctly answered. I spent the next 20 days, one on one, explaining every system, sub system and component, showed how product flowed through the system. How to observe and correct conditions. Recently he called saying the machine was down. From 1800 miles away, via cell phone pictures and pdf electrial drawings he never read before, we fixed it in three hours.

      So the claim of Mr Johnson is nonsense. He wants the status quo of Spanish speaking immigrants lack long observation and correction skills strapped with a language barrier to lead the recovery effort. Johnson knows nothing of the American workforce.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. sDee says:

    “”We need to do the value added things.””

    What could be more value-added to refined materials than manufacturing goods from them?
    And what more value-add than producing those refined materials from raw ones?

    We’ve generations of the political elite who now believes value-add is taxing and consuming stuff produced with foreign slave labor – and borrowing the money to do it.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Bud Klatsch says:

      Competition brings innovation and excellence. Let America compete in the very important arena of manufacturing and pol’s must provide the cooperative environment government should provide and stand back. Manufacturing is too important to a successful economy and country to give it up.

      Liked by 3 people

    • daizeez says:

      The beauty of this country is we were able to make our own goods and feed are own people. Many countries cannot.

      Like

  5. goddessoftheclassroom says:

    As passionately as I feel about the importance of a true liberal arts educations (which includes the sciences), how we assess our students is upside down. Someone draws a line and says “here is where students of grade x must be” based on amorphous “standards” instead of content.

    I would be thrilled with a national recommended English curriculum (a list of books, vocabulary, grammar topics and kinds of writing) to which to aspire, but it must be recognized that some students simply do not have the abstract cognitive ability to master these concepts.

    Until a student’s test score is also listed with his or her grade in the subject, IQ, and attendance percentage, the score is just a number.

    I have a class of 8th-grade students who cannot read above the 4th-grade level. The state demands that they be able to write a text-dependent analysis on the annual test. What a waste of resources. These students should have begun skills-based vocational training in 7th grade with general practical skills emphasis in English, math, science, and social studies.

    Now I have to get ready for work…

    Liked by 5 people

    • Little Annie’s Fannie says:

      But that won’t fit in the Everybody Gets A Trophy World! You must be one of those mean teachers who expect your students to learn the material in order to earn the grade. I believe that’s called bullying. Just pass out a paper on the first day with a list of your standards, ask them to check off the ones they know, ask what grade they would like to have, give it to them and you move to the head of the popularity class. They have a great GPA, great class rank and can probably snag some good recommendations. With a resume like that, who needs test scores?? Colleges accept students with these test scores since $$$ are in their wheelhouse. Majors like Feminist Studies, Black Studies, etc. were created for those that colleges accepted with the knowledge that grades and class rank are fantastic but test scores are inversely proportional. Perfect criteria!!

      (I am entitled to 5 minutes of sarcasm daily. Used it all at once)!!!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Tegan says:

        I used to do classroom teaching evaluations at the community college/university level. One of the things I tried to get teachers to understand is their goals…was it to have every student get 100% on a test? Of course, the answer is YES …that means you have accomplished what you wanted them to learn. That doesn’t mean trick questions on obscure footnotes, etc. Tests are not a contest…they are a measure of how good a job the teacher is doing with the subject matter.
        I urged them to tell students what was going to be tested,…example, there will be a question on the 2nd admendment. Guess what, every student would read and understand the 2nd admendment, if they wanted a good test score.
        Sorry, this is a little off topic to the thread, but I believe it can be related to preparing students for the job market.

        Like

    • Risa says:

      Is the classroom of students you are referencing categorized as Special Ed? Are they genuinely lacking in the potential to perform up to the standard, or are they coming from homes where they live in chaos and no one cares enough to work with them and motivate?

      In the years-long process of eroding away good jobs for high school graduates, we have also seen the American Family destroyed. Under-educated parents who divorce while there are minor children in the home or worse, never bother to marry and have multiple children with multiple partners, typically live in a chaos which fails to nurture and encourage children to achieve up to their potential. These children also act out in school.

      At the same time, school districts will ensure they build state-of-the-art athletic facilities long before they think to employ an adequate number of reading-specialist teachers. My small rural community and the communities around me all have great basketball facilities and lousy reading programs. Our educational priorities are skewed, and our families are increasingly train wrecks.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Larry Bucar says:

    PDJT has had a line on Cof C since the 1980’s, SD’s reporting of this since the tea party days is opening tens of thousands of eyes DAILY to the cruel fact of multinationalism’s wicked intentions, totally agree that Hannity + Limbaugh are in the tank for Cof C – someone PLEASE call these “conservatives” out TODAY.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Publius2016 says:

    They also want to implement STATE EXEMPTION IMMIGRANT WORKER VISAS too! These fools know THE WALL, MERIT, AND END OF CHAIN LOTTERY IMMIGRATION so they are setting up a backdoor! Why don’t we let Americans work? President Trump is saying to the MultiNationals, if you build it in the USA, no tax! America First!

    Like

  8. crandew says:

    Bottom line:
    The borders need to close and the tariffs on goods coming into the US need to be raised.
    No more outsourcing or getting cheap foreign goods/labor. Period.
    Our country fell for this ‘global’ nonsense back in the 90’s, and if we want to survive it needs to be soundly rejected now.
    Wages need to rise. Period.
    Workers will fill the thousands of manufactoring jobs when they pay enough to live on.
    Great blog man! Rock on!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Fred says:

      Yes the borders need to be closed, but a general tariff increase is not good. A tariff on nations who exploit their labor is in order, or the exchange rate for their currency needs to be adjusted. Putting a tariff on imported goods will only raise the price of everything in that category in the US.
      By closing the borders, there will be adjustments to the way society will function. Prices will go up unless the welfare state is shut down. Shutting it down gradually over 5-10 years would be sufficient. It could start with requiring the recipient to work at least part time. The problem with doing this is that there are so many socialists in high positions, that they continually thwart the things that are good for America, and Americans.
      Manufacturing jobs will always pay close to a subsistence wage. The other side of that is that the worker does not have the ability to understand that they must budget, and they spend every last cent they get. If that last cent is not spent on necessities, it will be spent on a “luxury item”. There is no thought of saving something for an emergency. This attitude is a dead end, and you get chaos in the life of that person. Taking responsibility for your own wellbeing is not part of victimhood, and that is what is taught to today’s youth.
      Until we get the education system sorted out, the following generations will continue to be taught to shirk the duty of personal responsibility, and continue down the road to becoming slaves to the system.
      Removing the reward for not working is one of the first steps in getting America back on its feet. Importing low cost labor keeps the cost down, but it also keeps citizens idle, because they don’t want to work for the low wages. The idle workers do not have the skills for a higher level job, but think they are entitled to a higher standard of living. There is no easy way to get the mindset changed. There will be a lot of turmoil in changing the course of the nation. Get ready for the STHTF.

