White House Briefing On Upcoming President Trump Visit To France…

President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump will be traveling to France on Thursday at the invitation of French President Emmanuel Macron to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Bastille Day.

Given the nature of the people, corporations and global interests, behind the installation of French President Macron, the planned events in Paris on the Champs-Élysées represent the largest security risk to date for U.S. President Trump.  Macron is a useful idiot, the exemplification of a disposable puppet.  Macron’s dispatch, post-catastrophic international security embarrassment, would not be seen as a significant problem.

Today the White House conducted a press availability to discuss the trip and answer media questions in advance of the President and First Lady’s departure into hostile territory.

[Transcript] 3:32 P.M. EDT – AIDE: Good afternoon. For your recording purposes, this background briefing on the President’s upcoming foreign travel is off-camera and not for broadcast. Attribution for your briefing is senior administration official. This information will be embargoed until the conclusion of the briefing and we’ll release a transcript afterwards.

Okay, so open remarks and when my colleague calls on you, please identify who you are, and your outlet, so he knows who he’s speaking with. Thanks.

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: So, good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. Thanks for being here. For the next few minutes I’d like to brief you on the President’s upcoming trip to Paris later this week.

The President will arrive in Paris midmorning on Thursday, July 13th to conduct meetings with President Macron of France and to participate the next day in annual Bastille Day celebrations at the invitation of President Macron, and the First Lady will also accompany.

On arrival on Thursday morning, the President will move to the U.S. Embassy for a meet-and-greet with embassy staff and also with U.S. participants who will be in the Bastille Day festivities on the following day, Friday.

Following the meet-and-greet, he will have a working lunch with senior members of his delegation and senior U.S. military leaders participating in the ceremonies. They include the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, General Joseph Dunford; the Commander of U.S. European Command and the Supreme Allied Commander Europe, General Mike Scaparrotti; and the Army Vice Chief of Staff, General James McConville.

Later in the afternoon, the President and First Lady will be greeted by President and Mrs. Macron at the Hotel Invalides. And while there, they will be hosted for a tour of the tomb of Marshal Foch, who was the Supreme Allied Commander at the end of World War I, the French National War Museum, and also the tomb of Napoleon.

The tour will be followed by bilateral meetings with President Macron and his senior advisors. The meeting will focus on Syria and counterterrorism topics. We also anticipate the two Presidents, in the introductory one-on-one meeting, will also share perspectives from the recent G20 meeting.

The bilateral discussion will be followed by a press event where President Macron and President Trump will make remarks followed by questions from the media.

Later that evening, the President and the First Lady will be hosted for a private dinner by President and Mrs. Macron.

On Friday, July 14th, the President and First Lady will participate as guests of honor in the annual Bastille Day ceremonies on the Avenue des Champs-Élysées. This is the French National Day.

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the entry of American troops onto French soil and into World War I. As they do every year, French troops from all of the French military services will participate. This year will also feature participation by U.S. soldiers, sailors, airmen, and Marines from the Army’s 1st Infantry Division — of note because this was also the first U.S. unit to enter France and actually participated in the Bastille Day festivities in 1917 and was the first U.S. unit to go into combat — the 173rd Airborne Brigade, which is also based in Europe; the 10th Mountain Division; U.S. Army Europe’s 7th Army Training Command; sailors from U.S. Naval Forces Europe; airmen from U.S. Air Forces Europe; and Marines from U.S. Marine Forces Europe.

The U.S. Air Force demonstration team, the Thunderbirds, will also participate and conduct a fly-over during the ceremony. And there will be one U.S. naval aviator who will pilot a French Rafale fighter plane as part of the festivities. Three U.S. veterans of the Normandy invasion will also be present.

At the conclusion of the Bastille Day ceremonies, the President and First Lady will depart.

So that’s a quick overview of the President’s trip. I’m happy to take your questions at this time. Yes, ma’am.

♦ Q I had two questions, sort of unrelated. On climate, you did mention that those were the subjects. So is that just completely off the table, or is the President going to entertain any discussions on that? Obviously very contentious with President Macron. My second question has nothing to do with that, so I can wait until after you answer that.

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Right, sure. The conduct of the bilateral session which is scheduled for something like an hour, an hour and 15 minutes, is based on topics that were coordinated with the French President. It’s entirely possible that President Macron will raise the issue. And if he does, the President has spoken on the issue a number of times and he’ll be ready to engage in that as well.

♦ Q I mean, did they discuss that enough during the G20 Summit? Is that why it’s not being prioritized this time around? Or is there any reason?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Well, I can’t speak for the French. They asked to focus the discussion on Syria and CT, but it’s entirely possible that it may come up on the margins.

♦ Q Got it. Totally unrelated topic, but since we have you, the BBC was reporting today that President Trump will not have an official visit to the UK this year — maybe not a state visit either. We’re trying to kind of determine what the plan is. He said he’s going to go last week. So if you don’t mind, if you have any clarity on that, that would be great.

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Yeah, what we know about that is that the United Kingdom has extended an invitation for a state visit, the President has accepted, and the timing is being worked out between the two governments right now.

Yes, ma’am.

♦ Q What are you guys hoping to accomplish with this trip? Obviously it’s really short. Is there anything by way of deliverables that you could expect? Or what’s the goal here?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Well, let’s keep in mind what the, sort of, centerpiece of the trip is, which is the French National Day and its celebration of the 100th anniversary of U.S. forces entering World War I — an entry which was really decisive, historically. The French Army had sustained horrendous losses over three years of war; Russia had just fallen out of the war because of the Bolshevik Revolution, so a million German forces were being transferred to the Western Front. And so while we certainly didn’t win the war by ourselves, the American contribution was decisive in the outcome of the war.

So I think that’s the primary reason of this particular visit at this particular time. The national guest of honor, the nation which is the guest of honor, is the United States for this year’s Bastille Day celebration, and the President and First Lady have been invited as guest of honor for that. And so, of course, while there they’re going to use the opportunity to discuss topics of mutual interest, but that’s really the centerpiece of this visit.

Yes, sir.

