Not Guilty ! – Officer Edward Nero Acquitted in Baltimore Six Trial (Freddie Gray)…

As most anticipated Officer Edward Nero has been acquitted by Judge Wiliams during a bench trial determination.  The arrest and charges were political decisions intended entirely to appease the racial grievance community…

mosby going to courtEdward Nero mugshotjudge barry williams

(Baltimore Maryland) Baltimore Circuit Judge Barry Williams on Monday rejected the state’s case against Officer Edward Nero, acquitting him on all counts for his role in the arrest and death of Freddie Gray.

The judgment, which followed a five-day bench trial, is the first in the closely-watched case. Nero, 30, had faced four misdemeanor charges of second-degree assault, reckless endangerment and two counts of misconduct in office.

Prosecutors argued that Nero committed an assault by detaining Gray without justification, while the reckless endangerment charge related to Nero’s role in putting Gray into an arrest wagon without buckling a seat belt. In closing arguments Thursday, Williams had skeptically questioned prosecutors about their theory of assault, which legal experts said was unprecedented.

Williams on Monday said there were “no credible facts” to show that Nero was directly involved in Gray’s arrest, and said testimony showed Nero’s role in putting Gray in the van was minimized by the actions of others and not unreasonable given his training.

Nero leaned forward after the verdict was read and wiped his eyes. He hugged his attorneys.

mosby screen

[…] “The State’s Attorney for Baltimore City rushed to charge him, as well as the other five officers, completely disregarding the facts of the case and the applicable law,” the attorneys said in a statement. “His hope is that the State’s Attorney will re-evaluate the remaining five officers’ cases and dismiss their charges. Like Officer Nero, these officers have done nothing wrong.”

Prosecutors remain bound by a gag order and did not comment. State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby did not attend the reading of the verdict, and a spokesperson did not respond to questions about her absence.

[…] Williams said “Miller stated unequivocally” that he had detained Gray, and noted that Brandon Ross, one of Gray’s friends, also backed the account in his testimony. Prosecutors alleged Miller had twisted his story to help his “buddy” Nero, but Williams noted Ross had no such incentive to lie. Williams also said he believed that Miller and Nero had said “we” to describe their collective actions — but not assign joint responsibility.

Prosecutors also argued Nero could be convicted on under a theory of “accessory liability,” which Williams said would require showing Nero knew a crime was being committed and either participated or deliberately allowed it to continue. Bledsoe had argued while there was no case law to support the argument, there was also none prohibiting it.

Williams said it was “not an appropriate application of the law.”(read more)

Baltimore six 2

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This entry was posted in BGI - Black Grievance Industry, Cultural Marxism, Dem Hypocrisy, Dept Of Justice, Freddy Gray Death, media bias, Police action. Bookmark the permalink.

293 Responses to Not Guilty ! – Officer Edward Nero Acquitted in Baltimore Six Trial (Freddie Gray)…

  1. Former Lurker says:

    Riots?

    Probably not until they are all found innocent.

    Liked by 5 people

  2. Sentient says:

    Nero put Williams on the spot by skipping a jury trial. It was either acquit or Williams would lose all claim to being able to try a case based upon facts and the law. Williams could have presided over a Kafkaesque political show trial, but he daren’t take the responsibility himself. Thankfully, in acquitting Nero, Williams acquitted himself well.

    Liked by 19 people

    • John Galt says:

      Williams did they best he could by improperly suppressing Mosby’s gross “the knife was legal” blunder. A conviction would have resulted in reversal on appeal.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Arkindole says:

        Counselor, my first thoughts honed in on a civil case brought by the LEOs against the city for present and future damages. It’s probably the case they won’t be working there after this is over. Any thoughts?

        Like

        • John Galt says:

          Cops generally have unions and good lawyers. I wouldn’t be surprised to see cops leaving the Baltimore Police Dept. pursuant to terms of confidential agreements. Mosby gets the glory, the cops get the cash.

          Liked by 4 people

          • Arkindole says:

            Good enough, I suppose, as long as they complete the Baltimore financial collapse and set up some negative reinforcers for the other bicoastal enclaves.

            Like

        • Suzy Kiprien says:

          I agree. The BLM thugs will retaliate and they are everywhere. Honestly, I don’t think they could ever work in police enforcement anymore, thus the civil lawsuit.

          Liked by 2 people

          • 1american1st says:

            The officers could work in LE in other cities in America that aren’t run by racist thugs like Baltimore’s mayor & Atty Marilyn Mosby. Both should be fired for catering to criminals. That’s not what they were hired to do. Both are trash.

            Liked by 6 people

            • Clc says:

              I think there is an ongoing internal investigation to determine if the officer violated dept. policy. if cleared from that, the dept. would have to take them back with backpay.

              Liked by 4 people

            • JeremyR says:

              As with Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, their lives would not be worth a nickel on the street. A million punks with attitude and a desire for revenge or fame would be lurking, and the first call they received to a dark alley or bad neighborhood would be their last.
              Better for them to seek anonymity and live quite lives as carpenters or longshoremen. Preferably in a place far away from Phaultimore and the liberal thinking. Some place like Kansas or Texas where a citizen can carry with out worry.

              Liked by 1 person

            • mopar2016 says:

              Affirmative Action has been a 50 year failure. These people have no shame whatsoever.
              And AA also says, “I can’t make it through life without the help of the people that I hate”.
              Some people have zero pride.
              And some people are just no good.

              Liked by 3 people

      • TexasDude says:

        Juries can nullify laws. The smart play was bench. Sadly, for most Americans, this option is only allowed for very minor offenses.