      Like

  9. David A says:

    “We are in the position of eliminating positions via automation because we don’t have the people to do them.”

    That is a natural process of technology, ongoing from the IR forward. Indeed, it is the reason America can again compete in some areas. ( As such I think you mis-identify the cause) The speed of said progress causes temporary disruptions, yet overall benefits. There is no ultimate shortage of jobs, as there is no shortage of human desire, healthy or otherwise.

    One thing is certain, it makes ZERO sense to bring in unskilled workers with zero understanding of this nations founding principles ( often with antagonism and even hate towards this nation)
    and a strong inclination to vote for statism.

    Thus Trumps call to greatly increase the number of educated English speaking immigrants, while rapidly lowering the number of non- educated non- English speaking immigrants, and
    stop altogether the importing of those taught to hate, and his wise insistence that we can educate current citizens better as well.
    We waste billions with elitist education teaching social statism.

    Like

  10. Twitter reads your DMs says:

    President Trump talked about the unfair trade practices such as China dumping steel into the US by importing them via a non-steel manufacturing country and these Senators response was that we need the cheap steel, we condone the dumping, and illegal and unfair trade practices are necessary for our constituents. How can we solve anything when Republican and Democrat Senators both can’t even agree that the rule of law is necessary for our nation? Corruption comes in many forms, selective favoritism and looking the other way is definitely one of them. It’s really astounding that they talked openly about this.

    Like

  11. Madison Grant says:

    One thing I’d like to point out in regards to education is that, in service to globalism, it has taken on a wholly different purpose. The wealthy elite used to support higher education as part of a Jeffersonian tiered education system, where those suited for certain kinds if labor would be educated for a basic level needed for citizenship, and the university system was designed as a proving ground for the natural aristocracy who had the intellectual potential for leadership and discovery. Today the wealthy elite still prop up the university system with generous endowments, but it us becoming increasingly apparent it’s for a wholly different motive. Why is everyone being encouraged to eschew manual labor for a college degree of some kind now? When one looks at the overwhelming ideological disposal of higher education toward collectivism now, and its increasing goal to sweep up nearly every young person with the capability of achieving a high school diploma in some tier of it, it is easy to spot its new purpose. The money still drives the institution, but its purpose is no longer to identify the best and brightest for roles in our country’s historical system of freedom and decentralized control. The best and the brightest, and even the somewhat bright to average are being inculcated and disposed to accept the collectivist existence the elite desire to place us under control for their managrment.

    Liked by 5 people

  12. Bob Thoms says:

    Wow. Some here agree with Johnson???

    Like

  13. mariner says:

    Imagine what comments could have been captured after serving politicians one or two drinks.

    Liked by 2 people

    • abstain says:

      Ha ha. Maybe President Trump will let a party be televised. Then we can hear what he’s heard his entire life. A mike at each table.

      Like

  14. Bob Thoms says:

    Build more manufacturing here, the market will figure out how to staff it….competition for labor is good for American families!

    It’s how you MAGA!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Katherine McCoun says:

      End the source of cheap labor by ending open borders and globalism’s moving the manufacturing overseas. Reduce the drug flow. Bring the country face to face with a huge demand for workers and then welfare system will come into the spotlight. With jobs available everywhere the sunlight will shine on the able bodied welfare recipients.

      The welfare system Must be reduced so one is motivated to work.

      Poor in America isn’t what it used to be. Even the poor have cell phones, often including the children! These days the poor don’t just have TVs they also have satellite/cable! Video game systems are a norm. Cars are usual as is air conditioning. Even on the poor side of town the buses are rarely full and need to down graded to public vans or short buses.

      Drugs, welfare system and work ethic are part of this issue. Eliminate the cheap labor options and force America to deal with our issues!

      Liked by 3 people

      • BuiltRich says:

        Bingo!!!!

        Like

      • Bob Thoms says:

        The Trump Plan on 4 paragraphs!

        Like

      • covfefe999 says:

        Prices will go up. A lot. Are we all willing to pay them? Are we all willing to hang on to items we have because it’s too costly to replace them? Are we all willing to live like the middle class of, say, the 1950’s or 1960’s used to live? More frugally? Fewer items, less frequent turnover?

        Like

        • dutzie60 says:

          I keep flashing back to those years of my youth. To answer Yes I would be willing if it would right this ship for the future of my kids and grandkids. If it happens, I hope it’s in time for me to teach them how to live a frugal life of happiness. Being poor didn’t kill me – I just didn’t have much. 😀

          Like

        • booger71 says:

          Why do you hold onto things that quit working 3 days after the warranty expires? People I know will gladly pay more for manufactured goods that actually last well beyond the warranty. Now that may be because I am a baby boomer that doesn’t need the latest gadget from Apple when the old gadget works just fine. It takes time, but mindsets can change. Our President has started changing the way we look at things, others are slowly following.

          Like

        • rvsueandcrew says:

          That’s the way I live in retirement and I couldn’t be happier. Too much stuff suffocates.

          Like

          • steph_gray says:

            Yep – one of my pleasures in retirement has been finally having time to keep track of coupons, seek out bargains, weed out stuff I don’t need (give it to charity), and keep an eye on the long lasting quality of anything I do buy. This thread has been very educational. When my foreign-made washer and drier die, I fully plan to check into Speed Queen.

            Like

      • Fake Nametag says:

        My daughter thinks we are poor because the “poor” children in my daughter’s school all have way more bling than her. I’m not sure exactly where my salary falls in the grand scheme but I’m pretty sure it is in the top 5% if not higher. The habits of so many people are a disaster. I’m not sure how we get back to a society where people are realistic about their finances.

        Liked by 1 person

      • lisabrqwc says:

        This made me think of some comments I read yesterday in response to President Trump’s suggestion that EBT cards loaded with cash be replaced in some measure by monthly food boxes like Blue Apron. The outrage of the libs was so over the top — how dare Uncle Sugar have a say in how food is provided to the hungry?!! And what right does the government have to decide what these ‘poor’ people have to eat?!!

        The entitlement is just too much!! Whatever happened to ‘government cheese?’ That used to be a thing, didn’t it? Nothing like watching the person in line in front of me paying with high-end groceries on their EBT card, while I’m shuffling through my coupons and feeling blessed that ground chuck is on sale this week so I can stock up.