♦ Q We saw the President and President Macron talking a lot on the sidelines at the G20. They seemed to spend a significant amount of time together, and you seem to mention that as separate from the Syria and counterterrorism things. So I’m wondering if there were specific policies or topics that they were going to want to follow up on in this bilat.

And then, secondly, if you could kind of put the President’s visit and how you see it into, I guess, the broader context of what President Macron has been trying to do in his, sort of, first months in office. Obviously, President Putin was visiting a few weeks ago. He’s kind of had a number of these big events. Just kind of maybe some insight into how you — what you see as some of their reason for wanting to do this.

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Pretty broad question. Of course, the President is going to be prepared to discuss a wide range of topics. I think that goes without saying. But we expect most of the discussion to focus on what’s going on in Syria right now, and then the French and American cooperation both inside the alliance and bilaterally with respect to that, and counterterrorism issues not only in Syria, but in other places.

I think I’ll just leave it at that. Yes, ma’am.

♦ Q You said the two leaders would be sharing perspectives from the G20. Can you elaborate on that? What specifically — which specific perspective does President Trump hope to share with President Macron?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Well, what I mean by that is both leaders had a number of pull-asides and bilateral exchanges with other heads of state. And what we expect is that President Macron and President Trump, when they have their private one-on-one session, will probably ask each other about those: What were your impressions of your meeting with, I don’t know, Prime Minister May or President Putin, or whatever. I think that’s highly likely.

And then, after the one-on-one session, they will move into a group session where their senior advisors will come in and they’ll get on with the more formal agenda. That’s what I meant by that.

Yes, sir.

♦ Q Can you characterize the dynamic between President Macron and President Trump during those G20 meetings, and whether the issue of migration came up, and if that’s something that they’re going to talk about during this visit?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: I don’t believe they had a formal bilateral session at the G20. And the reason is because they’ve spoken at length a number of times before and knew they were going to be meeting in Paris this week. So that’s the — I guess that’s the answer to that.

More generally, I would characterize the relationship between the two of them as being very positive. I’ve personally been present at a number of phone calls between the two of them. I see the chemistry as being very good. There are some issues where we see the world a little bit differently, but many issues where we see the world more or less the same. The French are and have been, and will be, very close security partners of ours who cooperate in many different domains and on many different issues. And I think the relationship, still in its early stages, is a very, very good one.

♦ Q Can I follow up on that?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Sure.

♦ Q There was a lot made of the body language between Macron and Trump in their two handshakes. There was one at the G20, too, where they had this sawing motion, this sort of strong handshake. Is there anything larger to say about that? Are they rivals? Are they entering into a rivalry here in any way? Can you expand on that?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: I don’t want to get into characterizing body language. I do share with you — my personal observation has been that their chemistry is quite positive and very good. President Macron really is an innovative, charismatic guy who’s trying to do some different things in France, and his political party didn’t exist a couple of years ago. So in that respect, he’s been a real trailblazer. And I think both of them think they have some things in common in their experience. Obviously, many differences, but some things in common. So I see it as a very positive developing relationship.

In the back. Yes, ma’am.

♦ Q Can you talk about — are you expecting any sort of protests at all during the President’s time there?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Always possible. But President Macron has indicated he doesn’t expect to see anything of particular note on this, certainly nothing like we see at all the G20 events.

Yes, sir.

♦ Q Thank you. A couple for you. First, I know that Secretary Mattis has been asking NATO partners to pony up troop contributions for the new strategy. Does the United States at this point have everything it needs from France, or will the President be asking President Macron directly for troop contributions?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: The President is consistent in this message whenever he meets NATO as a body, or whenever he meets his counterparts among the NATO allied nations. France is currently spending 1.8 percent of its GDP, so it’s very close to the 2 percent target that was agreed at Wales in 2014. And their numbers are trending in a positive direction, and they’ve assured the President that they have every intention of meeting the Wales targets, which are supposed to be met by 2024.

I sort of remind the audience that France is far and away one of the largest and strongest military members of the alliance and spends an awful lot of defense right now, and carries a heavy load in the counterterrorism fight, in particular in places so that really we don’t have to. So when you consider that the Sahel, for example, is half the size of the United States, and the French are carrying on the counterterrorism effort there with 4,000 or 5,000 French soldiers, I mean, their contributions are great.

I think the President is happy with where France is and doesn’t see that as a particular issue.

♦ Q And then, on a lighter note, are there cultural sights that the President would like to see while he’s in Paris?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Well, he’s not going to be there very long, but, yeah, I think what he’s going to see at the Invalides is going to be great. That’s where the French President would like to take him. So there’s going to be a real photo opportunity there. And then, if you’ve ever been on the Champs-Élysées for Bastille Day, it’s pretty spectacular. There’s not a lot of time, given the meetings that they’ve scheduled for the President to see other sights.

Yes, please.

♦ Q Thank you, sir.

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: You’re from where, please?

♦ Q Oh, I’m from NHK Japan. So we’re hearing reports that Chancellor Merkel is going to be meeting with President Macron on July 13th in Paris, before the meeting with Trump. Is there any possibility that President Trump will also have the opportunity to meet with Chancellor Merkel, or that the three of them will be able to meet?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Yes, I don’t think so. That’s not on the schedule right now. We’re aware that President Macron and his senior team are meeting with Chancellor Merkel and her senior team all through the morning of the 13th. I think they finish at something like 2:30 p.m. in the afternoon. But there’s no plan right now.

The President, as you’re aware, met at some length with Chancellor Merkel at the G20.

Yes, ma’am, right here.

♦ Q Is there going to be any discussions of any trade issues while they’re there? T-TIP? Any bilateral? Any trade at all?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Always possible. There’s an hour and 15 minutes blocked. They may run a little bit longer than that. Obviously, the President is always ready, willing and able to talk about issues of importance to the American worker and to the American economy. And there’s every possibility that it will be raised. But we’ve been asked to focus on preparing, and the President has been focused on preparing specifically for Syria and CT topics.

Yes, sir.

♦ Q Thank you, sir. From your understanding with the conversations that President Trump and President Macron have had so far, do they view the threat posed by radical Islamic terrorism in the same way?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: I think there’s a lot of commonality in their worldview and in their perspective. I don’t know if I would go so far as to say that it’s an identical perspective, because obviously the French experience is different from ours. But broadly speaking, I would say they see the threat in much the same way. Yes.

