President Trump Opioid Crisis Announcement – 2:00pm Livestream…

President Trump is schedule to announce a public health emergency over the opioid crisis. This declaration of a public health emergency will allow grant money to be used for the opioid epidemic and ease certain laws and regulations to help deal with it. (This is different from declaring the opioid crisis a national emergency.)

UPDATE: Video Added

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump will declare the nation’s opioid crisis a public health emergency on Thursday in a bid to redirect federal resources and loosen regulations to combat widespread abuse, senior administration officials said.

RSBN Livestream LinkWH Livestream LinkAlternate Livestream Link

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216 Responses to President Trump Opioid Crisis Announcement – 2:00pm Livestream…

  1. LARS says:

    My niece has major issue with opioid, hope this helps.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. frank says:

    I hope part of this crackdown on opioids involves Napalm to the Afghan poppy fields.Do the world a big favor. Hopefully the farmer will be tending his field of red when the fire ball hits..

    Liked by 10 people

    • mike says:

      These synthetics are so potent weight-wise, its hard to believe napalm and poppy spraying could be effective.

      Failures in medicine, borders, economics, upbringing and education drive this.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Mal says:

        What drives this is American troops guarding the poppy fields in Afghanistan, the taliban cut production to practically zero, then, the Americans arrived.

        Like

      • sat0422 says:

        Failure in local authorities to be vigilent about pill mills who only issue these drugs AND failure of state authroities to monitor the scrip writing by various doctors for these drugs may also be part of the problem.
        That said, there are people who need such drugs but since the scripts must be picked up and taken to the pharmacy, this should not be a problem. Since the computer has come of age in dispensing drugs, it should be easy to recognize when a person is taking more than they are prescribed for a chronic pain condition. Please remember some people are living with horrible chronic pain everyday. It might help if the laws and effort to limit Tylenol, Aleve, and Aspirin could be removed and the hysteria that exists over their use needs to be toned down…

        Like

        • Llamamama3 says:

          Well said!
          Those using NSAIDS on a daily basis should have blood tests every 6 months. Physicians are able to see from the test if a body is beginning to develop problematic side effects such as kidney function, liver function, gastrointestinal bleeding (anemia is an indicator). If any anomaly begins to show, physician will begin preventative measure to stop it from becoming a life threatening situation. A good physician, common sense, and becoming a proactive patient by using research is what’s needed, not hysteria!

          Like

  3. Dekester says:

    The speech is live on CNN and Fox.

    Melania is speaking now, and her message and presentation is simply beautiful.

    How on earth can your fellow Americans not fully respect this lovely First Lady.

    Opioid addiction is a national emergency.

    Thank you PDJT for this commitment.

    God bless PDJT

    Liked by 10 people

  4. sunnydaze says:

    Melania is giving a great speech. Once again.

    Liked by 5 people

  5. G3 says:

    Beautifully spoken, First Lady Melania.

    Liked by 5 people

  6. Sharon says:

    Opioids, cigarettes, alcohol, propane, cold medications, sharp knives and pencils, pressure cookers, guns, bump stocks……….there is no end to what can endanger individual lives.

    Babysitters’ fists.

    Hot mud pots at Yellowstone.

    Outlaw it.

    Regulate it.

    Finance it.

    Staff ot/

    The assumptions that drive compassionate government spending have no sunset.

    Liked by 17 people

    • Dekester says:

      True Sharon.

      The nanny State is out of control.

      I am not sure what you know of fentynal. It is an incredibly dangerous drug..there is an even more dangerous drug than that out there. Carfentynal ( not sure of the spelling.) used to tranquilize elephants among other things.

      First responders can become extremely ill with second hand exposure to these horrors.

      Liked by 8 people

      • Sayit2016 says:

        Sadly, tragically, my neice’s finance died of a drug overdose 8 months ago that was laced with Carfentanil or carfentanyl (Wildnil) it is 10,000 times more potent than morphine. He had been clean for 5 years and was on a good path… a beautiful, talented, gifted guy, that was crazy in love with my niece. A guy at work slipped it to him knowing he was a recovering addict. I am sickened to say he was a marine. To this day I do not know what made him make this choice….it is absolutely heartbreaking. I had this weird dream about him after he passed where he was saying noooooooooooooooooooooo!!!!! like this is never what he wanted but could not stop that dose from killing him. So this for me really hits home and make no mistake it IS an epidemic. RIP Ben…you were so loved and are terribly missed.

        Liked by 11 people

        • AM says:

          This is the nightmare we should have attended to long go. I’m so for your niece.

          Liked by 3 people

        • dekester says:

          We had to open a panel van door that was illegally parked on the street. Inside, three deceased youngsters. Heroin laced with fentynal.
          Heroin, which I have never used, nor any other illegal drug for that matter. Is nasty, and should never be experimented with.

          The new synthetics are LETHAL!

          Liked by 5 people

        • Minnie says:

          My sincere condolences to your family. ❤️

          Addiction is a disease, until it is properly classified as such, many continue to struggle with sobriety.

          It is a disease, one the family does not cause, cannot control and cannot change.

          ❤️

          Liked by 3 people

          • Sayit2016 says:

            Thank you Minnie…. until it touches your family there are so many things that one just does not understand. I have now seen first hand the heartbreak and the damage it does to families and loved ones.

            Liked by 2 people

            • Minnie says:

              ❤️

              Like

            • TPW says:

              While I am sympathetic to those that use the drug for the mental effects one should not want to cause harm to those who have to have pain relief to function. There are already many safe guards to legally control opiates to the point that people who legitamely need them are being denied access ……..those that are the abusers will seek them out in the black market and this is where most of the problem lies …..

              Liked by 4 people

              • Sayit2016 says:

                Those are two separate issues for sure. I agree 100% I do not want this to spill over to legitimate patients that medically need pain relief. I was in a Cessna 145 plane crash– and THANK God for strong pain medication. Like most people as soon as I could switch to a milder pain medication I did. It has done it’s job. A lot of the reasons people do get addicted is that the pain protocol is not working and they are taking more and more to get pain relief….and they know long term use of pain medication will abscess the lower gut. So what is the solution ? My older sister went through this with her osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis and had to have 2 feet of her colon removed !

                Liked by 1 person

                • sat0422 says:

                  I have a long time friend who as rheumatotid and was nearly down for the count. She finally found Rumicaid (not sure of spelling) and she has to pay for it herself because insurance won’t. It is the only thing that has helped keep it under control in her life and she is now 66 years old. Yes, some people suffer REAL and horrible pain.

                  Liked by 2 people

          • dginga says:

            I wish I could conjure up a lot of sympathy for addicts, but very few are truly “victims” of an “epidemic.” More like volunteers. Even if your loved one gets a dose of heroin laced with fentanyl instead of their usual straight heroin, they are still out there using HEROIN! Nothing says you have a drug problem like buying your meds from a guy named Chico out behind the 7-11.

            And for those who will jump all over me for being cold and cruel, I have had addicts in my family. They are all addicts by choice. You can call it a disease all you want, but the only cure for addiction is to CHOOSE not to use. It is tough, it may require a significant support system and some people just aren’t strong enough. But as long as there is some way for an addict to get high, from alcohol to pot to heroin to sniffing glue or paint, there will be addicts.

            And BTW, some of the addicts I know are CHOOSING to be sober, some are dying or dead from their addictions and some are very happily addicted and strongly resist any efforts from their loved ones to persuade them to stop before their addiction kills them.

            Liked by 6 people

            • Minnie says:

              “Require a significant support system”

              Yes, they do, more often than not the “addict” was already battling undiagnosed mental health issues prior to using – hence the term “self medicating”.

              Mental health services require a major overhaul, as well.

              Liked by 2 people

        • Homesteader says:

          Sadly so did my only nephew back in February. His poor parents were so devastated that they could barely stand up during the wake.

          I am sorry that your niece’ fiance’s family had to go through this too. No family should!

          Liked by 2 people

        • piper567 says:

          Was once on a psychiatric geriatric ward, having entered while a serious lockdown search was ongoing.
          Turns out one of the patients was critical, and no one could figure out the cause.
          Get this: one of the patients had been wearing a fentanyl patch, and the critically ill pt had peeled it off and ate it. This was pieced together due to an alert staffer who noticed a patch was missing on another pt.
          The very ill patient survived, but just barely.
          Even ordinary fentanyl is v dangerous to the uninitiated.
          The pt who lost his patch had had it on for days (time release), so the dosage which threatened the pt who ate the patch was fairly low.
          This has stuck w/me during all of theses discussions re this drug.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Mia C says:

          Wow. What a heartbreaking tale. My heart bleeds for you.

          Like

      • booger71 says:

        Fentynal patches are the only reason my 98 year old dad can get out of bed

        Liked by 7 people

        • Minnie says:

          After discectimy with fusion on my neck 13 years ago, they prescribed fentanyl patches for 5 days.

          It was the only thing that could control pain, and I was grateful when I no longer needed that degree of pain management.

          Still, there are very valid reasons for prescribing opioids (cancer, etc) and not all pain medication should be demonized.

          Liked by 8 people

          • Blaze says:

            Yes there are valid reasons for chronic pain sufferers and I am one of those. I have Scheuermann’s disease of the thoracic spine since childhood. Strong opiates (oxycodone) make my life bearable and productive. There are zero side effects for and about the only product that cuts the grinding and chronic pain from the disease. The hoops now I have to jump through monthly to get my Rx is getting pretty complicated and a real hassle compared to just a yr ago. Drug testing is one of them. Remember there are millions of us safely and doing it the legal way. Chronic pain for me and other similar can be dangerous because of the high blood pressure associated with pain.

            Liked by 5 people

          • sat0422 says:

            I agree and with the monitoring that is in place today…if medical personnel will check the history and trail of prescribed medications, then that might help a lot. I do think we have to think about facilities to put people who are addicts. I would think that the number of those who need treatment will be great once they are withdrawn from the drugs. if they survive. This is a war and one which we have tried to win since the Reagan days.

            Like

        • M. Mueller says:

          Also help in the last days of pancreatic cancer. The OD’s are not coming from these kinds of prescriptions. When I picked them up for the patient, the pharmacist told me not to throw the packaging in the garbage because it might cause the house to be broken into.

          After the patient died, the unused Fentynal was returned to the pharmacy.

          Liked by 4 people

          • dginga says:

            When my MIL died she had a Dilaudid pump. The Hospice nurse had me brew a pot of coffee, after which she took the wet coffee grounds and poured the remaining Dilaudid into them. She also dissolved other pills in a small amount of water and put those in the coffee grounds as well. She said that druggies read obituaries looking for people who died at home, then go to the house and go through the trash at the curb looking for pain meds, etc., because a lot of people just throw them in the trash inside the orange pharmacy vial.

            Liked by 1 person

            • Sayit2016 says:

              I am literally shaking my head over this… just when I think I have heard everything.

              Like

            • Sharon says:

              After my husband died at home (liver cancer) the hospice nurse was taking care of all the things that they have to do at that point (this was a couple of days after he died). We had reams of all sorts of powerful drugs on hand, in quantity. She left them with me along with a sheet of instructions regarding how to dispose of them (including the coffee grounds suggestion). No one ever asked if I HAD disposed of them.

              At this moment I have probably close to a hundred of opoid tablets, left from the vast supply given me after breast cancer surgery a year ago.

              The only reason I don’t get rid of them is because as the pharmaceuticals are more and more tightly controlled and if there is a digital power outage cross country and my neighbor or me breaks a leg and can’t get treatment, I want something available to help with the pain in the absence of access to medical care.

              Those opoids are just sitting there in my cupboard. They never yell at me to take them.

              This is just another handy-dandy ready-made situation in which the government is assigned responsibility (AND AUTHORITY) over personal decisions.

              Have you ever noticed that once the governments GETS such responsibility (AND AUTHORITY) they are MOST reluctant to yield it back?