        Like

    • Suzy Kiprien says:

      It was wise to opt for a bench trial. No judge wants to be overturned on appeal. Thus, Judge Williams followed the spirit of the text of the law in combination with Police Protocol.
      What is great is Judge Williams is a person of Black race.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Doug says:

      I think Judge Williams showed some courage. I spent 22 years employed by the USDOJ as a low level LEO and was surprised to see the judge in this case in liberal Baltimore let the officer walk. Hope it goes the same way for the other 5. The prosecutor showed bias from the start and certain things about the entire case stink. Gray was a frequent criminal and reports were that he often faked injuries when arrested, then there is the report that he intentional tried to injure himself in the back of the van, though I don’t know if this was mentioned during the trial. I spent years transporting convicts and we always had then seat belted into the vans we used, though.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Clc says:

        this was such a bogus charge going in, I bet the judge knew the outcome of the trial before the first witness was called. this trial was only a show to appease the local folk.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Jason says:

          the Trial/Charges aren’t to appease, but to rile them up for next round. All they need to do is point to how there was no ‘justice’ for Freddie, Mike Brown, Trayvon, etc.

          If they can get something to stick, it’s a bonus but that’s why none of this has been in the news, they know they have no chance and are doing their best to bury it.

          Like

    • jc says:

      I never thought Williams would deliver a fair verdict, my hats off to him. He’ll probably never hold an elective office in Harm city again.

      Like

  3. auscitizenmom says:

    I am glad he was let off. This whole prosecution of all of these officers is just persecution.

    Liked by 18 people

  4. zephyrbreeze says:

    Shame on Mosby. Let’s hope this is the beginning of the end of her short, and notorious career.

    Liked by 23 people

  5. winky says:

    Of course….This was all about a crooked DA who got caught with her pants down along with a few others who had something going on there….the civil case was settled to get money out of the city while O was still in office…..this had probably been going on in Baltimore for awhile…..crooks lining their pockets at the expense of the people of the state …corruption.

    Liked by 11 people

  6. freepetta says:

    There was NO case to start with!

    Liked by 5 people

  7. sundance says:

    Liked by 12 people

    • Concerned says:

      Everyone saw what happened to GZ and Officer Wilson. Nobody wants to be the next victim of the BGI. What a relief for Officer Nero. I hope he leaves Baltimore, there are lots of nice places in the US where he and his family can live in peace.

      Liked by 12 people

    • maiingankwe says:

      That picture really says a lot. This is what people don’t get or care about…the complete destruction of an innocents life and their family. And for what? Justice? No, sadly not. The only thing he did wrong was not seat belt him in. Of course he had no idea the criminal was known to fake and cause himself injuries. I’m sure the criminal did not think he would die, but was thinking of all that money he’d get from a huge lawsuit. He jumped right into achieving his goal when he realized they hadn’t buckled him in. At least that is my take on it.

      When he died it was everyone for more greed and power, especially Mosley. She saw her ticket to more money and standing without a whit of compassion for the truth and the lives of these policemen. She thrived on the riots and destruction of her city, the more damage the better her chances for ascension in employment.

      There are so many people to be completely and utterly disgusted with it would take too much time and space to write all of the grievances we have with these people. They should be utterly ashamed of themselves and their behavior, and hopefully at least some will see their errors and be ashamed for what they have done.

      I do not envy the position Williams was in, but I do respect his decision and hope he does well for the others too. May Nero and his family heal as well as the rest of his fellow officers facing the court. It is not just five men and one woman, it is their family members as well. That is a lot lives that have been affected, and they have gone through hell. And for what? Because a career criminal thought he could take the city for a ride and sue the pants off of them? What a horrible individual. I’m sorry he died, I actually am, but his death does not excuse his behavior.

      Thank you for that picture, it really hit it all home for me. Be well,
      Ma’iingankwe

      Liked by 1 person

  8. zephyrbreeze says:

    It’s like a banana republic down there…
    From the article:

    “The state’s theory for the assault charge had been described by legal observers as “novel” or even “radical.” When the constitutionality of a police stop is questioned, the typical remedy is for charges to be dropped or evidence suppressed. Officers can also be sued.

    “But prosecutors sought to criminalize the interaction, with Deputy Chief State’s Attorney Janice Bledsoe remarking that people were “jacked up all the time” and that officers must justify all of their actions. Williams closely questioned prosecutors on the theory in closing arguments, but made no conclusion on it in finding Nero had no involvement.”

    Turning police into criminal defendants as protocol. Jeeezz…..

    Liked by 3 people

    • lovely says:

      Yep, it is sheer madness.

      I hope all of the defendants choose a bench trial. Nero neatly turned the tables and put Mosby and her minions on trial.

      A judge, even an activist judge like Williams can only spit on the law so much. Not to mention that judges are among the most powerful and arrogant people within our government.

      Williams knew if he found Nero guilty on any of the counts that he would eventually be overturned, not to mention that he would be the laughingstock of his peers and colleagues.

      Kudos to Nero and his attorney for turning the tables on Mosby and the whole witch hunt.

      No way was a judge going to play a jester even for the short term BLM kudos that would have been heaped upon him.

      To quote the late Antonin Scalia *“Understand that reason is paramount with judges and that overt appeal to their emotions is resented. The reason is rooted in the nature of what we typically think of as “jury argument” — a blatant appeal to sympathy or other emotions, as opposed to logical application of the law to facts. Before judges such an appeal should be avoided.”

      …. You are fortunate if the jude will attribute such misconduct to your ignorance rather than the vulnerability of your case”*

      Rule of thumb, never piss off a judge and never ever make a judge look like an unmitigated fool, especially in a highly publicized case.

      Liked by 5 people

    • MVW says:

      Intimidation of police by the social justice warriors is the intent. It does not matter to them if the case is won or not, police in America are now on notice.

      Liked by 5 people

      • lorac says:

        Hopefully once Trump takes over, the “higher ups” in police departments and DA’s office, etc, will feel backed up by Trump and not beholden to the BLM and Obama.

        Liked by 1 person

    • TexasDude says:

      The DA’s office and the police should have a good working relationship because they are on the same side. In Baltimore, it is obvious the DA’s office see the police as the problem.

      Liked by 3 people

  9. rumpole2 says:

    Good result…. and proper result from what I read of the trial.

