Governor Brown: “Californians Will Be Heavily Fined For Long Showers”…

(Via Breitbart) Sunday on ABC’s “This Week,” Gov. Jerry Brown (D-CA) said Californians will face heavy fines for taking long showers.

Brown said, “This executive order is done under emergency power. It has the force of law. Very unusual. It’s requiring action and changes in behavior from the Oregon border all the way to the Mexican border. It affects lawns. It affects people’s — how long they stay in the shower. How businesses use water.” (more)

“Some people have a right to more water than others”…

Long version

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102 Responses to Governor Brown: “Californians Will Be Heavily Fined For Long Showers”…

  1. auscitizenmom says:

    Yeah, go ahead bimbo, and cut off the water to farmers. People don’t need to eat.

    Liked by 3 people

    • MaryfromMarin says:

      They’ve already done that here, aus. Driving in many parts of the Central Valley is painful. Vast orchards of completely dead trees, toppled over, which once yielded fruit for the country.

      Liked by 3 people

      • PatriotUSA says:

        I have friends in San Carlos and friends in Fresno. Places in the Central valley look as if they have been bombed, and they have. Bombed by too many years of liberal greed, progressive laws and regulations that have ruined and affected all of California. It is most apparent to me in the Central valley and the delta region. Tragic and who needs food grown in our own country, right.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Roy says:

        I think that’s a goal. Destroy food production, just as water rights will someday ALL belong to the government or favored private individuals. The ultimate goal is government control of all food and water.

        ”If you control the food supply, you control the people” – Henry Kissinger

        Liked by 1 person

    • doodahdaze says:

      Give the socialist enough time and there will be no food.

      Like

  2. stella says:

    Let me say first that I haven’t studied the California water problem in depth. A couple of observations:

    -California has historically had significant droughts.
    -Man has attempted to support too many humans on too little water, mainly by shuttling water to high population areas, via dams and aqueducts.
    -Farming is, in my opinion, more important (at least now) than suburban lawns.
    -Some of the farming done in California is foolish. My nephew (who grew up on a dairy farm in the Sacramento Valley, and who remembers well the droughts in the 1970’s) told me that they had rice farms in that area, which is a very water-intensive crop. I remember visiting my brother’s dairy farm in the 1960’s, where it was obvious even to my teenaged eyes that farming would not be possible there without irrigation.

    Liked by 2 people

    • stella says:

      History of rice growing in California:

      http://sunwestfoods.com/?navid=7

      Liked by 1 person

    • stella says:

      The modern oases of drought-hit California: Aerial photos reveal how lavish lawns of the golden state are surrounded by parched earth

      http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3026386/The-modern-oases-drought-hit-California-Aerial-photos-reveal-lavish-lawns-sunshine-state-surrounded-parched-earth.html#ixzz3WSVbKmSN

      Liked by 2 people

      • Dixie says:

        Is one of those pictures Nancy Pelosi’s estate and vineyard?
        Just one opinion from the comment section of that link:
        The problem is that California has failed to control groundwater extraction for irrigation of farms. Likely this is by design, to create an artificial emergency thereby allowing the government to pass climate change taxes. Then when the population becomes acclimated to these climate change taxes, they will fix the groundwater issue and move on to designing the next emergency to drain people’s wallets.

        Liked by 2 people

        • stella says:

          I really think the water problems in California are long standing and, although the climate alarmists will try to take advantage of the current drought, it isn’t a simple problem to solve.

          Liked by 4 people

          • auscitizenmom says:

            I moved there in the early 70’s and they talked about drought the whole time, except when we were flooding.

            Liked by 3 people

            • stella says:

              I mentioned earlier that my brother had a dairy farm in the Sacramento Valley. He bought it in the 1950’s, and lived there until he died in the 1980’s. In the 1970’s there was a severe drought, their well went dry, and they were forced to truck water in for the cows. Actually, he was mentioned in an article in Time regarding the drought. My nephew wrote for the local paper, so I’m sure that’s how they got connected to my brother. The point is that this isn’t a new thing.

              I’ve been reading that California hasn’t seen anything yet, and that in the more distant past severe drought conditions – worse than they are now – lasted for years.

              Liked by 4 people

    • MaryfromMarin says:

      All very good points, stella. Water usage and allocation has not been pursued wisely here in CA. IMO, workable solutions have not been pursued wisely, or even seriously.

