British Spy Agency MI6 Pulls Agents From Hostile Countries After Russia/China Decode Snowden’s Encrypted Files…

It has recently been reported that a Russian computer geek was able to crack the encryption code used by Edward Snowden to protect his massive cache’ of U.S. NSA files.  According to reports both Russia and China had been working for a long time to break the encryption and discover the full scope of the data Snowden removed from the NSA downloads.

edward-snowden(Via Daily Mail) MI6 has pulled its spies out of ‘hostile countries’ and America’s intelligence agencies are on high alert after Russia and China cracked encrypted files leaked by fugitive whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The top-secret documents contain information that could lead to the identification of British and American spies, according to senior officials in Downing Street, the Home Office and the security services.

A senior Home Office official accused Snowden – the former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor responsible for the biggest confidential information leak in US history – of having ‘blood on his hands’ after they gained access to over one million files.

Security services have reported increasing difficulties in tracking terrorists and dangerous criminals via email, chat rooms and social media since he exposed Western intelligence-gathering methods, the Sunday Times reports.

Now aides in British Prime Minister David Cameron’s office have confirmed the top-secret material is now in the hands of spy chiefs in Moscow and Beijing.

A senior Downing Street source told the Sunday Times: ‘It is the case that Russians and Chinese have information.

‘It has meant agents have had to be moved and that knowledge of how we operate has stopped us getting vital information.’

A British intelligence source added: ‘Snowden has done incalculable damage. In some cases the agencies have been forced to intervene and lift their agents from operations to prevent them from being identified and killed.  (read more)

It might sound weird to bring a John Oliver video into this discussion. However, Oliver does something rather necessary in his April 2015 show regarding the Snowden NSA revelations – he reaches an audience that doesn’t spend time educating themselves of the inherent issues at hand.

Oliver hosted this discussion in April and includes an interview with Edward Snowden. Again, don’t get hung up on the locker room humor, unfortunately in these type of presentations it is entirely needed to bridge the gap between a disconnected and apathetic electorate, and an issue of profound significance.

Oliver lays out the backstory, then the Snowden interview segment begins at 14:00:

*side note* if you doubt the effectiveness of the Oliver approach, consider this video was seen via u-tube by 7.2 million people.  Andrew Breitbart understood the value of, and importance of, this type of pop-culture message delivery.
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This entry was posted in Big Stupid Government, Conspiracy ?, Cultural Marxism, NSA, propaganda, Spying, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

58 Responses to British Spy Agency MI6 Pulls Agents From Hostile Countries After Russia/China Decode Snowden’s Encrypted Files…

  1. kpm58 says:

    This creates a huge problem of who may be compromised and manipulated.
    I hope there are some good people in the government who have already been working on this potential problem.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. BobNoxious says:

    Snowden is such a little weasel. And of course, the overgrown 3 year old Glenn Greenwald was throwing the biggest temper tantrum on Twitter b/c someone dared to question Saint Snowden.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I have always thought that Snowden was nuclear-level cocky, for thinking he could take data into the arms of the Chinese and Russians, and they could not hack it out of him.

      He was like a lab rat, living in Russia’s lab, where surveillance of the animals is not so gentle. To get the data, they only had to turn their powers – all their analytics – all their geniuses – all their computers – on one person. Once they got a copy of the data – wherever in the world they did that – all they had to do was study a single person long enough and carefully enough, to lower the time-to-decrypt from millions of years to 4 or 5.

      Snowden thought he was better than an entire intelligence agency. This is the fitting proof that no such thing is possible.

      Like

      • RoyBaty says:

        Snowden feels that our intel agencies are the enemy. He hasn’t seen what the Chinese and Russians would do with a traitor. Maybe now he will.

        Liked by 1 person

        • He was expendable from the moment they decrypted a single key. I’m sure that keeping him comfy and protected hid the decryption event, so doing whatever he wanted was a priority. Not out of need for anything but deception.

          There is no longer any need for deception, unless they can lull the West back into thinking it’s not all decrypted. I would not fall for it for a second.

          I hope that we got this understanding in a smart way. If MI6 pulled back people, I have no doubt about that.

          Like

  3. Did the President get any golf in today? I’m sure it was golf weather somewhere.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. bertdilbert says:

    If they use the IRS they will use the NSA. If the average American knew that this could affect whom they were able to vote for they might pay attention. The average American is clueless or does not care.