    I dont know about riots? A lot of Safari Park animal activity on twitter and outside the court.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. JoJo says:

    Perhaps this judge is worthy of a place on Trump’s SCOTUS list? They don’t even have to be lawyers, much less “jurists” who graduated from Harvard, clerked for a SCOTUS, served as a federal judtge, etc., etc. In fact, IMO, we could use a few SC judges who have served on the front lines of justice and observed reality.

    Like

    • mickie says:

      Personally, I feel the ONLY reason this judge ruled this way is because he knew it would be overturned on appeal. Regarding SCOTUS, let Trump be Trump.

      Liked by 7 people

    • lovely says:

      No Williams is an activist judge. The law in this case was impossible for him to circumvent without being added to the malicious prosecution suit which is sure to be headed Mosby’s way.

      Liked by 5 people

      • mikeyboo says:

        I hope you are right about the malicious prosecution suit. Mosby deserves serious punishment.

        Liked by 3 people

        • lovely says:

          http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/malicious+prosecution

          Malicious Prosecution

          An action for damages brought by one against whom a civil suit or criminal proceeding has been unsuccessfully commenced without Probable Cause and for a purpose other than that of bringing the alleged offender to justice.

          Elements of Proof

          To win a suit for malicious prosecution, the plaintiff must prove four elements: (1) that the original case was terminated in favor of the plaintiff ✓, (2) that the defendant played an active role in the original case ✓ (3) that the defendant did not have probable cause or reasonable grounds to support the original case ✓ and (4) that the defendant initiated or continued the initial case with an improper purpose ✓ Each of these elements presents a challenge to the plaintiff ✓

          All depends on if Nero or any of the others choose to wage war.

          Like

      • Jason says:

        definitely, Judge has done a number of absurd things up till now. Only made the ruling he did because he knew he could be held accountable

        Liked by 1 person

    • mariner says:

      {JoJo}

      That’s a pretty low bar you have.

      Williams made several questionable rulings in the pre-trial phase; the fact that he actually reached a fair verdict is not enough IMO to consider him Supreme Court material.

      Liked by 4 people

    • mopar2016 says:

      No way JoJo.
      Get back.

      Like

    • mimbler says:

      This wasn’t a good judge. He made the correct ruling -only- because it was so obvious that he knew he’d lose on appeal otherwise
      Mike

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Lucille says:

    Thank you, Judge Williams! A rightful conclusion to the unjust arrest of Officer Nero.

    Liked by 4 people

  12. Erick Dee says:

    Mosby has that same look my ex-wife had when I whupped her in court.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. sundance says:

    Liked by 4 people

  14. coeurdaleneman says:

    CRS.

    That.

    Is.

    All.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Good. This prosecution was all political. May the rest follow.

    Like

  16. Concerned says:

    I’m predicting riots tonight because there are so many people like this stupid woman who don’t know any of the facts of the case and think Nero “murdered” Gray.

    Like

  17. stringy theory says:

    It’s ironic the BLM crowd today wants the same kind of kangaroo court “justice” against whites many blacks faced in years gone by.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Concerned says:

    There’s no excuse for this level of stupidity from an MD. If she were my physician I’d have to dump her for being an idiot. She’s a Green Party presidential candidate, btw.

    Liked by 3 people

  19. drartaud says:

    Well, on this issue I may part ways with many others. If this officer would have been convicted, that would have been a news story, not that he was acquitted. I suspect that his problems will linger on for years, and for the police department, and the insurers, and tax payers. For the ability to plead the Fifth Amendment in a Criminal Trial doesn’t exist in a Civil Trial, ergo an O.J. Simpson found innocent of the crime but deeply liable civilly for it.

    We are apotheosizing police and police dogs, and relativizing John and Jane Q. Public and their dogs.

    YouTube is filled with graphic examples of innocent people and their pets (at different times, of course) of being wrongfully shot by overzealous officers.

    http://www.thewire.com/national/2014/02/police-officers-who-shot-two-innocent-women-103-times-wont-be-fired/357771/

    http://www.policestateusa.com/2013/david-perdue/

    The video is a female officer fired for trying to stop her partner from strangling an arrested man. When she tried to stop him, the other officer punched her in the face, breaking dental work. They fired her, but later “retired” the aggressive officer after he tried to strangle another arrested man, and when his new partner tried to stop him, he also was punched. Not making good decisions there, I think.

    Good officers that look the other way when citizens are wronged by bad cops, are, in fact, bad cops themselves.

    Much much kudos for the 85%+ that honor the badge and their communities. Enough weirdness happened in this incident that they were almost assuredly looking for a cover story. I don’t know if they were directly involved in malicious injury.

    Best to all, please read the related links and watch the video before yelling at me. I’m frail 😉

    Like

    • Howie says:

      Take a walk… in Liberty City around midnight. Don’t forget to bring your wallet.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Concerned says:

        NO kidding! I invite drartaud to visit several wasteland ghettos in the Chicago area. Ride along with the cops who have to police there and see what they have to put up with. I know someone who lived in a bad neighborhood, the stuff he witnessed is stuff that most of us can’t even imagine.

        Liked by 2 people

        • drartaud says:

          Look up Pittsburgh, then Mount Oliver (in Pittsburgh), the French have warned their citizens to avoid my “borough”, we have our own police, fire department, mayor, but are located “in” Pittsburgh.

          https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/govbeat/wp/2013/11/14/16-american-cities-foreign-governments-warn-their-citizens-about/

          Constant shootings. My wife heard gun shots one day, asked me to turn on the police radio, turns out she heard someone being shot to death.

          Driving home one day, we passed an intersection. 5 minutes later, a man was shot in the head at the same place.

          In the same area, right after three men (elsewhere but not far away) were shot in the leg, a man was reported to be driving down the road, shooting through his open car window. The car came to a stop against the curb, the police arrived, apparently the guy had been headshot and was acting insensibly. He’s believed to be the person that shot the other 3.

          A young man, helped us with cutting the grass, was walking home on a Saturday afternoon. Within 5 minutes of him passing the local pizza store, and a man was shot to death in front of it.