      And monies which were voted for repair of existing/creation of new dams, reservoirs, and water transport infrastructure, mysteriously made its way elsewhere. Strangely enough. /major sarc

      Liked by 4 people

      • Menagerie says:

        No sarcasm intended at all, but it seems to me California hasn’t pursued much of anything wisely. They just seem to see higher taxes as they ultimate answer to every I’ll effect they have caused by stupid laws and regulations.

        Liked by 2 people

        • MaryfromMarin says:

          Can’t argue with any of that, Menagerie. Here are some stats that might shed light:

          “…in 1934, 1.5 million Democrats voted, compared to 1.4 million Republicans (and 154K other). That’s been the way it has been ever since. In 2008 it was 7.6 D, 5.4 R, and 4.1 Other.

          Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_Legislature) says Except for the period from 1995 to 1996, the Assembly has been in Democratic hands since the 1970 election (even while the governor’s office has gone back and forth between Republicans and Democrats). The Senate has been in Democratic hands continuously since 1970…”

          [from a 2009 comment on calguns.net, about how long Dems have controlled CA]

          Considering that we now have a blanket primary/top-two primary, rather than an open primary [established 2010/2011] the chance of Republicans getting more representation in state offices is slim to nearly none.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Very true – Mary. But no one has mentioned the water being sent to the sea without being used for farms of homes because of the FISH. This is also a longstanding practice, enforced by the feds. Does anyone remember the Klamath Basin Crisis? It is no longer in the headlines but is still going on.. The Klamath Basin straddles the Calif/Oregon border.
        The woman running this blog has devoted the past 14 YEARS to accumulating this news. She lives in the middle of it and is a farmer. http://www.klamathbasincrisis.org/

        Liked by 4 people

    • lou says:

      people in general have been extremely wasteful with many resources….water being one of them….the West is primarily semi arid….it was never supposed to support millions upon millions with pools, hot tubs, lawns, golf courses, luxurious landscaping…..It could support millions of people if water was used properly….

      agriculture is the most important activity that water can produce….it must be protected…

      now if moonbean wants people to save water, go for it….my only concern is that Mr and Mrs Hollywood and their ilk will still have their pools, their fountains, their golf courses and nobody is going to get them to do differently….the rich are just immune….

      Liked by 2 people

      • auscitizenmom says:

        Exactly.

        Like

      • bogeytct says:

        You have to understand. The people in power in California aren’t going to address a problem that affects others unless those others give them something they didn’t have before.

        You may think electing them and giving them a ton of power is good enough but all the power you gave them was payment for addressing normal business. If you get a crisis you need to give them a new normal of more power. That’s how it goes. It’s political exploitation. Grift in epic ways.

        That’s why they do everything to not avoid crises. They want them to happen.

        Like

    • John Denney says:

      “they had rice farms in that area, which is a very water-intensive crop”

      “Yeah! And then when you buy it at the store, it’s STILL dry!” – a former co-worker, bless his heart.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. cohibadad says:

    I always wonder with some of these policies how much they fear the backlash of illegal aliens without work, the poor without welfare, etc. Like balancing how much it would cost to finance absurd stuff but it keeps a certain percentage of people from going crazy and burning the whole place down.

    Like

    • auscitizenmom says:

      Bussing more illegals in to California isn’t going to help their drought problem a bit.

      Liked by 1 person

    • omanuel says:

      We cannot predict Earth’s climate while NASA and other research agencies hid information on cyclic changes in the Sun over the solar cycles.

      Lack of information on cyclic changes in the ratio of light:heavy elements caused a Colorado scientist in 2006 to predict the Sun would run out of oxygen.

      Here is the program for the 2006 Impending Oxygen Crisis and the (now deleted) prediction by Tom Ayers that the entire Sun will be entirely devoid of oxygen in 2015:

      http://web.archive.org/web/20060528095910/http://www.hao.ucar.edu/Public/events/colloquium_2006new.html

      The pulsar-centered Sun that birthed and controls every atom, live and planet in the solar system will be revealed if NASA and other federal research agencies reveal cyclic changes over a typical solar cycle in:

      The solar surface temperature
      The solar surface composition
      “Cosmic” and neutron fluxes in Earth’s upper atmosphere
      Changes in isotope abundances in solar flares and eruptions

      Professor Stig Friberg and I reported some of this information at the Helio-seismology Conference, Big Bear Observatory in 2002:

      http://www.omatumr.com/abstracts/gong-2002.pdf

      Professors Barry Ninham, Stig Friberg and I also published information on implications of solar eruptions for Earth’s climate in 2002:

      http://www.springerlink.com/content/r2352635vv166363/

      I look forward to your comments.