              Funny how that works.

              Like

        • piper567 says:

          booger, they are very effective, very successful in cases of chronic pain.
          A real blessing to these patients.

          Liked by 3 people

        • linda7780 says:

          I read here all the time and hear comments about accountability and personal responsibility when it comes to guns, which I agree. No gun ever jumped up and operated on its own without an operator. However, when it comes to drugs, there seems to be a double standard on the issue. I have to take meds for pain just to live in a clean house and grocery shopping. My family has been through hell because of my son’s meth addiction. He had no pain and no reason to take anything. Yet, I am being treated as a drug addict and he is getting the utmost sympathy constantly and just goes right back to them. I am very careful about taking only the minimal amount that works for just pain and keep it closely guarded at all times so no one can take it. Where does personal responsibility play in this role? Like the other comments from people like me, it is very discouraging to be treated like an addict who wants the euphoric high. If there was a true alternative that was not addictive, I certainly would take it. I’m getting old and have very little left for food and necessities. The cost has gone so high now, I don’t know what to do. I have few years left. I just want to have a normal life and not be in debt until I do.

          Liked by 9 people

          • dginga says:

            Linda, if it helps, I am with you 100%. I can’t believe that the government has decided that conscientious doctors are too stupid to know which of their patients actually NEED these drugs and which are just looking to get high. So because there have been some unscrupulous (and even unlicensed) doctors, mostly running “pain clinic” pill mills, who overprescribe prescription pain meds, every doc in the country is restricted from practicing medicine the best they know how.

            I remember when I had my knees replaced, an extremely painful procedure, my doc started out giving me a low dose of Percocet, enough pills to take them exactly as directed for 10 days. At the 10 day mark I went in for my surgical follow-up. At that point he gave me a new prescription for me to take about half as many Percocets for 10 days. He told me that once Rx #2 ran out I should no longer need the Percocets. He told me very clearly to ONLY take them for pain. If I started taking them to help me sleep, or for any other reason, to come back in immediately. I ended up not needing the whole second scrip.

            My husband’s cousin, a former heroin addict, contracted Hep C. She convinced her doc to give her pain meds for the Hep C. He finally stopped prescribing them for her because he said she should not be in that much pain. So she found out about the pill mills (pain management centers) in Florida. (This was several years ago.). Every 90 days she would drive through three states to get to Florida. While there she would go to several different “pain management centers.” Every center would give her a 90 day supply of Vicodin. She would keep some for her own personal use and sell the rest to other addicts she knew. While she was doing this, even though she had Hep C, she continued to drink heavily and smoke cigarettes and pot (for the pain, of course.). Her latest gambit is that she now has advanced cirrhosis. She is hitting up everyone in the family to give her money so she can get a liver transplant. Now, no rational person would actually believe that the transplant centers would give a liver to a practicing alcoholic/drug addict /smoker. Yet a surprising number of our family members are giving this woman money and I am criticized because I point out that she did this to herself. Every single thing that is wrong with her has been the result of her own choices. I have no sympathy.

            Liked by 4 people

            • linda7780 says:

              It sounds like my life. I just had a total hip replacement but I felt so bad for the knee replacement people in the therapy classes we attended because everyone of them were hurting much more than I was. I also had a family member who went to the next state where she was able to get oxytocin. She was as healthy as she could be. I couldn’t believe it when I found out. I do understand what you are saying. This is a hard thing to deal with.

              Like

            • linda7780 says:

              oxycontin not oxytocin

              Like

            • dayallaxeded says:

              I have a cousin who was sorta like your cousin–turned out she was bi-polar. Got proper treatment for that and totally changed her life. Sadly, she pretty much hit bottom before that, but Praise God, at least she got it together before losing her life and in time to be a comfort to her family.

              Like

          • dayallaxeded says:

            Prayers up for you and your family! If you’ve seen my other comments here, you know you’re not alone in fighting chronic pain.

            Re: Meth–it’s a special situation and sadly so. If a person does not genuinely, in their own heart want to kick a meth habit they’re not going to kick it. It not only invigorates physically, but often induces euphoric, megalomaniacal, and/or egocentric mental states. Empathy is dramatically curtailed. Makes it very very very difficult to kick without a strong will and motivation. I’m so sorry to say, it may be better for a meth addict to die sooner, before they do horrible things.

            Here again, though, the problem is one of border and traditional law enforcement, not regulation of legal medical practice and medications–to my knowledge there is no legal form of methamphetamine (there are other, legal forms of “speed,” but not “meth”). All information I’ve seen indicates that most meth, like heroin and illegal synthetics, is coming from Mexican cartels. So, again, where’s the dayum border wall and why in God’s name would anyone, even a died in the wool globullshit Demonrat, stand in the way of getting it built, given the clear human and economic costs of not doing so!?!

            Liked by 1 person

            • linda7780 says:

              Thank you for your prayers. I haven’t read your comments before but I will. You are so right. I struggle with living with the effects Meth has had on my son. The information I have obtained is the reason places like where I live and WVA, etc. are covered with woods where they can set up tents and move so easily. They know how to make it and don’t really need anything from Mexico. My son does and many of his friends do. That’s why I really don’t know how Meth can be stopped. Now, on the other hand, the production of heroine does come from the borders. It seems that will be much easier to control if they take steps to control the borders. After dealing with my son, I am preparing myself for the worst but, hoping for the best. He agonized over his condition but he keeps going back to it. If I had my way, I would put him where he has to get clean and keep doing this over and over until he stays clean. I wish I had a place I could just lock him up in my house and feed and clothe him. If I were superwoman, I would. 😃. At least I would know he was being given the necessary things he needs to live and couldn’t hurt himself or others. When I was young my Mom kept doing the same thing over and over until I finally figured out that I better stop if I wanted any peace. But, he has grown up now so I can’t make him do anything anymore. He started this drug as an adult.

              My chronic health problems just make it that much harder because I have documented proof. His problems will kill him because of choices he is making that are affecting his mind and health. I can’t give up on him yet though…He is my son…I can’t think of letting him just die. I may have to face that anyway but, as long as he draws breath I have to remain hopeful. Sorry for such a long reply.

              Like

      • Founding Fathers Fan says:

        Federal investigators have identified a dozen analogs of fentanyl produced in clandestine labs, all of which act similarly in the body to heroin, with the exception of being more potent. This was reported in 2016. https://www.statnews.com/2016/04/05/fentanyl-traced-to-china/

        Liked by 2 people

    • AM says:

      I can grow tobacco where I live. I can make knife. I may even be able to manufacture a gun out of plumbing parts if I’m frisky.

      Do you know how to manufacture opiods? Probably not. That’s extremely specialized chemistry, out of reach of the average person. Their ability to create physical addictions and kill people has no correlation to the hazards people have traditional faced through time. They are the dark downside of modern medicine and the industrial revolution.

      To compare an opiod to a sharp pencil is to completely misunderstand the nature of the evil in front of us.

      Can we stop all of it? No, of course not. But I think we can safety fight a brand new hazard of modernity with some modernity.

      Liked by 2 people

      • booger71 says:

        My grandma grew opiod hens and chicken poppies since she was a teenage girl. She made poppy tea for her and grandpa he entire life. This is how this perfectly natural plant was intended to be used.

        Liked by 2 people

      • KBR says:

        Tobacco is much maligned, as it is an herb that can be utilized very well for a few medical conditions.

        We have cell-receptors that, it has been claimed, are receptors meant for “nicotinic acid” or “nicotinamide.” However nicotenic acid and nicotinamide were actually synthesized from the nicotene in tobacco plants, then created “synthetically” and then what they imitated synthetically, they called a vitamin, “Niacin” one of the “B vitamins.”

        So the claim was that our own bodies had been originally created with cellular receptors for something they had just “created”–by synthetic imitation of naturally occurring nicotene– in the 19th-20th century. (That’s why niacin will make your face get hot and red–a reaction– but nicotene, even when inhaled with smoke, does not make your face get hot and red: natural substance vs synthetic/fake.)

        Think about that. Our ancestors had to live without that essential “vitamin”–that they also had receptors for– long before scientists “created” it! (Nope, they just got nicotene from their diets, but not from tobacco

        Do not mistake what I am saying for “pro-smoking.” Inhaling any kind of smoke into your lungs every day is a very bad idea. Every fireman knows that. The tar from the smoke will coat your lungs inside, the additives in the filters, and the yellow stuff from the burning of chemicals including nicotene can partially paralyze your cilia (the little moving tissues that sweep out particles of whatever should not be there away from the lungs and back up to the throat to be coughed out.) It does damage and that is not good.

        I am saying that an important herb called tobacco has been deliberately demonized as “THE” cause of (nearly every) cancer. Which it is not.

        Nicotene used in massive doses will kill you, just as massive doses of nicotene will kill bugs and rodents.

        But, when used in ways other than inhalation of smoke, like through skin patches, it has been shown in some studies to mitigate some of the effects of Alzheimers.

        Since tobacco has been made into “the devil” pharm companies needed to disguise the fact that they wanted to give nicotene taken from the “unholy-tobbaco” plants as a medication. So they “created” a “new plant” by crossing soybeans and tobacco hoping to use the tobacco-nicotene harvested from these 🤖frankenstein-plants as a “newly-created” substance from a “new plant.” 🤦‍♂️

        That way they can make fake-news-medicine. And still keep up the tobacco plant’s reputation as 👹”The devil that causes every cancer known to man.”

        God only knows what soybeans will do to human nerve/brain synapses/cells when absorbed through the skin in a 🤖-combo with nicotene. But nevermind, it won’t be called nicotene nor tobacco nor soybean-juice: it will be given (or has been given) a “new name” as has the “new plant.”

        By the way, I really hate it when people at a funeral start asking “did he smoke?” Or “did she still smoke?”
        As if they (the askers of stupid questions) are not only fully-knowledgable biochemists themselves, but capable of determining the cause of a disease that supposedly scientists have been studying for a very long time and STILL cannot cure.

        If you know the CURE for heart disease and cancer PLEASE SPEAK UP!
        If you do not know, PLEASE SHUT UP!

        Finding the actual cause will find the possible cure. Tobacco ain’t it.
        People who ask such questions while professing sympathy, are IMO just looking for a tasty bit of gossip they can share and thus blame the dead for their death, even while they leave the bereaved even more bereaved.
        It is uncalled for. It is boorish. It is cruel.
        Please do not do that.

        My theory is:
        Everyday Damage to tissues & cells which are dying of old age naturally causes the body to produce new cells and slough off damaged cells (happens every day)
        Extraordinary damage, or wounding, or parasite, or break of bone, causes a need for extra cell production for a short time until damage is repaired. (Healing.)
        Sometimes the “time-to-quit-the-extra-cell-production, because-the-healing-is-done” stop-signal does not work.
        So the ever-constant turn-out, due to the failure of the “STOP” signal, of more and more new cells depletes the stored supply of materiels to make healthy new cells, and some slightly abnormal cells get made.
        Cells “pile up.” A tumor forms.
        If the body cannot repair what I am calling the “stop-signal” mechanism, the cells get more and more abnormal, and the body’s own defenses against abnormal cells are also “overworked” so the tumor becomes “cancerous.”
        Find out what has gone wrong with the STOP signal. See if it can be fixed.

        I know. It is just an idea. It makes sense in the form of “common sense.”

        Liked by 1 person

    • jane harris says:

      sharon…like

      Liked by 1 person

    • notasmidgeon says:

      There are people with chronic pain and unfortunately they will be greatly penalized. A good day for them is a day with a bit of relief so they can get groceries, do errands, etc.

