NAFTA Day #2 Recap…

Day two of Round One NAFTA negotiations continued today.

Round one is scheduled to run through Sunday August 20th.   Generally speaking the key negotiators are not presenting too much public information as the larger objectives of the first round are structured around the bigger issues of the agreement itself, and not the individual economic sectors which follow.

The potential for an agreement still appears around a level “3” on a ten point scale.

On the positive side for those who follow the U.S. Trade Team, you might enjoy hearing that the crony-capitalistic lobbying group, The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, has been significantly reduced.  U.S. CoC President Tom Donohue attempts to put his best face forward amid his diminished ability to influence actual policy:

“[…] In the next weeks and months, negotiators will tackle these issues and many more, and the Chamber will be paying close attention. We believe modernization of NAFTA is a reasonable and achievable goal, but it must be done carefully to preserve market access for U.S. companies.”

“The Chamber was a strong voice for the American business community during the original NAFTA negotiations 25 years ago, and we welcome the opportunity to update the agreement.”(link)

Yeah, the fact that the U.S. CoC constructed the corrupt, and highly political, 1994 NAFTA agreement doesn’t portend too well there Mr. Donohue. :::spit::::

 

Additionally, the ever virtuous Canadian team pressured to havefreedom of the press” included in any new NAFTA trade agreement.  Apparently the Canadian influence continues toward a social justice manifesto within the actual trade deal.  Previously Canada announced their primary trade objectives around transgender rights, cultural sensitivity and climate change.

CTH freely admits it sounds weird, but currently it appears that Canadian trade and economic perspectives are heavily invested in social justice-type issues.

CANADA – Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland said yesterday’s opening day of work was more about setting the table ahead of the long, hard slog of sorting through all the details. Freeland says the detail work will be particularly important, because she and her American and Mexican counterparts are renegotiating a trade pact that is already in force and upon which so much of our economy is based. She likens it to renovating a house while you’re still living in it. (pdf release)

On the Mexican team side, they appear more interested in maintaining the “status quo”, which is a little odd until you realize Mexican politics benefits Mexican officials and not the Mexican people itself.  As such all of the visible cues from Mexican Trade officials are geared toward maintaining a top-down multinational corporatist system we have previously described. –SEE HERE

Meanwhile the average Mexican worker sees zero benefit to the deal according to the principles espoused by Mexico’s trade team.

It’s an odd dynamic because U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross has proposed the NAFTA renegotiations include increases to the minimum wages of Mexican workers.  Mexican officials are looking out for Mexican officials, and Wilbur Ross is trying to help Mexican workers.  It really is an unusual dynamic.

EL PASO – As  negotiations began this week to revise the North Ameican Free Trade Agreement, leaders from both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border gathered in El Paso and Juarez to urge negotiators to do no harm to the economic power of the 23-year-old treaty, and to also discuss how the two countries’ long-binational relationship can be enhanced despite strained relations caused by President Donald Trump’s election.

Trump changed the political, cultural and social landscape of the United States-Mexico relationship, Chihuahau Gov. Javier Corral told more than 200 people Thursday at the Cibeles convention center in Juarez during the second day of the two-day U.S.-Mexico Border Summit.

But, he said, “The links that join us are indestructible.”

Events like the summit help to “keep building bridges and not walls” between the two countries, he said.

Modernizing, but not hurting NAFTA and trying to get Washington politicians and others across the United States to understand the importance of Mexico and the border for the nation’s economy were themes of the two-day summit, which began Wednesday at the Downtown El Paso convention center, where about 500 people attended.  (link)

[…]  “The great loser in these last 23 years has been Mexico, above all, the small farmers,” said Ernesto Ladron de Guevara, speaking for one peasant farmers union at a park across from Mexico’s Foreign Ministry.

His union is pushing for NAFTA’s fate to face a public vote, possibly to coincide with next year’s July presidential election and, if the deal survives, wants it to exclude anything related to agriculture and food production.

Mexico now imports some $18.5 billion of agriculture products every year, making it one of the most important markets for U.S. farmers.

That makes U.S. rural states key supporters of the pact, making it harder for Trump to follow his declared instinct to rip it up in favor U.S. blue-collar workers who feel jobs have flooded south.

While some Mexican agriculture such as large-scale livestock farms and horticulture has flourished under NAFTA, others, especially small scale grains producers, have found it hard to compete with U.S. imports.

“The effects of the treaty have been negative for the country’s indigenous people,” said Jose Narro Cespedes, a small farmers’ representative.

Other protesters emphasized that Mexico needs to pay attention to itself, rather than outside trade partners.

“We need to focus on the internal economy,” said Galindo. “We’re a sweat-shop country, and the whole world knows it. The only thing we’re doing is exporting.”  (read more)

For those who understand how modern trade has been taken over by multinational corporations and multinational financial interests, all would agree the concerns of the individual farmer are 100% valid.  –Explained Here

The BIG Ag corporations now control the entire international market; and with that control they control the pricing, flow of product, harvest and domestic supply within each participating nation.

The massive corporate conglomerates represent less than 20% of farms and businesses, yet they produce 70% of all products.  These Big Ag entities control the supply and price of food products, there is no such thing as a “free market”.

A strong article in NPR presents the problems for all three national sides of the farming equation.  Ultimately, what most people don’t realize is that farmers, and eventually consumers, are being exploited by multinational corporations.

Mexican, Canadian and American national farmers are fighting against multinational corporations who are controlling every aspect of the food production, and manipulating the supply side -via exports- to maximize their profits within each individual nation.

[…]  Whether or not it was the primary culprit, NAFTA certainly hasn’t altered the steady rise in farm concentration. Trade expanded the total size of the pie, as the Farm Bureau points out: U.S. agricultural exports to Mexico and Canada jumped from $8.9 billion in 1993 to over $38 billion today. Yet, critics point out, the largest farms control most of the slices, with 20 percent of farms operating 70 percent of U.S. farmland. Between 2013 and 2016, 42,000 farms ceased operations, according to USDA data.

The National Farmers Union, the second-largest farmers organization, highlights this disparity. “The net effect of trade agreements like NAFTA is to put more power, more authority with the large multinational companies and by extension, take that power away from family farmers,” says Farmers Union President Roger Johnson.

The world’s major meat packers, Johnson pointed out, operate cross-border in Canada, the U.S. and Mexico, taking production wherever costs are the lowest – which is precisely the criticism Trump has made of companies moving American jobs to Mexico. In a similar example, some of the tomato and berry imports Florida growers complain about are actually produced by U.S. companies operating in Mexico.

“I think there is a parallel [in agriculture] to what we see with manufacturing,” says Karen Hansen-Kuhn, director of trade and global governance at the Institute for Agriculture & Trade Policy, a progressive think tank. “The farm bill and trade policies — but especially NAFTA — are geared around the idea that farmers should get big or get out and depend on export markets to make their ends meet. That undermines farmers who are trying to produce for a smaller scale, who are trying to produce more sustainably.”

The view from Mexico – But if some U.S. farmers feel like they’ve been hurt under the trade deal, it’s not as if trading partners are enriching themselves. In Mexico, the poverty rate hovered at 53 percent as of 2014 (the latest numbers available), according to The World Bank. Around 2 million Mexican farmers have lost their land in the NAFTA era, and many recently took to the streets of Mexico City to protest the trade agreement.