♦ Q Also, just to follow up — after the events on the Champs-Élysées, President Macron is traveling down to Nice, France —

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: He is.

♦ Q — for the memorial associated with the events of last year — the terrorist act last year. Did President Macron extend an invitation to President Trump to go down with him to Nice as well?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Yeah, no, he did not. Although the President will address that event, I think, in his remarks.

Yes, please.

♦ Q Tara McKelvey, BBC. I know that the U.S. and France have had a close military relationship in the past, and it seems like you’re trying to build on this. So could you tell us a little bit of what the President has said about France? Like, is he looking forward to the trip to Paris? How does he see the relationship between the two countries?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: When the President — President Macron asked him if he would — so they extended a formal invitation, a written invitation, and then, in a subsequent phone call when President Macron asked him to come, he was excited to tender the invitation in person, and President Trump was very excited to respond to it and to accept the invitation. So, yes, I think he’s very excited. The First Lady is very excited. Anytime that you can go visit a couple like the Macrons in the City of Light, it’s pretty tremendous.

On this particular day, however, it’s got added significance. So I think the President is excited and very much looking forward to that.

Yes, ma’am.

♦ Q Ayesha Rascoe with Reuters. There was some talk after the G20 that the U.S. was a bit isolated, especially on issues like climate change. Do you feel like — or does the administration feel like this trip to France is, at all, a way of showing that the U.S. is still engaged in international issues and still kind of leading on the world stage?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Well, the U.S. is engaged in international leadership. It is engaged on the world stage. The President — every leader at the G20 came in with a request to meet personally with President Trump. So I think that that pretty much says it all right there.

Yes, please.

♦ Q I’m Jackie from CBS.

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Hi, Jackie.

♦ Q You just spoke in pretty glowing terms about the city of Paris, which isn’t the way the President has spoken of the city in the past. He said it’s not what it used to be. Will he clarify those remarks at all?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Well, I don’t think the President is going to clarify earlier remarks. From everything that I’ve seen and everything that I’ve heard, the President has got very positive feelings about the city of Paris, and the people who live in Paris, and the French nation more generally.

♦ Q Well, he spoke pretty disparaging of the city during the campaign.

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: I’m not in a position to characterize that. I can only tell you what I’ve seen and heard since I’ve been here.

♦ Q Okay. And then, just once more, is there a reason that this visit was prioritized? I’m sure he gets lots of invitations to visit other countries.

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Well, there are few allies that are closer that France. And I think when President Macron asked, the President was happy to accept.

Yes, ma’am.

♦ Q Can you tell us which administration official principals are going to be accompanying the President on this trip?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Yes. The White House Chief of Staff will accompany, the National Security Advisor, and the Homeland Security Advisor will accompany. We will also meet Chairman General Dunford in Paris.

Yes, please.

♦ Q Just a point of clarification. This will be a press conference with questions — two questions each. Is that —

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: That’s right. I think both President Macron and President Trump will make brief remarks, perhaps 10 minutes each. And they’ll be followed by two questions for President Macron and two questions for President Trump — is the format.

Yes, ma’am.

♦ Q Does the U.S. have a position on an EU Army and just defense integration, period? I ask that because you said they would be talking about Syria. We’ve been told that they’ll be talking about the military. And I’m wondering what the position is on that, especially with respect to NATO.

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Right. I think our position about an EU Army can be pretty simply summed up. Where additional European security measures and capabilities can be brought to bear in the service of American interests and European interests — and, of course, they’re conjoined in so many ways — then I think we support it.
Where an EU Army might evolve over time and become, in some ways, a competition to the NATO Alliance — which we see as the primary security provider for the transatlantic union — then I think we might have some questions and we would want to engage on that.

Yes, ma’am.

♦ Q Can I just ask you a (inaudible) kind of question? Can you describe whether the President has ever talked about his previous visits to Paris? Is there any color that you can add about him ever rhapsodizing about visiting Paris before? And also, will he return to the White House or will he return to New Jersey?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Yeah, I’m not in a position to characterize or add color to that particular question. And I wish I could, but I’m just not in a position to do that. He’s going to return to the United States —

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: I don’t think that (inaudible) put out yet.

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: I don’t know if they nailed that down.

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: I can’t say yes, but we’ll keep you posted.

AIDE: We have time for two more questions and then we have to wrap things up.

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Or zero, if you don’t have any.

AIDE: Or zero. (Laughter.)

♦ Q With President Trump requesting that NATO countries spend more on defense, that could benefit the French industrial complex significantly. Is that a piece of the conversation? Is Donald Trump going there to try to make sure that big countries also buy American weaponry as they ramp up, and not just go to the French?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Yeah. You know, part of the conversation that usually gets left out is that there’s a 2 percent goal, but there’s a 20 percent goal. And the 20 percent goal is just as important. And that’s a commitment to spend at least 20 percent of national defense spending for NATO allies on actual capability, on equipment. Right? Because there are lots of things that you can spend defense funds on that would mean very little in the way of actual capability for NATO. And the French are very serious about that.

You probably saw, from the President’s trip in Warsaw, the announcement that the Poles are going to do a big buy of our Patriot Air Defense Missile System and also the HIMARS system, which is sort of a long-range rocket artillery system.

So where it makes sense, where there’s a market, and where’s there’s interest in American technology — which is the best in the world — then, yes, the President is going to press that. But these are national decisions. Of course, France has its own military industry as well, and they’re going to take that into account also.

Yes, sir.

♦ Q Thank you. Jake Turx, Ami Magazine. You had mentioned just earlier that part of the trip is to highlight World War I. And my question is, is there any particular message that the administration might want to be focusing in on, particularly draw any parallels between World War I and any events that are going on in the world today?

SENIOR ADMINISTRATION OFFICIAL: Yeah, thank you very much. I’m sure the President will mention that — address that in his remarks. So the fact that we participated in such a major way in World War I, side by side with the French, is a clear parallel to what we’re doing today. We still live in a dangerous world. We still live in a world that has many, many threats.