        Like

      • Tegan says:

        Yes!…..Katherine. Yesterday I read that already people are complaining about FREE food boxes…the tired old “second class citizens because they have no choice”…”what if they can’t eat some of the items because of diet restrictions”…etc.
        The food is for the NEEDY, it is free to them…they are not entitled, as much as the liberals try to push the concept.

        Like

  15. JoD says:

    It is wise to eliminate manufacturing jobs and a healthy society’s ability to be self sustaining.
    Every item that we use everyday, should be made in China. (yes, it’s sarc.)
    When the day comes, and it will, when China decides to make it’s move and try to swallow the United States, we will not even have the capibility to produce the shovels we are currently using to dig our own graves.

    Liked by 1 person

    • covfefe999 says:

      It’s a problem when we think that manufacturing is a low-level career, an undesirable career, and that things should be made by poor people in third world areas. This is a cultural-societal problem decades in the making.

      Liked by 1 person

      • The same mind-set that introduced slaves from Africa. A man that will not do his own work need only look at the collapse of empires and know that imported labor, is what raised them to the ground.

        Like

      • Alligator Gar says:

        This “service economy” garbage was clearly stated as necessary and desirable by Bill Clinton during the 1990s. He actively supported the destruction of manufacturing and agriculture and said that it would always be “cheaper” to import strawberries and washing machines. He was of the devil his father, a liar through and through.

        Like

  16. drjhigg says:

    My impression driving thru his state a few times is that there are people craving to work more with their hands as craftsmen. You see a lot of little home shops, I have never seen the like elsewhere. Some people are just happy building and fabricating and a society that cannot meet all needs in some fashion is really broken. It is a shame he thinks that way. He wants to set the country against itself and watch it fail.

    Liked by 2 people

  17. covfefe999 says:

    Johnson says there aren’t enough people to work the manufacturing jobs. Maybe it’s true. Kids are being brainwashed into thinking that they need to have 4 year college degrees now. Many of them come out with degrees that aren’t entirely marketable (women’s studies, anyone?) and yet for some reason they are still lauded for going to school. An unemployed college-degreed person is looked upon more favorably than a person who is working full time in a plant in today’s culture, sadly. So what do you do if you have a plant and you can’t find enough labor? There’s plenty of labor in the vast ghettos (of all colors) in the urban areas but no plants there. While I think Johnson is correctly identifying a problem I think his solution is absurd. He’s OK with caving to the dysfunctional damaging path we’re heading down rather than trying to fix the problem. But those of you here who are parents: would you dare guide your child away from college and into manufacturing? I think few of you would. Maybe guide the child away from college into a skilled trade, but I don’t think many of you would say “don’t go to school at all, just work at this tire plant”.

    Like

    • covfefe999 says:

      Just read Bob Thoms comment above regarding wages. His point (made via question) is excellent, raise the wage. The workers will come. Maybe a huge company can do that, what about a smaller one? There must be little incentive for a smaller one to go into or stay in the manufacturing business unless somehow they are making extraordinary profits and can support paying higher wages.

      Like

    • Little Annie’s Fannie says:

      I have a friend whose son was made to take Algebra 2, Chemistry, and 3 years of Spanish in order to get a high school diploma because one day he “might” want to go to college. He wanted to become an electrician, which does require higher education just not a traditional 4 year degree. HS said no, must take college ready classes for diploma. Funny thing is that only 2 years after leaving HS and taking courses at a technical school, he now makes more than any employee at the HS (including principal and counselors who insisted he couldn’t be successful without that 4 year degree).
      Follow the logic. How’s life in the rabbit hole??

      Liked by 6 people

      • covfefe999 says:

        I wrote: But those of you here who are parents: would you dare guide your child away from college and into manufacturing? I think few of you would. Maybe guide the child away from college into a skilled trade, but I don’t think many of you would say “don’t go to school at all, just work at this tire plant”,.

        Like

      • I have a friend with little to no education. He travels the world fixing machinery that makes plastic grocery bags. Generous annual bonus, and on more than $250,000, and he has SEEN the world!

        Liked by 2 people

        • covfefe999 says:

          Is he in a skilled trade? I’m excluding skilled trades. I’m talking about straight manufacturing plant jobs, you go to a plant, you do your job, and you go home. You’re not fixing machinery, you’re putting a part into another part or putting material into a mold, etc.

          Like

          • booger71 says:

            Before NAFTA, we had hundreds of thousands of those jobs in the U.S.. Yes people went to a job worked on a factory line, made good money, went home and spent time with their family. When they retired, they had a good pension. People seemed happier, families were more intact. I am not seeing a downside

            Liked by 1 person

          • He started out packing the bags. Being hands on every time the machine broke down, gave him the skills to now be a millionaire!

            Like

          • Coldeadhands says:

            There are many “dead end jobs” that require a four year college education. What’s up with your negative bias toward assembly work?
            How many jobs does the average person have in a lifetime? I dare say that most jobs are transitional.

            Like

            • covfefe999 says:

              I don’t have negative bias. Please read my comment carefully before you berate me. I am asking how many parents would guide their kids into taking plant jobs as opposed to going to college or trade school. That’s all. I have personal knowledge that plant jobs can be excellent jobs but I fear most parents don’t want to take the chance, they think their kids should all be getting 4 year college degrees. Johnson was complaining about a lack of workers. What do you do if you are a manufacturing business owner and you have no labor?

              Like

      • screwauger says:

        When I graduated HS in 1978 my dad forced me to go to college because of social security death benefits from my mom would only continue past 18 for full time students. I didn’t want to go and I had several friends who went to work for a local auto parts store (privately owned not a big chain). I buckled down after a year or two and got my degree and for years I felt sorry for those friends as that owner could close at anytime and they would have nothing to fall back on. As my college educated wife and I in our white collar jobs groomed our two daughters for college, my friends continue to gain stock options and become managers and have their own stores. This was stil just Bob Browns auto parts and machine shop. One day about twenty years ago, Bob Brown managed to hook up with NAPA. The store(s) are still called Brown’s Auto Parts NAPA. Every single one of my HS friends makes double or triple what I make today. Many have sales positions on the road and are making 6 digits with unlimited perks to major car races, special discounts and preferred status for certain manufacturers. My dad was a machinist. He wanted and needed that social security money but more than that, he didn’t want me in a “sweat shop” like he was all his life.
        I sure wish I could get a do over.