      Liked by 3 people

      • BT in SC says:

        Those of us in very legitimate need of these opioids are already being penalized! You have no idea what I must go through every month to get my RX refilled. On the McGill pain scale, nothing is more painful than RSD. I commented, here, before on the disease I have. There is no cure. Anyone afflicted with such a disease would do just about ANYTHING to be cured! Through no fault of my own, somehow I ended up with it – RSD. Well, I guess it was my fault, really, by opting to go through with knuckle replacement surgery. But, after putting myself in the hospital with an ulcer from too much Aleve [my “drug” of choice for arthritis pain] I listened to a surgeon who said that a knuckle replacement would take care of the arthritis… no different than a knee or hip replacement. Most who need such surgeries will never get RSD. I’d never even heard of the disease! It’s not common. Believe me, had the surgeon have shared with me the possibility of such an outcome, I would have kept my arthritic knuckle and lived with the pain it caused, because that “old” pain is NOTHING in comparison to this “new” pain. Nine days after the surgery, BAM! And having started off slowly with the opioid pain relief – Percocet after the surgery – then some Tylenol and aggressive physical therapy – it was, what I consider to be probably the closest you can come to living in he11! The surgeon who did my knuckle replacement made my RSD diagnosis [like I said, nine days after the surgery] and while doing everything I was told to do I continued to suffer. Screaming out in pain. I couldn’t turn the faucet of tears off the pain was so bad. I am lucky that I found a new set of physicians – originally three – who knew what I was experiencing and how I needed to be treated. I now have a fourth doctor I see every month, along with the other three. This is probably TMI, but the fourth doctor is a psychiatrist. RSD is called “the suicide disease,” because of the pain it causes. Without two doses of the oxymorphone I take every day, I could not function.

        I am at a complete loss as to what the attraction to these opioids is. I’ve watched “Intervention,” and supposedly there is this overwhelming warmth and euphoria and your mind “shuts down” and you don’t have any problems, worries or cares after you take them. [I’m referring more to the street drugs – heroin and such, but plenty of addicts are paying hundreds of dollars a day for the pills I’ve had to take, and they take them by the handful {according to “Intervention”}.] As far as feeling the warmth and feeling as though I haven’t got a care in the world, no. Absolutely not the effect I get. And, as far as the “euphoria?” Really? Because I would about kill for some “euphoria” some days. Instead, I get to feel tired and lethargic. Along with a handful of other unpleasant side effects… but for the most part most of the horrific pain – not all – is controlled, thankfully. They say hindsight is 20/20. Unfortunately it’s too late for me to get my bad knuckle back. If I could, I would. It was nothing like what I suffer with, now. I’m thankful that it is my non-dominant hand instead of my dominant hand. I am basically one handed now. And yes. I’ve considered more than once having my left hand amputated. Unfortunately, that will not make the RSD go away. Somehow it’s a “mind” thing. The pain IS very real, but it’s not actually in my hand / arm, even though it is. Sharp, intense contraction like pain that hits you anytime without any notice. It will make you scream out loud. Lay your hand on the table [palm down] and let someone smash it with a hammer. Then, start stabbing it with a very sharp knife – real fast – over and over. And, just when the stabbing stops, set your entire arm on fire. When you think the fire is finally out – the stabbing starts again – like electric jolts. It’ll stop. And just when you’ve caught your breath, and finally stopped crying… that “one” is over… WHAM! Do it again. Maybe it’ll hit two, three, four times. Then it stops. You go several hours – maybe even the rest of the day. Then, you lay down to go to bed. You’re almost asleep and WHAM! It happens again. The next day, you are “pain free” until you’re sitting on the couch reading “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs” to your grandson, and with no notice whatsoever, WHAM! It stops. You get dressed to go out to dinner with your husband and friends, and just as your salad is put down, WHAM! It happens again. Or, as you’re sitting quietly in church, paying attention to the sermon, again, with no notice, WHAM! While you’re in the shower… when you go out to fill the bird feeders… while you’re reading Sundance’s latest post… it doesn’t stop. So, you take very, very strong opioid drugs to try to relieve some of that pain. And they help. They DO NOT take all the pain away, and they do not prevent the pain from happening, but they do help some. You have to do a whole lot more than just take drugs. There are wrist blocks – I get them weekly. That allows me six or eight hours of no spasmatic contractions – pain – and makes my left hand absolutely useless, but at least I can do some physical therapy. You get “stellate ganglion blocks.” They work for a couple of days. Sometimes. But “it” always comes back! It’s my life now, and I just have to deal with it. All this “opioid epidemic” is doing is making it far more difficult for me to get the pain relief I need!

        I am not unsympathetic to those who have experienced loved ones who have overdosed. My husband’s step-brother’s son overdosed on methadone. Then, because he couldn’t deal with his son’s death, the step-brother hung himself. However, what is left unsaid with many of the drug overdose deaths is that the handfuls of these narcotics some people take also contain ibuprofen or acetaminophen. The deaths are not always caused by the actual opioid, but instead because of liver or kidney failure from the amounts of the ibuprofen or acetaminophen. I could go on… But those of us who have genuine, legitimate medical problems are being punished! And our concerns must also be addressed in this issue. I’ve said enough, and pecking out with one hand frustrates me. No need working myself up, getting all tense and anxious, when any minute, with no notice, I can be attacked! And, it will just make the “attack” that much worse when it happens.

        Liked by 1 person

        • dayallaxeded says:

          May God comfort you and find a path to healing! I’ve seen a couple of cases involving RSD following serious hand/wrist injuries–it is amazing and inexplicable what happens, but there is not doubt it does, in fact, happen in a small percentage of cases and it is often debilitating. All I can do is pray for you and glad to do it!

          Like

        • dayallaxeded says:

          BTW, if you’re challenged to type with two hands or individual fingers, gesture or “swipe” keyboard input on android devices is pretty great. The basic google keyboard supports it (in settings select gesture input), Swiftkey is a very good, more customizable free alternative, and Swype is kind of the granddaddy of all swipe keyboards, partnering with Dragon Naturally speaking to provide voice input, too. I don’t know why no one has created such a keyboard for Windows and Apple PCs, but it can’t be far off.

          Like

          • BT in SC says:

            Thank you, dayallaxeded! Prayers are always appreciated. Always! And why the heck haven’t I thought of “talking” being converted to type, yet?! That software has been around for a while, and it just never occurred to me. [Should I blame my “mental block” there on the drugs or just age? Both, maybe…] Again, thank you for your kind words.

            Like

  7. freddy says:

    Did they figure this out all on their own……………………………………………..
    Mexican Drug Cartels Are ‘Greatest’ Criminal, Opioid Threats to U.S., Says DEA
    Mexican drug cartels continue being the greatest criminal threat to America and are largely to blame for the current opioid crisis striking most of the nation, a new assessment by the U.S Drug Enforcement Administration revealed…………………………………………………………………………………………………How ’bout this little nugget……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….Mexico, about to break all records of murders in 2017
    Posted by DD material from el Pais and Mexico News Daily

    Not even in the cruelest years of the war against drug trafficking were recorded such high homicide figures as those that have endured this 2017 . In the first nine months of the year, according to figures released by the Mexican Ministry of the Interior, up to 18,505 felony homicides – more than 68 a day – were counted.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. tuskyou says:

    Opioid Orphans. POTUS describing the detox of these precious babies and how they will lose their parents to drug overdoses. He is clearly moved and horrified by the hell these babies go thru.

    Liked by 10 people

    • dekester says:

      Your President is indeed moved. If one has ever been around fetal alcohol or crack addicted babies we understand.

      He is a wonderful and caring man. Yet fearless, what a combination.

      Liked by 9 people

    • notasmidgeon says:

      For many years, while working in a neonatal intensive care unit, I cared for babies going through withdrawal….mostly from methadone. Moms were previous heroin addicts that never got off the methadone. Yes, this situation is extremely pitiful. It may also be pitiful to see how people with chronic, debilitating pain cope and are made comfortable in the future. Until you’ve encountered this type of pain with family members, friends, or yourself, you really don’t understand. I’m hoping the pendulum doesn’t swing so far in the other direction that people are not able to get pain relief.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Llamamama3 says:

        notasmidgeon, thank you! I had hoped that there would be a sensible balance in order to overcome this situation. But, it seems that is not the case. Again law a biding chronic pain sufferers are the ones forgotten again! 😢

        Liked by 2 people

    • dginga says:

      Drug addicted babies have been a problem for decades. They are almost entirely the result of addicts who use ILLEGAL drugs during pregnancy. I have tremendous sympathy for these babies; not so much for their mothers.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Founding Fathers Fan says:

    ‘Opioids’ include illegally-made fentanyl and heroin (also illegal). This is not a ‘crises’ nor an ‘epidemic’. This fake news of the worst sort. Every day, 330 million people in the US do not use opioids of any kind. This is just A Close Encounter of the Third-Grade.

    Liked by 2 people

    • AM says:

      The industrial revolution brought many great things. The ability to manufacture in bulk over the top addicting drugs and disburse them cheaply was not one of them.

      The Opioid addiction issue is hitting the lower classes hard in the very rust belts that Trump won. We could abandon those people to rot, survival of the fittest style. Or we could say “No human was ever really supposed to have access to drugs this powerful”. We could help those at the margins succeed instead of looking down our noses as say “You’re on your own”.

      Small government is not about abandoning people to the world and never was. Gambling is a great example. It was outlawed in most of the country until the 1980’s because it’s bad for the people at the margins and therefore hurt society as a whole.

      Certainly it was mostly outlawed during times of much less government than now. That “freedom” to gamble is dubious one. It’s mostly about a society that has thrown in the towel on each other and refuses to go through the effort to care. The opiod issue is the same.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Maquis says:

        Well said. Very true. “…a Religious and Moral People…” does not ignore the evils that prey upon the weak.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Your Tour Guide says:

        It hit the Dayton, Ohio metropolitan area like a hurricane last year.
        Montgomery County had the most opoid OD deaths of any county
        in the US. Eight Hundred Eighty people dead. Out of a population
        of roughly 440,000. Somebody else can do the math on this one.
        It depresses me too much. I love Dayton with all my heart. It was
        hard to keep composed when I was reading the article about the
        extent of death in my old home town. I consider it genocide.

        Liked by 2 people

        • dginga says:

          But what did they die of really? That is the dishonest part of this media frenzy about the “opioid epidemic.” I suspect the vast majority of the dead were RECREATIONAL drug users who were using heroin, or fentanyl-laced heroin, or took way too many Vicodins that were prescribed for someone else but they bought them off a guy. I seriously doubt these deaths were patients taking prescription narcotics under the supervision of a doctor.

          Liked by 2 people

    • Cuppa Covfefe says:

      I can see you’ve never been to West Virginia. There’s parts of it that are almost HELL.
      When normal painkillers (thanks, in no small measure to Obozocare) are too expensive to obtain, in depressed areas, whatever is available at a reasonable cost will be used…

      This is not a case of “the nanny state” and it’s disingenuous to frame it as such.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Your Tour Guide says:

        The drugs coming up to Dayton are coming across the border from
        West Virginia. The outlying areas most affected seem to be around
        Route 35. Xenia, Washington Court House, Hillsboro…….
        The drugs are following the state routes in Ohio, West Virginia,
        and into Indiana. Draw a line from around the Ohio tip at a 45
        Degree angle into around Richmond, Indiana. That’s the reports
        I’m hearing from RNs that have friends working in the Hospitals
        in Ohio.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Cuppa Covfefe says:

          Yep. My reply was to FFF. I have many relatives back there, including a doctor, who says the problem is really getting out of control. As is the associated human tragedy.

          With Obozo all but killing the coal industry, no one can afford proper medical care and medications, especially considering the disaster of Obozocare.

          Liked by 1 person

        • dginga says:

          These are areas that were targeted by Mexicans from certain areas in Mexico who came to the U.S. to open markets for black tar heroin. Black tar heroin is much cheaper than the heroin you might buy in NYC, Chicago or L.A. It is even cheaper than meth. It is peddled by small groups of Mexicans who have a very sophisticated system of supply and distribution. They run huge quantities of this heroin across the border every single day.