Mexico’s traditional subsistence agriculture has shifted to large-scale produce operations in the north, while Mexican livestock production has industrialized as multinational companies like Tyson, Cargill and Pilgrim’s Pride have opened up operations.

Meanwhile, nearly half of Mexico’s food is imported from abroad, much of it from the United States. That includes corn, which is both a staple food and a religious symbol for the indigenous population — yet today, most of Mexico’s corn comes from the U.S. Midwest. In 2016 alone, the U.S. shipped $2.6 billion worth of the stuff to its southern neighbor — its largest export market — mostly for livestock feed.

“The upshot is you have a country that was practically self-sufficient in corn, its staple food crops, is now highly dependent on imports to feed itself,” says Laura Carlsen, director of the Americas Program at the Center for International Policy in Mexico City.

Market power and monopolies – To complicate the picture even more, the World Trade Organization, which was established in 1994 to accelerate globalization, has had a major impact on farmers in all three NAFTA countries.

“NAFTA and the WTO were designed to make it easier for people to set up big corporations and take those big corporations into neighboring states,” says Barry Lynn, director of the Open Markets program and a senior fellow at the New America Foundation. “[The agreements] were designed to make it harder to fight monopolies.”

Just look at the meat industry, says Lynn. Today, only four companies in the U.S. control 85 percent of the beef industry, and the largest of them — JBS — is Brazilian. JBS, which is backed by the Brazilian state bank, runs Pilgrim’s Pride, a chicken company with operations in the U.S. and Mexico, as well as Swift Foods, a multinational beef and pork processor. (read more)

Most American voters think farming looks like this:

However, in reality, 2017 farming looks like this:

 

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169 Responses to NAFTA Day #2 Recap…

  1. ECM says:

    There is something particularly rich about a country who doesn’t even guarantee free speech, clamoring for ‘free press’ in a trade agreement.

    Liked by 32 people

    • sadsack says:

      Free speech in Canada is dead. We have laws and motions on the federal and provincial level that ban particular kinds of speech.

      I believe that free speech is under attack in the U.S as well.
      Trudeau has betrayed us but I firmly believe that your president will fight for the american people ‘with his last breath.’ I do believe that his life is in constant jeopardy.

      God bless you and keep you strong. You President Trump needs your support. I think the rallies give him strength but I do worry that some nut will try to kill him. He is leading an epic battle.

      You press is beyond bias and disrespectful to your president but I believe ours is just as bad, if not worse, toward him.

      Lots of prayers going your way!

      http://www.cbc.ca/news/opinion/anti-islamophobia-motion-1.3994374

      Liked by 27 people

      • TAS says:

        I think Canada still has a “North American Union” in mind. IMO, Nafta needs to never be restored. I had many textile and furniture factories close after Nafta was signed in my small town, almost destroyed it and changed it forever. Scrap it and sign deals with each country. America First!!!!!

        Liked by 6 people

        • The minimum wage in Mexico is about $.49/hour or $4.00/day and in the US the Federal minimum wage is $7.25/hr or $58.00/day. How can there be a fair trade agreement with such a discrepancy in wages with a country that cannot even provide their cities and towns with potable drinking water. It’s very hard to negotiate with a country that has a corrupt narco-economy.

          Liked by 4 people

          • USTerminator says:

            The NAFTA revise needs to include the minimum wage for all 3 members. $5.00 and 5% increase annually. This would be win-win-win for all countries. The Mexican workers will make more money. US and Canadians will be more competitive. The original content need to be fixed at 90% to qualify for tariff free, otherwise tariff of 35% should be based on % below 90%. This is for all products and services. This will never happen since the losers would be multinational companies and China.

            Like

        • MaryLS says:

          I agree — just scrap NAFTA. The profound differences between Mexico on the one hand and Canada-US on the other almost ensure an unlevel playing field. Focus should be on bilateral deals which can better accommodate each country’s strenghs and weaknesses. Canada has gone over the top with it’s ridiculous “priorities” — maybe they should save them for the time when the one-world-government they are pushing via the UN is accepted everywhere. Hopefully that won’t happen any time soon.

          Like

      • mollyonviola says:

        Thank you SO much for your encouragement and support! Kind words from a neighbor are a rare treasure. We pray with you and for you as well. God bless you.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Sunshine says:

      LIKE.

      Like

  2. USA loves Melania says:

    Canada is led by very very stupid people.

    Liked by 9 people

    • WVPatriot says:

      Fantastic user name!!!!!

      MAKE AMERICA BEAUTIFUL AGAIN!

      Liked by 9 people

    • Chrtstia Freeland is a communist.

      Liked by 5 people

      • WVPatriot says:

        Canada has tilted toward communism for decades.

        Liked by 3 people

        • SharonKinDC says:

          Yep. Went to Niagara Falls, Canada side in the early 70’s. Was 10-11 yo. I literally could FEEL the hostility from Canadians at the modest motel and attached restaurant we stayed at. Very weird vibe.

          Liked by 4 people

          • parteagirl says:

            I lived in a “conservative” province in the 90s (Alberta) and could still feel the anti-American hostility. Visited Toronto and it was much worse.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Hi I am British by birth, and only recently naturalized as an American.

            It gives me an advantage in opinion here, as Canadians will share things with me, that they wouldn’t dare share with Americans. This works both ways too, and I am sure I have no idea what others really think of the British.

            No, I am not speaking of ALL Canadians, but, overall, I would say that Canada believes that Americans are generally stupid, especially rural folk. I can’t recall the amount of times that Canadians have heard my accent, and assumed that our Head of State, the Queen, bonds us together in a way that allows us to share opinions. They assume I am going to automatically agree with them. When alone, away from Americans, they will open up about their opinion, voluntarily. Most of it virtue signaling.

            They are very keen on putting distance between themselves and America. There is a huge air of superiority about them, and they seem to want to apologize for the stupidity of their American cousins. If I didn’t know any better, I would say that they seem to think that they are a better “class” of people, “class” identification being a classic British trait, and so loved by the snobs.

            This was very apparent during the Bush era. I hated Bush too, because I hated the choice of wars, open borders, NAFTA, World Trade, World Bank, and the whole neo-con bubble. But Canadians seemed to take it to a personal level. They disliked American over confidence, and braggadocious attitude. They also referred to Americans as racists.

            I would say the most common insult, was their assumption that Americans were so stupid that they voted for the son of previous president. To them, this signified their over attachment to branding, their ignorance of nepotism and favoritism, and their desire to make up for not having a Royal family of their own.

            The irony that Trudeau is in power now is not lost on me at all. And to read last night that they are moaning about having less than 10k illegal Mexicans enter cross their border was something I had to laugh about.

            I have some wonderful Canadian friends, but overall, they do think they know about all things American, when in fact, they know nothing of the rural American experience. I am sure that Trudeau will be a bigger “school day” for them than they previously realized, and after eating a few slices of humble pie, they will find a greater affinity to their American cousins, and we will, as people, be all the stronger for it. Patience is the key.

            The main difference across the board would be rural versus urban opinions.