        Liked by 1 person

        • screwauger says:

          It continues:
          Two years after I graduated college with a degree in psychology I applied for an electricians apprenticeship. I had several interviews with the local IBEW office. They turned down my application because they did not think I was serious and just needed a job (I was an assistant manager of an Arby’s at the time). I so wanted to ditch my degree and twist wires, be a tradesman but…

          Liked by 1 person

    • drjhigg says:

      No I tried and failed to get my son thru 4 years. Instead he, went 5 and felt humiliated at his “failure” in not completing a degree. He went to work as a successful programmer almost immediately and serves in middle level management now for the past 10 years. There are so many ways to succeed really. We drive people into unhappiness so often. I am really guilty on this point I fear.

      Liked by 1 person

    • abstain says:

      I went through college, but realized I wanted to work outside, so I started grading floors by hand and tar coating foundations. Eventually I found I enjoyed, and made good money, framing houses with a regular crew.

      Cubicle work is pretty stultifying.

      Liked by 2 people

      • covfefe999 says:

        If you have kids, would you guide any of them into skipping college (or skilled trade training) and taking jobs at a local manufacturing plant?

        Like

        • abstain says:

          They’ve all taken up trades after college, just like I did. At this point, their education is a part of them. It’s not all bad.

          The Theater major acts in his free time. The English major builds theater sets in NYC. The Architecture major is actually working for an architect, and doing some building too.

          Now if the local bank would go for consolidation of their various debts, give them a decent rate and KEEP the debt local, we’d be a little happier, but life is good.

          Thanks for asking.

          Liked by 1 person

          • covfefe999 says:

            Not trying to be a pest but you didn’t answer my question. Would you have guided any of your kids to take local manufacturing jobs rather than go to school or learn a skilled trade? I ask because I think most people wouldn’t, and it causes the problem Johnson is complaining about. We can’t have lots of manufacturing businesses if there aren’t enough people willing to work the jobs.

            Like

            • abstain says:

              We were writing to each other at the same time.

              At the time, and at their age, they wanted to leave home, and college is one path or bridge to real life. If companies came to high schools and offered apprenticeships or job learning programs again as they used to, things might have gone differently.

              Liked by 1 person

            • booger71 says:

              And we can’t have those jobs (for people not to apply for) unless those jobs are brought back first. Before the horse can pull the cart, the cart has to be attached to the horse first.

              Liked by 1 person

              • covfefe999 says:

                But Johnson is saying people (at least the ones in Wisconsin) don’t want the jobs. I think he has a point, I just don’t like that he gives up. So what do you do if you want to start a manufacturing business but you can’t find people to work in your plant? You would have to raise the wage probably, how much can you bear before it’s not cost effective and you say “screw this, I’m going to start some other kind of business”?

                Like

            • Alligator Gar says:

              Yes. I would certainly encourage my son to do this. My son hates school. Letting him GED at 16 and go to work at a tire plant would be so good for him. He’d stop hating himself for not liking academics like his friends. He’d be making a little money, learning an industry tied to something he loves, cars. It might push him on to learn a skilled trade (mechanic) at some juncture. It would be a great opportunity for a strapping young fella who hates school.

              Like

              • covfefe999 says:

                You are the kind of person who is supporting manufacturing then. I know some of those plant jobs can be good jobs and can lead to satisfying well-paying careers, either by remaining at the plant or moving onward and upward with the experience. I wonder if you are the norm or you are an exception. I fear the latter. If we have too many people who think plant jobs are crap then we can’t have much manufacturing here in the US.

                Like

        • abstain says:

          I certainly get your point covfefe. College is a rip off, and academia pretty much needs a reality check.

          Online colleges are growing, and the President will push internet access for the entire country. Competition. MAGA.

          One of my kids’ contemporaries apprenticed as a plumber instead of going to college. He’s a plumber now. He took a little flack at first, but erudition doesn’t compare well with a fat paycheck.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Coldeadhands says:

            I have had plenty of interactions with erudite tradesmen. They may not have been well read in arenas that some here find valuable but values are in the eye of the beholder. The precepts of liberal arts degrees do not make the world go around.
            I want my children to be healthy, faithful individuals who are good parents to their children. What they do for work is secondary. Parents do the important teaching. Omit teaching Faith at the peril of your children. College will not teach the foundational values.

            Like

        • booger71 says:

          I would, in a heartbeat.

          Like

  18. Kathy says:

    This really shows how much we need “term limits.” These senators are like the doctor who has some good news and bad news for his patient. The doctor gives the bad news first- “You have terminal cancer.” The good news- “ I get paid anyway.”

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Madison Grant says:

    I’ll tell you one thing. Maybe I’m not “blue blood” Republican enough for this comment section, but the obscene practice of paying 3 million dollar golden parachutes to executives who FAIL at their jobs lies in stark contrast to the Wall Street economy snobs at places like the National Review telling middle class Americans to “suck it up, buttercup; this is the way it is.”

    Liked by 2 people

    • Katherine McCoun says:

      Express that concern via boycott of the company and via Demand of our elected officials that Out tax dollars Not bail out either those companies that fail nor the banks that lend them money nor the pensions that were unwisely promised. NONE of that is a function of gov or my responsibility as a tax payer. Each business must deal with their own pr fallout and the consequences of their spending, hiring and investing choices.

      Our safety net is to cushy for corporations, not just the working poor.

      Like

    • Bob Thoms says:

      I doubt anyone here is a “blue blood Republican”, but I could be wrong. Anyone?

      Liked by 1 person

    • WVNed says:

      Why do I care what a company pays it’s CEO? I can choose not to be a shareholder of that company.
      Stupid liberals see some sort of moral equivalence between golden parachutes and politicians stealing from taxpayers and there simply isn’t.

      Like

      • Madison Grant says:

        You do realize the people paying out the golden parachutes are the ones paying the thieving politicians too? They don’t get rich off their government salaries. They get rich off the lobbying loot. Why is it okay to slam the poor or the middle class for having their priorities out of whack, but not the wealthy? If Libertarians are right, and the law of natural self interest takes care of everything, why did it take a billionaire looking out for the broader interests of the health of his nation (and not self interest- look at what POTUS has exposed himself and his family to!) to finally intervene in this situation? The lassez faire economics of the last 30 years has given us the law of the jungle, not some live and let live utopia.

        Like

        • Alligator Gar says:

          We’ve not had Smith-type laissez-faire economics in this country in over 100 years. In the last 30, you have been experiencing the pain of fascism, which Mussolini correctly said should better be called “corporatism” because the interests of the state and the major corporations were the exact same (and to ^%$# with the people.)