          Read the book “Dreamland” by Sam Quinones. He is a journalist who has been studying the so-called opioid epidemic as it grew through the American heartland over the last 20 years. A liberal, he sincerely wants to blame all of this on the pharmaceutical industry, the medical profession and, frankly, on you and me, but after reading the book I thought it inadvertently made a great case for building a very high, very thick wall on the Mexican border.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Tegan says:

      I’m not sure what your point is, FFF, but just like declaring a hurricane or wild fire a “crisis”, “disaster”, etc, is a procedural step to direct federal funds to various agencies.

      Like

    • covfefe999 says:

      Founding Fathers Fan, you’re wrong. Opioid addiction and deaths from opioid overdose are skyrocketing. It IS a crisis. It IS an epidemic.

      Like

  10. georgiafl says:

    Ob4$+4rd would never concern himself with this drug plague.

    He was all for ANYthing that kills Americans:
    – abortion
    – drugs and drug gangs
    – ghetto lifestyles
    – STDs
    – Horrible rules of engagement
    – Open borders
    – Illegals
    – Terrorists

    H80 more every day.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Michelle says:

      Yes and the dam’s solution to the opioid babies would just be to abort them.

      Liked by 3 people

    • covfefe999 says:

      And a lot of those things disproportionately affect black communities, so I want to know why any black people still think highly of Obama. He did nothing for them and so much against them!

      Liked by 1 person

      • georgiafl says:

        Ordinary black Americans do not approve of Obama – it’s the ideologues – communist and Islamists and black supremacists who support O.

        Like

        • Your Tour Guide says:

          Wish that were true. Work with some unbelievably nice black coworkers.
          Almost all of them will hear NOTHING bad whatsoever about Obama.
          The weird thing is that they are actually more socially conservative then
          most of the whites I know. Big on corporal punishment, attending church,
          buckling down for education. Almost all are married. That seems to make
          the most difference on how ghetto vs non ghetto mentality they are.

          Don’t know what it would take to wake them up from the Obama worship.

          Liked by 3 people

    • redridge45 says:

      It’s rules like this that drives illegal drug use; heroin is already cheaper and now even easier to get.

      Liked by 2 people

      • tuskyou says:

        I’m not keen on this rule either. It’s the doc who prescribes the med for the length of time they think is best not the pharmacy. My sig other had his ankle fused–he was on narcs for longer than 7 days.

        Liked by 3 people

    • Minnie says:

      This change to policy by cvs is entirely wrong and short-sighted. Unless or until the FDA states otherwise, I predict cvs will lose many customers.

      This will drive legitimate long term patients to seek other avenues of relief.

      So wrong.

      Liked by 3 people

    • dayallaxeded says:

      This, like gun free zones, does nothing whatsoever to stem illegal activity, but just penalizes those who really, medically need narcotic pain meds. CVS has been a PITA about filling prescriptions of all kinds, but especially pain meds, as written by licensed and tightly regulated, reputable doctors for at least a couple of years. It’s why I don’t give them any business, even though I like the local pharmacists–they can’t get around the “corporate” controls to do what is medically right. Fortunately, there is a very good, family-owned and operated pharmacy close enough that I and my disabled family-member aren’t forced to be slaves to stupid, uncaring corporate elites.

      Liked by 2 people

  11. georgiafl says:

    I AM SO PROUD OF OUR PRESIDENT – and – OUR ATTORNEY GENERAL for going after foreign and domestic drug dealers, gangs, addictive drug over-prescribers and for working toward non-addictive pain killers!!!

    WE ARE SO BLESSED – to have them work for our country and our young people!!!

    Liked by 7 people

  12. FL_GUY says:

    President Trump is fulfilling another campaign promise.

    I personally feel that the opioids are just the visible surface of a much larger iceberg of evil that we don’t know about but which he does. I suspect President Trump is going after the entire iceberg which will have positive benefits to our safety and security.

    Liked by 9 people

  13. I wonder if he’ll also address the release of the JFK files. They still haven’t been released yet.

    Like

  14. FofBW says:

    As a volunteer at a Recover Center here is So. Cal. I have witnessed the huge increase of addicts identify as both alcoholics AND drug addicts.

    I am so moved by this speech filled with love and hope today.

    Liked by 12 people

    • USA loves Melania says:

      Thanks for your volunteer service, FofBW! You have a good heart. And thanks to our President and First Lady for taking on this issue. And a tip of my MAGA hat to Right Side Broadcasting for showing these speeches without interruption.

      Liked by 5 people

  15. StrandedinCA says:

    Guess I’m going to be the minority on this . . . but the Federal Government was never supposed to protect anyone from their bad choices. Can the Government just focus on doing the things that it was designed to do and quit spending my tax dollars on people who can’t function as contributing members of society? Natural selection will weed them all out if we allow it to operate properly.

    Liked by 5 people

    • georgiafl says:

      Forty years ago when drugs first got out of control (during the Bush and Clinton years), my solution was to put addicts, drugs and dealers in a prison community and throw the drugs in with them. Make them work, take care of their community, grow their own food. AND – No way out – ever.

      Now, I would make half of Drugville into a recovery center and those who want to come clean, let them be clean one year, then come out – on probation.

      Any regression, back in under the same terms, except a 2 year clean rule to get back into society.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Dorothy Marcum says:

      no you are not in the minority
      the “rules” they are making punishes real patients who are not addicted nor trying to push, sell or thwart the system
      This will make the problem much worse

      Liked by 6 people

    • carrierh says:

      I agree that we were not to use our money for others bad choices, but what we are facing here is a major war and hence our feds and we must fight it to the end. Too many seek this outlet but I also think with businesses opening us here and more with jobs, that the futility of their lives will move them away from seeking these drugs. On the good side now hospitals are using more acupuncturists and our acupuncture clinics because Oriental Medicine is more skilled and has a longer history of getting rid of pain without opioids, AND far cheaper as well. This is exciting because we have also been effective with PTSD. We will also be able to work with our retired vets as well, and we will be paid but it will be far less than buying the drugs and doctor visits. YEA!

      Like

      • Tegan says:

        The problem with the alternative procedures (and I have personally benefited from acupuncture) is that it often is out of pocket expense….states will not recognize it for insurance if it’s not in a doctor’s office. South Carolina is one. So, an employee can go to a weekend course and get certified to practice acupuncture and insurance will pay, but someone who has studied for years who has a private practice cannot.

        Liked by 1 person

    • the5thranchhand says:

      StrandedinCA, I am standing with you, in the minority, on this. The first, and foremost, duty of the federal government’s is to defend its borders. In that sense, the government’s job is KEEP OUT ANYTHING that is harmful to its citizens. P.E.R.I.O.D. If our laws were morally and correctly enforced there would not be a ‘drug problem’.
      And, drug use is not a disease, it is an addiction.
      May the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob bless President Trump, his family and his cabinet members.

      Liked by 2 people

      • M. Mueller says:

        Most of our drug problem can be laid right at the feet of our politicians and their stupid open boarders policy. The “Gang of 8” and all of the others who wanted to invite all illegals in, instead of crushing them, are the ones responsible.

        This country hasn’t been fighting any “war on drugs” in many, many years. Makes you wonder how much drug money goes to politicians!

        Liked by 3 people

    • LKA in LA says:

      You are not a lone stranded. Nursing homes do not even have generators for the elderly but New Orleans cops carry narcan (antidote to narcotics) to save another druggie. Taxpayers saddled again. Now the druggie is a victim. I thought putting Sinus Tylenol behind the counter and having to show your license was suppose to eradicate meth use? How can parent’s put their young kids on ADHD meds and not expect them to think taking a pill to feel better isn’t an option? A higher power, God, is the only hope. Not more rules for the rule followers.

      Liked by 2 people

  16. Dorothy Marcum says:

    love Melania Trump
    not a fan of those big sleeves

    Like

    • Q&A says:

      Our first lady is not a mere mortal. On her, these are angel sleeves; on me, they would be a clown suit. Same with her glorious heels; I’ve got to be closer to earth.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Tegan says:

      Like Michelle’s “boob belts” these bell sleeves seem to be in vogue right now in the Furst Family. I saw Ivanka speaking recently and she also had them…IMO, really unattractive.

      Like

  17. In Az says:

    Pushing a seven day supply only for certain drugs causes even more work for honest doctors and honest people who depend on certain medications when nothing else works.
    This seven day only fill causes problems for too many honest people.

    The problem is not the majority of doctors, it is drug cartels and drug dealers. The crack down on doctors in the past has not stopped the illegal drug trade, not stopped the drug cartels, not stopped the addictions, the violence, the demand, etc.

    Honest doctors and honest patients will once again be punished because of the displaced hysteria.

    Those that really need help will be denied and hassled along with honest doctors, and the true drug addicts will still get their drugs……this happens over and over again.

    When I had back surgery I was given a certain amount of pain medication. The medicine I had barely touched the pain. I dealt with it. I have had 32 major surgeries on every part of my body and I am not addicted to anything.
    I was given Gabapentin, and Gabapentin made my pain worse, and in many people Gabapentin does make pain worse.
    Everyone seems to think one thing will work for every single person. It will not.

    Yes, there are bogus pain clinics that give out pain medication prescriptions like candy and those do need to be shut down. They deal only in cash and are money makers for unscrupulous people.

    Doctors to the rich and famous need to be targeted also, because the doctors to the rich and famous give their clients anything the flip their client wants. Michael Jackson is a very good example of what happens when doctors cater to their famous clients.
    People in the film and music industry can get what ever drugs they want. They need to be targeted. But they will not. Only the average person is punished, the average honest person who needs certain medications will be punished along with good doctors.

    Liked by 13 people

    • georgiafl says:

      Speaking of the rich and famous – a neighbor of mine went to Vegas to one of the last Elvis concerts. They managed to sneak up and get into his room after he had checked out. (This was 40 years ago before electronic key cards, etc.) These allegedly adult Southern ladies wanted to take a picture of themselves in Elvis’ bed. They came home telling us about the drugs, hypodermics, etc. in Elvis’ trash cans.

      Poor old country boy, Elvis got addicted to whatever it was, and went down hill fast.

      His last concerts were mostly lip synch.

      Elvis was my generation….and we loved him. As a young teen, my best friend and I would sit on her porch swing and sing Love Me Tender, and other Elvis songs out loud.

      Those were the days before drugs took over high school, college, small town USA.

      Liked by 2 people

    • redridge45 says:

      Agree. When I needed, I couldn’t get either; had to do a workaround to get what I needed to get out of bed and work (which puts me in some bad category, I’m sure). Done with them now. It’s crazy, just like with sinus medication (Claritin D, etc.), if I have purchased in the last 30 days and forget it when I travel, I cannot purchase but someone else can buy it for me. Ridiculous!

      Liked by 2 people

    • charliedan says:

      That’s right!
      I have been taking Tramadol for 15 years, 6 pills a day, now my new doctor only gives me 4 pills a day and I have to take a Urine test every 90 days to get it!! SUCKS!!!!
      My good Doctor says I can go to a pain clinic if that doesn’t work. Our Niece went to a pain clinic and became an addict. She died from drug overdose at 44 years of age. My neighbor, a Professor at a Major University, had back surgery. He taught Brain Sciences, very educated man. He had to go to a pain clinic, became an addict and had to go through rehab and still suffered horribly!!
      How about people like these???

      Liked by 5 people

      • Alligator Gar says:

        I know people in constant excruciating pain who still must work. They NEED medication to function. Why must they have to continually jump through more hoops? My HMO requires that I pay a high co-pay every time I visit a specialist (such as a neurologist or pain doc). Making people go every week for more meds is highway robbery. Every time they darken the door of the Dr. office they will be charged a *&^% co-pay. This is awful proposed legislation and presumes that every person seeking help for chronic debilitating pain is an addict.