            Liked by 7 people

            • MaryLS says:

              I agree — just scrap NAFTA. The profound differences between Mexico on the one hand and Canada-US on the other almost ensure an unlevel playing field. Focus should be on bilateral deals which can better accommodate each country’s strengths and weaknesses. Canada has gone over the top with it’s ridiculous “priorities” — maybe they should save them for the time when the one-world-government they are pushing via the UN is accepted everywhere. Hopefully that won’t happen any time soon.

              Like

            • Michael says:

              “The main difference across the board would be rural versus urban opinions.”

              takeadeepbreath I think you might enjoy this piece at Cracked Magazine of all places. I think it explains Trump’s win better than anything else this news junkie has read.

              Excerpt of
              “We country folk are programmed to hate the prissy elites. That brings us to Trump.
              6
              It’s Not About Red And Blue States — It’s About The Country Vs. The City”

              http://www.cracked.com/blog/6-reasons-trumps-rise-that-no-one-talks-about/

              Like

        • Judith says:

          “Canada has tilted towards Communism for decades.” That’s partly because Canadians have always piggy backed their freedoms on our military might. Recent generations, especially, have never had to give their all to defend it. That’s like a parent who hands their kids everything on a silver platter, so their children never enjoy the sense of accomplishment to truly appreciate what they have.

          Then there’s the fact that the money they didn’t spend on their own national defense has afforded them an awful lot of social programs. This made socialism much more doable. Heck, with all that’s come out about globalist fronts like the Paris Climate Accord, we’ve probably funded Canada’s socialism directly, in ways (like NAFTA) we’re not even aware.

          Too bad Canadians can’t see how their Primrose Lane will one day lead to a glass-strewn alley, as socialism invariably does. As Margaret Thatcher once stated, “The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people’s money.” Canada’s PC police and open borders blunders will surely hasten that end. Not to mention the sap with the pink socks.

          Liked by 9 people

    • bpk1300 says:

      As a western Canadian suffering under a socialist Bernie Saunders type govt, stupid does not even begin to describe the morons in our socialist provincial and federal govt.

      Liked by 12 people

      • Donna in Oregon says:

        I love Canadians, so much fun. Really nice people. The French speaking ones….don’t know too much about. I think all the illegals from the USA should be sent to the French speaking Quebec side. It is more a French than a Canadian thing….this refugee/immigration crap, eh? Send them to the Frogs. They’ll straighten them out and the French will like tacos, enchiladas and burritos. It’s a match made in heaven. 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

        • The Boss says:

          …the French will like tacos, enchiladas and burritos. It’s a match made in heaven.
          Don’t forget the salsa and ketchup! Talk about fine dining! 🙂

          Like

      • sadsack says:

        True statement, bpk1300. Alberta companies have started to make the move to the US in anticipation of President Trump getting his tax policies through. The regulations he has already gutted make the US a lot more appealing than Canada.

        Interesting that Mulroney is on the trade team. He is a known crook.

        Liked by 5 people

        • linda4298 says:

          Well if you listen to the usa business shows, they are so negative about tax cuts, saying slim to none. the media is all liberal, always negative about the President.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Judith says:

            The media work for a greedy global cabal who refuse to cede control. Notice how any policy that would benefit American citizens, or any country’s “citizens” for that matter, is antithetical to their goals.

            Liked by 3 people

        • Borealis says:

          Still better than the guy who followed him (I don’t count Kim Campbell; she was just the sacrificial goat to let Mulroney avoid a historic defeat). I still can’t think of the Cretin without wanting to spit, much like my ex-military father hisses every time he hears mention of the current PM’s father.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Guffman says:

          They HAD to bring Lyin’ Brian Mulroney in for these talks. No one in Little Potato’s government has a friggin’ clue how to go about negotiating anything. They recently cut short a court case and handed over 10.5 million to Omar Khadr, a self-confessed terrorist and killer. They all think SJW issues are the most important part of anything they do.

          Freeland is possibly loopier than the Little Potato with the childish socks fetish himself.
          Canada is so screwed under these morons. The even sadder part is that ALL of our provincial governments are Liberal/Socialist run now as well. Sanity has left the country.

          Liked by 4 people

          • dekester says:

            Yep. We truly have a mountain to climb.

            Credit the socialists though, they figured it out.

            Gain control of the school and universities, the media and the rest is a piece of cake.

            What Canada needs is a real crisis, and it may be coming.

            The Canadians on this site may agree, our insanely high real estate prices in Vancouver and Toronto have created a smugness that is quite nauseating.

            Near all of it fueled by way of money laundering.

            When that goes poof..look out.

            I notice that this week has been particularly for some of our blue chip energy related dividend paying stocks.

            God bless PDJT

            Like

        • sledhead406 says:

          We had a convoy of oil rigs and support trucks heading south through town a month ago out of Alberta. Friends in Red Deer and Edmonton are spending as much time in Texas now as they used to up in Ft Mac.

          My left leaning father in law in Edmonton is seeing the light now too.. Actual economic results witnessed with PDJT have him actually considering the market principles Ive argued for years.

          On a NAFTA note- I took delivery of a large order of lumber late yesterday for my next building. Every single board is from BC. This was the case with the last building I put up as well. Meanwhile most the lumber mills just west of me here in Montana are shut down and those timber guys are working in gas stations.

          Liked by 7 people

          • Orygun says:

            You know it about the lumber mills. Some of the smaller ones are coming back here. One of the mills was building furniture until the market opened back up.

            There was train load after train load all heading south stamped “Made in Canada” soon after NAFTA passed and it has just recently started turning around ever so slowly here.

            There is a lot to harvest out there and the loggers and mills are going to need to get busy!

            Like

        • Remington says:

          As I mentioned, the obvious solution for Alberta to to make them part of the U.S. In exchange we give Minnesota to Canada…Match made in heaven.

          Liked by 1 person

        • forjava1 says:

          Currency-manipulation crook — CAN$ — if nothing else
          Then he laughed in our faces, for the financial-press cameras.

          Do not let me into the same room…

          Like

      • Matt Musson says:

        Unfortunately, Alberta is the only area of Canada that actually sends surplus taxes to the Federal Government. Every other area of Canada is a net consumer off government dollars. And, Alberta is younger and wealthier than the rest of Canada.

        But, cumulatively, Canada is about to move from a demographic that is saving for retirement (Capital Rich) to a demographic that is retired (Capital Poor). In the next decade Canada will be hit with the stark reality that they can no longer afford all the social welfare programs that they can today.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Stay strong. We pray for you. America has had Obama. Britain has had Tony Blair. There are millions who can see what is happening, and pray for you daily.

        Liked by 2 people

    • SharonKinDC says:

      Good lord, what a nitwit.

      Liked by 7 people

    • So tacky, she has her hair up like she’s about to do laundry and clean the head.