          A woman, walking home from her job at McDonald’s, was shot and seriously wounded. She is white. They eventually caught the guy, he claimed he “just liked to shoot people”.

          Other than the white woman, all victims were black, all known assailants are black, and I’d bet the unknown ones are black too.

          (Some of these shootings occurred outside my borough, but all within 1.5 miles or less from my house).

          And if you want a real thrill, look up the pranks: Bait Phone, Bait Bicycle, and Bait Car. Prepare yourselves for a shock. People taking bicycles (with cables tied to them that stop the bike after it’s going fast, or electrified seats, or Air Bag seats), taking shock phones (when a button is pushed remotely) and breaking into cars and tearing through the glove compartment in full view of hidden cameras.

          The black community has serious, serious, problems to address before they start worrying about the mote in the eyes of whites.

          Liked by 4 people

          • drartaud says:

            This was my comment on another site today. We know crime only to well.

            Like

          • Howie says:

            There is a simple way to address these problems. Crack Down. Hard. Pacify the crime zones. Call in the armed national guard and quell the gangs. Grand juries and chain gangs. Strip them of their so called victimhood and instill discipline. Law and order over their “culture.’ Stop rewarding their failure and punishing any success. Make them work like the rest of us for their food, phones, and widescreen tv sets.

            Liked by 4 people

            • your tour guide says:

              Been there, have the T shirt. Been gone for 21 years, but the memories linger.
              Had a tenant, dated an Atlanta cop. Would keep me updated on what caliber bullets
              she’d heard the night before being fired off from next door. Worst section 8 complex in town. I was able to actually use 8 pages, single spaced of crime statistics to get my
              property assessement lowered. Had been over- assessed by 80 thousand.
              Knew the tenant was a keeper the day after she moved in. I was expecting to have to
              refund her deposit and put another ad in the paper after she witnessed a big black male, strung out on whatever, grabbing his girlfriend by the hair, and slamming her face into a
              Honda Civic car hood . Three cops were climbing all over him, trying to take him down,
              but he didn’t stop until her face was a bloody, unrecognizable pulp.The tenant stayed put.
              The situation we’d witnessed got me out of jury duty a few months later. A pretty boy
              white dude was on trial. When the judge introduced the people for the jury, I thought he
              was the attorney. He was accused of beating his girlfriend with a baseball bat. Hospitalized
              her. The judge heard my story about the beating, and how I thought that I’d want to fry the pretty boy bastard (who was making eye contact with all the female juror candidates.)
              He dismissed me.
              Anyway, I lived in a neat old home in crackville in the early 90s. 14 crack houses
              in a 1/2 square mile area. The female mayor of Washington DC at the time (forget her name) wanted the National Guard sent to DC to try to get the place under control. I was
              liberal at the time ( actually voted for Clinton for the first term). But I was sick to death of
              watching all the idiocy going down in my neighborhood. To the point that I was hoping that
              Clinton actually would send the National Guard into DC, just to make a statement. Naturally, he didn’t. Maybe I should thank the jerk, because I wrote him and liberalism off
              within the year. Haven’t looked back.

              Liked by 2 people

          • wondering999 says:

            And I will speculate how much of this adult crime begins in elementary school, where the adults in charge are not actually “in charge” but only passive witnesses to chronic abuse. Kids run around assaulting others, stealing their lunch money, intimidating the vulnerable, vandalizing, ganging up.

            http://www.wsj.com/articles/orderliness-in-schoolwhat-a-concept-1457998034

            The Success Academies in NYC recently filed a lawsuit to allow their schools to not-accommodate antisocial behavior. The Powers-That-Be want all schools to keep all kids enrolled regardless of how they affect the lives and bodies and upbringing of the other students, and the community in which they eventually reside as young oughta-be adults (whether socially competent, or not).

            Liked by 4 people

            • your tour guide says:

              We had a 10 year old named Rante in my old crack neighborhood. He was a one person crime wave. Was kicked out of all seven elementary schools in the city. Would actually act like the Don of the neighborhood. The little jerk bossed 14 year olds around,
              and they didn’t dare say anything back. His chief claim to fame was taking a gun off of a
              city cop in a nearby park.

              Like

              • jello333 says:

                Too young to “lock up and throw away the key”…. but definitely NOT too young for some real harsh boot camp type environment. A couple years in there, and I bet he’d be a totally changed kid.

                Like

              • wondering999 says:

                What a nightmare. Do you have any idea what became of him? Sooner or later he had to encounter someone meaner than him…

                Like

                • your tour guide says:

                  Nope. But I’m tearing up thinking about what I witnessed with the kids around me. I fenced in my back yard. 410 feet of 5 foot high chain link to keep the crack whores from cutting through. One of the kids from next door, was about 8. He helped me fill up 17 big trash bags full of litter, including soiled disposable diapers. He picked up a backpack, looked at me, and said “Somebody must have gotten raped back here.” From an EIGHT
                  YEAR OLD!! I told him that I was going to get a drink of water, went inside the house, and
                  bawled my eyes out. 10 was the cut off for how things went for the boys in the neighborhood. You could tell how they’d go from the walk. If they started the strut, then
                  they were lost for good.
                  I had one kid, about 6 tell me he wished that he was white. The only reason he said that
                  was that many of the kids in the neighborhood NEVER heard a kind word from an adult. Grandma, perhaps. Mom? No way. She was busy putting a section 8 roof over boyfriends head, so he could deal out on the stoop. One kid I wish that I could have kept track of. He
                  was a track athlete, and actually maintained a “C” average. Anything higher would have got him jumped. Mom was a prostitute. My opinion of her went up about 20 notches when I
                  saw her shut down a 8 person fight in the complex. She shamed all the other kids about what they were doing, and it wasn’t even her kid she was defending. Goodness comes out
                  of weird places sometimes.

                  Liked by 2 people

                • jello333 says:

                  Wow… thanks for that.