    Liked by 4 people

    • czarowniczy says:

      Or all of the above

      Liked by 3 people

      • bertdilbert says:

        The US could have chosen to give Snowden immunity and regained the files if they were that important. Instead they took the other approach and now blame Snowden for letting the information fall into the Russian’s hands. Spin Spin Spin.

        Liked by 3 people

        • czarowniczy says:

          First off, the Chinese and Russians had access to those files, I guarantee you, or they’d have tossed Snowden out with the garbage. Why risk US relations when they couldn’t be sure they had the data and what it was worth? I’m betting Snowden thought he was James Bond and let them have a taste of the encrypted files and they, with or without his permission, got a download of the encrypted database. I’m betting he thought his super good secret decoder ring crap would stymie them. The Russians had codes we intercepted during WW II that we STILL haven’t broken and the Chinese have more code breakers than we have code makers – they also could be credited with inventing encryption.
          I believe the US knew that Snowden had gotten scared, perhaps, the expert spy wranglers in China and Russia managed to get him to spill the encrypted beans for a guarantee that they wouldn’t throw him to the wolves – Snowden may be a somewhat competent T geek but he sure a shell ain’t no spook. You camn be sure the FBI and CIA profilers were doing as much of a mental picture of him as they could to be part of their damage control plan and most likely didn’t see him as stable enough to resist the pros.

          Liked by 2 people

          • nyetneetot says:

            Our encryption has been hobbled since the mid 90’s by the NSA, so I never had a drought the information was gone. And I absolutely agree the information was something foreign agents had previous access to. It was the US public and perhaps less technically savvy entities that didn’t know.

            Liked by 1 person

          • bertdilbert says:

            Yeah but by the same token I can say “I’ll bet Obama hates the USA and knew if the DOJ prosecuted him from the outset, that the info would fall into the hands of Russia and China. I’ll even bet ValJar assured Obama it was the right thing to do as Iran would likely benefit.”

            Who ya gonna believe? Snowden has better credibility than Obama.

            Liked by 2 people

            • czarowniczy says:

              When you have a nest of snakes it ain’t a matter of which one will bite you but who’ll be first. I can’t remember a more evil group in one place, this Administration’s Old Testament bad.

              Like

  5. czarowniczy says:

    Every know and then our agency(s) lose some case data through a stupid mistake – think back to Hezz kidnapping William Buckley in Beirut in ’84, that screwed a lotta intel pooches in the Mideast. Then we have the Cubans ALLEGED ability to smuggle intel resources inside of CIA/MI-6 South/Central American ops that ALLEGEDLY really did major damages there.
    Every now and then we just really get blind sided as we generally take the turncoats, if we get them, and kid-glove them. Soviets had a far harsher methods for dealing with them, generally revolved around their being killed in a rather gruesome manner and their families spending time in places that would make US projects look like paradise. We are too civilized to do that so we make them sign papers that they’ll get a term in Club Fed and lose their book/movie rights if they get caught.
    In this case I’m betting Snowden’s got the idea that he’s gonna have to get used to really warm winter clothes and vodka as there are people other than squishy US intel folks who’d really like to see him turned into a living lampshade. He was a lightweight who was and still is in this waaaaaaay out of his depth.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Col.(R) Ken says:

      Czar, something about this whole deal just smells. Snowden couldn’t turn a computer on let alone write code. This may be a NSA plant, and what he released, was old stuff gin up with enough truth around the edges to make it passable. MI6 has had its share of insiders, and to bring assets home fast, well this was probably done 5-8 months ago. Granted this subject is NOT in my lane, been around some of the people, knowing this: they don’t take a s$it without prior planning.

      Liked by 1 person

      • czarowniczy says:

        I know that contractors have access to things that analysts don’t. EG: contract IT puke at my old facility didn’t officially have access to the intel data BUT did have access to user ID and password system. If he wanted he could have gone in and change the password of someone who, le’st say, was away for a few weeks, use the new password (he’d know the user ID) to access the system, grab what he needed and when the analyst came back – whoopsies’ his password wouldn’t work. Analyst would go to the contractor and say his password didn’t work – contractor could just say that it expired or there was a systems glitch that caused some to go south, whatever, and give the analyst a new password. No one would be the wiser.
        Contractors like Snowden don’t need to know what, they just pop that illegal thumb drive in and vacuum up everything they can. Snowden could also, at system level, just browse categories of interest, pick out a cabinet of files and download away. If he got into the really secret area of HCS human intel that IDs agents, he could just vacuum pout a given area and winnow at will. No one knows (or aren’t telling) how many times he loaded a drive and dumped it into his private library. He doesn’t have to be a genius, if he gets stuck he could ask a co-contractor for help as most don’t know/care what the other guy’s doing.