      Liked by 2 people

    • parteagirl says:

      She thinks the Chinese calling Trudeau “little potato” is a compliment? 😂

      Liked by 4 people

    • Wink says:

      Why does she remind me of that silly 70’s song “Tip Toe, through the Tulips”? LOL

      Like

      • Budman says:

        Have any of you noticed that liberals start their answers to questions with ” SO” ???? Really hard believe this idiot has a stake in negotiating a trade deal. A young Hillary Clinton in the making

        Like

    • chbailey says:

      I lived in Canada for some years and I loved Canada. The land was spectacular: I had real adventures in the outdoors and in their great cities… from Halifax to Toronto to Vancouver. Canada is easy to love and to want to protect …I believed at the time that Canadians love their freedom as much as they love their vast country. I found the citizenry to be unique and a very different mix of cultures: this country is a complex tapestry of regions. The different Provinces seemed to me more like separate countries even. I met many Canadian citizens from Europe in Alberta, from Calgary to Edmonton, who were, in hindsight, sorry that they choose Canada only because of the northern cold weather and would rather have gone south for the US climate. That was the only negative thing I ever heard anyone say.
      I hope that this beautiful and great country prevails over the globalists, for, as far as was my experience, Canadians who love free Canada far outnumber the communists.

      Like

  3. “Other protesters emphasized that Mexico needs to pay attention to itself, rather than outside trade partners.”

    Would that all countries would put their own interests first (i.e. make themselves great again)!

    Liked by 17 people

    • Sylvia Avery says:

      Remember during the campaign when Candidate Trump went to Mexico with hats as gifts that said Make Mexico Great Again? If everyone would get out of his way, he’d do it, too, just as a side benefit.

      Liked by 19 people

      • Judith says:

        This is what the greedy globalists want so desperately to hide. Trump is fair. That means win-win on all sides. By avoiding specific policy debates and painting him as a monster in the Enemedia, they take the onus off of their own sinister, greedy goal of world domination. Globalists demand all of the chips, not half. The fact that our side is arguing on behalf of Mexico’s workers illustrates this point. Trump has already thrown a bone (or a pork chop) to Venezuela and has said he would reopen trade with Cuba only when their people, and not their greedy government, can benefit. Trump is a true world leader.

        Liked by 12 people

    • Esperanza says:

      A country like Mexico dependent on expensive imports! It’s criminal. Mexico is an agricultural paradise. We have the same here with the EU farms policy. Our farms are going out of business. I live in paradise, yet they import crap food by road, not even by train, so our public transport is dying too. This is so fucked up.

      Also I’m coming to the view that all this is not less expensive. I don’t believe shucking all this stuff round the planet is cost effective.

      A few years ago, a tee shirt maker in the textile north of France stopped making tee shirts in China, he said that with the long turn around, rejects etc it wasn’t worth it. Apparently with the 150 year skills they had in Roubaix even seconds were saleable whereas the Chinese ones were fit for the bin.

      Liked by 18 people

      • Aparition42 says:

        The international shipping magnates are also big players in the globalization movement. They will fight tooth and nail to keep us dependent on a global economy.

        The only way it makes sense to mine resources in one country, create parts in another country, assemble in a third country, and sell in a fourth country with massive shipping costs and times at every juncture in between is because local production has been strangled by overregulation, taxation, and market manipulation while the countries to which production has moved have zero human rights, safety, or environmental protections.

        When they say, “jobs Americans won’t do”, what they mean is, “jobs Americans won’t do for $0.50/ hour for 18 hours a day in dangerous conditions. The more impoverished a people is, the less money they are willing to take and the more they are willing to sacrifice. An American landowner will demand a significant portion of the value of a hardwood tree, but the tribal government of a third world nation will gladly take pennies to let a globalist corporation clear-cut their forests.

        If liberals really cared about global human rights and environmental protections, they would oppose globalization at every level. We’re not only off-shoring jobs. We’re off-shoring our human rights abuses and environmental damages.

        Liked by 20 people

      • BobinFL says:

        I watch a show called Savoring Europe (I believe) on Sunday afternoon sometimes and it takes you to the local communities to get a feeling for customs, agriculture and food. Very interesting show as it gives you a look outside of the elite EU echo chamber. In just about every show, the locals – no matter which country – talk about how their heritage – livelihood, customs, traditions,arts etc. – are being ripped away since the EU has come to power. All lament their young leaving due to opportunities only being in the cities. Their small family farms and businesses are shutting down due to EU rules and regulations that only the large producers can afford to abide by – so they all have to sell out to big AG.

        Sounds very familiar…..wonder if it was all planned? (no I don’t wonder). Very sad state of affairs!

        Liked by 10 people

      • Judith says:

        Globalists have created monopolies to benefit only themselves. These are definitely not cost effective. Competition is healthy and drives down prices. This is why they’ve deliberately crushed small businesses. The globalists demand ALL the chips.

        What galls me is that globalists dupe gullible people into believing this world domination is all for the greater good. And the few they can’t con, they simply bribe.

        Liked by 5 people

      • My parents are from the West of Ireland so I’ve spent a lot of time there. With EU membership the natives are restricted from fishing in their own waters. Huge Euro trawlers fish the waters and export and sell some back to the hapless Irish. The coast is littered with huge fish farms that dirty up the once pristine waters. The natives meanwhile don’t grow anything and eat out of cans and other crap processed food. To top it all off, most, like someone mentioned here about Canadians, are anti-American, profess arrogant cosmopolitan EU claptrap and seem to enjoy the German yoke they live under. Pathetic.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Globalism rips off all countries, since it operates in the best interest of no country. I hope Mexicans can take their country back. Is there a Mexican Trump who is up to the challenge?

        Liked by 1 person

    • magagirl says:

      I am pleasantly surprised that the mexican farmers are fighting this one.

      Liked by 8 people

  4. progpoker says:

    Trying to wrap my head around the circular logic-fact that US farmers use illegal alien Mexicans to pick vegetables that are shipped back to Mexico thus, putting more Mexican farmers out of work. Those farming families then sneak into the US to pick vegetables that are then shipped to… 🤨

    Liked by 37 people

    • Sylvia Avery says:

      I know. You should see me sitting here laboriously repeating this and sketching it out with my hands. It makes my head hurt.

      Liked by 7 people

      • Dixie says:

        IKR……Information overload and the struggle to understand is making me sick.

        One thing which really stands out is that President Trump is a very brave man.

        Liked by 5 people

        • The complexity of the globalist scheme is one of its most important assets. Very, very few can wrap their head around this game of rape and pillage. They get away with it by saying the people get cheaper prices.

          When we are a consumer society, price becomes everything. We shop to sate our wants, while we throw away what really brings about true peace and inner happiness. If it’s it not stopped, the western world will become agenda 2030 (aka agenda 21). Scars the skin of me.

          The other element fighting for the west is Islam and they are also making huge gains. When we have no boarders, no national pride, no heritage, no language, no customers to fight for, we will fall.

          Liked by 2 people

      • Lburg says:

        SA – You might enjoy this – a free relationship mapper. Customizable, interactive shareable, with analysis tools and tutorials. Don’t remember where I first saw it – it may have been someone here at the tree….

        https://onodo.org/

        Liked by 2 people

    • bpk1300 says:

      No kidding, gives my teeth a headache!!!

      Liked by 3 people

    • Esperanza says:

      This is the evil that is the current system personified.

      Liked by 6 people

    • gildie says:

      I can’t see how an American grown tomato, with the incurred expenses, shipped south to Mexico, could compete with a locally grown Mexican tomato, with cheaper labor, sold in their near-by town. They must be giving them away.

