President Trump: “I do not see a role in Libya”…

During a press conference yesterday with Italian President Gentiloni, President Trump was asked about the future U.S. role Libya.

QUESTION:  President Trump, do you see a role for your administration in helping stabilizing Libya?  And do you agree that stabilizing Libya means combating terrorism and ISIS?

PRESIDENT TRUMP:  “I do not see a role in Libya.  I think the United States has right now enough roles.  We’re in a role everywhere.  So I do not see that.  I do see a role in getting rid of ISIS.  We’re being very effective in that regard.  We are doing a job, with respect to ISIS, that has not been done anywhere near the numbers that we’re producing right now.  It’s a very effective force we have.  We have no choice.  It’s a horrible thing to say, but we have no choice.  And we are effectively ridding the world of ISIS.  I see that as a primary role, and that’s what we’re going to do, whether it’s in Iraq or in Libya or anywhere else.  And that role will come to an end at a certain point, and we’ll be able to go back home and rebuild our country, which is what I want to do.”

[Transcript]

President Trump is taking the smart and strategic approach toward Libya having previously discussed the North African country extensively with President al-Sisi of neighboring Egypt.

The smart play is for the U.S. to maintain diplomatic relationships with Libya, while supporting Egypt and al-Sisi’s position of influence.  Libya’s factional and tribal government is still missing the core elements needed for success – a stable central figure with broad moderate following.

History has shown that injecting U.S. opinion toward a centralized government that exists without leadership only brings a worse outcome.

Like Syria, Libya is a tribal nation with diverse ideological and regional perspectives.  If there isn’t an existing structure of regional representation when the dictator is removed chaos is the outcome.   However, once regional representative leaders are established, the bottom up approach can work better to find a unifying central figure.

That’s also the goal in Syria.

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This entry was posted in Egypt & Libya Part 2, ISIS, Islam, Jihad, media bias, North Africa, President Trump, Refugees, Syria, The Story of Libya, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

71 Responses to President Trump: “I do not see a role in Libya”…

  1. citizen817 says:

    No More Nation Building… A great plan!

    Liked by 22 people

  2. Bob Thoms says:

    Bravo President Trump !

    Liked by 10 people

  3. vfm#7634 says:

    “Like Syria, Libya is a tribal nation with diverse ideological and regional perspectives. If there isn’t an existing structure of regional representation when the dictator is removed chaos is the outcome. However, once regional representative leaders are established, the bottom up approach can work better to find a unifying central figure.”

    A confederation-type setup like Switzerland is the only thing that can possibly work in such fragmented, tribal countries such as there are in the Mideast.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. H.R. says:

    Let Libya choose its own tyrant.

    It’s none of our business unless they produce jihadists/terrorists bent on the destruction of the U.S., and the U.S. is already working on that threat.

    Liked by 8 people

  5. Pam says:

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Pam says:

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Pam says:

    oops wrong thread.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Brian L says:

    Frankly I’m thinking we should just let Egypt take over the entire continent. Not like it could be any worse than it is now.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. BigDilbert says:

    The longer Libya remains a festering stinking hole, Trump can remind us it is a product of Hillary and Obama.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. fleporeblog says:

    Russia and Egypt both want ex-Libyan General Khalifa Haftar to run Libya. He is anti ISIL and would be the kind of leader to turn Libya around.

    From the article linked below:

    But analysts do not believe Sissi has in mind a surgical counter-terror operation against the ISIL presence in Libya, which constitutes just three of the country’s innumerable militia groups. Rather, his idea of an intervention would more likely be aimed at channeling global anti-ISIL sentiment towards substantive support for Tobruk’s military allies, spearheaded by ex-Libyan general Khalifa Haftar and his Libyan National Army. Sissi has long been accused of arming Haftar’s forces under the table; now they believe he wants to overtly build them into a force that can vanquish the Tripoli alliance.

    http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2015/2/17/egypts-sisi-presses-wider-intervention-against-isil-in-libya.html

    Here is an additional article about a recent meeting of the 3 leaders from Libya in Egypt.

    http://www.madamasr.com/en/2017/02/25/feature/politics/haftar-and-sarraj-in-cairo-the-details-of-egypts-partially-successful-libyan-summit/

    Our President will back President al-Sissi since he knows what is best for the region and the world in that area.