        Liked by 1 person

        • manickernel says:

          So the Russians/Chinese had this all along, finally decrypted it, and graciously advised us of same. That, at least, is how it seems to be reported.

          I would think if this information had been removed, then encrypted or not, western nations would have already moved to protect any threatened assets.

          I agree with what has already been said, Snowden smells like a plant. Of course the Russians know that, so acting on any of his information is tricky until they can verify it. All the so-called revelations about NSA snooping that came out were an open secret, he just shone a light on it.

          Liked by 2 people

          • I’m starting to think that the whole thing is above the plant level. There is one side that truly benefits here – the “global” side. When nations don’t have manageable secrets, they might as well be part of the same team. I think the communists are trying to get us to a point where America as a nation per se is unsustainable. If things are exposed beyond a certain point, nothing can be kept secret. Obama wrings his hands like a soap opera actor, but the fact is, Snowden is just a part of the radical transformation he desires. It used to be that we had a world-class system of secrets and Cuba was the dopey country with idiot codes by short-wave radio operators. No reason the commies can’t flip that, with one of their own in charge of the US.

            Like

  6. moogey says:

    It is announced at the beginning of the week that our Government computer systems have been in the process of being hacked for at least a year. Today, foreign spies are being pulled out due to possible compromise. And this is being laid at the feet of a man who hacked files years ago, but just as a coinky dink, those files were finally broken into this very same week?

    Liked by 2 people

    • czarowniczy says:

      If security mistakes in WH IT uses led to or in any way assisted the OPM hackers we’ll never hear about it. They aren’t sure when the hack began and haven’t even told the Senators how much and what kinds of data were stolen. Just assume that some Chinese analyst knows all about those embarrassing little medical tests you may have had and what your bosses thought about you in your last few performance reports.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Col.(R) Ken says:

        Oh No! Not that report where I had too much alcohol in my blood system! Then there’s that Physo report: I like Girls! I like spending time with girls, not with men! Hey Chi-Coms, give me a call, “I’m right here, let’s dance”.

        Liked by 4 people

      • They had to have helped. They were a stepping stone. Once they had all of ValJar’s “private” work-related emails, they could fake requests to the right people, get what they needed, and move on.

        Obama didn’t have to leave down the main gate to the fort. Just a “whoops” – door ajar – on the servants’ entrance.

        Liked by 1 person

        • czarowniczy says:

          Just like the Clintons the Obamas believe they are above the plebeian law, procedures and rules are made for the inferiors they rule over. At the end of his 8 year tenure a lot of Bill’s WH cronies still hadn’t had their security clearances processed so we didn’t even have the foggiest idea of their backgrounds or abilities to access the secure information Americans died to gather. Nor do we have any idea if what they privately profited from of left with. Who knows what the current plague will take or what they’ll do with it.

          Liked by 2 people

    • chiavarm says:

      You are exactly on point. Just like the Brits in WWII. When they broke the Enigma code, they would still send a recon plane to “spot” the ships in the Mediterranean, so the Germans would think that it was the plane that spotted them. They did not want the Germans to know that the Enigma was compromised.

      Liked by 3 people

    • BobNoxious says:

      I was just thinking the same thing … Mighty strange coincidence.

      Liked by 1 person

    • JoeyP says:

      Excellent point. And the Snowden leak was the government’s fault anyway. It all traces back to their extreme incompetence regardless of how they have their media minions spin it.

      Like

    • OP says:

      I agree with you…they are using Snowden as their patsy….BITH SIDES!

      China has been caught hacking the government systems for years…but they say…no we haven’t…but they do and say things that indicate…they have.

      How convenient…Chinese can say…we got this from Snowden…he’s the thief, the rat.

      Then the other side is…the USA knows that they left a gaping hole open for years, the computer systems have been a sieve…EVERYONE has been looking in, grabbing info…

      How convenient….Obama can say…it’s all Snowdens fault..he gave away the info….

      I think the Chinese recent hack…is the data dump that they are “acting upon”…not Snowden’s data.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Eskyman says:

    Maybe I’m in the minority on this one- but I reckon Snowdon did the right thing by whistleblowing what the NSA & all the other shadowy secret snoops are up to, and how it is unConstitutional, and how they are collecting information on everyone, most definitely including you and me.