      Liked by 3 people

      • magagirl says:

        And mexican tomatoes are tastier. More flavorfull. The soil and the climate do something, food is tastier there.

        Liked by 1 person

      • progpoker says:

        And we’d be subsidizing it somewhere in the process…

        Like

      • Understanding it is not hard comprehending the lack of ethics behind it and the level of international corruption is difficult. The old statement is “follow the money”. The thread of days back on the “Soros approach ” to changing society for the benefit of a few is applied here. Not necessary by his hand but as a theme. Just add another level of control, food production and distribution. Starvation or draining independence or resources to prevent it is a great motivator. It is not a new tactic. In has shown up through out history in some cases deliberately and in others as collateral consequence or as “Never let a good crisis go to waste”. Examples include such examples as burning crops and sowing salt in the fields, the Irish potato famine, and including near extinction of the American bison. While Canada has invested the savings of living under a US military umbrella in social programs, Mexico has seen massive flow of money into the bank accounts of a those in power with a very thin trickle down effect which never actually reaches the general population (yes I think they do have some version of subsidized health care). End result is a large amount of the population is driven into US labor markets. US wink and nod is for “off the books labor” (keeps costs low and a few reap the profit; COC and friends) also can’t forget creative election fraud. The ruling Mexico bene is remittances driving a large sector of the Mexican economy, a pressure relief valve such that the general population gets by enough that there is not widespread and violent demand for change and the bige is those feeding at the corruption trough continue uninterrupted. Who foots the bill? The majority of the Mexican population population living in poverty considering the wealth of resources available, American tax payers on the hook for a double hit the social service used by imported labor and the US citizens displaced, those in the US to poor to pay takes who are either locked out of the job market by lower cost imported labor or participate in a low wage economy due to limited skills and competition by the imported labor market.
        Prevention: What a few million folks in the U.S. have done vote in a leader that puts people ahead of corruption. The win/win deals that PDJT drive are a monkey wrench in the whole system. Secondary is helping drain the swamp however possible.

        Liked by 2 people

    • valheisey says:

      Why are Haas Avocados imported from Mexico to Florida? They can be grown in California and Florida has their own variety (bigger and green). I don’t buy Haas bc I have never seen them USA grown.

      Like

      • Beenthere says:

        Haas has more favor compared to the bigger and green ones from FL. I don’t know about the CA ones.

        Liked by 1 person

        • alligatriot says:

          I whole-heartedly disagree.
          Bias alert: Native Floridian

          Our local “Alligator Pears” are by far tastier than Haas.
          Having said that, I truly feel shipping and storing produce has a very detrimental effect on flavor. So, buying local and in season makes a tremendous difference.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Jenny R. says:

      Welcome to a slave state. Welcome to a feudal state.
      You forgot the bit about actual farmers’ sons and daughters then doing one of four things: 1) if they are wealthy enough, becoming a trust fund hipster and perpetual college student — possibly joining something like antifa; 2) either becoming a wage foreman for the big ag farmers, and thus part of the system and take full advantage of hiring illegals over citizens…and treating them like slaves; 3) they go to college/join the military and then try to make a life outside of farming; 4) if they are on the low end of the economic scale and don’t “make it”: a meth head/heroin junkie welfare case…possibly to od at some point…or they can maybe find a local Walmart to be a stockboy at.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Wink says:

        Some people run cattle on their small farms to make ends meet. Also the Amish and Mennonites have moved into areas to work the old family farms.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Orygun says:

        I know a once industrious farming family that is doing just that. Leasing their land and pretending to be farmers while playing at life using the sweat and labor of their hard working grandfather.
        Kid in Hollywood pretending to be an actress while the parents pretend they are creating a vineyard. Oh, and all their vines died last winter from the cold. Unbelievable!

        Like

    • It is about growing conditions, crop yield and investment to obtain the crop yield. Check your produce for a label of origin often those fall tomatoes will say product of Mexico or somewhere else. The big export to Mexico is corn (possibly wheat for flour) to produce dietary staple tortilla, high calorie low cost food item especially for the poor . The midwest excellent conditions for corn, wheat and soybeans. Also economy of scale becomes a factor along with modern agriculture (requires invest dollars= greater yield per acre and can tolerate a lower cost per bushel), allows for a level of competition that cheap labor can’t compete with. I am sure some of the more agricultural oriented folk here can add more. Also Mexico even was into subsidy /price regulation for tortillas and/or corn at one time (US ethanol production drove the price up and some protests occurred). On the other hand last time I checked , you can’t “combine” (= mechanical harvest) tomatoes or avocados and in general they are much more labor intensive mean labor cost and a tropical environment becomes a benefit (longer growing season)
      Now as to flavor, stage of harvest plays a big role, often picked before reaching peak ripeness (allows for transport time and longer shelf life). They will sort of ripen over time or through the miracles of modern science.g time may Longer shipping time may translate into some what better flavor. But “somewhat” usually does not translate into optimum flavor. Commercial produce seldom compares to that picked fresh from the tree or the vine when it is truly ripe-tomatoes actually have a rich taste, oranges have a robust taste instead of just sweet and peaches don;t have the flavor of cardboard. Your intermediate locally produced (want it to last until sold preferably not a sell it to day or it is trash).

      Like

      • Esperanza says:

        I’m guessing Mexico is not a good country for wheat. Wheat needs temperate and water. Interestingly in ancient Greece, the wheat crop failed 1 year in 4, the barley only 1 in 20.

        Like

  5. fleporeblog says:

    This POS, Tom Donohue had the audacity to say the following from the article SD linked above:

    For instance, it would be a mistake to focus on the U.S. trade balance, which isn’t a fair measure of who’s “winning” on trade. Suggesting that imports are somehow a problem to be solved or that services trade—such as engineering, audiovisual, and financial services—is less important than goods trade is incorrect. Attempting to chart a course for trade policy on such a basis is likely to lead to the wrong priorities and harm economic growth.

    This moron knows the game that is being played by these multinational corporations. Our President made it clear from day one that the trade balance would no longer be one sided. If you think for one minute that our President will allow that to happen if a final agreement is reached, I have a bridge I can sell you in Brooklyn, NY.

    Liked by 18 people

    • fleporeblog says:

      I stand by my statement from last night:

      At this point the hell with Mexico 🇲🇽, Canada 🇨🇦 and ultimately China 🇨🇳! This was the greatest scheme made to man. The Mexicans have gotten filthy rich because the Chinese have used them to deliver their 💩 to sell in our country so that they can forgo any tariffs. All Mexicans have to do is assemble the garbage and pass it on to us.

      Using the EO would start the six month clock to termination. In the meantime both of those countries would be eager to negotiate bilaterally with us. We could have both bilateral deals done ✅ by the time the six month window closes on NAFTA. These POS need us more than we will ever need them!

      Thank you God in Heaven for our President who loves our country and all its citizens. The Energy Revolution that is fueling our Economic Train 🚂 and our Economic Leverage with Russia 🇷🇺 and eventually with China 🇨🇳, will allow those 60,000 factories to be rebuilt and operating to make all our products right here in the Great USA 🇺🇸!