    Liked by 6 people

    • duchess01 says:

      I agree – we have no business sticking our noses in African affairs – where have we intervened and made a difference – President Trump forged an important alliance with President Al Sisi – he respects Al-Sisi’s judgment – I am thrilled our President sees no role in Libya! I think previous imbeciles have done enough damage there – don’t need to name them, either –

      Liked by 4 people

  11. fleporeblog says:

    SD I am so happy you referenced this from yesterday’s joint press conference. Many folks may have missed the joint press conference between our President and the PM of Italy. Listening to the final answer you quoted above by our President brought such joy and warmth for me (last 1:16 of the video below). His answer about the US involvement in Libya should put everyone at ease about our role as the world police. John McCain, Lindsey Graham, Marco Rubio and the rest of the warmongers were crying themselves to sleep last night.

    Liked by 10 people

    • duchess01 says:

      Oh, I agree, flep! Idjits – all three of them are war pigs –

      Liked by 3 people

    • ediegrey says:

      Particularly striking to me is that I think the Italian president was answering his question on Libya, talking about stability and all that and finished by saying the USA is critical in this. Then President Trump says no way, we will deal with ISIS period – then we are back home to get our country together again. Libya can take care of Libya.

      Liked by 2 people

    • nihonsuki says:

      I am worried about the happy Saudis, McCain, and Lindsey, but if Trump can get money from the Saudis, hire third world troops, use the right military equipment, and rules of engagement, things could be affordable.

      The Phillippines have offered their troops to Qatar (for a price I imagine). There are all sorts of low wage nations whom can contribute. Get 60 year old army vets (shorter time on disability), and let them sit in armored cars. Don’t make them do hearts and minds stuff, and give flexibility for unpredictable routes, better rules of engagement, and avoid easy to ambush routes. But Petraeus’ friends are big on hearts and minds.

      Liked by 1 person

    • RC says:

      Signor Gentiloni is President of the Italian Council of Ministers. He has one vote, like the other ministers around the ministerial table, and is accorded every honor as “Prime Minister,” or spokesperson for the Council. However, the other ministers, such as telecommunications, railroads, public health, pensions, have substantive control over their departments and are constantly negotiating with fellow Parliamentarians for funding of their departmental programs. Having the “Prime Minister’s” support is very helpful, but not strictly necessary if a Parliamentary majority backs a program.

      Like

  12. miketrivi says:

    I would support a prolonged campaign on re-conquest and re-colonization of these muslim lands with the goal of returning them to Christendom. The time of the Orc is over.

    Liked by 3 people

  13. “And we are effectively ridding the world of ISIS. I see that as a primary role, and that’s what we’re going to do, whether it’s in Iraq or in Libya or anywhere else. And that role will come to an end at a certain point, and we’ll be able to go back home and rebuild our country, which is what I want to do.”

    Well said Mr. President, well said indeed. #MoreWinning 😀

    Liked by 7 people

  14. CountryclassVulgarian says:

    Good. I don’t see a role there either.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Steve in Lewes says:

    I guess all those twitter, FB, youtube, etc “foreign policy experts” who claimed that PDJT was breaking his campaign promises, and in some cases jumped off the Trump Train, after the Syrian missile attack, really knew what they were spewing about, huh!

    Liked by 3 people

  16. MIKE says:

    I doubt we will see the DJT administration creating any more vacuums in the ME or anywhere else in the world. That was the past administrations forte. I actually think the man knows waaay ahead of time when a Foreign policy storm is brewing and has and will implement the most awesome of contingency plans; he has drafted and assembled a “dream team” of killers and sharks; and they will not involve any U.S. resources other than diplomacy and “advice”.
    This man is wicked smart, so much that I am beginning to feel empathy for those clueless neer-do-wellers in the Mostly Soros Media….. Nah. Skroo ’em.

    Liked by 4 people

  17. We are very blessed…..

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Andy Smith says:

    Yay Trump!!!
    So if we are going to knock out Assad in Syria (a very bad move IMHO) who is the “stable central figure with broad moderate following” to replace him?

    Like

    • FLEEVY says:

      “””
      If there isn’t an existing structure of regional representation when the dictator is removed chaos is the outcome. However, once regional representative leaders are established, the bottom up approach can work better to find a unifying central figure.
      “””
      There isn’t one today. One will emerge.