The French were strong allies — so, with us in Afghanistan, in the Gulf War. There were with us in the Korean War, as well. So we have a long history — not always marching in lockstep, but real friends and real allies. And so there are clear parallels to our partnership and our alliances 100 years ago and today, no question about that. That’s a big part of why the President is going to be there this week.

I think that’s all we have time for. Thanks very much.

END – 3:55 P.M. EDT

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155 Responses to White House Briefing On Upcoming President Trump Visit To France…

  1. sundance says:

    Liked by 5 people

    • mireilleg says:

      Sundance I love you, and really enjoy your posts and opinions. On this article I must disagree with you on one point. You called Macron a useful idiot. I assure you that I find no use for this pip squeak. Not as an American citizen or as a former French citizen, not as a womam (ew) and barely as a human.

      Liked by 12 people

    • Arkindole says:

      Harry Nilsson:”you see what you want to see and you hear what you want to hear. …”
      The Point

      Liked by 1 person

    • LBH says:

      Attention to detail, people. Sundance didn’t say this, Reuters did. Sundance just pointed it out.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Timmer says:

      I am concerned that this is an assassination attempt. He shouldn’t be travelling to France on such short notice.

      Liked by 2 people

      • bolshevict says:

        Maybe Macron’s meeting with Merkel is for Merkel to show the Frogs how to lose control of their own streets to violent rioters while foreign heads of state visit, as when our First Lady was besieged and trapped in her Hamburg hotel room last week.

        Like

  2. ginaswo says:

    I was trying to figure out how we could send an assortment of US military to protect POTUS & FLOTUS while they are in Macaroon ville.
    So glad our Trump Team has our military on site 😊

    Liked by 13 people

  3. JMC says:

    The security for our President in France concerns me.

    Liked by 14 people

  4. vikingmom says:

    Ummm – Bastile Day was in 1789 – how is this the 100th anniversary?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sylvia Avery says:

      Also to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the US entering WW1. I can see why the French might celebrate that, but for my part my grandfather and great uncles were fighting “over there” so I can’t say it makes me feel like celebrating.

      Liked by 12 people

      • vikingmom says:

        Mine as well! And for anyone who has studied the vast differences between the American War for Independence vs the French Revolution a dozen years later, there is a VAST difference between the ideologies that inspired both!

        Liked by 10 people

      • In Az says:

        I have an original letter of commendation my grandfather received for his role in an important WWI battle in France that he was part of. Of course the Americans won that battle

        (This invitation by Macron suspicious)

        Liked by 3 people

        • Sylvia Avery says:

          How absolutely cool that you have such a letter!!!

          I, too, see this invitation as suspicious. As suspicious as Macron falling all over himself to stand next to PDJT. It just seems like a set up of some kind. Just something to pray about since I can’t call the President and tell him to stay home because I am worried.

          Honestly, sometimes I can see my grandmother in myself and I don’t know whether to laugh or cry. She used to worry about everything and it would drive me nuts as a young person. Ah well. I remind myself of my mother, too, as time passes.

          Liked by 2 people

          • georgiafl says:

            I know what you mean. I’m beginning to look and act more like my mother too. My recent Southern ‘conniption fit’ defending AG Sessions is a prime example.

            Liked by 2 people

          • deanbrh says:

            Macron was not always “falling all over himself to stand next to PDJT.” The fact is, there is protocol to follow for G-20 photos and the protocol dictated that the newest member (Macron) stands at the end of the first row, on our left, looking at the photo, And the 2nd newest member (Trump) stands next. Aside from the photos, Macron is looking to be noticed, obviously and who would you choose to be Best Buds with if you were a short little newby twirp married to a grandmother? He chose the Leader of the Free World and the only super-Alpha male in the group, naturally.

            Liked by 2 people

      • Kroesus says:

        well the article starts with SD describing this as a celebration of the 100th anniversary if Bastille day which predated the French Revolution and occurred on 14 July 1789….in the Q&A you can then see it is also the 100th anniversary of the IS forces landing in France for WWI

        Liked by 1 person

    • rsanchez1990 says:

      It’s the 100th anniversary of American troops landing in France during WW1.

      Liked by 3 people

    • missmarple2 says:

      This is to commemorate the US entering WWI and arriving in France, which coincided with Bastille Day in 1917.

      Liked by 7 people

    • Brian L says:

      100th anniversary of us entering WWI.

      Like

  5. MIKE says:

    I’ll be praying for the First Families’ safety, as always. But especially around this idiot and his mother er, wife.

    Liked by 12 people

  6. Skinner says:

    Trump shall be the best thing that happened to France…and Europe

    Liked by 4 people

    • carrierh says:

      In spite of themselves, many countries truly do look up to America and Trump is the reason why. They see America strong, effective, and helpful as we used to be. Trump is highly admired for his leadership, common sense, and effectiveness that someone like Macron would definitely like to copy. Of course if they don’t close their borders, there is no way we can help them with that and why we must definitely have closed borders.

      Liked by 6 people

  7. quintrillion says:

    This is the first time something is telling me, no. P45, don’t go. Waste of time & energy.

    Liked by 12 people

    • M. Mueller says:

      I agree. And if he stayed home, he could sit on top of our good-for-nothing Congress.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Lack is not all says:

      I still dont understand what does Macron want from this visit? Why our President accepts the invitation of a traitorous enemy? Its the same as being invited to Chappaqua to Hillary’s house

      Liked by 4 people

      • carrierh says:

        It is called the art of the deal. You don’t have to like or love anyone, but it helps to have connections, especially among almost 200 countries so that some type of peace is accomplished. Trump is good at this and why he was called and congratulated by so many countries’ leaders and respecting America once more because it means they will also have protection. I was also thinking he must be sure to wear his bullet proof vest and be sure that Melania is properly guarded as well because there are enemies of America here and elsewhere.

        Liked by 6 people

      • MaineCoon says:

        I don’t want P45 & FLOTUS to go either, but P45 is taking the opportunity to remind France & EUROPE that USA troops came to their rescue.

        The French hold a lot of disdain towards Americans. Always have. Go figure. I’m glad it’s a very short trip.