      We are sitting on a GOLD MINE and our Golden President is letting it fuel ⛽️ every aspect of our economy, domestic and foreign agendas!

      That is MEGASUPERWINNING!

      Liked by 27 people

      • NewOrleans says:

        Using the EO would start the six month clock to termination

        NAFTexit, Baby!

        Liked by 7 people

      • jrapdx says:

        The problem with starting the 6 month clock is the uproar bound to be heard from the media and Uniparty. The evil jerks in Congress will try to sabotage the President’s actions and the media will foment as much trouble as possible like we’re having with antifa and their ilk.

        I think Trump is going to let the “renegotiation” play out. If it takes a few months all the better. That gives time to get budget, tax reform, infrastructure through the mill. When the NAFTA renegotiation finally fails, and the 6 month window starts, it will be 2018 already or close to it. The timing makes all the difference in the world, the Unipartisans will very likely be singing different tunes as the 2018 elections start to show up on the horizon.

        Winter is coming! And with it the specter of impending primary elections prompts the creatures to fall in line like almost nothing else could do. NAFTA will be history!

        Liked by 13 people

        • progpoker says:

          The problem with starting the 6 month clock is the uproar bound to be heard from the media and Uniparty.

          Trump would call that Tuesday.

          Liked by 9 people

        • fleporeblog says:

          Good point! No need to rush it now. Timing is everything with our President.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Donna in Oregon says:

            Also, there is another issue with NAFTA where China sends the parts and Mexico puts them together for American car mfg. President Trump is going after China too, so it is important to mandate how third-party duty free is managed.

            This has been an ongoing problem and why China is interested in NAFTA. China uses loop holes with other countries to bypass our trade laws. This must be addressed in any trade. Especially drugs, food, and any product for dogs and kids. The Chinese are brutally negligent.

            I never trust countries that crap in their water supply. Never.

            Liked by 10 people

              • Donna in Oregon says:

                Oh, you mean never buy food from people that crap in their water supply? Yeah. Common Sense 101 IMHO 🙂

                Liked by 3 people

                • tampa2 says:

                  Donna, The vast majority of canned sea/shell foods are products of China, Thailand and Korea (Chicken of the Sea, StarKist and BumbleBee). Brunswick (Canadian), Cape May (Maine) and Bay Harbor (NJ) are the only such goods I will purchase… For the same reasons you put forth.

                  Liked by 1 person

            • teaforall says:

              Country of origin is what they do not want in the NAFTA agreement 62.5% of the product must be made in Mexico, Canada and US

              Liked by 1 person

            • Beenthere says:

              “I never trust companies that crap in their water supply.”
              How about India?

              Liked by 1 person

            • Ross Newland says:

              Donna in Oregon wrote:
              “China uses loop holes with other countries to bypass our trade laws. This must be addressed in any trade. Especially drugs, food, and any product for dogs and kids.”

              Absolutely! It is well known in the honey trade, that China managed to get honey contaminated with antibiotics and/or chemicals into the U.S. via an intermediary country that could care less. Creates a huge problem, because more honey imports have to be tested, which subsequently raises the price of the product.

              Not to mention the intermediary country is probably paid “thanks for the favor” money.

              Like

      • gildie says:

        When those factories begin operating in greater numbers back on US soil, AFL-CIO Trumka will be knocking on the WH backdoor pleading for a meet. I want that meeting TELEVISED!

        Liked by 7 people

  6. WVPatriot says:

    A vast majority of Chinese goods are what used to be hawked in “5 and 10 cent” “nickel and dime” stores all over the country — think Woolworth’s.

    Fle, I agree with your colorful evaluation of what is exported to the U.S.A.

    Liked by 4 people

  7. wheatietoo says:

    Chrystia Freeland complained that “renegotiating a trade pact that is already in force”…is like “renovating a house while you’re still living in it”.

    Oh the horror!
    Guess what, Chrystia, millions of people have done this.
    Most people do not have the luxury of ‘moving out’ of their house while they are doing renovations.

    What an elitist thing to say.

    Thank you, Sundance…for all the heavy-lifting you are doing, in keeping us informed of what is going on with this.
    You’re amazing.

    Liked by 24 people

    • n1ghtcr4wler says:

      most people don’t even have a house.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Charlie says:

      US Ambassador negotiating on behalf of Canada?
      Mr. Smith Ramos on the Mexico side? Did Smith Ramos take his wife’s last name?
      He appears to be more American than Mexican.

      Like

      • Beenthere says:

        The Mexican elitists have mostly Caucasian(Spainard) blood than Mexican Indian blood. Mexico is an extreme 2 class system where not only do the the elitists have more wealth but they also have different facial and body features from the “peasants.”

        Liked by 2 people

      • louche9 says:

        I’m guessing, but it could be that his father is American, Canadian, English, etc. and his mother is Mexican. Mexicans put their father’s name first, and tack on their mother’s maiden name at the end. It is more egalitarian, but a huge pain for Americans who have to alphabetize their paperwork. Any school district in CA would agree.

        Like

  8. JimBob says:

    Wednesday, the Media had a side-show of crowing about various big-company CEO’s quitting President Trump’s ‘manufacturing council’, supposedly because of President Trump’s statement regarding the Charlottesville fight. I think it MUCH more likely that they quit because the US NAFTA negotiators are taking a pro-USA worker position different than these multinational CEO’s want, and they will not support it. The are using ‘Charlottesville’ as a smokescreen.

    Liked by 17 people

    • citizen817 says:

      UniParty is all smoke and mirrors. Especially when it comes to re-election time. It’s all they have.

      Liked by 4 people

      • kiskiminetas says:

        When I think about the uniparty and Tom Dona(HOE) my mind conjures up thoughts of uncounted multitudes of peoples’ saliva glands overflowing and then freely releasing outward and downward at the very feet of these leeches who for the most part are followers of Satan. Oh the horror and fake shock expressed on their faces. But just having gotten up I digress. Never mind

        Like

      • Founding Fathers Fan says:

        The uni-party is only made possible by all the so-called conservatives who refuse to rally together and vote out incumbent RINOs in their primaries. There’s only about a 17% voter turnout in republican primaries.
        “Politicians and diapers must be changed often, and for the same reason.” ― Mark Twain

        Liked by 2 people

    • tampa2 says:

      Spot on, JimBob!

      Like

  9. Donna in Oregon says:

    Still very excited, even tho it is clear that Mega corporations are running the world economy I am still hopeful that the new trade environment set-up by the Trump admin. will allow the family farm to be revitalized here and also in Mexico & Canada. Would love Mom & Pops to make a come back.

    Buying locally here means to shop in Farmers Market Also, there are several small farms that provide year-around to subscribers. We get chicken, beef and pork locally. Makes such a huge difference in flavor and quality. Knowing the people that produce your food is so much better than any Safeway or Walmart can ever provide.

    Fingers crossed and prayers for NAFTA. MAGA!

    Liked by 11 people

    • Esperanza says:

      Amen.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Homesteader says:

      Donna, I can remember when there were a half dozen local, private butchers in the farmland where I grew up. I also remember when the government forced them (all but two) out of business by demanding very expensive stainless steel furnishing and overpriced coolers and refrigerators. They already had stainless counters and refrigerators but that wasn’t good enough for our lords. They did this for one reason only and that was to push them out of business and make way for the super grocery store chains. That is a fact.