        Liked by 6 people

    • booger71 says:

      And I have to go fight with my dad’s doctor every time his Fentynal patch prescription is up. I can’t imagine having to do it once a week.

      Liked by 5 people

    • carrierh says:

      In Az, read my statement above – our government, and all health organizations are now pushing acupuncture as more effective, cheaper, and no drugs involved. So, you can rest easy that real help is coming very, very soon. Doctors will no longer have to contend with way too many on drugs but send them to acupuncturists within their clinic or hospital or refer them to us outside. In fact the codes we use are even updating how we can bill the insurance companies that can pay for this.

      Like

      • dayallaxeded says:

        Unfortunately, there are many many conditions and patients for which accupuncture and other alternative treatments just don’t work, but morphine does. There is time-released morphine that’s very effective and not very interesting for abuse purposes. Of course, it’s addictive, but when a person has genuine, life-long chronic pain, WTF else are they supposed to do? I have a family member in that position, so I see this up close and personal daily. The pain specialist did require a trial without the time release morphine a few months ago and holy crap, that was 10k% horrific–a reasonably active, thoughtful person turned into a ball of sobbing pain, anxiety and desperation. Government should do whatever it takes to target and take out criminals, especially alien invader criminals, but DAMMIT, leave medical decisions for doctors and patients! The latter is not one iota gummint’s bidnez!

        Liked by 2 people

    • This is the problem.

      A friend using a medication for a neurological disorder lost her doctor and had to try and get refills from a doctor working in a medical group. He literally trembled in fear when pressed to prescribe this medication.

      These doctors literally fear for their jobs and their license if they prescribe medications that have been safely supporting the well being of their patients for decades.

      As you say In Az, the focus is in the wrong place.

      Also, those practicing Jihad are happy to spike drugs and create zombies out of those within their circle of influence. My intuition says this is happening in our cities far more than we realize.

      Liked by 3 people

      • notasmidgeon says:

        Yes, the prescribing Docs have been warned and are being reviewed. Would have been more logical to have developed an effective, non narcotic pain medication before pulling the rug out from under the feet of the patients in need and the doctors legally prescribing.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Maquis says:

      Agreed.

      A once a month trip to the VA pharmacy is already a calendar annotated mandatory event. One cannot pick up a new prescription refill any earlier than the very day it runs out.

      I cannot imagine the grief involved in doing so a weekly basis! Just the hassle of getting the doctor to do his job in time can be a nightmare. Quadruple that and see how well that works. 🤕

      Any pharmacy doing this would be little different from a Methadone Clinic. Humiliating. Utter. Chaos.

      Liked by 1 person

    • piper567 says:

      sort of like guns and criminals, no?

      Like

  18. Truthfilter says:

    I loved Melania’s comments about how even the strong-minded can become addicted to painkillers. My stepfather was killed in a car crash in 1996 after taking too many pain meds. He had been a successful and respected builder/contractor but he injured his back at work and was prescribed mild pain meds. He got addicted. Over a period of 5 years, his tolerance required stronger and a larger quantity of the drugs. This caused him to pass out at the wheel and hit a culvert.

    I don’t honestly know of one person whose life hasn’t been affected in some way by someone’s addiction to pain killers (opioids). Here in south Louisiana, many pain med addicts have turned to street heroine –which is cheaper and easier to get than prescriptions.

    The answer really IS to stop prescribing even the mildest forms of these addictive drugs. It often starts with Tylenol #3. We need alternatives to codeine and morphine. I think POTUS is absolutely on the right track.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dorothy Marcum says:

      There is REAL chronic pain! I guess real pain patients will have to suffer because addicts get access to dope and more dope brought from Mexico
      Was the Mexican cartels even addressed?
      Prescription medications are a life line for people who are in true need so why they have to suffer just makes my head explode

      Liked by 7 people

      • Alligator Gar says:

        DITTOES to you. Because some people get addicted (a personality that is addictive is a requirement), the rest of people in chronic pain must suffer? BOLDERDASH!

        Liked by 4 people

      • Cuppa Covfefe says:

        The common thread I see here is “damn everybody else, I WANT MY MEDS or MY RELATIVE’S MEDS and everyone else can get stuffed”.

        The problem is, addiction will end up killing EVERYBODY, either directly or indirectly. And though it will be an inconvenience for some, indeed a massive inconvenience in some cases, restricting access to these types of drugs and compounds is necessary, along with SEVERE penalties for possession, synthesis, trading/selling, and the various criminal acts that accompany that.

        And yes, I’ve had relatives in extreme pain who needed these meds, and they jumped (OK, others jumped for them) through many hoops to obtain them. I had one relative for whom no med available would suffice, so they cut his nerves in an attempt to reduce the pain (he was a terminal cancer patient). So I’m not speaking our of turn. I’ve also seen folks completely destroy their lives (or others’) with these meds (and illegal derivatives) when used “off the book” or “off-label”.

        It’s an ugly problem that’s been let go far too long. And any effective solution will be a lot more painful/irritating/expensive that it would have been had it been instituted at an appropriate time. Nasty medicine, indeed.

        Like

        • dayallaxeded says:

          Wow, that’s some serious hyperbole you’ve got there! No, addiction won’t kill anyone, but those who don’t manage their meds properly, under a competent physician’s directives. And no, we’re not just talking about “inconvenience.” We’re talking about the difference between life with terrible chronic pain that is either medically managed in a legal and responsible way or a very very short and terribly miserable life of un-managed, despair-inducing pain for which there remains only one, final solution–I’ll leave you to fill in the word for it–it’s too close to me for me to want to say it or type it. Think about that before you try to impose your drastic personal solutions on everyone.

          Also consider how upset we’ve been over gummint demanding nothing more than that we all buy health insurance that provides for basic services, including stuff that doesn’t apply to each of us, like [anti-] reproductive “care.” If you objected to that overreach into the privacy of doctor-patient and personal medical choices, you can’t rationally turn around and demand as much or more overreach just because it’s a different crusade you support. Doctor-patient decisions are none of the GD gummint’s GD bidnez!

          We need to stop diverting resources to policing law-abiding doctors and patients and put the resources where they’re needed and can be effective–on the borders and in real, street level policing. The way it seems we’re currently heading, we won’t all die from the few who are addicted, whether legally or not, but we all will be made to live like pre-judged criminals–no big deal for those who already live as criminals, but a big damn downgrade for those of us who routinely follow the law and act responsibly.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Cuppa Covfefe says:

            I watched my uncle DIE of bone cancer, and they cut the nerves in HIS SPINE to attempt to alleviate the pain, as nothing else did.

            Don’t give me crap about hyperbole. I’ve seen both addiction and horrible pain first-hand.
            You need to get away from your narrow agenda and look at the big picture. Because if the big picture (read: drug abuse, cartels, CIA “farms” in Afghanistan) is not addressed, your agenda will be irrelevant, along with the other 300-million-plus in this country.

            Maybe visit East Oakland, parts of Los Angeles, parts of West Virginia and “trailer-park-trash-territory” to see what can happen. The problem is NOT going to go away by itself, nor is it getting smaller with laissez-faire enforcement. Sorry that you have problems, but other people do too. And not all were self-inflicted, nor were they caused by “the system”.

            Like

            • dayallaxeded says:

              Surely you realize that everything you’ve identified as the root of the drug problem is already a criminal act or enterprise and largely foreign–in short, ramped up enforcement of existing laws and border security will effectively deal with these issues, without interfering with the personal rights and lives of law abiding doctors and patients who need pain relief.

              BTW, whoever prescribed severing nerves to alleviate pain was a charlatan–even when done with cauterizing instruments, that treatment never works for long and even if it does, it is likely to be utterly debilitating–doesn’t just cut pain, but also affects sensation and muscle innervation. Saw it in dozens of personal injury suits, done by a particular plaintiff whore surgeon–always with sad to just ineffectual results. Sad to say, your uncle would likely have had a much less unpleasant end of life with a fentanyl patch or similar.

              You are the one with the narrow outlook on this subject, if you cannot distinguish between appropriate, medically supervised administration of narcotic pain medication for chronic pain versus illegal recreational use of any addictive drug, whether opioid, amphetamine, or whatever else is out there.

              Like

        • Dorothy Marcum says:

          really out there
          nobody is dying but ADDICTS who at some point have to accept some responsibility for themselves
          The thing now is “oh we’ll get Narcan” we’ll be fine ….this is NOT about pain medications it is about Heroin and Fentanyl coming from Mexico

          Like

        • notasmidgeon says:

          Actually, only a few here have taken a milder stance than what you’ve just described. I am a retired registered nurse…..I can see BOTH sides of the issue. This is not a black or white issue….there are shades of gray. Be responsible.

          Like

    • dayallaxeded says:

      Very sorry for your loss, but the nuclear remedy you propose is non-scientific, contrary to decades of medical science and practice, and practically non-functional. How is it possible that we haven’t learned from alcohol tax/regulation, prohibition, the “war on drugs”, gun bans, 55 mph speed limits, etc. etc. that gummint cannot prevent people from doing what they want to with themselves. Sure, persecute the hell out of illegal dealers, people who illegally manufacture, and even frauds, but stay the hell away from lawfully practicing doctors and their patients. Virtue-signalling, overbearing prohibitions do nothing but foster and feed illegal activity–it’s one big big reason the drug cartels exist.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Lulu says:

      But they aren’t addictive for everyone or even most people and have been used forever without the massive overdoses of the last few years. There’s something else going on here.

      Liked by 1 person

    • linda7780 says:

      I visited BC several years ago. You could not even buy Tylenol PM or any type of PM otc meds. They also didn’t allow guns. However, riding through the streets of Vancouver there were obvious addicts everywhere. Also, what they don’t tell you is how many are killed with knives and other methods. I know we need to get the drug epidemic under control but, how to do it is my question. These days when the government knocks on your door and says, I’m here to help, I have become very gun shy. Hopefully, that changes. 😞

      Liked by 1 person

  19. TeaForAll says:

    I am a Visiting Nurse . This is huge and I am so glad to finally see this addressed. Here in NJ Patients are discharged with only 5 days of pain meds. Due to the new opioid laws in NJ. Patients with chronic pain due to diseases process are on such high doses of pain meds. They now must have a pain management doctor to prescribe their pain meds and each script must have a decrease dose. Understanding synthetic pain meds and how they affect the receptor in the brain is the beginning and challenge to the drug addiction.
    THANK YOU PRESIDENT TRUMP

    Liked by 5 people

    • georgiafl says:

      Do TENS units or any other electronic/mechanical devices offer any relief to longterm pain patients?

      Like

      • carrierh says:

        georgiafl, we use electrostim (electric stimulation) for tough cases even with paralysis, so ES is far better than TENS, which we can use also.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Alligator Gar says:

        Some of us can’t use it because of hardware in our backs. I don’t take any drugs, prescription or otherwise, but those who do need them should not be penalized.

        Liked by 3 people

      • tuskyou says:

        My mother in law had chronic back pain for years. She tried the TENS unit but it didn’t help her. It does work for some tho. I’ve used it and it helps me but I have a different kind of back issue. I think it’s most helpful as a component of treatment not just by itself

        Liked by 1 person

      • Maquis says:

        Georgia,
        The VA gave me an H-Wave machine a couple few months ago as my pain meds were slashed in half. It has been surprisingly effective.

        Similar to TENS as to general appearance, it works much differently. TENS blocks pain during use, H-Wave actually drains nerve tissues of certain nutrients needed to send pain signals, offering hours of relief after use. The effects can even be cumulative.