                  Liked by 1 person

        • mopar2016 says:

          I’ve lived in Chicagoland for more than 50 years.
          It’s a pretty disgusting area these days.
          In many neighborhoods if someone isn’t shot or stabbed daily, it just means that someone isn’t doing their job. I blame the dems for turning us into a ghetto.
          And the Republicans are culpable too.

          Liked by 1 person

          • jello333 says:

            What was it one of the “ear witnesses” said in the Mike Brown case? Something like, “I heard what sounded like gunshots, and I thought it’s too early in the day for that.” How sad that people have to live like this (and yeah, some CHOOSE to live like this)… that shootings are just a ho-hum occurrence.

            Liked by 1 person

            • your tour guide says:

              In Atlanta, ( and many other towns across the U.S.) there’s a dirty little secret. What you
              hear off in the distance, generally at night. Atlanta has LOTS of pricey neighborhoods that are adjacent to, or down the street from attractive, landscaped, rental crime scenes. So ,
              you might have a home in an older 3 or 4 hundred thousand dollar neighborhood, but still
              hear people emptying their clip at night. When I lived in my old hood, I initially thought that
              what I heard at night was confined to impoverished areas. We never had guests after night
              fall in my old neighborhood, knowing that they might hear the gunfire and not come back.
              And you( regrettably) do get jaded to it. My son was in his crib, about 8 months old.
              We heard:”Pop! Pop! Pop! POP POP!
              I looked at my wife “Is that what I think it is?”
              She said “I guess so.” So we got up, moved the crib away from the windows,
              and then sat down and watched TV. A few minutes later, what we had done hit me.
              I called the mayor, every city comissioner, and the chief of police up and tore them all
              a new one. I told them there was NO excuse for what was happening to continually occur,
              and they’d failed us by allowing it to continue. The area’s now better, but so many have gotten worse. NO EXCUSE.

              Liked by 2 people

    • Concerned says:

      drartuad, you can list as many of these stories as you wish. But the topic here today is the officer that Marilyn Mosby attempted to wrongfully convict.

      Liked by 2 people

      • drartaud says:

        If he’s not honestly innocent, she’s not honestly guilty. My point is that terribly abusive cops seldom are held accountable.

        Like

        • Concerned says:

          What you wrote is irrelevant. The facts of this particular case are such that this officer should have never been charged in the first place.

          Liked by 4 people

        • TrumpFanGirl says:

          So any cop will do?

          Liked by 1 person

        • jello333 says:

          “My point is that terribly abusive cops seldom are held accountable.”

          Mostly true. But what’s that got to do with THIS case?

          Liked by 1 person

          • drartaud says:

            Because, every case where cop is acquitted, it’s done with the same assurance of his innocence. Even with abusive cops. So how do we know if justice occurred, based on truth or our subjective desires. Once they more routinely prosecute bad cops I’ll be less cynical. I gave examples, they fired a cop for trying to stop another cop from strangling someone, and the guy they kept went on try to strangle somebody else. Sounds like they kept the bad cop.

            Like

            • jello333 says:

              In maybe the worst case I know of — the cold-blooded, premeditated murder of Kelly Thomas — the cops walked, and the BLMers were nowhere to be found. Of course Kelly was white, so that makes all the difference in the world.

              Liked by 2 people

            • mopar2016 says:

              Well drartaud, if you’re ever mugged or robbed. maybe you can call BLM and see if that works out for you.

              Like

            • Jett Black says:

              You’re being deliberately ignorant to shill for an irrelevant position. There’s plenty of video and third party, civilian testimony to prove that Nero did nothing whatsoever improper or causative of Freddie Gray’s death. Simple as that. Gray was uninjured when Nero and his partner turned him over to be transported. This case has nothing whatsoever to do with those you keep harping on. Learn the well documented facts of this case, including the radio log/public video/street cam timelines and the testimony of civilian witnesses at the arrest scene and Donta Allen, the detainee in the van at the same time as Gray. Until then, you are, in fact, just an ignorant tool.

              Like

        • mopar2016 says:

          How profound.
          Did you think that up on your own?

          Like

    • John Galt says:

      Translation: I don’t like this thread topic, so let me change the subject.

      Liked by 6 people

      • drartaud says:

        There’s no change in topic. Cops guilty of the most heinous acts are seldom held accountable.

        Like

        • Concerned says:

          And what does Officer Nero have to do with that? Should he be punished for the actions of others? Totally missing your point here.

          Liked by 1 person

          • drartaud says:

            All of the cases I cited, and tens of thousands of other ones, there’s always a belief by us that the cops are innocent. Often, but not always, they are. The three examples I gave were recklessness that their departments tried to say were justified.

            Like

        • lovely says:

          You are an ignorant, misguided, duped puppet.

          Reality is not as you think it is. Don’t bother listing an arms length list of awful police deeds as it will only further prove my point.

          This was and continues to be a malicious prosecution. Every liberty minded individual should be pissed off about this witch hunt. You for some reason are using it as a launching pad to malign police officers.

          An agenda not a well thought out divergence from an opinion it is simple mimicry of marching orders.

          Good luck with life.

          Liked by 3 people

          • drartaud says:

            If you’re reality is that fragile, I’ll refrain from challenging it. We do not have the information one way or another. Countless bad cops are acquitted. Are there any cops you think were ever guilty? Did you visit the links I provided. I’m betting no.

            Like

            • lovely says:

              You are far too indoctrinated to understand that the Mosby witch hunt has nothing to do with any other case.

              I doubt anyone is so misguided as to believe that there are no corrupt cops. Here is one for you Joe Gliniewicz. The existence of corrupt officers has zero to do with the malicious prosecution of good officers.

              You can remain ignorant and hateful or you can open your mind.

              Liked by 3 people

            • Howie says:

              Actually I used to care a lot. I was an advocate against wrongful convictions. That changed when I see what is going on with the Obama Administration, and what they tried to do to GZ. They are encouraging this bad behavior. Heads must be cracked. Pants off the ground. Civil behavior established. Gangs crushed and obliterated. It is coming.