        Liked by 12 people

        • dilonsfo says:

          I think that President Trump excepted this visit to remind France that the USA had to come to their rescue twice (WWI and WWII) and pull their butts from destruction. Now, once again France is falling prey to Germany by allowing an invasion of ME Muslems into their country prompted by the German chancellor.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Esperanza says:

          It depends. You have both.

          Like

    • SEJMON says:

      Me too …PDJT should not go there …

      Liked by 1 person

    • I agree 100%. Please Mr. President, politely decline for now.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Bendix says:

    I must confessed I just skimmed over the questions, so utterly stupid were they.
    Climate? Yes, the weather will probably be mentioned.
    Let’s initiate a system where reporters are tested for speaking and thinking skills. If they can’t perform at a high school level, they flunk.

    Melania could have had her pick of very wealthy men who would have given her a life of privilege and pampering. She wanted more than that.
    What a courageous, caring, hardworking woman.

    Liked by 10 people

    • daughnworks247 says:

      Let’s not forget Melania was a multi-millionaire, on her own, by age 35, before meeting the President. Melania was taking care of herself quite nicely.

      Like

  9. Minnie says:

    Were the dolt reporters NOT asked to state their names and outlets?

    Ugggghhh

    Liked by 4 people

    • MaineCoon says:

      I noticed that too. Unprofessional.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Grandma Covfefe says:

        And they don’t even formulate their questions properly. They can not do the questions short and sweet and to the point.
        They’re not very intelligent.

        Liked by 1 person

    • chbailey says:

      Yes they were directed to do so. Five of 19 (give or take) were respectful enough to follow the request: NHK Japan, Tara McKelvey BBC, Ayesha Rascoe Reuters, Jackie CBS, Jake Turx Mai Magazine. The rest didn’t want their names to be in the transcript or not be connected to their question? Or they deliberately dissed the rules because to be agreeable and do what is correct may give the appearance that media is not in “resist” mode? They must not be seen to be agreeable? Whatever…very tedious.

      Like

  10. Sylvia Avery says:

    So here, fresh from the lightweight corner, are my thoughts about this trip:

    1. Giddy with delight at the thought of more Melania fashions to swoon over.
    2. Terrified that our PDJT and his FLOTUS are going to the Terror Capital of the World and having to depend on the Pajama Boy globalist shill to protect him. Sick feeling in gut over the thought of how infiltrated with Mooslims their CT and intelligence and law enforcement must be and worried over how many of these will have grubby paws on key information.
    3. Already exhausted because I know I will be up all night watching coverage.
    4. Wondering “why bother?” with Macron and France.

    So, this is going to require some strong faith and a lot of prayers.

    Liked by 12 people

    • missmarple2 says:

      “We will be protected by God.”

      Donald J. Trump, Inaugural speech, January 20, 2017

      Liked by 20 people

      • Sylvia Avery says:

        Yes. I am ashamed of how often I go wobbly in the faith department. People here always buck me up. I know this. It is true. And still, I give in to fear and falter. I absolutely believe with every part of my being that Donald Trump was led to this position by God, so you’d think I could trust God to take care of him!!! SMH.

        Liked by 7 people

        • missmarple2 says:

          Hey, don’t feel bad. We all get worried or scared from time to time.

          I have never forgotten President Trump saying that. It stood out to me like it was written in blazing letters across the sky.

          Those blunt words of faith were from a man who isn’t used to the evangelical speaking-style, or the catholic 27-paragraph explanation (I am Catholic).

          It was said by a guy who has had a vision, who believes, and who is telling everyone else to have confidence and believe, too.

          I just post it when people get a little worried, because not everyone heard it the same way I did.

          Liked by 16 people

          • Sylvia Avery says:

            I remember, Miss Marple, and it hit me the same way. I was in awe, because I know he hasn’t had a lot of religious training but he said it with such certainty. I believed it. And I believe he does, too. But I forget. I get wrapped up in fear so easily. But when reminded I can take a deep breath and remember Who is in charge here. Thanks again!

            Liked by 6 people

        • dekester says:

          Sylvia,

          Your honesty is appreciated.

          PDJT has a helping hand in all of this. Brilliant as he is, what he has, and is accomplishing.
          Is being directed by a power even greater than the indefatigable PDJT.

          Thank you.

          Liked by 3 people

        • Kristin says:

          We have a fearless world leader. He knows we will be praying for his and FLOTUS safety always.
          He is always working on our behalf. I love this man.

          Liked by 1 person

      • theresanne says:

        “I am immortal until God’s work for me to do is done. The Lord reigns.”
        Henry Martyn

        Liked by 2 people

      • DEGinTN says:

        Thank you for correcting our focus. Trust God.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Alexsandra says:

        Humble suggestion, but I think a wise one for personal happiness and to honor both the Lord and the President He gave us: Please use that feeling of concern not as a reason for worry (as the scripture says, don’t worry, it only causes harm), but take that concern instead as a prompting to pray for President Trump and Melania. And trust in God (who says to cast your cares on Him, for he cares for you).

        Liked by 1 person

      • vfm#7634 says:

        Yes. DJT is our President by the grace of God. Period.

        Like

      • Grandma Covfefe says:

        Thank you Miss marple for the reminder of this perfect quote. I wrote it on a 3 x 5 card and will pt it next to my computer screen on Thursday and Friday.

        Like

    • Sylvia Avery says:

      Oops, I forgot point #5–I hate the press. Honestly, do they have contests to see who can come up with the STUPIDEST questions or does it just come naturally? ARGH!

      Liked by 7 people

      • vfm#7634 says:

        Fake News

        Like

      • Grandma Covfefe says:

        I wouldn’t be surprised if they get bonus money from their Master. I think it is why WH Press decided to remove the camera, to knock down the preening while insulting the press secretary.in front of the camera. We prefer transcripts, anyway.

        Like

  11. The Deplorable Tina says:

    I wonder if Obama will “coincidentally” be in the neighborhood at the same time & have a chat with Macron after Trump is gone?

    Liked by 6 people

  12. MOA says:

    A very very bad idea….unless PTrump intends to troll Micron on his own turf.

    Like

  13. Macron is getting blasted for just telling the truth. I’m starting to think we have a wild card here.

    “French president Emmanuel Macron has stunned his left-liberal admirers by saying that Africa does not need more aid, as its problems are “civilisational” rather than financial.”