      With kind regards,
      Oliver K. Manuel

      Liked by 1 person

      • wondering999 says:

        Thank you, Oliver Manuel.

        Like

      • Grimble Gromble says:

        I’m not an astrophysicist, but I did spend many nights in Rolla 😉 [’78-‘8 BSEE]

        Liked by 1 person

        • beth60497 says:

          Hey I was in Rolla too.. just 1 year for school 84-85 but many years after for St Pats. My ex is a Board Rep..
          Switched to UMSL for accounting.. Using computers, not programming them.

          Like

          • Grimble Gromble says:

            Just missed each other … I graduated in ’83. I worked at KMNR my last few years when it was in the Temp mining building near the power plant. Been back maybe once or twice for a Alumni Show but that was years ago, sometimes stop at Zeno’s with parents on way to Branson.

            Like

  4. coeurdaleneman says:

    To me the solution is easy: be true to water rights in order of their establishment. The market would sort things out. Big government meddling and abrogating them using the regulatory process has made a mess of things.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. 1American1st says:

    Hey Moonbeam! Yeah, you Jerry! You & your Democrat Socialists have cause most of this by allowing Millions & Millions of Illegal Aliens to invade Kalifornia + creating “Sanctuary Cities”. Bet you don’t even know how many illegals are squatting in Kalifornia. Blame yourselves, you Socialists.
    So now you want to create hardships on American Citizens. Typical freaking DemonRats!

    Liked by 2 people

    • omanuel says:

      Yes, that was part of the plan.

      Liked by 1 person

    • stella says:

      California’s water problems have existed for decades and, although illegal immigration hasn’t helped, it isn’t the primary problem. California doesn’t get enough water over the long haul to support the population it has.

      Like

      • JohnP says:

        ….and hasn’t for a long time.

        Like

      • michellc says:

        This may be a dumb question, but since this is a problem that has existed for decades, has nobody been trying to come up with a solution or is there no solution?

        Like

        • auscitizenmom says:

          Illegal aliens is one part of the problem. Another part is trying to make a rain forest out of a desert. And, my guess is there is graft in the water going to the farms.

          Like

        • stella says:

          It takes a person who is more knowledgeable than I am to explain it. They have been building dams, reservoirs, etc. for decades. There is too little water spread too thin, as I see it.

          Like

        • stella says:

          Here’s a history of water management, if you’re interested:

          http://www.water.ca.gov/swp/history.cfm

          Like

          • michellc says:

            It looks to me like a huge population in a desert area where it seems they don’t really realize they live in a desert has been a recipe for disaster for years and for years they’ve been trying to make it work.
            That’s probably oversimplifying it but it just seems to me if way back before the population was so great and way back before as much water was needed if water supply was such an issue then it was just a matter of time before the well ran dry.
            I think there may be no solution.

            Like

        • manickernel says:

          Sooner than later a good earthquake is gonna sort it all out.

          Liked by 1 person

  6. booger71 says:

    One thing Moonbeam did not do was to stand up to Federal Fish and Wildlife that forbade giving water to farmers so they could get fresh water to a scrub fish near the ocean.

    Liked by 4 people

  7. labrat says:

    Israeli’s lead the world in water preservation technology, instead of regulating – perhaps they should encourage innovation?

    Liked by 3 people

  8. doodahdaze says:

    Kalifornia be gettin jus right. Stankonya. Whew!!!

    Like

    • John Galt says:

      90% of California agricultural workers are illegal aliens. Of course the farms will get water. Can’t have self-deportation.

      Like

  9. taqiyyologist says:

    “Trouble with you is
    “The trouble with me
    “Got two good eyes
    “but we still don’t see
    “Come round the bend
    “You know it’s the end
    “The fireman screams and
    “The engine just gleams” — Grateful Dead, Casey Jones

    Will we see an election in ’16? Starting to doubt it.