              Liked by 2 people

            • The Boss says:

              Who you gonna call when some gang-banger breaks into your house to have his way with your wife? Get over yourself buddy.

              Liked by 2 people

              • drartaud says:

                I’d call Smith and Wesson, Colt, Ruger, the phone, and phoning the police, is the last thing I’d do. We’ve heard calls on the police radio with a man with a weapon in a store. A good cop offered to leave his district, but the Lieutenant said to return to his district, they’d get the call “after roll call”. A man I knew phoned me and said he was coming over to kill me. I locked the screen door, set the inner door to lock, and made another provision. If he tried to break through the screen door, I’d shut the inner door. If he tried to break through the inner door, I’d use my provision. The guy came and was gone nearly 15 minutes before the cop showed up. They investigate, seldom prevent.

                Liked by 1 person

                • emma says:

                  Thanks for that insight into your lifestyle.

                  I’m willing to bet that most posters at CTH don’t associate with people who end up calling them to threaten to come over and kill them.

                  When you lay down with dogs, drartaud, you inevitably get up with fleas.

                  Liked by 3 people

                • Howie says:

                  We do not tolerate this stuff around here and the citizens, The Sherrifs Office, ( we only have county sheriff ) all work together to stop the criminals. We and Leo’s have each others backs against the crooks.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • drartaud says:

                  Thank you for the most fortuitous example, I’m deeply indebted. You know nothing of my situation, but passed judgment based on superficial information, just like we mentally acquit or find guilty, these cops.

                  The man, dear lady, was my landlady’s son. I knew him, I never associated with him. He was angry over an issue with the house we rented. I don’t even remember the issue. So, you malign my character, another above said I was engaged in “hate”, I thought this was the Conservative Treehouse, not huffpo.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • jeans2nd says:

                  dra – I have read your comments here and elsewhere. Living equidistant between Cleveland and Pittsburgh and not too far from Y-town, I am able to observe all 3 cities from a safe distance. I understand and agree with your point. To me, the problem seems to be with this particular prosecutor. In her rush to judgement and overcharging all the officers, she effectively elimintaed any possibility of determining if, in fact, any of the officers had done anything wrong. Which brings to mind to Michelle Fields fiasco. The LEOs charged Lewandowski, but the prosecutor took the necessary time to determine if any wrongdoing had actually occurred. In Cleveland, the voters did not riot when the officers who shot Tamir Rice were not indicted. They primaried the prosecutor out of office. The novice Baltimore prosecutor has much to learn.

                  Liked by 2 people

                • drartaud says:

                  I agree, but too many bad cops are walking away from heinous crimes against citizens. I don’t know if these cops are guilty, but they were shown at an unscheduled stop playing around with something in the back of their van. They were very close to the station at the point of arrest but drove around like Japanese tourists rather than going directly there with a prisoner purportedly injuring himself in the van.

                  Best regards.

                  Like

            • mopar2016 says:

              Shouldn’t you be on huffy po?
              This is an adult site.

              Like

        • Crystal says:

          You’re painting with a broad brush here. During the pursuit of Gray, he allegedly jumped over a wall and down 15ft. to a tennis court below. He also entered an empty building during the pursuit where he might have ingested any drugs he was allegedly carrying. The other prisoner inside the van gave a written statement saying he thought Gray was deliberately trying to injure himself in the van. Also, if Gray had swallowed any drugs during the pursuit, he might have had a seizure in the van. We don’t know the results of the toxicology report. Additionally, Gray was known to fake injuries in order to be taken to the hospital rather than to jail.

          BTW, Mosby had directed the police to be ever more vigilant at the particular corner where Gray, who had over 20 arrests, was first spotted allegedly doing a drug deal. Mosby’s husband was running for reelection and that corner, known for frequent drug deals, fell within his jurisdiction.

          Liked by 3 people

          • rumpole2 says:

            Great points.
            Worth taking note of for the 5 trials to come.

            Like

          • rumpole2 says:

            In addition I have noted before….

            Small reality check
            1. IMO a cop SHOULD NOT get in the back of a cop van like that to put set-belt on a perp.. especially an agitated perp.
            (Does not apply here but that goes DOUBLE if there are more than 1 perp)
            IMO it should be a disciplinary offense if an officer is silly enough to do that.. he puts himself and the public at risk since a perp may well be able to get possession of his gun, taser etc.
            2. Freddie Gray did NOT die in the van.. he died days later in hospital. There was treatment at police station, a trip in ambulance and all manner of treatment at hospital which could have (with all best intentions in the world) been a factor in his death.

            Liked by 1 person

      • TexasDude says:

        Gotta minimize this by noting there are bad police. WTF?

        Bad doctors cut off wrong limbs, put their names on organs inside people, and enable drug addicts.

        In every effin’ profession, there are bad people.

        What the heck does that to do with this other than your anti police mentality?

        Liked by 1 person

    • TexasDude says:

      Get a grip.

      In every profession there are bad people, even ones who have your life blood literally on their hands like doctors.

      This post is not about police corruption or the like, but completely about police hate.

      Frail or not, but pissing on other people because of your own issues is disgusting.

      Like

    • jello333 says:

      OF COURSE there are bad cops out there, and I agree that otherwise “good” cops who cover for them are also bad. If you had been reading here for long, you’d know that almost nobody in the Treehouse believe that cops are always in the right. In fact we’ve strongly condemned and called for the prosecution of specific cops in specific instances several times. But that has nothing to do with the Freddie Gray case. In this one, it very much appears there WERE no “bad” cops… just a really stupid guy (Freddie) who caused tons of trouble for himself, 6 cops, and lots of others.