        Good for the back, muscles, joints, and such. It cannot address internal organs, can’t be used on the neck due to severe spasms that worsen

        Liked by 4 people

    • Dorothy Marcum says:

      So once again your answer is to leave out true chronic pain patients …
      People who don’t have real pain perhaps one day will know what real chronic pain is

      Liked by 2 people

      • TeaForAll says:

        Dorothy

        I have multiple patients that use medicinal marijuana for chronic pain and it really does bring their pain level down to a level they can tolerate. No pain med will totally relieve pain . The goal is instructing pain management, we use a scale 1 – 10 when teaching pain management. Mobility, nutrition and also using heat and ice especially for bone pain.. Depression also plays a big part in pain. Patient with chronic pain , have depression due to quality of life. Chronic pain effects every aspect of their life, so sad. Some days it is hard seeing patients suffering from chronic pain.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Dorothy Marcum says:

          Walk a mile in chronic pain patients shoes and use your scale
          This commission is crap
          More money for REHAB not taking away medications from the needy

          Like

        • dayallaxeded says:

          And I’m sure if gummint steps in and increases oversight, penalties, paperwork, and makes treatment of chronic pain patients even more inconvenient, demeaning, and just all around difficult than it already is, they’ll magically feel better, be less prone to seek pain relief from “other” sources, and you and your chronic pain patients will somehow be transported to nirvana. Yeah, I won’t hold my breath.

          You’re right that depression plays a huge part in quality of life and pain perception for people with demonstrable, pathological (not an MD–I mean pain stemming from an objective, physical cause), chronic pain. But what you don’t mention is the problem of attempting to treat such patients with anti-depressants, which have their own very problematic side effects. If one narcotic drug, in a time-released form not amenable to abuse, will sufficiently relieve pain and thus also depression in a patient, shouldn’t the patient be allowed to use that drug according to MD’s directions? What bureaucrat would you or anyone here trust to have the power to contradict that MD’s directions or that patient’s choice?

          I’m on this like red beans on rice, b/c it’s very very personal, but I have to say, even a few years ago when it wasn’t a personal/family issue, it was still and will always be plainly wrong and an unconstitutional usurpation of individual liberty and state/local regulatory authority for the feds to interfere in the realm of MD/patient decisions. As horrible as the impact of Rowe v. Wade has been in regard to abortion, its fundamental thesis was and is valid–medical decisions are between the MD and the patient, unless and until third parties are involved.

          Liked by 1 person

          • BT in SC says:

            Thank you thank you thank you!! So glad there ARE others who understand. I guess I, too, am going to have to be more involved with this issue. Letter writing [voice activated typing!], phone calls, whatever it takes. All of “this” will have a YUGE impact on those of us with real, genuine medical issues. What has already been extremely difficult is going to become so much more so with the “Feds” interference with regard to MD / patient decisions. Oh my! The anxiety it causes just thinking about it… which causes even worse “attacks.” The circle is never ending and SO incredibly vicious!!

            Like

  20. Fleporeblog says:

    Here is a perfect arena that our LORD knew that our president and our FLOTUS could make a real difference in the lives of millions of American adults, adolescents and regrettably children born to an addicted mother. You will not find two people in this world more dedicated to this epidemic than our Lion and our FLOTUS. Unlike Nancy Reagan’s “Just Say No” campaign, our President is going to go after every venue where these drugs are created, brought into our country and abused by doctors that over prescribe down to the addicts themselves.

    God has blessed our country and I sleep well at night that we are in the greatest hands possible.

    Liked by 3 people

    • TeaForAll says:

      🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • I am not buying into the doctors over-prescribing story. It’s not happening. Doctors live in fear of being acused of over prescribing.

      Years ago I reviewed a site by a doctor helping people wean off opiates. The process was not days or even months. They had learned from their work that it was a multi-year process that involved moving patients from one drug to another until they were fully free from the physiological damage caused by their use.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. freddy says:

    Black tar heroin has been around a long time. Fentynal is the game changer and being made in huge batches in mexico in factories the size of wal mart. Sinaloa cartels specialty………Pre cursors come into prts from China and yep meth is produced by the ton as well. mexico is the key and the destruction of the catrels and the product is what they must focus on not little rehab places and politicians wring their hands. It’s Mexico and Afghanistan… Take down the problem or have it ongoing forever.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dorothy Marcum says:

      Mexico and the WALL
      punishing true pain patients seems to be the “answer” they want
      shameful

      Liked by 2 people

    • Cuppa Covfefe says:

      Look at where Prescott Bush got his money (it wasn’t just oil). Look at how “interested” the CIA is in Afghanistan. Those poppies have to go, even if it means no more poppyseed buns and “Mohnbrotchen” anymore…

      Like

  22. John Doe says:

    I watched this live on MSNBC (someone has to do opposition research). EVERY talking head on there was floored, and absolutely effusive over FLOTUS and POTUS speeches. I mean…it was jaw dropping. They’re changing their methods of attack. Something in the air today.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. KBR says:

    I wrote an email just yesterday to the Congressman in my district in response to his email on this very subject.
    There is a bigger “epidemic” caused IMO by “psyche drugs” being Rx’d like candy given & for little to no reason to far too many people. And that has been going on for far too long. I told him we need to crack down of the laws already on the books about all “controlled” Rx drugs which are now prescribed too much.

    Some psyche drugs are extremely addictive, like Xanax and similar, that sometimes are given freely long enough to get the patient hooked, then the Rx is cut off: this leaves the addicted patient to seek relief from street dealers, who waste no time in getting the person hooked on something else, often opiods.

    The patient, whose conscience, reasoning ability, and willpower has been weakened by those very psyche drugs that were prescribed by a physician, and who is now addicted to the “medicine” he can no longer get from his doc, is in a very vulnerable state and can easily be swayed by a street dealer to accept whatever he deals that might bring any relief for the Rx-caused addiction.

    Some “psyche” drugs are said to be “non-addictive,” but I have my doubts: any psyche drug that
    you must “taper off gradually” to “avoid risk of possible suicide” is IMO addictive! And that includes Prozac and all its relatives and substitutes.

    I know these things from being a Clinical Scientist, and from seeing it far too many times.

    I know the drug Rx’s are too easily obtained from having been offered Rx’s myself
    1) when a pet died
    2) when I was sad at an appt because I witnessed a crow eating baby birds just before a visit with a NURSE practioner
    3) when my daughter left for college
    4) when I teared up during a medical history when talking about the death of my beloved father.
    5) when I laughingly quipped “Gosh, my nerves are shot” because someone had pulled out in front of my car and very nearly caused an accident on my way to a check up

    None of these instances warranted a prescription. I wasn’t “bawling,” I merely teared up. I was in office for allergies or colds or ordinary checkups. These instances cover many years and different doctors in different states where I have lived. I learned not to “chat” with doctors & never to “joke” b/c in my experience, they generally do not have much sense-of-humor.

    Now I just stay out of doctor offices as much as possible: that has become my version of “preventive medicine!” It prevents misdiagnoses, bad Rx drugs, and unneeded “hunting expeditions” for something wrong that they can “treat” and make $.
    (Not advice for anyone else, just my own opinion for my own case.)

    [If you have a tender heart, and you make a medical person “uncomfortable” by blinking back a tear, they WILL try to give you “medication” for it. I did NOT accept those medications either time. I told them that IMO we need more caring people, and less drug-induced robots in this world, and that I was not “depressed” just “expressive.”]

    My sister DID listen to her doctors & thus quite innocently got hooked on Rx’d “sadness-drugs” then on “bad nerves-drugs.” That led to Rx’d “pain drugs” for headaches and backaches (symptoms which appeared, real or not, only AFTER her rounds of sadness-drugs and bad-nerves -drugs were stopped.) Lost her career, her health. Attempted suicide. She is gone now, dead by 59: fell (likely from drugs) and severely bruised herself which resulted in a fatal blood clot. I miss her. She had a tenderheart too.

    Helping the current addicts is not enough. Teaching young people that sadness, times of mourning… and certainly tenderheartedness…are NOT sicknesses..This.is.important!

    Ordinary situational sadness is NORMAL and although it sometimes hurts, it will pass. Do not allow docs to medicate normal emotions. Psyche meds kill.

    (I also do not take pain meds in general. I did take a shot once for a kidney stone, but no “follow up Rx.” So far I am lucky, I guess: What pains I do have I can manage without Rx…at least so far. Keeping fingers crossed that that does not change. I hope to live out my life accepting the good days, the sad days and the bad days of it, with a clear mind.)

    Liked by 6 people

    • carrierh says:

      KBR, the over the counter drugs are even worse and are considered our #1 killer as people choose products that contain similar “drugs” and wind up sicker or dead. This blew my mind in having to study pharmacology that over the counter are truly dangerous and then prescriptions drugs dealt out like candy. You will be hearing more about Oriental Medicine being given the opportunity to be more effective, less costly, and doesn’t kill. Many of us also talk about nutrition, I like to teach some Qi Gong exercises, meditation, etc., all of which are great to health.

      Liked by 1 person

      • KBR says:

        Yep! I used to teach pharmacology, so I know how right you are!

        Interestingly, as a toddler-to-preschooler, I had very painful episodes of earache and kidney pain due to genetic kidney problems. I taught myself to dig my thumbnail into various spots on my fingers to allieviate the pain! Decades later, I studied the pressure points in the hands from oriental medicine.

        Lo and behold! Many of them were the ones I used from my childhood! (An angel must have told me, because that was long before articles about oriental medicine got any TV coverage, and although I could read by age four, I wasn’t into medical tomes as a small kid!)

        Liked by 1 person

    • dayallaxeded says:

      “Now I just stay out of doctor offices as much as possible: that has become my version of “preventive medicine!” It prevents misdiagnoses, bad Rx drugs, and unneeded “hunting expeditions” for something wrong that they can “treat” and make $.”–Truer words were never spoke! That’s been me since dealing with all the “stuff” relating to my family member’s spiraling health issues since a bad bone break, leading to nerve damage, to chronic pain, etc. etc. I had a bad bone break a few months ago and needed powerful pain meds to remain functional, but weened off ASAP, b/c just couldn’t go down that road, no matter how “comfortable.” Just quit going to the doctor, too, once it was confirmed everything was healing adequately. If I’d had a cast, I’d have cut it off myself. That’s how much I’ve come to dislike and distrust the medical community. I know some need it, and I can respect that, but I’m still staying as far away as possible.

      Like

      • I don’t go to doctors unless I need an antibiotic which last happened 10 years ago…ok, I did go a few time since for minor stuff. I met a 98 year old woman out walking around a lake near hear and she told me don’t go to doctors. Hey, she drove herself to the lake in her pick-up truck…who am I to argue!

        Like

      • KBR says:

        Dayallaxeded, I agree with your agreement! 😃

        Littleflower, yes antibiotics against major bacterial infections–that the body can’t seem to rid itself from–are one of the very few “curative” medicines available.

        But some cause side effects, and kill good gut bacteria along with the bad bacteria, so I use on myself edible-medicinal-fresh herbals and some minerals applied directly to skin/membranes–early in the infection-process– to try to ward off need for strong oral (goes everywhere in the body vs goes only to the affected area) antibiotics later. (Fresh garlic & some peppers for capsaicin/tiny amounts pure zinc, applied by steam or soup, tiny amount of zinc by swab to the affected area, for colds for instance.)
        I am not suggesting this for others, merely telling you what I do for my own self.
        In this way I am attempting to avoid potential proliferation of pneumococcus/streptococcus which can live in your throat in small-but-ineffective quantities (kept small by your own cell-defenses) but always awaiting the opportunity to build bigger colonies (like while your cell-defenses are overworked fighting/consuming something else like the residues left by a virus.) I also use small amounts of antibiotic ointments for potentially-infected cuts/blisters of the skin along with fresh aloe leaf to aid healing.

        Most medicines only are symptom meds: they might allieviate symptoms but do not cure anything. So they do not make you well again. If you get well after taking a symptom-masking drug your own body did that, it healed/cured itself.