    Like

  10. smarty says:

    Are the illegals still welcomed with open arms? Millions of people coming in, are thry bringing their own water??? Just really kills me that liberals do not see how insane they are.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. crazy says:

    What California doesn’t have is enough cheap surface water. The solution has been talked about and discarded for years – market pricing and desalination. The left wing stranglehold on government has stopped both. Apparently they’d rather suffer and demand help from Washington.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Lou says:

      desalination isn’t so easy, and is very expensive currently. there is very little potable water throughout the US. mostly we use aquifers, ponds, and lakes. if the technology were there to create potable water out of ocean water, we would solve a big problem throughout the world.
      the problem IMO is not allowing more immigrants, and the gov’t spending money in R&D in creating potable water out of salt water. I know some will argue that many of the immigrants are migrant workers, and that’s true. it goes a lot deeper than that because GMO producers and allowing subsidies for large corporate farmers instead of just family farmers which were capped at a certain acerage.

      Like

      • crazy says:

        Of course it’s not easy nor inexpensive – something like 15x the cost, I think – but a working market works these things out. Government controls price and availability of both now leading to the over-consumption in wet periods and scarcity in lengthy droughts. The same bad government that thinks it can control the climate wrote the laws and set the policies that did this.

        Liked by 2 people

        • TheLastDemocrat says:

          Exactly.

          Here is where the govt could do some good – by helping a desalination plant or two come online.

          Whether the govt helps or not, there is a largely market-driven solution. It is a better answer to pay the going rate for water than to fine people who use a bit much.

          Businesses and nations build oil pipelines all over the place – crossing continents. If Californians really need water, someone can build a pipeline from one place to another.

          Like I told my wife: if water is in such shortage, why is it possible for me to leave the hose on my lawn for hours without any great worry for the expense?

          Like

        • Yes, it’s expensive. Just like producing oil from oil sands was too expensive, until it wasn’t. Now it is again, but still…

          Like

  12. William says:

    How is Mr. Moonbeam going to ensure people don’t take long showers?

    Like

    • Dr. Bogus Pachysandra says:

      “Long defined by whom?”

      I admit that I’m cheap! At the 1830 farmhouse, we had a huge electric water heater. I learned to get wet, turn off the shower and soap up and wash, then turn the shower back on to rinse. I still do that. I hate the Cleveland Water Company. And, for 30 years, I operated a small public water supply.

      Like

  13. pyromancer76 says:

    Earth is 70% water; distribution (with help of technology) is the answer. Any desert can bloom — and should. Crazy gave part of the answer — market pricing and desalination. Israelis figured out how to do it economically. Two other parts to the solution — catchment basins and piping (much longer distances). Every idiot knows California will face severe, long droughts; as will the southwest — look at those gorgeous sand dune-cliffs everywhere. If there is the will, there is a way. But we have to defeat the elites sucking off the current recession/depression system first. Elites never give up power/wealth easily.

    Like

  14. BertDilbert says:

    Time to set up a fake e mail and mail my friend who has a pressure washing company in CA. I will inquire about aesthetic pressure washing of sidewalks and buildings… Will say my consultancy company has been hired for the next round of water conservation cut recommendations. Oh he is going to go in panic mode.

    Like

  15. chick20112011 says:

    How many celebs in Hollywood are going to shut off the water to their pools and lavish landscaped mansions to share with the average citizen and farmers?
    How is the Gov. going to “fine” the illegal immigrants?

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Videodrone says:

    On the other hand, I pay for every drop of water I use, it is mine and I can do with it what I want

    Like

  17. Horsesoldier says:

    Well Moonbeam, make lemonade out of lemons then. Just tell your constituents they’ll have to take more golden showers (since you’ve been whizzing on them forever)

    Like

  18. Sandra says:

    Do they have the infrastructure to monitor citizens’ water usage?

    Like

    • Grimble Gromble says:

      In the past (ca 1990 – Lancaster CA) they would baseline your water usage from historicals and then surcharge you for amounts in excess of that baseline. Currently, they could simply take your baseline, multiply by 0.75 and surcharge you by whatever amount over that as they wish. Lot’s of problems with that approach but they did it back then.

      Liked by 1 person

      • MaryfromMarin says:

        Our water usage has been recorded for years. If you are mandated to reduce by a certain amount, then overusage is pretty easy to detect.

        It falls hardest on those who have been faithful in reducing their water use already. Then their mandated reduction is based upon already reduced usage. IOW, being penalized for wise water use.