          Like

          • Madison Grant says:

            You’re correct. It is, more accurately put, the dawning of fascism aka “the merging of the corporate and the state.” It is lasses faire in the sense that it’s anti-nationalistic and globalist, and promotes ‘hands off’ to the extent that it allows the most powerful to be predatory (thus corporate sharks consolidating and ‘eating’ each other as the power and wealth pools into fewer and fewer hands).

            Like

  20. Phil aka Felipe says:

    Here ya’ go.

    The truth of Trump’s words being shown right before your eyes.

    Listen to what he said in this campaign speech:

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Kristin says:

    Again, it has been a few weeks I have said this because we have been wading in the deep weeds if DC and all the shenanigans, I love my President.
    A man of his word. Working hard for us.
    A leader.
    Thank you for this exposure Sundance.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. H.R. says:

    Ron Johnson, in the article: “We need to do the value added things.”

    He does not understand his own words.
    Mining ore adds value to what would be useless stuff in the ground.
    Smelting the ore into metal adds value to what was once stuff in the ground.
    Machining the metal adds value to what was once stuff in the ground.
    Assembling the machined parts into useful products adds value to what was once stuff in the ground.
    Transporting the finished goods to where they are to be used adds value to what was once stuff in the ground.

    The design and engineering of innovative, useful products starts the value-added chain, but the most brilliant idea ever for a product is useless just sitting on a piece of paper. The transformative steps taken to get that idea on paper into the hands of the user are the value added to the idea.

    Services are conveniences and only exist because someone created value – something people can eat or use – to trade for the convenience. And government jobs create no value whatsoever. They only add cost; no value.

    Mining, Manufacturing, and Agriculture create wealth (cf Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations). Everything else is the cost of convenience which is purchased from created wealth.

    Liked by 5 people

    • covfefe999 says:

      I think Johnson was talking about the inability to find people to do manufacturing jobs. What do you do if you own a manufacturing business but you can’t find enough people to work the jobs, and you can’t afford to pay a higher wage to draw people from other jobs? Kids are being told to go to college to, presumably, end up with higher paying jobs and more stable careers. How do you as the manufacturing business owner compete with that?

      Like

      • H.R. says:

        He did discuss that but it was a different point of his, covfefe999.

        We have too many people doing non-value adding jobs and not enough people doing value adding jobs or not working at all. That’s why the US is in debt up to its eyeballs.

        We have enough people in the US, but the real problem to address, as many have previously pointed out, is to get them working at something useful; wealth-creating work.

        We need to get back to the spirit of America. “If thee don’t work, thee don’t eat.” (2nd Thessalonians 3:10. (Yes, we should care for one another, but that’s an individual mandate, not a government program.)

        Liked by 2 people

      • booger71 says:

        You go to the high school guidance counselors with information and job opportunities about your company. They did it in the 60’s and early 70’s when I was in high school. We had a large paper cup plant, a Dayton Rubber v-belt plant, and a Zenith plant who were competing for workers right out of high school, along with various skilled trade union reps offering apprenticeships to kids out of high school We also had a strong VoTech program where Jr’s and Sr’s could go after lunch and learn a trade.

        Liked by 2 people

  23. Tom Begley says:

    Much easier to find workers if you don’t make life too easy for them with free stuff. This is not rocket science.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Trialdog says:

    Think “Kohler.”
    Think Chinese manufacturing.
    Think campaign contributions.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Alligator Gar says:

      Hahahaha. I have a Kohler kitchen sink faucet I put in about 5 years ago. It has silently leaked under the cabinets. What a mess. Now I have to put another one in. Just to put another one in 5 years from now…..

      Like

  25. Jenny R. says:

    Ron Johnson, the guy whose investment portfolio is about half stocks in foreign companies? Including perhaps an Irish tax dodge?
    I don’t know why he would EVER want foreign companies to dominate over American manufacturing…

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Jenny R. says:

    It’s almost midterm time, and I highly suggest researching uniparty canidates by reading what their loyal opposition has said about them in the past: they’ve both really thrown some dirt at each other in the past during their kabuki campaigns, a lot of it will stick.
    And both sides deserve it — and didn’t expect it either. Win-win

    Like

  27. StanH says:

    This is what happens when now nearly a generation of kids have been told that we can all be poets. I believe we have begun the coarse correction with Mr. Trump and his emphasis on American Made, Technical Schools, etc. The parallels with the Roman Empire are eerily apparent, barbarian invasion, pampered elites and the overt dismantling of pride of country by our idiot leftist, with the creation of entitled imps who only fight for themselves. This will be a heavy lift indeed with so many of our young men emasculated, happily sitting back and asking “what’s in it for me?” while sucking their thumbs waiting for their “fair share” as opposed to getting off their effete butts and “once again into the breech dear friends” This country used to produce in spades, a fierce minded people with can do spirit that achieved Herculean tasks with regularity. Now we’ve been sold the Moral Equivalence horse twaddle that creates Myrmidons who simply say “yes master” as they take their daily dose of Soma and obediently step away from the rigors of life. All of this for the “cause” of diminishing the USA. We had better find our spines and prove Sen. Johnson and his CoC masters wrong.

    Liked by 2 people

  28. carshop says:

    What these chuckleheads don’t realize is that is is in our national security interest to manufacture. Not that they care, they’re only lining their pockets. The more we do here, the less we are concerned when we have to be strategic with one of our so called trading partners.

    Like

  29. covfefe999 says:

    I just realized, if we’re going to criticize Johnson or anyone else then we need to offer up a solution.

    I wrote above: What do you do if you own a manufacturing business but you can’t find enough people to work the jobs, and you can’t afford to pay a higher wage to draw people from other jobs?

    What’s the solution? I ask this openly, not with any snark or pessimism. Do we need government subsidies? If the manufacturer bears the entire burden of higher wages the product prices will surely raise up. Are we all willing to pay higher prices? Do we add tariffs to imports to force them to match the cost of our domestic prices?

    Like

    • Bob Thoms says:

      ” can’t afford to pay a higher wage…”

      An age old problem that the government can’t solve. Leave it to the market to sort it out. Maybe that business has to close if they can’t get workers, can’t pay the going wage, can’t automate the jobs.

      Capitalism can be a cruel sometimes. Leave government out of picking winners and losers.

      Is there a role for government in helping communities and disadvantaged groups? Yes, but stay out of playing Fixer in the micro economy.