      Liked by 1 person

    • RC says:

      Assad happens to be an Alwis, a minority / moderate branch of Islam hated by Sunni and Shia alike, as milk-toasts not worthy of their militant theocracy.

      Assad is presently fighting multiple Sunni Jihadi bands, equipped and funded by Saudi Arabia, the Gulf Emirates, Jordan, Turkey, the US State Department and various Capital Hill Senators. With his back to the wall, Assad accepted Russian and Iranian military support. Russia demanded a naval base on the Mediterranean and Iran is pressuring him for a naval base as well. Since the Iranian forces in Syria have proved rather worthless, Assad may be able to resist this demand, even as he becomes increasingly reliant on the Russians.

      The triumph of any coalition of Sunni Jihadis now operating in Syria, whether these be Turkish proxies, Saudi proxies, or others, would be a disaster for the US, for Israel and Christian minorities in Syria. Assad has repeatedly stated that he would accept regime change once the Jihadis are defeated. But everyone outside Syria and Russia seems to believe their murderous band of Jihadi theocrats are preferable to him.

      PS President Trump speaks exclusively about ISIS and ignores all other Sunni – Jihadis operating in Syria, as though these will turn into lambs once ISIS is destroyed. Alas, we are “The Great Satan” to these Sunni – Jihadis just as much as to ISIS.

      Like

  19. ivehadit says:

    Oh my, oh my, oh my!
    I just ADORE all this testosterone flowing through our country now!
    WE LOVE YOU DONALD!!

    Like

  20. Sundance: Compliments on another great perspective.

    IMO, your final 3 paragraphs nailed what we should consider as “essential ingredients” and why we should avoid another disastrous entanglement.

    Time for the Europeans to step up and defend themselves against African instability and the resulting migratory invasions of Europe.

    As for the upcoming Islamic destruction of European nations, they’ve invited the problem into their borders, and America should stay the hell out of disasters of Europe’s own making.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Simple Jack says:

    I say this only because it’ll be ignored by most of the media: Donald Trump has done a phenomenal job of learning to be President of the United States. Listen to this statement, then listen to some of the things he said shortly after the inauguration. It’s night vs day.

    He sounds like a statesman now. For a 70 year old man to learn such a demanding job so quickly is a true inspiration.

    Liked by 1 person

    • FLEEVY says:

      Any specific examples come to mind? I thought he’s been good all along.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Simple Jack says:

        I wouldn’t say he was bad even at the start, but he’s gotten better. You’d have to; as GWB has often said, it’s a job no one can ever be truly prepared for.

        No specific examples come to mind, just an overall impression that he’s not winging it anymore.

        Liked by 1 person

  22. filia.aurea says:

    Trillions wasted in Oil, Poppy and regional wars in the Middle East. All this while we continue to immigrate invasive species from all over the globe. The first stop in the destruction of ISIS lurks in the Swamp.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. NJF says:

    I love the opening pic.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. “History has shown that injecting U.S. opinion toward a centralized government that exists without leadership only brings a worse outcome”

    It has taken us HOW MANY failures to learn this? How many failed puppet game vernments have we set up? How many nations currently exist solely because of America’s support and intervention? Yes, WeARE the leaders of the free world, which sometimes always means we are its Policeman, too. But “America First” doesn’t mean “America ica ALWAYS”

    Like

  25. yucki says:

    We’ve got enough to do at home. Unfortunately that includes our “near-abroad” – a Russian expression – a higher priority than MENA [Middle East/North Africa].

    Mexico. Venezuela, as we’re seeing. And Brazil, a bigger menace still under the radar.
    “WELCOMING THE CALIPHATE TO BRAZIL: New immigration law opens Brazil’s borders to drug trafficking and the Islamic Caliphate”

    This article deals with the situation of the Islamization of Brazil in light of the new Law of Immigration, approved by the country’s Senate and sent for presidential signing. It highlights steps that have been taken to increase the nonexistent Islamic presence in Brazil into become an influential power. To understand the situation one needs to understand the deterioration of the political landscape of the country, which is briefly discussed in the course of the article (keeping in mind that politics in Brazil has a huge complicating factor: endemic corruption).

    http://gatesofvienna.net/2017/04/welcoming-the-caliphate-to-brazil/

    Like

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