    He did that knowing that he would very possibly die, or be hunted; exiled forever from his native land.

    My hat’s off to him, and I wish we had more heroes like him.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Aslan's Girl says:

      I’m inclined to agree with you. I’m glad we found out about the NSA. VERY glad.

      Liked by 1 person

    • BobNoxious says:

      Had Snowden only leaked the Verizon warrant and similar type info that clearly dealt w/ US citizens inside the U.S. & 4th Amendment issues then i think more people would be open to considering him a “whistleblower” worthy of protection. Or, had he leaked this info and been willing to stay in the U.S. to face the music.

      However, everything else he leaked relates to foreign surveillance programs, used on foreign targets overseas. And he ran to China then Russia to avoid extradition- anyone of the first things he leaked after the Verizon warrant, while in Hong Kong-China, was info about a foreign spy program that targets the Chinese… Mighty strange timing.

      People like Greenwald intentionally conflate capability/capacity to do [XYZ] w/ actually doing [XYZ] and act like spying on foreign powers/ enemies is somehow evil. That’s absurd, IMO. The idea that we can all be citizens of the world in some utopia is a pure fantasy.

      Obviously you’re entitled to your opinion and we’ll just disagree on this issue, but I see Snowden as a coward and a traitor.

      Liked by 1 person

      • To me, he’s both. He violated a promise, and in the process caused major instability in the world. Discernment tells us that rules exist for a reason. He certainly did not obey the spirit of the law by what he did, and his methodology will prove to have disastrous side effects. So I cannot condone what he did, even though I personally benefitted.

        How did I benefit? I’m damn glad that he turned me from a paranoid to a wise guy in the period of a few weeks. As every one of my paranoias and person-space conspiracy theories was revealed to be factual, I realized that my tin-foil hat was gold – that it was not me being crazy but my own countrymen being liars – etc., etc. However, I’ve been a bit forgiving about that, as I’ve come to understand the treason that is Barack Obama. The Chinese and the Russians have been up to the same stuff, and have been even more nasty in harming the nation around me. Just because communism “fell” and turned into Putinism in Russia and Party Oligarchy in China, doesn’t mean these countries have good intentions toward us. All the Soviet shenanigans are still extracting a terrible price, the reward of which, Putin gladly reaps. Even the worsened race relations in the United States right now are ultimately a Russian doing, and there are days I would cheer for a nuke going off over Moscow, my hatred of what they’ve done is so bad. I would only hope that Obama was tied to it, a present returned to sender.

        Like

        • smiley says:

          great comment.
          I agree with you.
          I still wonder how he got security clearance, to begin with.
          he’s a strong advocate against gov’t intrusion, and for internet freedom….and as a whistleblower, he opened people’s eyes about all that, he exposed it…
          but he violated rules in the process, which makes it very controversial.
          I have to question the timing of this now…. a scapegoat.

          Liked by 1 person

    • John Galt says:

      The problem with the Snowden as whistleblower / hero theory is that Snowden didn’t reveal anything new.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Room_641A

      Liked by 1 person

  8. seabrznsun says:

    I’m not too inclined to believe Snowden is the real bad guy in all this. After all, our own government has placed many enemy aligned persons in some very high level and high security positions. And our own government has armed the enemies of the U.S. We’re just expendable pawn in their power games. That old saying comes to mind here. Power corrupts, absolute power absolutely corrupts. The worst part of this would seem to be the exposure of active undercover agents. I suspect the rest is pretty much already known.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. jello333 says:

    I admire Snowden for his courage… but I think he’s WAY too overconfident in some ways.

    Liked by 2 people

    • That overconfidence could be even more than we realize. Many believe that he had some kind of “dead-man switch” to protect himself – basically disaster-level information that would keep him more valuable alive than otherwise. I have my own theories about what that information could be. At least one of those theories has global consequences of an unknown effect. A single person should not make such decisions. If he did cut such information loose of his own accord – information that many people worked very hard to keep bottled up – then he was extremely overconfident to think that his one-person scheme would be safer than the bottle constructed by tens of thousands of very smart people. He may have thought he was adequately protecting his “special” information, but he let the genie out of the bottle the moment he opened it on the sly.

      And then there are the complications that involve potentially intentional release of that information. Who knows. But the whole point is that NSA spying on Americans is probably the tail, and he let loose the whole dog. That may be overconfidence to the point of stupidity.