      Liked by 1 person

      • covfefe999 says:

        I think the market has sorted itself out and unfortunately we are the manufacturing losers. Lax trade policies and cheap labor in other countries, right now we cannot compete. And if we make it so we can compete I think it necessarily means higher prices. I’m willing to make the sacrifice, pay more, have less, keep things longer, in order to help our economy.
        But I don’t think I’m the norm.

        Like

    • trumptyear says:

      vocational high school training……
      “States like California initially shifted away from vocational education in high schools in order to prepare students to enter the state’s public universities, Forbes reported. Another reason vocational education has declined in California high schools over the last several decades, according to the Los Angeles Times, is that a combination of overcrowding and budget cuts forced schools to convert shop rooms into classrooms.”

      Like

    • maggie0987 says:

      In the clip with Johnson you hear PDJT pointing out that employers are also competing with government in the market. Therefore, remove the government as a competitor angle (welfare benefits etc.) and you might get somewhere.
      Also, watching this video it is so interesting to watch PDJT’s style and manner – he is a good listener and does not seem interested in scoring debating points.
      I’ve said this before, that, as a Canadian, I am SO jealous that you have PDJT and we have Turdeau!

      Like

      • H.R. says:

        maggie0987: “In the clip with Johnson you hear PDJT pointing out that employers are also competing with government in the market.”

        Exactly! And government is pure cost. It eats wealth. None of its jobs create wealth. Government jobs are, by and large, patronage and power for politicians. Robbing us to buy our own votes is not a MAGA strategy.

        Downsize government and there will be plenty of workers for wealth creating jobs. If you want to eat, you’ll find work. If you don’t have the skill, you find a way to acquire the needed skill. There is no need to involve government. Government ‘help’ is cradle-to-grave nanny state thinking and it sucks the marrow out of self reliance and initiative. It’s a good way to enslave a populace.

        Like

  30. Bob Thoms says:

    The major problem is the inner city poor/unskilled. Rural poor problem is a problem that is more easily solved.

    Trump has obviously thought this through. It is why his war on drugs is part of his economic plan. The rural poor have been newly devastated by the opioid pandemic.

    Like

  31. President Trump lit up the upper players of the globalist scum. Their bosses and they are the true enemies of the United States of America.

    Like

  32. Example A: I am an old dude and need a nose hair trimer. The cheap crap on the market is annoying. The first one I bought died before the first battery lost charge. Two others lasted less then two months. I use sissors and am so discusted I am tempted to run with them. I would GLADLY pay more for something made in the good ol’USA that last!

    Like

  33. jbrickley says:

    The swamp GOPe is completely full of B.S. They want cheap slave labor provided by the new sub-class of illegals whom they can strong arm and control. They want to do what China does, employ people in horrid conditions for peanuts and then profit off their backs. The truth is things can be far more advanced and you can have highly skilled labor doing the work. Apple could manufacture their iPhones with more automation and they are in fact adding automation as of late. But it’s just been cheaper to use the slave labor of hundreds of thousands of Chinese to do things like install one screw and pass the iPhone to the next drone who plugs in one ribbon cable and slides the iPhone to the next person who installs another screw. Modern manufacturing does not require brainless drones, it requires highly skilled people using advanced machinery. America can lead the way in these new advanced processes. People need to engineer these processes and service the machines and operate the machines.

    A manufacturer such as Pratt & Whitney pioneered advanced manufacturing. They expanded it’s manufacturing after winning both civilian and military contracts and opened new plants for which they needed to staff and ramp up. They rented trailers across the country to nearby states and advertised in the local papers and television that they were recruiting workers. No experience necessary just a high school diploma. My father signed up at one of these trailers in a shopping center parking lot in upstate NY. He was dropped off at a pay by the week motel in CT and he showed up for work in Hartford CT. The newly hired staff were on-boarded and advised to pair up for carpooling and housing. He met my future uncle from RI who was also recruited via a trailer. They got an apartment together as roommates. They were trained in an apprenticeship program that included courses in mathematics and how to measure at 10,000th of an inch. This was back way before CNC machines, everything was human-driven. They were trained as tool and die makers and worked in machine shops. They both worked 30 years for Pratt & Whitney and retired. They both provided for their families enabling myself, my sibling and my cousins to prosper more than they did to advance in life.

    The future of manufacturing is 3D printing which is the opposite of subtractive manufacturing. Instead of carving out a particular part from a solid block of metal alloy, it is built up layer by layer from metal powder which the excess can be vacuumed up and recycled and used for the next part. This technology was actually in use at Pratt & Whitney in the late 80’s. They were 3D printing forms for molds which they previously carved out of wood. The technology has come a very long way with new printing materials and the ability to use metal instead of just plastics or ceramics. As exciting as 3D printing is to the future of manufacturing the other big new technology is materials science where new materials are discovered with new physical properties. Lighter, harder, stronger, more flexible, etc., etc.

    America can lead in technology and innovation, if the schools are not teaching STEM then the businesses can do do it themselves. I took my father’s old apprenticeship books and binders to my mathematics teacher and she was blown away by the endless practical application of Algebra, Geometry, and Trigonometry. Here were blueprints and exercises showing how a machinist must think about things. She made copies to use with her classes.

    Liked by 1 person

    • jbrickley says:

      Oh, Lenovo (Chinese, formerly IBM) ThinkPads have a recall due to a loose screw that can slip into the battery causing a short circuit and cascade failure of the Lithium-Ion battery. That means it will burst into white-hot flames and burn down your home or office!

      As far as I can surmise, the only logical root cause would be a flaw where a plastic mold screw hole was incorrect and the brainless drones inserted a screw that didn’t bite and never reported it until many thousand of these laptops hit the market. We want people who can freaking think and a work environment where a worker can raise their hand and say, there is something wrong here! Not Chinese labor trained not to think but to work and for Chinese management who will cut corners to make a buck. Like buying lead paint from your brother-in-law at a deep discount and using it toddler toys for America. Or reducing meat protein in pet food and intentionally doping it with harmful chemicals to make the pet food pass inspection by reporting more protein than reality. Thus poisoning many thousand cats and dogs in the USA.

      Liked by 1 person

      • annieoakley says:

        The Chinese even put the chemicals (ground up melamine) into powdered infant formula and killed their own children. Cutting corners is all they do.

        Like

    • dutzie60 says:

      jbrickley, that is a great story and homage to your father and uncle. Thanks for posting.

      Liked by 1 person

  34. bofh says:

    Education (the noble concept) is not the same thing as Education (the big business that is creating a debtor class).