        Symptoms are sometimes the body warning the conscious brain that something bad is happening: when symptoms-only are treated the warning is masked, but the “bad thing” is not treated by these meds, just the symptoms are eased.

        Sometimes “hiding” symptoms can make the actual problem worse (Ignoring the warning)
        Body says: “Something is wrong in your back, (Ouch ouch!) don’t lift anything heavy right now.”
        But you “feel better”, b/c you took a “pain-reliever” (symptom/warning hider) so you think it’s okay to go ahead & lift heavy things today–before the body has healed the relatively-minor muscle sprain/strain. Since the unhealed strained back muscles cannot support the spine too well right now, you end up with a more serious, more painful, and very difficult-to-heal spinal nerve/disc injury.

        All b/c you failed to listen to your body and failed to take the precautions your body’s pain-signal was screaming for you to take, b/c you masked the signal-symptoms with pain reliever drugs. You “felt” well enough, but your muscles were not well enough.

        Often symptom-relievers make contagious diseases more easily spread to others (I feel okay so I will go to work/shopping.)

        One symptom that needs immediate treatment is a dangerously high fever, but by that time there is possibly a bad infection that also needs antibiotics/antivirals/antihelminths. Lower fever may be actually helpful and is certainly one indication that the body is fighting this invader off. Some believe that fever itself is one body-mechanism for destroying the invader.

        Basically, in most cases the body heals itself. Most medicines don’t cure.

        Liked by 1 person

        • dayallaxeded says:

          Probiotics, particularly acidophilus and lactobacillus are good supplemental intestinal flora that aid both in healthy digestion and seem to “starve” bad bacteria that might otherwise make us ill. Big fan here of cayenne–I’ve personally experienced significant improvement in healing of minor nerve injuries by supplementing with cayenne. I also think it gives your body some more tolerance or capability to deal with GI bugs and toxins–no science for that, just the observation that spicey hot foods are so prevalent in tropical areas, where food preservation is problematic–natural selection at work. You’ve got to have a tolerance for its GI tract effects and for the “heat,” if you taste it, though, so YMMV.

          Also, for respiratory/sinus issues, nothing like a neti pot (or squeeze bottle) flush of nasal passages/sinuses with the warmest bearable saline solution. Most respiratory tract viruses and bacteria flourish there b/c it’s a little cooler than 98.6*. That’s why making the solution as warm as tolerated adds to its effectiveness (+ it feels good, once you get used to it). The mention of fever as a part of the body’s natural healing mechanism is another application of the same idea.

          Neti daily before bed is the preventive regimen suggested to me by a very good pharmacist many years ago. He told me he used to have colds and such constantly during the winter, until he tried neti cleansing. Given the extent of a pharmacist’s exposures to sick people, I give his little clinical trial a lot of credence. I’m less disciplined, but no doubt neti cleansing has helped me a lot with minimizing symptoms and accelerating recovery from colds and similar respiratory tract infections, as well as allergy symptoms.

          Like

  24. highdezertgator says:

    Just remember… Alcohol is still king…. and its legal….Prohibition didn’t work… made it worse!

    Alcoholism is three fold…a physical reaction (allergy) induces physical craving; a mental obsession (insanity before the next drink) and the spiritual malady (underlying condition of the soul)…. only a spiritual solution can overcome this addiction…. and yes folks alcohol is a “drug” (a depressant)

    http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/alcoholism-epidemic-more-1-8-americans-are-now-alcoholics-1634315
    Alcoholism epidemic in the USA: More than 1 in 8 Americans are now alcoholics
    Alcoholism has risen 49% in the US in just 11 years, national surveys find.
    Excerpt
    “Unseen epidemic
    The largest change was in the most severe alcohol use category. The number of people who had received a diagnosis of alcoholism over the period of the two studies shot up by 49%, affecting 12.7% of the total population. This means 1 in 8 Americans received a diagnosis of alcoholism in the year before the latest survey.

    “The increases were unprecedented relative to the past two decades,” study author Bridget Grant of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, told IBTimes UK.

    Despite its prevalence, Americans are not sufficiently aware of the alcoholism crisis.

    “The increases in alcohol related outcomes may have been overshadowed by increases in less prevalent drugs like marijuana and opioids, although all increases in alcohol and other substances are important.”

    But like those other epidemics, the increasing rates of alcoholism in the US are a symptom of a broader problem with addictive substances in the US, writes psychiatrist Marc Schuckit of the University of California, San Diego, in an editorial in the same issue of the journal.”

    Die in the problem or Live in the solution ….One day at a time!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Why do ppl always lump cannabis in with synthetic heroin? Geez… Do you know how many Vets have given up what amounts to heroin and psychotropic psych meds for cannabis?

      Liked by 1 person

    • carrierh says:

      high, may I use your last statement? It is a great thing to share with everyone not only with alcohol but with over-eating crap foods and being obese or morbidly obese, sugar addition, etc. We can all stop, think and help ourselves and others as good families, friends, neighbors. Not all will listen, but we can try and try again.

      Like

  25. PDQ says:

    How can throwing my tax money at drug abuse solve anything?
    Most of the patients my daughter cares for as a nurse are there, for free, because of drug abuse. No amount of money will stop them.

    There are prostitutes in the hospital due to drug abuse ilnesses TURNING TRICKS IN THEIR HOSPITAL BEDS.

    How will my tax money help someone of this mentality?

    This is a heart issue, not a money issue.

    Now, people who do not abuse opioids will be prevented from getting them. Once again, punish the innocent.

    Liked by 3 people

    • dayallaxeded says:

      And here you have the key–it’s a money issue in that as long as our tax $ go to support people who make bad and illegal life choices, those people will continue to live and be the burdens they are. There also needs to be fear and the strong disincentive to do bad illegal stuff that comes from seeing other people destroying themselves and knowing the “safety net” isn’t going to catch them will produce.

      While correlation does not equal causation, it can’t be completely ignored that the problem of drug addiction has skyrocketed right along with gummint welfare, starting with LBJ’s ironically named Great Society, with a too brief hiatus when work requirements were instituted for welfare benefits (forced down Klintoon’s throat by the last GOP congress–distinguished from GOPe, then allowed to expire under either Shrub or 0bunghole).

      Fundamentally, if we have the right to our own thoughts, we have the right to alter our state of mind. We don’t have the right to endanger or take support from anyone else while we do that or any other endeavor, but it is not the gummint’s bidnez to regulate our mental states. Yet that is exactly what 99% of current drug enforcement policy attempts and utterly fails to do. Target the cartels and criminal elements dealing and engaging in other criminality related to illegal drug trade and at the same time, let illegal drug users kill themselves, since that’s their choice. The problem will diminish to infinitesimal size in a generation.

      Like

  26. freddy says:

    We were upper middle class and I had a sister who tried heroin with boyfriend……..My life changed and my job was to hide all this from my mom who could never understand what happened so quickly…….I went on holidays to bring her home a few hours and my mom always cried. Where I had to go would curl your hair. The stolen grandmothers wedding ring and all the stuff she stole was heartbreaking as my mom suffered greatly. The child I had to take at gunpoint back to give to my mom to raise as sister was out of control. The life in and out of prison and the boyfriends and low lifes who gave her the OD’s and the hospital…The needle marks …….Oh man what a ride you’ll never know… i pray you never do…………..God bless Melania………..

    Liked by 5 people

  27. I am not a fan of big government solutions. I am a fan of personal accountability. However I believe what we are seeing is a combination of problems with no easy answers,no easy solutions. Yes, it is a problem for people that have to have these painkillers to survive. Chronic debilitating pain is a killer. (Suicide is an issue with chronic pain) But one aspect of this issue that I have not seen mentioned here is what has been created by the FDA in apparent collusion with Big Pharma. The granddaddy of this opioid nightmare is oxycontin. (sic)) That drug, highly addictive, was approved under suspicious circumstances. (On the phone and can’t link but you should be able to find it in a search engine) My own mother who suffered severe chronic back pain for many years before she passed, became addicted. And her politics were often to the right of Atilla the Hun (we used to joke). She also completely denied she ws addicted. Of couse. She followed her prescription and it hooked her. There are no easy answers, but a first good clue is to follow the money, whether it’s the FDA or the cartels.

    Liked by 2 people

  28. tuskyou says:

    This is a tough one cause I want the people who need and especially want help to get it. I don’t want people who suffer with chronic pain denied meds or have their pain inadequately treated. My mother in law had to fight for her pain meds. The battle wore her out. She tried everything the doc suggested: TENS unit, some kind of ear thing(can’t remember the name), massage. She used to get Celebrex (which did help) along with narcs but then medicare wouldn’t pay for it so she took something else that wasn’t as effective. I could type for hours about her chronic pain and the chronic pain of getting her meds.

    Bottom line: if someone legitimately requires narcotics to control pain they should have them. If it’s legit they will have documentation, physical exams, X-rays, MRI, physical therapy eval, etc. They will have what they need to justify the use of opioids. Nobody will be pain free nor should they expect to be free from any/all pain. The pain should be managed so that the person can have a decent quality of life and not be depressed about being in pain or stressed about getting meds.

    Liked by 7 people

    • dayallaxeded says:

      ^^^^THIS EXACTLY!!!!^^^ Thanks very much for understanding and prayers for you and your mother!

      Liked by 2 people

    • I have a friend with spinal stenosis. Her doctor will not give her anything for the pain. She has already said if her quality of life deteriorates she will commit suicide. And then, there are others who have no problem getting these drugs. I don’t understand. My friend still works (part-time, she is a senior) and is a contributing member of society…why is she denied?

      Liked by 2 people

      • tuskyou says:

        This is horrendous. I hope and pray she will advocate for herself. You didn’t ask for suggestions but I’d like to share a few. She should bring someone to the MD appt and go in armed with knowledge about the treatment options by researching online first. Don’t ask for narcs right out of the gate. Be willing to try what they suggest even if you think it won’t help (it might). Keep a log of what you take or do to help manage-even OTC stuff and have it on you/her. Tylenol/Advil have side effects and eating them like candy isn’t the answer. My sig other lived on handfuls of Advil for years before his ankle surgery. Your friend may need new tests to bolster her case.

        Or maybe she needs a new doc. I don’t say this lightly cause it’s a royal pain changing doctors. Kudos to your part time working friend. I hope she gets the help she needs. It breaks my heart to read your post. My mother in law had debilitating chronic pain but we were very involved in her medical care. Many, many times I wondered how her pain would have been managed if she didn’t have support.

        Liked by 1 person

      • dayallaxeded says:

        Second tuskyou’s suggestion both for involvement of a companion/advocate and seeking out a new doc. It required some research and a little trial and error to find a really responsible, humane, competent pain management MD and even with that, sometimes it’s must necessary for me to go and make sure the MD understands the facts, as they are for the other 23 hours of the day that he’s not seeing the patient. Our pharmacists (it’s a family-run pharmacy, not one of the predatory corporate urban blighters) has been quite helpful, since they know which doctors are routinely submitting Rxs for certain meds and receiving good comments from patients.

        Like

    • Dad's son says:

      Thank you. I am living this nightmare, especially since there was a big crackdown about 3 years ago on prescription rules. Unrelenting, chronic pain 24 hours a day from basically a rusted out skeleton & joints, and more joint replacments on the way. Celebrex is part of the puzzle, but so is a low-dose opioid. The rules have tightened down so much that the people like me are having to jump through Soviet-style hoops, go to ERs when I’m out of state for more than 30 days because now other states won’t recognize out-of-state doctors’ prescriptions, drive 50 miles in-state for appointments that get billed to my soaring medical insurance, just to pick up a low-strength paper prescription that used to be called in to the pharmacy by phone from my long-term doctor.