    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2017/07/11/macron-africa-needs-fewer-children-civilisational-issues/

    “French PM Emmanuel Macron Deemed ‘Racist’ for Dissing African Fertility”

    “When countries are still having seven or eight children per woman, you can spend billions of euros on them but you won’t stabilize anything,” Macron said.

    http://www.breitbart.com/london/2017/07/11/french-pm-emmanuel-macron-deemed-racist-for-dissing-african-fertility/

    Liked by 9 people

    • dilonsfo says:

      That statement surprised me also. It is the truth…and, although it came from Macron, it needed to be said.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Esperanza says:

        I know I am being to be in agreement with Micron WAY too much…

        Like

        • Grandma Covfefe says:

          Well, it is best to just go with the flow and see what happens, if the Trump effect will rub onto Macron. Macron is right about Africa, but he needs the money to pay Turkey the promised money from Paris Accord.

          Like

    • georgiafl says:

      THAT is wrong – having large families is not wrong, does not increase societal instability, has not held Africa back.

      Problems in Africa are: 1. corruption, 2. foreign countries exploiting and enslaving Africans, 3. need for Christianity and Christian values. These are the reasons Africa is primarily 3rd world and a miserable place to live.

      Liked by 2 people

      • georgiafl says:

        Macron is spouting European ideal of ‘population control’ – birth control and abortion are the European Progressive ideal.

        Climate Change, Zero Population Growth, Birth Control, Abortion, Carbon Tax….all progressive ideological agenda garbage.

        Liked by 1 person

        • MVW says:

          Yes, for both of your replies.

          Aide is free stuff and destroys the production of a country. The results are disastrous. Aide destroys a country’s economy.

          Charity is not easy. Give money to a drunk and see what happens. Aide has to be given intelligently for it to do any good.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Macron is insane if the thinks Muslims are going to listen to him about birth control, and that’s who he was basically referring to in Africa. Muslims have an agenda, and it’s to over populate Christians. Biological jihad.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Large families are wrong when the parents or parent can’t financially support them, which leaves the the rest of society to take care of them and often times the children end up with malnutrition, hunger, starvation and disease.

        I do agree that government corruption also being another part of the problem.

        Liked by 1 person

        • vfm#7634 says:

          Exactly. Irish Catholic men tended to marry late if they were poor. It’s not at all like the Muslim proclivity to trust to fate for everything.

          Liked by 1 person

  14. Bruce says:

    Right now looks like a waste of time. Soon he will be liberating France from jihadists.

    Like

  15. Ejay says:

    One point of optimism, with only a couple of exceptions, the stupid ‘journalists’ questions referred respectfully to ‘the President’ or ‘President Trump’ not just ‘Trump’ or ‘Donald Trump’. PDJT has earned the title and both he and his office deserve respect.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. redlegleader68 says:

    To all my fellow Treepers above this post, I must point out one truth from the Campaign as it relates to this trip:

    LET. TRUMP. BE. TRUMP.

    He’s got this … we just don’t (and won’t) know the details till he’s ready to tell us. Calm Down.

    Liked by 13 people

  17. CathyMAGA says:

    I don’t like this visit. Didn’t read that whole thing, but Macron doesn’t even like Trump, so why invite him there, and on Bastille Day? Let’s remember who helped Macron win the election…and there will be protest, and Macron is an idiot if he underestimates them…last Bastille Day people died there.

    Like

    • churchmouse says:

      ‘why invite him there, and on Bastille Day?’

      I heard on French talk radio (RMC) weeks ago that, for a long time (well before the US election), the French government was going to invite the US president to the Bastille Day ceremony this year to acknowledge American help in WWI. 1917 was the year the US troops arrived in France.

      Like

  18. wjb105 says:

    There is a difference between the French revolution and the American ‘revolution’. The Americans declared independence in 1776. Their government and principles and religion did not change. Just like the Dutch in 1581, when they declared independence from Spain. Government and principles and religion did not change. Not really a revolution. The French got rid of their government and changed principles and religion. It was anti-Christian. It was about turning society upside down with horrible consequences. In the French case the revolution devoured itself though the guillotine and bread Napoleon, the French Adolf Hitler. In was all about no God and no master or atheism. They broke with reality. You can compare it with the Bolshevik revolution in Russia in 1917. On the 14th of July there is essentially nothing to celebrate. Only nihilism (or progressive liberalism).

    Like

  19. Plain Jane says:

    Looks like Macaroon is as tall as Putin.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. MOA says:

    France has the largest most well developed terrorist presence in Europe.
    The Pres is extremely vulnerable to a very large bomb there. God forbid.
    Dumb idea.
    SS needs to wake up.

    They can meet in Tahiti, French and safe.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. appadoo9 says:

    Our President Trump goes to France to honor our WWI soldiers, and because we our admonished to Not hide Our Light under a bussel.

    Liked by 6 people

    • dilonsfo says:

      You bet…President Trump is a return to the old American…not afraid to stand up to achieve their goals. Those values, stamina and fearlessness is sorely missing today. Most of the stories that instilled that in our youth have been taken out of school book, school rooms, households.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Although I know this goes without asking but I tweeted President Trump and asked him to remind Macron about the American lives lost during WW1.

      “In the early fall of 1918 five hundred American infantrymen were cut off from their regiment and surrounded by Germans during five days of fighting in the Argonne Forest. Though they would be forever remembered as the Lost Battalion.”

      http://www.americanheritage.com/content/lost-battalion

      Liked by 3 people

  22. appadoo9 says:

    I pray for Our President’s safety, Here, or abroad. Evil has no boundaries

    Liked by 4 people

  23. TakeBackOurRepublic says:

    I am very concerned with this trip primarily because he will be outside where he is most exposed. Anything that happens would be blamed on radical Muslims; don’t you know justifiably because of “how much they hate Trump”. This would be a too convenient and convincing cover for the true masterminds behind an assassination attempt. The CIA removed JFK and used Oswald as their patsy. Nothing has changed between then and now. Macron is a tool and globalist shill being used to draw our President to a danger zone.

    Like

  24. tonyE says:

    The French want our help to built a Maginot WALL that will withstand the Germans this time.