    How’s that degree in French Literature going to help anyone? Gender Studies? Plus saddling the student with a huge debt load (or, as seems inevitable, ultimately passing it off to the taxpayers as a giant bail-out).

    You won’t find any visible criticism of “Big Edu” – in fact, the term itself is yet to be coined. And yet, what product, exactly, is Big Edu turning out? What value does it render in terms of cost versus measurable positive result? It’s past time that some scrutiny is paid to the spiraling cost of college-level education, as well as to the assumption that “college” (as currently constituted) is somehow necessary across the board.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. TwoLaine says:

    Sundance, where is the cold anger banner on this one? Sorry, nothing pisses me off more than b.s. like this. I guess you could say it’s my trigger. This needs to be amplified and replayed over and over and over again.

    If you needed any more clues that these people care nothing about solving real problems when they get to the District of Corruption, after their miserable b.s. attempt to repeal ObamaCare last year, this is it.

    What else do you need to know about Ron Johnson? He is clearly an advocate of bussing unknown foreigners into your towns in the middle of the night to disrupt and ruin your towns forever. To steal your childrens education in the name of diversity, break your hospitals and take every last bit of low cost housing they can find, driving up the cost of housing for everyone else. They will also tap into your shelters, your food pantries,and every last dime you have left in your city coffers.

    Ask Ron Johnson how much money leaves the USA because of all these foreigners we bring in for b.s. diversity and humanitarian reasons.

    Billions of dollars are lost to US economy each year as migrants send money back home
    by Ann Corcoran
    1 Feb 2018
    https://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/2018/02/01/billions-of-dollars-are-lost-to-us-economy-each-year-as-migrants-send-money-back-home

    FAIR: Refugee resettlement costs taxpayers billions; welfare biggest chunk
    by Ann Corcoran
    7 Feb 2018
    https://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/2018/02/07/fair-refugee-resettlement-costs-taxpayers-billions-welfare-biggest-chunk/

    Liked by 1 person

  36. ForGodandCountry says:

    Johnson not up for re-election until 2022. Same for Mike Lee and Roy Blunt.
    Since 2014, Blunt has been the largest recipient of campaign contributions from Monsanto, which is headquartered in Missouri. BOUGHT AND PAID FOR.

    Lamar Alexander (R-TN), however, is up for re-election this year.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Mickturn says:

    The FACT that most of our manufacturing jobs are overseas is NO accident. The Globalists/Elitists pushed those laws/policies to line their own pockets. Same on ‘bad’ trade deals. We let our negotiators give away the farm then wonder why we’re getting screwed! We need to stick to MAGA and let those in other countries stick their own M?GA. Oh, by the way when are all the countries we saved in various wars ever going to pay us back?

    Like

  38. SteChatte says:

    Well, industrially speaking, the USA should be more invested in energy efficiency, R&D, and robotics. “Labor” is for the relatively uneducated. Sure, stuff made by overqualified American labor will work better and last 10 times longer than crap made by Chinese peasants. But stuff made by robots running on cheap energy is even better, and definitely lower priced. The USA’s wealth is sufficient to make this transformation, that is, where our population is maxed out as “engineers”, and only a small fraction works in factories making robots.

    Like

  39. Bob Thoms says:

    Warehouse work is a thing of the past, kept in demand because of NAFTA and other trade deals.

    We have had a high demand for warehouse workers because of off shore manufacturing; with manufacturing returned to America, warehouse demand will shrink significantly. On time delivery to and from manufacturing facilities reduce the need to warehouse component parts and finished product.

    Like

  40. trapper says:

    Oh, let’s just call it out. The interests he represents don’t want to hire black Americans. When the employers tell him they can’t get enough workers, what they mean is they can’t get enough illegal Mexicans. They would rather hire illegal Mexicans than black American citizens because they can pay the illegals below market wages and treat them however they want because most of them are too desperate to object.

    So they continue to flog the lie that American blacks (let’s be honest, that’s who they are talking about) are lazy and pampered (jobs Americans won’t do) and would rather sit around on welfare than work (pay them to not work). The notion of a shortage of American labor is a bald faced lie, told to distract from the nonexistent southern border that provides their steady supply of cheap illegal labor.

    In Chicago, whenever a new employer opens or someone puts on a “job fair” they get mobbed, mostly by inner city black Americans who want to work. They can get 100 applications for every opening for unskilled work. So just knock it off with the lie. We all know better.

    Liked by 1 person

    • trapper says:

      Oh, and while I’m at it, that’s one hell of a way to sell Wisconsin development, isn’t it? “Please don’t move your business to Wisconsin. We’re full up, and our lazy citizens don’t want your jobs anyway.” I expect he’s going to get an earful when he goes home. Hah!

      Liked by 1 person

  41. mptc says:

    This country has aborted over 50 million of its citizens since Roe v. Wade. Let that sink in. How does a country grow an economy, populate and fund schools, keep Social Security solvent, etc. when that many people are wiped off the face of the earth. Now ask yourself, why does the Republican lead House and Senate refuse to defund Planned Parenthood?

    Liked by 2 people

  42. John Adams says:

    “corporate conservative media” Thats a lot of syllables. I think I can reduce this to just one. Truth.

    Like

  43. MIKE says:

    Globalism courses through these swamp denizens’ veins. It’s all they know. They know not of hard work, and all have soft callous-free hands. RINOism is our clear and present danger. It is maddening to watch as these hucksters try to lay our trade deficit problems at the feet of the President and his team of real-world experienced advisers. Who work for $1.00 a year, well some of them do, anyway. IOW, they have become completely disconnected from middle class workingmans’ reality. Sad but true. Get ’em out. Next election. Or it will not change. I recommend we schiff-can the IMF. “The Fund” does not hold America among its’ best interests.
    IN TRUMP WE TRUST

    Like

  44. fleporeblog says:

    This was the best 52+ minutes I have spent in a long long time! Wow was that an absolute eye opener. The Republicans were absolutely disgusting! These POS are bought and paid for by the CoC. Senator Blunt from MO is a total POS. The Democrat House Member from MO truly cared about those 900 workers that lost their job when the aluminum smelter factory closed.

    The Democrats actually seemed to be more aligned with our President. They want him to go after China 🇨🇳. Other than Senator Portman from Ohio, every other Republican was throwing out their BS worrying about steel and aluminum costs going up if tariffs are set, stating multiple times that only 3% of our steel usage is attributed to the military. We only import 16% of steel etc. etc.