      Like

    • amwick says:

      Officer Kwiatkowski won two defamation suits: against Horne and then her attorney. There is much more to this old case than first meets the eye. http://www.amren.com/news/2011/12/ex-cop_makes_ca/ Boils down to she said, he said. http://www.buffalonews.com/city-region/buffalo/pridgen-seeks-facts-on-hornes-2008-firing-20140605

      Like

    • Yeppers says:

      My mother was hounded and chased and harassed by a cop in my hometown to the extent the F.B.I actually got involved. It was so ludicrous the cop was placed in a psych ward for an extended stay and later was convicted. Every single cop in my home town knew it was going on. And every single cop in my home town also wanted him gone. But they wouldn’t do anything about it. They wouldn’t testify against him. And not a single one would do anything to help my mother. I’ve long ago left that small town in Indiana and now reside in Tennessee. A long time friend of the family was a deputy for approx’ 12 years down here in this southern state. His main reason for finally quitting? (And I quote…) “Man…I’d sit there in court and watch those cops get on that stand and lie…and lie,…and lie… often in cases that had horrendous effects on people’s lives. I just couldn’t go along with it any more”. Soooo, having said all that and at the risk of sounding argumentative…I believe the person’s ‘85%’ estimate honoring the badge (stated a few paragraphs above) is a highly exaggerated estimate. In fact, it’s downright wrong. However to make sure everyone here knows where I stand… I do not believe the cops mentioned in this article are guilty of what they are being accused of.

      Like

    • Yeppers says:

      I have to ask, just HOW creative did the police department have to get in order justify terminating this woman? And may I ask what it was exactly?

      Like

  20. Big Jake says:

    I hope the judge has bomb-proof underwear. They’re gonna be after him.

    It takes big brass ones to stand up to a mob. Good on him.

    Liked by 1 person

    • mopar2016 says:

      The judge knows full well that this witch hunt would be overturned on appeal.
      That’s the only reason that he did the right thing in my opinion.
      I hardly think that he’s a hero.

      Like

  21. Hollywood, mainstream media, and entertainment literally promotes violence, anarchy, and rebellion has been doing so along with public school systems for the last 40 yrs. This has created a criminal population or an “anarchist culture” in USA today. This “extreme culture” is now your doctors, lawyers, politicians, businessmen & women of today. What does this have to do with this case? EVERYTHING!

    Liked by 1 person

  22. scott says:

    What will be interesting is the next trial. It is of one of the black officers. If he gets convicted, you know there will be trouble because the black cop was found guilty. Question to me is: Will the Baltimore DA got after him to get a conviction knowing it will look bad if the black cops gets convicted, or will she drop the charges on him and the rest so the black cops don’t get “railroaded” while the white cops remain free? She is now between a rock and a hard place of her own making. My money is that she will drop the charges saying that the first two trials show that she cannot get a conviction.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. tappin52 says:

    It is a sad day when a court renders the correct verdict and I feel suspicious about the reason why. These officers should have never been in this position. I am relieved at this particular outcome, but I do not trust that the decision was made from a position of truth and justice. The political posturing from those in office makes me suspicious. They did not all of a sudden become ethical defenders of the American way.

    Like

  24. Mosby, the infantile waste of oxygen that she is, could not even show up for the verdict.

    Liked by 2 people

  25. Joe's Dad says:

    Can’t wait til Trump gets in and law & order is subsequently restored, putting an end to Obasturd’s racial bullsh!t upheaval America

    Liked by 2 people

    • Howie says:

      The second he runs out his law and order message he locks it up. All the honest people are tired of the victimization of crooks, perverts and malcontents.

      Like

  26. v4ni11ista says:

    In Baltimore there stands a tree against the grievance industry.
    The little boys of B-more town, they come with sticks to burn it down.
    But Circuit Court Judge Barry Williams could see that Nero didn’t kill him.
    Still, Mosby runs from case to case, with her Mussolini face
    and shreds away that Thin Blue Line, left to fight back all the crime
    that Democrats and Liberals master with their socialist disasters.
    Why is it that Baltimore leaders can’t find someone who wasn’t committing a crime
    when their own Police, at the mayor’s behest, trying to clean up the drug dealers nests,
    get stuck with a nut who’ll break his own head from thrashing about and then wind up dead?

    Like

  27. Howie says:

    The criminals in Baltimore are hoping to get a lynching of one of the other four unfortunate cops. An investigation of Mosby is in order. A full on all out investigation by the new Trump DOJ in January with a Federal Grand Jury. All DOJ attorneys should be fired on the spot and replaced. No holds barred and no rock unturned.

    Liked by 2 people

  28. MzMaryMac says:

    I would so love to know what the vote was on the first hung jury!

    Like

  29. MzMaryMac says:

    I hope that when Trump gets elected he shuts all of this down once and for all. I’m just so tired of all of this race baiting going on. I am white, but my daughter, who is adopted, is black. She has no problems whatsoever in her community with any of her friends, most of whom are white. But when she keeps seeing this kind of stuff going on, I am afraid of the message that society is sending her – that’s she’s a victim, that white people hate black people, that white people have more privilege over her. I am lucky that she herself feels privileged enough to spend a lot of her time giving back to the community.

    Liked by 2 people

  30. watcher says:

    Seen DeRay being interviewed on cnn this afternoon. Wasn’t listening so don’t know what hate he was talking about.
    The msn are probably all rooting for riots.

    Like

    • John Galt says:

      “Wasn’t listening so don’t know what hate he was talking about.”

      DeRay finished 6th in the mayor’s election, nobody was listening.

      Liked by 1 person

  31. freddy says:

    radical black activists the mayor, Mosby and Loretta, practicing the worst form of racism in America where they try to destroy men’s lives for a political agenda regardless of the facts. This is pure racist behavior and In America today no room for people like these. They need to be punished for hate crime and false arrest… They knew the charges were bogus……….

    Liked by 3 people

  32. so what happens to the $6.4 MILLION DOLLARS baltimore gave to the
    guilty drug dealer’s family???