        Like

  19. CoffeeBreak says:

    I’m waiting for the state to declare ownership of the water in private pools.

    To my memory, the drought in California during the 70’s lasted about seven straight years. We used to carry an extra propeller so we wouldn’t have to buy one at the general store when we went camping/boating. The first time we had a broken propeller, the general store charged $90.00. I think new ones elsewhere where in the $16.00 range. We often scavenged for parts, though.

    It was scary when there was a fog over the lake and you’d see a rusted out car, an old concrete bridge or a bunch of tree stumps. Once when we swam alongside the boat, we realized it was straight muck about ten inches below the water. So. Gross. Then trying to climb back in the boat without shrieking in horror, I scraped my leg on some old barbed wire.

    I’m shocked all of us were able to continue reproducing. A friend from Georgia never was able to conceive because she swam in dirty, parasitic water as an eight year old.

    Like

    • Concerned says:

      This reminds me of a documentary I saw a couple of years ago. Some South American country was (probably still is) experiencing severe drought. The government actually made it illegal for a citizen to collect rainwater in a drum!!! I will try to find the details, it was pretty shocking. Might have been a Frontline about water problems around the world.

      Like

  20. HH (@hch242) says:

    As global warming will be the liberal media battle cry it is indeed the wave of illegals putting a drain on the states natural resources. Doubt very much any one prepared for this onslaught.

    Like

  21. Save water, bathe with a friend

    Like

  22. moe ham head says:

    no big deal liberals dont shower all that much anyway

    Like

  23. doodahdaze says:

    California is the example of what is happening to America. It is a harbinger of what will occur in the whole country.

    Like

  24. John Denney says:

    Neatest idea I’ve heard is to go out into the ocean where the water is deep enough, put an osmotic membrane over the end of a pipe, and lower the pipe into the water until it’s deep enough that the water pressure forces fresh water through the membrane. Now you have a well that never runs dry.

    Liked by 1 person

    • John Denney says:

      900 psi is the middle range (600-1200 psi) for reverse osmosis desalinization. That’s the water pressure at about 2000 feet (630 meters) deep, which is just a couple miles off shore in Southern California, the darker blue in this image.

      Like

    • nimrodman says:

      Yeah, but then what? You’d have to run pumps to lift that fresh water back to the surface.

      You show a map below and point out that 2,000 ft water depth is sufficient water pressure to drive the reverse osmosis process. But then what’s the cost to lift that desalinated water 2,000 ft plus to where it can be used back on land, subtracting friction losses from your presumed gain.

      Hint: you might as well just run pumps at a desal plant on land to generate the necessary osmotic pressure.

      I think. I’m not an expert in this topic but do know a bit about pumping lift and the electricity required to drive it.

      If you’ve worked through the physics and costs (or seen an article that does), what am I missing?

      Like

  25. czarowniczy says:

    Well, aside from the fact that the pretentious flock to live in a DESERT, then decide that despite the environment they chose to live in(and worship) is not hospitable to a water park lifestyle, they are entitled to water. OK, so stealing the water from other areas in the state to feed the need isn’t working any more punishing the clean leaning is the answer? BTW, will the privileged also be fined for owning huge consumptive/evaporative swimming pools that suck up gallons and are used infrequently? How about those ostentatious fountains and them thar ‘water walls’ that so many hoity-toity businesses and some homes like to have? And them golf courses…
    Next will Brown suggest bath houses as substitutes? I’ll bet he could get Federal funding for that.

    Like

  26. shipley130 says:

    I would say that the governor of California is an ecoterrorist.

    Like

  27. doodahdaze says:

    To: Dear Leader
    From: Israel
    Subject: Obama Promise

    Up Yours. If you like your promise you can keep your promise.

    http://www.breitbart.com/video/2015/04/06/obama-my-promise-of-protection-should-be-sufficient-for-israel/

    Like

  28. Lou Lou says:

    Moon dust needs a platform to launch a delusional run for President , again, and what better way to get all our attention , no water , no food.

    Droughts in California are VERY common, they even wrote a hit song about it , and a one and a two sing it with me :

    ” it never rains in Southern Calofornnnniiiiiaaa , but when it rains , it pours ” etc

    Like

  29. Nick says:

    Brown is a criminal who puts Illegals in front of law abiding citizens. He doesn’t want to touch agriculture because it will upset the Illegals who he values more than anyone else.

    Like

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