    I was so grateful that our President pointed out that what he has done in the Energy Sector is going to payoff Bigly in dropping the cost of manufacturing in our country.

    I wrote the following after the 4th Quarter and 2017 Annual GDP was announced at the end of January:

    What is holding our country and economy back is the IMPORTS that we are reliant upon. Notice in the 4th Quarter and for the 2017 year, there was an increase (acceleration) of imports which is subtracted from our GDP totals. Our President and his Killers absolutely understand that this was the plan of GHB, Bill Clinton, GWB & BHO. NAFTA & China becoming part of the WTO are the two creatures that was born and nurtured by these POS.

    Realistically, a goal of 3% GDP for the 2018 year is what we should all aim for. The idea of 4% or 5% is not realistic at this time. The reason being, our need for imports. We saw Chrysler announce they are closing a factory in Mexico and expanding their factory in Michigan. Campbell Soup is closing their factory in Toronto, Canada and bringing their entire operation back to the US. Samsung and LG are opening new factories in SC and TN this year. Mazda and Toyota are expanding their production in the US with their factory in Alabama.

    If the Mexicans and Canadians don’t agree to our terms with NAFTA, we need to get the hell out of there immediately. This will cause many new announcements of companies coming BACK to the US.

    Putting these tariffs on solar panels and washing machines may effect the price by $50 but it allows Whirlpool and other US companies an opportunity to compete. Our President will be announcing massive tariffs on steel and aluminum within the next 90 days. Once again it will cost US consumers some additional money but it will bring our steel and aluminum companies back to life.

    Everything I described will truly have AMERICA BACK AND BETTER THAN EVER! Cutting our need on imports has a multiplier effect. Our GDP by 2019 and 2020 will be closing in if not at 4% Annual GDP. By the time our President walks away on January 20, 2025, 5%+ GDP will become the new normal because factories will once again be up & booming like they did before NAFTA and China’s introduction into the WTO.

    Like

    • MIKE says:

      I’m more than willing to pay a few bucks extra for a quality component. I sense most Americans would be, too.
      Good post, flep. The CoC toadies are a real threat. Many likes

      Liked by 2 people

  45. Bob Thoms says:

    Wow. Some really great points be made in this thread,,,,,,,really smart POVs…..an education for me.

    Like

  46. John K Evans says:

    I just got back from Bangkok, where the big scandal of the moment centers on the effort to reduce pollution by replacing aging gas powered buses with new LPG fueled vehicles. Hundreds of new buses are sitting on the docks in quarantine. It seems the winning bidder for this contract is assembling the buses in Malaysia (a fellow ASEAN nation), but the parts are coming out of China. Just as China uses back doors in NAFTA to pour auto parts into America, so they are doing the same thing in Thailand.

    Like

  47. nottakingthisanymore says:

    My disgust knows no limits. Just when I think Senators like Perdue and his slimy GA cohort make me sick from there COC pandering half-truths telling Border Security Enhancements then I hear this Johnson. Yes, Barak Johnson manufacturing can come back. Reopen those coal-fired power plants and aluminum production and steel production will return. Just Order the Tenn Valley Power Authority to buy them and open them as a government resource. Sell the energy straight to the smelters at cost.

    That is Sen Barak O Johnson if you want Americans to have great jobs and wages?

    Like

  48. One point I never hear anyone make, but that really, really matters long-term, is that we need to have more children. That is especially true for right-of-center Christians.

    In many ways this is a simple math problem. If you want your culture and beliefs to remain relevant, even after you’re gone, and for the US and the world to be a place in which your children, grandchildren, and future descendants want to live, then it has to contain a critical mass of such people. This is also critical for growing GDP, which we have to do if we want to avoid crushing taxes and still service (or even pay down) our national debt.

    I can see the many reasons people don’t have more children – it’s a ton of work, they’re expensive, and it can be hard to be optimistic about the future. Yet, just to maintain population, we’d have to average 2.1 children per couple. Ideally we’d have even more.

    My wife and I have pretty much decided to try for a third, largely for this reason. If you care about the future, there is literally nothing more important you can do than try to increase the number of good, decent people living in it. Perhaps this is even an area government could help (year-round school and free after-school programs would certainly help), but, if you’re still young enough – have another. The future will thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  49. cheryl says:

    They killed American jobs with NAFTA and they want to keep the status quo? I know I’m naive, but I find it very disheartening that we can’t even trust the people we voted into office to look after our best interests. I was raised to trust but they have broke me as far as trust is concerned. Now I’m just angry and that’s not the way I wanted to live my life. These people have to go.

    Like

  50. Seattlewonder says:

    Amazing to me that our elected officials fail to see the correlation between the break down of middle class families and loss of manufacturing jobs in the US. Not everyone is cut out to be a college graduate—I know as I have 3 boys who are all in skilled trade positions. Perhaps if the same emphasis was put on vocational training as academics we would have a stronger, more diverse workforce.

    Liked by 13 people

    • g.w says:

      Specially since the halls of higher education can’t be trusted to educate any longer, but only indoctrinate.

      Liked by 10 people

    • Bendix says:

      Especially when those college graduates are working part-time service jobs and will never pay off those student loans.
      I know way too many ‘STEM’ degreed people working outside those fields, if they work at all.
      I think if I were in high school today, and they kept pushing me into math and science, toward some boring, low-wage job in a chip plant that was going to close in a few years, I’d kill myself.

      Like

    • Bendix says:

      As far as not having enough disciplined workers, do not forget how many of our most disciplined have been in the military in these years of endless war, and will need something to do that pays well when they get out.
      By the time we get our manufacturing up and running again, we will have a new complement of workers coming out of the high schools, who haven’t been ruined yet.
      We are Americans! We can do this.
      As far as the labor shortages today, look how many rushed in for the high-wage fracking jobs, as they became available.
      People can’t move their families for low pay.
      This won’t happen overnight, but then again, it does not have to.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Rich Owens says:

      Not everyone will get or want a 4 year degree. Not everyone wants to sit on their butt and get paid to do so. In my opinion, what we need are more apprenticeship and trade school type classes in high school and post high school.

      Liked by 3 people

    • cherylpass says:

      I don’t think they “fail to see.” I think they don’t care. There”s a reason they don’t care…which I’m sure has to do with filling their pockets on global corporatism.

      Liked by 2 people

    • CO Hokie says:

      ‘Amazing to me that our elected officials fail to see the correlation between the break down of middle class families and loss of manufacturing jobs in the US.’
      I’m pretty sure the officials see the correlation because the break down of the middle class is one of their goals.

      Liked by 2 people

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