      Liked by 1 person

      • jello333 says:

        Yep, and naivete. Snowden was (as far as we know) pretty much on his own, so if he’s the real deal, he’s just… wow, Hollywood couldn’t write it. Even Julian Assange, who has the whole Wikileaks apparatus (and many thousands of people) willing to help him out, even he knew he could never been 100% safe… even with his encrypted “insurance file” that he distributed a few years ago. (I guess it doesn’t hurt to admit I have a copy of it, seeing how the PTB no doubt already know that, know my real name and address, etc, etc. 😉 )

        Liked by 3 people

        • Interesting era we live in. All those encrypted files will inevitably open if civilization manages to hold together long enough for the inevitably better decryption to come. The rate, relative to everything else, is the only question. I can certainly see the allure of the “no secrets, no hiding” POV. The problem to me lies more in the use of selective truth to sell one interpretation of facts over the other. CTH is basically the minority report when that happens. Big powers try to sell the prejudiced viewpoint of convenient pre-belief – white cop bad, black teen good – no matter what the facts are, close up. Places like this are an error check. As a programmer, I appreciate that! 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

          • jello333 says:

            I’ve said before… the Treehouse and my friends here kinda help me stay SANE*. 😉

            (* more or less)

            Liked by 1 person

            • Truth is one of the few grab-handles on the universe that can steady us on this bumpy ride. I appreciate immensely having a place where * truth is valued above all else, and we admit that we all see the totality a bit differently, but facts are facts, and remain sacred, unanswerable to ideologies. That is a sane view of the world, IMO.

              Liked by 2 people

    • Be Ge says:

      Good intentions pave the road to hell.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Jane Harris says:

    I think maybe what worries me the most about this video is the lack of knowledge that people seem to have about who Edwin Snowden is…..and what he did…. and why he said he did it….
    Oh well…maybe I shouldn’t worry so much…..it’s not going to do any good…..

    Like

  11. nyetneetot says:

    “Whale tears” SMH

    Like

  12. archer52 says:

    Snowden is a scapegoat. our intel knows their intel knows our intel. It’s a game. They are winning because they want to. Our feds like the cool job, great perks and want a promotion.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. Sharon says:

    He’s very good at giving earnest answers, while smiling, to questions with devastating import.

    Perhaps he has a future as Josh Earnest’s replacement.

    Like

  14. Dave leary says:

    If it really was ‘breaking news” that Russia and China have decoded Snowden’s material, why & how would this become public knowledge right now? And, how could our agencies be so incompetent as to think that the material would not fall into enemy hands? Plus, are the Russians and Chinese really that friendly that they would either share access to the same material at the same time, or are we supposed to believe that was just a lucky accident?

    The very second they knew what Snowden took, they presumed that the Russians and Chinese would read it all in very short order, and started taking steps to mitigate the damage.

    Anything we, the public, are reading is what the CIA wants to tell Russia and China.

    We do not really know anything for sure…

    Liked by 1 person

  15. John Galt says:

    What we need is the list of enemy spies working in the USA. Obama, Clintons, Boehner . . . .

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Will says:

    I’ve long had a hard time believing Snowden isn’t right where “they” want him. Perhaps it is what it’s reported to be, but I only grow more cynical as this hideous chapter of American history goes on. Bergdahl, Manning, Rodman going to North Korea…

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Eskyman says:

    Great comments from all, that’s part of why I love the Treehouse!

    After reading through all the above, I still stand by my original comment. Snowden knowingly gave up his life (which was a very well paid and comfortable one) to blow the whistle on the NSA and other shadowy creepazoids, and for that reason I consider him a hero. He could have done what countless bureaucrats in gov’t do: ignored it, and gone right on helping out the would-be lords over us serfs, regardless of whether they do good or ill, and not caring. Another Lois Lerner-type, trading blackmail for advancement.

    Or maybe it’s just that I do NOT BELIEVE a single word that our government spokespersons direct toward us peons, nor a single word from any Main-Stream Media person. For me, the “news” is what the talking heads are not talking about.

    When a real person dares to break out of the mold, I support them until it’s proven to me that they did it for nefarious reasons. So far all I’ve seen are slanted articles, slanted from very different angles; it hasn’t been easy to determine what the actual underlying truth of the matter is. But:

    Before Snowden, I had no proof my sneakin’ Goobermint was spying on me. After Snowden, I have that proof; the truth was out, and couldn’t be denied any more.

    [Full disclosure: I don’t believe in Glowball Warmening either; so you may want to disregard everything I’ve got to say! ‘-) ]

    Liked by 3 people

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