    Liked by 2 people

  25. rf121 says:

    US Navy marching in the parade. Hopefully a ceremonial unit. Fleet sailors cannot march. 🤣

    Like

  26. Grandpa M says:

    I have been lurking for a couple of months, this is first time posting.
    Don’t worry, Treepers,God has this. His mighty power is with our President Donald J. Trump.
    2 Timothy 1:7 – For God hath not given us the spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind.

    Liked by 12 people

    • Ad rem says:

      Welcome to the Tree House Grandpa M! You might want to find yourself two or three branches to settle upon. We can always use with a little more spreading of His word. 😀

      Liked by 6 people

      • Grandpa M says:

        Thank you, saw the CTH mentioned on Freerepublic. Now I have to have my daily dose of CTH. Sundance and all the Treepers manage to keep my mind amazingly clear.

        Liked by 10 people

        • thluckyone says:

          WELCOME, Grandpa M! SO glad to see you here! May I add, for those of us who feel obligated to worry (raising my hand here), a more productive use of our time would be prayer. That’s part of the reason our Father gave us knees.

          I think bent knees are not necessary for prayer but the “attitude” may be helpful. So, then, begin with worship and thanksgiving – the worry can be transformed.

          And, THANK YOU, Grandpa M for remembering to us the Only Holy Word of God.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Grandpa M says:

            You are welcome, thluckyone, I have to use prayer and the Word of God all the time to keep myself from worrying. And you are so right, counting your blessings fixes that “attitude” really quick.

            Liked by 1 person

    • Alexsandra says:

      Yes, Grandpa M. You may have been silent before but you knew exactly when and what to speak. This is not a normal presidency, this is a gift of God. Just as God was with David when Saul was hounding him, so God is here now.

      And for ourselves we also have to remember that He also says “but in the cowardly and unbelieving My hearrt takes no delight”. POTUS is very brave, and we likewise should be. Trust in the Lord. He is worthy of trust.

      Liked by 2 people

  27. A2 says:

    I too think this trip is a security risk. That is all.

    Like

  28. This is very dangerous for The President. The Globalists would be happy to take out 100 people to get at our POTUS, including recently installed puppet Macron, who is as disposable as a pair of dirty Pampers, and easily replaced. Just blame it on terrorists – there’s already 1,000’s of them crawling all over France. There is absolutely no upside to this for America or POTUS.

    Liked by 2 people

  29. melski says:

    I, like many of you, do not like the idea of President Trump going to Paris. I simply don’t have a good feeling about it. I pray for his safety.

    Like

  30. spren says:

    I am also very concerned about this trip. I’m sure all will work out well, but I still am very unsettled by it. To see the way the Macron seemed obsessed with positioning himself near Trump, and finagled side-bar conversations with him, and then to now on the spur of the moment invite him to these ceremonies where it appears Trump will be out in the open and possibly exposed.

    I hope my misgivings are due to paranoia and not intuition. God Bless President Trump as we know that many forces, foreign and domestic, are out to destroy him.

    Liked by 2 people

  31. rjcylon says:

    Guy that doesn’t destroy his own country visits guy that does, says “you should think about not destroying your country so much”, returns home, press attacks for xyz reason.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Ivehadit says:

    My first response was extreme trepidation. However, upon further reading, I suspect there is something bigger going on below the surface.No way does President Trump do something frivolous or unworthy of his time and presence. There is much more to this, imho. Praying, praying, praying for his and Melania’s safety…and their whole family.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Alexsandra says:

      Problem or concern — antidote is prayer. Not only does prayer — simple talking to God — give self-comfort, calming concern, but it fulfills God’s word.

      I call it the power of anemic prayer — does not have to be formal, just direct talking with the Lord and thanking Him — and amazing things happen.

      Like

    • nimrodman says:

      “My first response was extreme trepidation. However, upon further reading …”

      So are you now down a couple levels to just “abject wariness”?

      Like

      • Ivehadit says:

        No, actually more optimistic because Donald knows what needs to be done. And he is not wasting any time anywhere any how.

        Like

  33. xyzlatin says:

    The statement by the administration official gives the impression that there was only Britain, Russia, and France fighting the war. From 1914, of a population of 5 million nearly half a million volunteered in Australia and similar figures occurred in countries around the world. KIA were more than 63,000 Australians, 65,000 Canadians, and 20,000 New Zealanders, 127,000 Serbians, 13,000 South Africans, 1000 Rhodesians, 75,000 Indians (of a 1 million strong force). The USA suffered 53,000 soldiers KIA.

    Liked by 1 person

    • MOA says:

      Indeed, the Australian General John Monash is regarded as the most competent General on the Western Front.

      Liked by 1 person

    • spren says:

      Australia certainly made quite a sacrifice, but your numbers of KIA for the US aren’t accurate. US forces had 117,000 killed and this occurred in just over a year of action. The war started in 1914, but the US didn’t enter it until July 1917 and the war ended on November 11, 1918.

      Like

      • MOA says:

        Probably what he’s talking about there is combat deaths.
        Australia 62,149. USA 53,400.
        Non combat deaths takes the US total to 116,200.

        Like

    • “World War 1 was one of the bloodiest wars in all of human history. The number of WW1 causalities varies depending on the source you consult but the following statistics are generally regarded as an accurate representation of ww1 death and casualties.”

      Military Casualties By Country: Number of military deaths and total military wounded for each of the major countries involved in the First World War.

      Both Military and Civilian: Deaths: 16.5 million; Wounded: 20 million; Total WW1 Casualties: 35 million +

      Military: Deaths: 9.7 million; Wounded: 21.2 million; Prisoners of War and Missing Soldiers: 7.5 million

      Civilian: Deaths as a result of direct military action: 950,000; Deaths caused by disease and famine: 6 million

      More Facts: Country with the most military deaths: Germany (2.1 million); Country with highest total death toll: Russia (3.8 million); Highest Percentage of population killed: Serbia (16.11%); 250,000 British Soldiers were suffered a partial or full amputation as a result of fighting in the First World War.