    Liked by 2 people

  33. John says:

    I know this young man and his family and I can honestly say that he is the most caring person I have ever met. He is the farthest thing from a racist and someone that doesn’t care. Quite the opposite in fact. He loved Baltimore and the area he was working. He loved the people in that area. He hated seeing the unrest in his district. He was heartbroken by that. He was thrown under the bus and he came out of this stronger. A lot of people came to his defense and helped the family. I can not tell you how many people he had in his corner. He truly is one of the good guys and will always be. God speed Ed!! The future is yours now.

    Liked by 10 people

  34. VegasGuy says:

    The prosecution did not meet its’ burden of proving all the elements of all the charges….Piss poor prosecuting considering Williams was able to apply existing Law & shoot down every point of their prosecution.

    She went after these Officers with the BLM, and the general Black notion, that…”Freddie Gray was disrespected by the Police….”

    Basically, Mosbys’ theory that “somebody gotta pay….” certainly wasn’t supported by case Law or their presentation of evidence in the trial. Williams made that abundantly clear.

    As the late J, Cochran would probably say…”If the Law don’t fit, you must acquit….” Nothing in their presentation even supported the charges.

    Going with a bench trial was the right move. No emotions, no feelings, no juror with a …”my Bro was once dissed by the Polzee” BS. Just the Law & its application,cut & dry, element by element.

    “I heard your cry for Justice…” she proclaimed to the masses. Williams response….”I heard your inability to apply the Law…”

    Williams should look into malicious prosecution of her & her office, with such a pitiful presentation of a case that was never actually a case.

    Like

  35. Backspin says:

    Re-Alert : Baltimore City , Eldorado & Wabash , shots fired by #1 male from a red and white dirt bike. 1 wounded now @ Saiani . Possible second injured.

    Like

  36. rumpole2 says:

    The IGNORANT Masses…..
    “The Jury got it wrong”
    This much ignorance, coupled with low IQ can not be fixed…. Build a wall around Baltimore.

    https://twitter.com/RAWilcox_/status/734879742600577026

    Like

  37. benzy says:

    I was troubled by the “man in the street” interviews following the verdict. Among them was an interview with a BLM advocate who said, “I don’t care WHAT the charges are, he should have been found guilty”. I find it just stunning that people can make decisions in their life (and the lives of others) with NO information, not even a mild interest in finding out what happened, who did what or why. They just want revenge for something that wasn’t even done to THEM or anyone they know. (That is assuming it was something that was done TO Freddie Grey)

    Liked by 2 people

    • John Galt says:

      The state presented less than nothing: they immunized a witness and compelled testimony which exonerated the defendant. Unbelievable.

      Like

    • Monroe says:

      From the “transcript”:

      “The state concedes that pursuant to Wardlaw and Terry, that Miller had a right to stop Mr. Gray”

      Does this mean that the officers had the legal right to pursue, detain, and arrest Gray? If yes, then does that mean that some charges will be tossed out on the other officers?

      Liked by 1 person

      • John Galt says:

        It’s a problem. Three white bicycle cops: Brian Rice (white) made eye contact with Freddie. Freddie fled. Officer Rice pursued on bicycle. Garrett E. Miller (white) arrested Freddie after finding illegal knife. Edward M. Nero (white) acquitted.

        If the pursuit, detention and arrest were legal, then we seem to be all out of potentially culpable white defendants.

        Like

        • jello333 says:

          Yep. Like I said in another comment, the rioters, sorry, the protesters, are gonna have a dilemma on their hands if it comes down to only black defendants.

          Like

  38. yakmaster2 says:

    Surprise, surprise. Mosby’s creative prosecution is only brilliant in her and her syncophants’ minds own minds. Can’t you just hear them talking now about how “that Judge don’t know nuthin’ bout the Law!”
    I doubt Mosby et al ever considered case law when drafting the charges against these Police Officers—more like they looked up statutes and creatively bent circumstances to come up with violations. This woman and her minions need to be disbarred for practicing law without intelligence!

    Like

  39. TheLastConservative says:

    Great. Now if the idiot mayor gets put on trial everything will work out.

    🙂

    Like

  40. MouseTheLuckyDog says:

    I think it is finished now and Mosby will driop the rest. A lot of what the judge says shows that the white officers will be exonerated. I don’t think she wants to be seen convicting only the black officers.

    To paraphrase sundance. Marilyn it’s time to dance!
    http://www.trbimg.com/img-556cc6a4/turbine/bal-video-mosbys-dancing-at-universoul-circus-20150601/1050/1050×591

    Like

    • MouseTheLuckyDog says:

      Shoot! I forgot how to embed an image.

      Like

      • rumpole2 says:

        You need a location (url) ending in .jpg .gif etc.
        That location is a strange one… best I can do is save it and post my copy for you.

        Like

        • jello333 says:

          Just realize the power that person has. Forget about the Freddie Gray case… but just in general, the power a D.A. has. They literally hold the lives of people in their hands. They quite literally can decide whether or not to try to put a person in prison for the rest of their life… or even to KILL that person. Now look at that picture. Imagine you’re the person with that kind of power… and yet you’re comfortable going out in public and acting like THAT? Takes a very, very sick amoral person to do that.

          Like

  41. MouseTheLuckyDog says:
  42. rumpole2 says:

    No rioting?
    These 2016 pussies are not a patch on the 2015 crowd!!
    Back in 2014/2015 …. stream kids ruled.. Pepper spray be damned!!!

    Like

  43. DAVID PIERCY says:

    Deray McKesson appear on Megyn Kelly tonight regarding the Nero veridct. Megyn asked Deray over and over what Nero did wrong that should have resulted in a convicting and Deray refused to answer.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Concerned says:

      You aren’t kidding! How much more plainly can she speak? “What did the officer do?” Do-rag refuses to answer.

      Like

  44. Concerned says:

    National Review (not our favorite source!) published a harsh condemnation of Mosby: http://www.nationalreview.com/article/435759/freddie-gray-verdict-just-marilyn-mosby-conduct-shameful Last paragraph:

    Will this latest embarrassment finally induce Marilyn Mosby to pull the plug on this shameful prosecution? Freddy Gray’s death was a tragedy. So is the death of due process in a great American city.

    Like

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