      They need to leave people like me alone, who have foot-thick medical files, and bust the young idiots having “fun” who are making life hell for people like me. When I was a kid, almost NO ONE I knew abused prescription drugs – except for mostly housewives with “mother’s little helper.” Now, these kids are taking pills for kicks and people like me are the collateral damage.

      I certainly hope President Trump doesn’t tighten the screws any more on ill people. I hope he goes after the young abusers and leaves people like me, and those above in this thread, to at least suffer with no further reduction in dignity. What a lousy feeling it is to be made to feel like a junkie, especially with my judicious use and a medical chart as bad as mine. Walk a mile in my shoes any time of day and I guarantee that most people would be so very, very thankful once they stepped back out of them.

      Mr. President, please do make sure you measure twice before cutting once.

      Liked by 2 people

      • tuskyou says:

        I contacted the White House about this month’s ago. When I have time over the weekend I’m going to write again after watching the video or reading a transcript. I hope POTUS met with people afflicted with chronic pain to hear their stories.

        Like

  29. Anyone ever watch the movie “Amazing Grace”?
    http://www.amazinggracemovie.com/

    Excellent portrayal of opiate use as Wilberforce suffered
    horribly from Crohn’s disease and that is what medicine offered for it at that time.

    His will to persevere until slavery was abolished is inspiring.
    That he did it while suffering such torment inspires even more.

    (So grateful that today the work continues to fight human trafficking in all it’s horrible forms.)

    Like

  30. yy4u says:

    Another campaign promise kept or attempted to keep — he told New Hampshire voters who have a bad opiod crisis going on there that he would try to do something. If the Deep State/Bureaucrats/Permanent Democrat Majority don’t stop him, he will.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. nwtex says:

    Clean, Safe Places For Heroin Addicts To Shoot Up: Coming To A City Near You?
    Mar 30, 2016

    Addicts inject themselves at the InSite supervised injection facility in Vancouver, Canada. AFP PHOTO/Laurent Vu The (Photo credit should read Laurent Vu The/AFP/Getty Images)

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/ritarubin/2016/03/30/clean-safe-places-for-heroin-addicts-to-shoot-up-coming-to-a-city-near-you/#75af34e3ce95

    ~~~~

    Awash in overdoses, Seattle creates safe sites for addicts to inject illegal drugs
    January 2

    Officials in Seattle on Friday approved the nation’s first “safe-injection” sites for users of heroin and other illegal drugs…

    The sites — which offer addicts clean needles, medical supervision and quick access to drugs that reverse the effects of an overdose — have long been popular in Europe. Now, with the U.S. death toll rising, the idea is gaining traction in a number of American cities, including Boston, New York City and Ithaca, N.Y.
    […]

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/awash-in-overdoses-seattle-creates-safe-sites-for-addicts-to-inject-illegal-drugs/2017/01/27/ddc58842-e415-11e6-ba11-63c4b4fb5a63_story.html

    Like

    • dayallaxeded says:

      If our society will grow a spine and let these addicts die, if they can’t remain functional while using, this kind of accommodation, by preventing other, more costly and dangerous health problems, makes sense. If all we’re doing is further expanding a social/medical safety net and making it so comfortable people are almost induced to fall into it, then it would be better to cut off all social services of every sort and have gummint do absolutely nothing but investigate and prosecute actual crimes. Failing to feed oneself, or failing to earn shelter for oneself, or altering one’s state of mind is not a crime–it’s a choice and arguably a 1st Amendment right.

      Like

      • Belle says:

        The idea is (at least sometimes) to provide them not only with clean needles but also with information about their options to get sober. A friend recently told me about a needle exchange where they had more needles turned in than they gave out, and where a significant number of users were leaving with material about sobriety. I don’t know if it will work, but the goal of a needle exchange like the one I described isn’t just to make things comfortable for them. It’s to get them to a place where they can be helped and point them to resources.

        Liked by 1 person

        • dayallaxeded says:

          Good points–turning in more needles than handed out suggests that some illicit needles are getting properly disposed of instead of ending up harming a kid on the street or in my hand or foot while I’m doing yard work. Oddly, my quiet little residential street was, for a while, like a “needle park”–they’d pull up in their cars, park right under my living room window, where they could be plainly seen from above, go through their rituals, inject, take a few minutes to mellow then drive off. Sometimes they’d throw their “works” out on the neutral ground, though–nasty, irritating, and dangerous. Calling LEOs (many times) has been useless, b/c they never arrive fast enough. Since I cut some trees along the neutral ground, we haven’t seen this much. Maybe it doesn’t seem as secluded to them or their source has just moved to a different area.

          Like

      • Belle says:

        The idea is (at least sometimes) to provide them not only with clean needles but also with information about their options to get sober. A friend recently told me about a needle exchange where they had more needles turned in than they gave out, and where a significant number of users were leaving with material about sobriety. I don’t know if it will work, but the goal of a needle exchange like the one I described isn’t just to make things comfortable for them. It’s to get them to a place where they can be helped and point them to resources.

        Like

  32. Q&A says:

    It’s almost like a Venn diagram of 2 separate problems with addicts making up one universe and pain patients making up another. Most people (including the medical community) don’t understand the hell faced by people living with intense physical pain and the pharmaceutical help they need to be functional. I’m glad to see the push for drug companies to research non-addictive pain medications, but just because people need strong drugs for pain relief doesn’t mean they will automatically become addicts, nor should they be treated as such.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Maquis says:

      Dealing with the VA on multiple crippling pain issues it is clear that the presumption of the medical community, or of the VA leadership, is that Opiod use invariably results in addiction. I don’t believe that’s entirely true.

      Nevertheless, even if it is true, even if a patient with unrelenting pain receives Opiods to function, and to survive, actually does become at some level and to some extent addicted, who cares?

      If the patient does not recognize any sense of a “high” after taking it, nor a “low” when a dose is past due, does not display drug seeking behavior, ignores alcohol and doesn’t ask for increases in dosage, then any addiction is inconsequential and utterly irrelevant.

      If the Condition requiring its use persists, if pain in absence of treatment is unrelenting, if no behavioral nor social problems exist, then what does it matter if there is some degree of addiction? IT’S JUST A SIDE EFFECT. A negligible and unimportant one.

      As at least one Treeper thus far has mentioned, both wisely and compassionately, Pain Kills. Those that refuse to treat their patients’ Pain, Kill. Those that prevent doctors from treatimg their patients’ Pain, Kill.

      When I was young I never imagined that pain could be so severe that its escape could be worth taking one’s own life. So overwhelming that it could seem absolutely mandatory. It can be.

      There are a lot of brave and tough people here, righteous people, that have endured great pain and shunned the relief of such medications. I salute them. I ask them, ask all, to consider that we aren’t all wired the same. I doubt any two people are.

      Beyond our genetic code, the hormones we were exposed to in our mothers’ wombs can greatly affect the expression of those genes and the function of our bodies, especially our nervous system.

      Some people are wired to experience pain more easily and more keenly than others from our individual Day Ones’. Some experience events, or maladies, that trigger latent capacities.

      Surely a great many things in our world can create such conditions regardless of fortuitous genetic heritage, of a bucolic existence, of strength of character and willpower.

      From industrial chemical compounds that proliferate far faster than our bodies can develop defenses, to biological agents slowly developing in the worst of conditions yet making their way about the globe at the speed of modern transport; the risks to our health are legion.

      Any of us are an exposure away from living the miserable existence of those we so frequently presume to have brought their suffering upon themselves.

      Those in health, thank the Heavens for it and guard it well. Please also, offer the suffering the compassion and understanding you would hope to receive should you join them, for you might yet do so.

      Liked by 1 person

      • linda7780 says:

        I never got sick or laid out of work but, as I got older and in my 50s, my body fell apart all at one time. There were many days I wished to die from pain 24/7 365 days of the year. The doctor who delivered my babies said I have an extremely high pain tolerance and that I wait too long to get treatment because of that. This is not the case now. The non stop pain is awful and very hard not to get depressed. Also, the minute someone finds out you have to take something for it, you are no longer able to be sad, depressed, angry, etc., because they immediately think it’s because of the pain medication. I used to be very judgmental of people who couldn’t “pull themselves up by their bootstraps”. No longer. I am speaking of people who really and truly have pain.

        Liked by 1 person

  33. Pam says:

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Pam says:

    Liked by 4 people

  35. Pam says:

    Liked by 3 people

  36. freddy says:

    Unless a big breakthru occurs rehab is a never ending revolving door. It solves nothing only gives a family a little time not to worry about that call or some crime committed and now in prison….Remember a junkie needs $100 a day to not get sick and come out to steal. A tweeker needs a little less but close. A heroin addict will do ANYTHING to get more dope…….Home invasion robbery..no problem… The public needs help too in all this.

    Liked by 2 people

  37. citizen817 says:

    Pharma Exec Bribed Doctors to Prescribe Potent Opioids to Patients Who Didn’t Need Them, Feds Say

    The Department of Justice announced Thursday that they charged 74-year-old John Kapoor, the founder and majority owner of Insys Therapeutics Inc.,

    Excerpt:
    “In the midst of a nationwide opioid epidemic that has reached crisis proportions, Mr. Kapoor and his company stand accused of bribing doctors to overprescribe a potent opioid and committing fraud on insurance companies solely for profit,” said Acting United States Attorney William D. Weinreb in a statement. “Today’s arrest and charges reflect our ongoing efforts to attack the opioid crisis from all angles. We must hold the industry and its leadership accountable – just as we would the cartels or a street-level drug dealer.”

    https://lawnewz.com/crazy/pharma-exec-bribed-doctors-to-prescribe-potent-opioid-to-patients-who-didnt-need-it-feds-say/

    Like

  38. georgiafl says:

    Like

  39. Mia C says:

    Well, we should probably stop prescribing opioids as much as possible. Guess they’re too addictive. Can’t something else be used for pain? Anyway, I have no answers. Just hope the people who need this stuff for end of life pain can still get it.
    –I’d rather go out high on drugs and in little pain. I think that if you’re at the end stage they should let you have whatever they hell they have that can make your last breaths bearable. So I hope there’s an end of life exception because that’s how I want to go out.
    –Also, I don’t know what they use for childbirth but keep that stuff coming. My childbirth was bearable because of whatever they gave me and we need to keep it that way.

    Like

    • covfefe999 says:

      I don’t think you would want to end your life as an addict though. You wouldn’t just be high, you’d be suffering all of the symptoms of addiction including tolerance to the drug and withdrawal symptoms if you don’t keep taking more and more.

      Like

    • Belle says:

      “Can’t something else be used for pain?”

      That’s the problem. We don’t really have anything else right now that works as well and isn’t addictive. Medical marijuana shows promise, but since it’s still schedule 1 and is a relatively new to more widespread (public) use for medical reasons, we may have a long way to go before we know if it’s a viable long-term option with an acceptable side effect profile. Hopefully eventually someone will find a good option.

      Liked by 1 person

  40. covfefe999 says:

    Melania made me cry. I have a personal experience but want to remain private so won’t share it here. People who haven’t been touched by opioid addiction cannot imagine how horrible it is. Opioids change the thoughts and behavior of the addicts in such a profound way, they become irrational uncaring monsters.

    Like

  41. Pam says:

    Like

  42. free73735 says:

    $$$ drive the drug problem, all of them! I have mentioned this before, and will again. Find the series NatGeo did on “Drug INC”, for some in depth, valid understanding of drugs. I have 59 episodes saved of the series. They track sources & histories of the drugs used here as well as from around the world. Shows like Cops, Live PD, offers some information also. It’s not just for entertainment purposes. My only daughter died because of this scourge. She started at 19 with marijuana, kept climbing the ladder till she was 32 when her boyfriend blew her head off with a 357 mag. They were “quarreling” after having been to a party next door. They were both addicts. She had 5 children from 4 different dads, and all, are left with residual effects from the drugs.

    Like

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