      April 6, 1917: the United States enter the conflict by declaring war on Germany
      November 11, 1918: Germany sign armistice agreement and the First World War is officially ended. Fighting on the Western Front ceases at 11 am.

      http://ww1facts.net/quick-reference/world-war-1-timeline/

      Liked by 1 person

      • With creating 2 WW, Germany is responsible for modern day genocide of white men, even their own.

        Cher Ami a pigeon carrier saved 200 hundred lives from the Lost Battalion.

        Liked by 1 person

        • MOA says:

          “With creating 2 WW, Germany is responsible for modern day genocide of white men, even their own.”

          So true.
          If the German Wehrmacht mentality from two World Wars survived, there wouldn’t be a Merkel or a covert mass invasion by muslims….it would be culturally unacceptable.
          The sons of the Afrika Corps are now the dissolute guilty effete.
          It’s good their fathers didn’t live to see it.

          Liked by 1 person

  34. scott467 says:

    “Later in the afternoon, the President and First Lady will be greeted by President and Mrs. Macron at the Hotel Invalides.”

    ___________

    Hotel Invalides?

    Wasn’t there any room at the Hotel Infirmary, Hotel Incapacitated, or Hotel California?

    .

    Like

  35. scott467 says:

    “Q I had two questions, sort of unrelated. On climate, you did mention that those were the subjects.”

    _____________

    Laugh openly.

    Next question?

    .

    Like

  36. scott467 says:

    “So is that [i.e., ‘climate’] just completely off the table, or is the President going to entertain any discussions on that? Obviously very contentious with President Macron.”

    _____________

    The president has great respect for the pagan Church of Climatology and all of its adherents.

    The president looks forward to opening up the Climatology Scriptures with Mr. Macaroni so the whole world can see just how genuine and authentic and true this Church is to the interests of globalists and those tasked with the heavy burden of wealth-redistribution.

    Next question?

    .

    Like

  37. scott467 says:

    “Totally unrelated topic, but since we have you, the BBC was reporting today that President Trump will not have an official visit to the UK this year — maybe not a state visit either. We’re trying to kind of determine what the plan is. He said he’s going to go last week. So if you don’t mind, if you have any clarity on that, that would be great.”

    _______________

    Is passive-aggressive a state of mind with you, or a strategy?

    And who’s “we”?

    You got a mouse in your pocket?

    As soon as the president wants you to know what his plan is, then you will know.

    And yes, that will be great, for all of us.

    Next question?

    .

    Like

  38. scott467 says:

    “What are you guys hoping to accomplish with this trip? Obviously it’s really short. Is there anything by way of deliverables that you could expect? Or what’s the goal here?”

    _______________

    The only deliverables requested or expected by the president are clean towels and bed sheets at the Hotel Invalid.

    Beyond that, I would love to tell you what the president plans to accomplish.

    But if I told you, I would have to kill you.

    And I don’t think either of us want that, do we?

    Next question?

    .

    Like

  39. scott467 says:

    “Q We saw the President and President Macron talking a lot on the sidelines at the G20. They seemed to spend a significant amount of time together, and you seem to mention that as separate from the Syria and counterterrorism things. So I’m wondering if there were specific policies or topics that they were going to want to follow up on in this bilat.”

    ______________

    Who writes these questions for you?

    Do you even hear yourself?

    They ‘seemed’ to spend time together on the ‘sidelines’ and you claim that I ‘seem’ to mention it as separate from yada, yada, yada… is this what your readers want to know about?

    What is it that you think I’m going to say that is going to satisfy any of your personal curiosity, at all?

    You could do a little homework, and ask questions that at least potentially have concrete answers, or you can half-ass it by asking these ‘stream of consciousness’ questions that wouldn’t be answerable even if I wanted to tell you.

    How’s that strategy working out for you?

    .

    Like

  40. scott467 says:

    “Q You said the two leaders would be sharing perspectives from the G20. Can you elaborate on that?”

    _______________

    Yes, I can.

    Next question?

    .
    .

    “What specifically — which specific perspective does President Trump hope to share with President Macron?”

    _______________

    Well hold on, let me consult my Magic 8-ball, it’s my direct connection to the president’s mind.

    Hold on… hold on… signs point to…

    I’m sorry, I’m going to have to get back to you on that.

    Next question?

    .

    Like

  41. scott467 says:

    “Q Can you characterize the dynamic between President Macron and President Trump during those G20 meetings, and whether the issue of migration came up, and if that’s something that they’re going to talk about during this visit?”

    ____________

    Well let me take those in order, Toby.

    First, I would characterize the dynamic between Mr. Macaroon and President Trump as one of stature, and lack thereof.

    Second, the president wanted to talk about the islamic invasion of Europe, and how it has been facilitated by the treasonous political-class to undermine and subvert nearly all of the Western democracies, it’s one of his favorite topics, but as you know, another of Merkel’s Muzzees drove a truck through a crowd of innocent people across town, and for safety reasons the leaders had to postpone that discussion.

    The president looks forward to Señor Macaroon’s thoughts and ideas about continuing his treason and wanton disregard for the safety of French People and the safety of the People of Europe at the earliest opportunity.

    Next question?

    .

    Like

  42. scott467 says:

    “♦ Q Can I follow up on that?”

    ____________

    Okay Andrea, I’ll take that one for $200:

    What is “No”?

    Next question.

    .
    .

    “♦ Q There was a lot made of the body language between Macron and Trump in their two handshakes. There was one at the G20, too, where they had this sawing motion, this sort of strong handshake. Is there anything larger to say about that? Are they rivals? Are they entering into a rivalry here in any way? Can you expand on that?”

    ______________

    You can’t possibly be serious?

    Does your boss review the questions you plan to ask?

    And if not, why not?

    Who made a lot out of their handshake?

    Besides you, and the people sitting next to you?

    Why don’t you ask them? You can even quote each other as anonymous sources, as is your custom.

    Next question?

    .

    Like

  43. scott467 says:

    “♦ Q Can you talk about — are you expecting any sort of protests at all during the President’s time there?”

    ________________

    Don’t really know, you would have to ask Mr. Soros about that, and former president and unindicted conspirator Hussein Obama.

    Do you have either of their contact information?

    I’m sure all of your colleagues do, if you don’t.

    Next question?

    .

    Like

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