      Liked by 11 people

      • Dixie says:

        The manipulations behind all this is mind boggling. We have been screwed by unbelievably evil people.

        Liked by 4 people

        • Homesteader says:

          This is why they pushed the kids into colleges instead of staying home to follow in dad’s successful footsteps. Instead of earning direct cash for your family if it was a family business, or even more direct family gains if you were farmsteading, they pushed people into factory work. Paychecks were the way to control your money completely. The bastards worked real hard to destroy cottage industry and private farming.

          Liked by 8 people

          • Dixie says:

            Manipulation by people drunk on power.

            Liked by 2 people

          • G. Combs says:

            THIS goes into how the sister organization of the Council on Foreign Relations DELIBERATELY TARGETED US farm families/towns at the end of WWII to drive them into bankruptcy and thence to the cities as cheap labor.

            NAFTA is identical only played out in Mexico.

            23 June, 2008 Small Farmers And The Doha Round: Lessons From Mexico’s NAFTA Experience
            “From nearly 27% in 1991 it declined to slightly less than 15% in 2006, losing more than 2 million jobs[18]. Again small and marginal farmers and agricultural labour bore the brunt, as evidenced by very sharp decline in the number of rural households. According to a study by Jose Romero and Alicia Puyana carried out for the federal government of Mexico, between 1992 and 2002, the number of agricultural households fell an astounding 75% – from 2.3 million to 575, 000[19].

            There has been a significant increase in migration out of rural areas as livelihoods are lost and farms have been abandoned. The hope was that this migration out of low-productivity agriculture would be absorbed into higher-productivity non-agrarian urban employment. But anemic employment growth in the post-NAFTA period, particularly in manufacturing[20], put paid to that. And what little employment there has been has largely been in the informal sector. As a result there has been a change in the pattern of rural out-migration. In the 1980s the likelihood of migrating to urban Mexico was higher than that of migrating to the USA. Today, as a result of anemic employment growth, the likelihood of migrating to the USA is significantly higher[21].”

            Liked by 1 person

        • Judith says:

          It is all tied together in UN’s Agenda 21, which was signed in 1992 by GHW Bush Sr. All their chess moves, from monopolizing the food production to lopsided trade deals, the open borders human trafficking (slave labor), and the EU authoritarian collective, they all lead back to this extremely shady UN “agenda.” Now that Trump has thrown a wrench in the works, I bet they wish they had put their “one world” global police force/army into place prior to all this other stuff. (Antifa just won’t cut it.)

          People definitely need to study this, it’s ramifications are hair-raising and we are seeing only the top of the iceberg here. They had planned to tie it all up in a nice Marxist bow by 2021, I imagine.

          Posters here speak of their hopes to revive their community’s markets and downtowns. Who owns these downtowns now, I wonder? Small business owners continue to be driven out by invisible landlords who, inexplicably, have sharply driven up rents. Who are these people and why are they closing down our supermarkets and our community hubs? Hmmm

          Like

      • piper567 says:

        Homesteader…for many decades, the weight of regulations, such as you describe, have also crippled any competition in the dairy industry.
        Decades ago, goat dairies in CA were shut down, and here in WA, I know a dairy farmer who also did everything required of him, until he could not longer afford to stay in business.
        The good news for him is he simply switched to running beef cattle.
        But the independent dairies continue to be shut down, and few can so easily modify their businesses, so go under.
        This despicable activity runs parallel to the virtuous push to “buy local”, and shilling for “sustainable” methods…all the while, the “local” sources are being consumed.
        Go figure.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Homesteader says:

          So true. Add that to the regulations for shipping the milk for distribution. Nobody wins but the government. Wait. The big greedy store chains win too. By the time the milk gets to the consumer the price is absurd and the poor farmer who did all the work gets hardly any of it. Same with meat and produce.

          Then there’s the problem of developers buying up all the farmland to put house farms on them. In northern Maryland the people had to band together to stop this vile development before there was land on which to go food for the idiots buying these $300know townhouses. Don’t even get me started on this topic. Grrrr!

          I have pushed private farming and homesteading for 23 years. If you can’t do find someone who can and work with them. To Hello with these big grocery chains.

          Like

    • Kathy says:

      Another way to support family-operated farms — beyond shopping at farmer markets — is to become a member of a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture). Members pay an annual “subscription” to a farm owner in exchange for portions of that farmer’s harvest. The typical “share” consists of a box or bag of veggies or fruits throughout the growing season. Each farmer offers different subscription fees (generally in the $500 range), often with options for half-portions, pick-your-own, winter crops, eggs, flowers, meats, etc.

      I won’t clog up this thread — mountains of info available from Federal, State, and Community networks — but can offer a few get-started links:

      What is a CSA? http://www.justfood.org/csa
      USDA info: https://www.nal.usda.gov/afsic/community-supported-agriculture
      LocalHarvest info: https://www.localharvest.org/csa/
      Example of a CSA plan: https://www.localharvest.org/dillner-family-farm-M41809

      Liked by 1 person

  10. HMelville says:

    CTH writes—
    This article provides an excellent comprehensive view of globalist trade and the importance of these trade negotiations.
    On Tucker today, Mark Steyn discussed other important monopolies that will have enormous power over global thought and censorship. As Mark said, “…some tech giants that have the ability to regulate the flow of information on the Internet may have grown to be too big…”If Standard Oil was too big in 1909, what is Google now?”
    Google, You Tube, Facebook, and Twitter wield increasing monopoly powers in today’s internet world and their ideological based censorship is only ramping up. Just what America needs on top of the politically corrupt one sided Dem TV media.
    The battlefronts to preserve freedom, free speech and self determination are increasing in number and the cumulative monopolies hate Trump and his policies. They are just beginning to pile on in earnest and many believe the Charlottesville incident is their opportunity to permanently weaken Trump and set him up for removal later. Even FNC anti Trump Murdoch has now joined the piling on and publicly condemned him. But he has a long history of attacking DT’s policies.

    Liked by 7 people

    • Donna in Oregon says:

      President Trump has to fix our trade first. Then the Sherman Act.

      Old Jeff Bozo is going to get a haircut. (yes, I know he has no hair….) Sherman Act and trust bust these bloodsuckers of our economy: Google, Amazon, all of the Cable and Network conglomerates, all of the large banks and financial behemoths.

      Liked by 5 people

      • mireilleg says:

        Can’t happen too soon to make me happy. The facebook/google types are doing more than manipulating info, they are emotionally affecting teenagers who live by and for others’ opinions and approval. The vast majority of them are consumed by their phone. I have seen HS students in class pay attention to their phones and not listen to anything the teacher had to say. The whole info age is turning into a national disaster. Thanks al gore 😂

        Liked by 2 people

  11. mailmannz says:

    What’s there to negotiate? If Canada and Mexico want to do business with America then it’s up to them to meet the standards set by America!!!

    Liked by 3 people

  12. Howie says:

    Why the democrats and RINOS will lose again….they actually believe the MSM. Yes they are that stupid.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Founding Fathers Fan says:

      RINOs will continue to win their primaries because so-called conservatives stay home instead of voting them out in the primary.

      Like

  13. n1ghtcr4wler says:

    I still can’t believe how disturbingly unqualified the Canadian negotiator Freeland is.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Borealis says:

      She’s actually the best they could come up with from the Trudeau regime. This bunch makes Obama look competent. It makes me ashamed to admit I’m Canadian. For now.

      Liked by 3 people

  14. indiamaria2020 says:

    Ironic that the Mexican PEOPLE are marching in sync with the Trump position on NAFTA. This provides even greater leverage for Wliburine. I think that the small Farmer in the U.S. will influence our position, and NOT the interests of Agri-Business. Can’t wait for Sundance to crank the probability down to ZERO. Better for the American People, and better for the Mexican People, and a big blow to the Social Justice fairies in Canada.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Jenny R. says:

      I’m afraid we will have to rely on the Mexican farmers to do the heavy lifting in the protest sector — American farmers are too busy talking about Charlottesville on FB and virtue signaling about how “they don’t see color”, just like the rest of America.
      Not that there are many actual American farmers, farm owning ones, anyway…this article is correct: a lot of the farming is owned by corporations, and they won’t protest to get rid of NAFTA.

      Like

      • Wink says:

        Please stop over generalizing and pigeon holing us American farms who are working our small family farms!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Wink says:

          *farmers*

          Like

        • Niagara Frontier says:

          You are 100% correct to warn about over generalizing the state of farming.

          Agribusiness gets most of the attention because they are cash cows for the politicians, but they certainly aren’t the only players.

          In NY for example, almost a quarter of the total land area is used by the state’s 36,000 farms, and 99% of those farms are family owned. We’re talking about billions of dollars in yearly farm products and tens of thousands of jobs at stake.

          What happens in these negotiations matters a great deal to small farmers.

          Liked by 1 person

      • G. Combs says:

        Jenny R. says:
        “I’m afraid we will have to rely on the Mexican farmers to do the heavy lifting…”

        BOVINE FECES!

        Where were YOU when we American Farmers were fighting tooth and nail against NAIS and the Food Safety Modernization Act??? You should have seen the number of really nasty comments about NAIS on the Federal Register thanks to our activism. Heck NAIS was one of the top issues to be brought to the attention of Obummer via his website just before election in 2008.

        You didn’t hear about us because we were MUZZLED and Organic Consumers was taken over by Globalists.

        Here is two of the sites that is still up
        http://xstatic99645.tripod.com/naisinfocentral/id92.html
        https://www.r-calfusa.com/tb_video/r-calf-usa-explains-why-nais-is-flawed/
        Archive of Darol’s http://www.naisstinks.com/
        Archive of one of Walter’s NONAIS.org

        THAT’s when I started my journey learning about Agenda 21 and all the rest.

        ……………………………………
        Ag Census 2002 (2.2 million farms)
        Farms by value of sales…….Number of Farms
        Less than $2,500…………………….826,558
        $2,500 to $4,999……………………..213,326
        $5,000 to $9,999……………………..223,168
        $10,000 to $24,999………………….256,157
        $25,000 to $49,999………………….157,906
        $50,000 to $99,99…………………….140,479
        $100,000 to $499,99…………………240,746
        $500,000 or more……………………..70,642

        Liked by 1 person

  15. Brant says:

    I wonder if there could be some way to compare NAFTA and Obamacare (and the left/GOPe desired end game of single payer). I think they are basically, the same in that big multi national corps will control all (with complicity by gubmint). But, the 23-25 year experiment of NAFTA and it’s effect on our domestic employment, etc could be a good teaching tool to the slow learners.

    Like

  16. Truthfilter says:

    Thank you for these NAFTA articles. I’m sharing all of these with family and friends involved in farming and ranching. So many of us do not understand the global economics of these trade agreements and how it affects our livelihoods.

    Liked by 3 people

  17. A prosperous Mexican worker is a happy Mexican worker who prefers to stay in Mexico.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. cowpokesblog says:

    I thought there was going to be a daily or event score card published here? Did I miss it? A score of 3 was at the first one and I don’t see a score now..
    What did I miss?
    Thanks

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Alison says:

    Sundance, there aren’t enough ways to say thank you for the education you provide. Gracias, merci, and appreciation Bigly.

    Anything NAFTA can do to reduce Tom Donahue’s influence & USChamber’s lobbying sway will be a win for USA. I’d like to permanently ‘offshore’ those bastards.

    Like

  20. Founding Fathers Fan says:

    NAFTA – the giant sucking sound

    Like

  21. Bob Thoms says:

    Thanks Sundance.

    I am surprised how little coverage these events are getting. Political blogs i once considered serious places for information are ignoring what’s going on. I am talking about Powerline blog in particular.

    Like

    • sukietawdry says:

      We’ve just completed a long-stalled agreement with China on the import of US-milled rice (apparently the sticking point through the years has been the phytosanitary protocol). This is a big deal for the rice growers of America since prices have been depressed for the last couple of years. What doesn’t President Trump Tweet about that?

      Like

  22. My goodness.

    Can you imagine working for a company, going into a buying meeting, or pricing meeting, or a negotiation with a supplier, and telling them that the terms around which you will be discussing matters will revolve around social justice? SMH

    Ms Freeland looks about 20 years old. What did she do to get promoted so quickly? Does anyone know anything of her previous successes? It is an embarrassment for Canada, I am afraid.

    I wonder if she is related to Jonathon Freeland, the very pompous, and very leftist, senior commentator for the Guardian newspaper in London. I dated a lady who was a long time fiance of his. The family broke it off, because she wasn’t jewish.

    Like

  23. GW says:

    If it comes to it, can trump scrap or pull us out of NAFTA by himself, or does he need Congress or the Senate ?

    Like

  24. sukietawdry says:

    Interesting that Mexico imports such a high volume of agricultural products from us. Interesting because here in California so much of the produce in our local stores comes from Mexico. Of course, agriculture in CA has changed a lot over the years. We’re now very much into nuts, appropriately. Much more into nuts than fruits these days (but don’t tell them that in San Francisco). And rice. We like rice. Japan takes tons of our rice every year and now there’s a brand new import deal with China. Funny that a desert state produces so many crops requiring so much water and has a government that seemingly could care less about the proper storage and use of its water.

    Like

  25. tonyE says:

    Canadians are mostly strange, except for some on their mountain provinces.

    Mostly they remind me of polite American Progressives…. all touchy feely with an “awout” accent and no clue about real poltitics.

    When I’ve met them, I like to use my bad french on them…. “Bonjour,,,, eh?”… Oddly. “les Canadiens” are more honest about their politics than the rest.

    Meanwhile the Chinese are buying British Columbia… Soon the be the Middle East Kingdom.

    Like

    • sukietawdry says:

      In July, the average price for a detached house in the greater Vancouver area reached an all-time high of $1,019,400 (Canadian). Now, that’s a housing crisis. Last year the provincial government slapped a 15% tax on foreign purchases but all it accomplished was a temporary slowing of price increases. Ordinary Canadians are priced out of the market.

      Like

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