China! Will America Win the Trade War?

From our friends at PJTV, and Bill Whittle.

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14 Responses to China! Will America Win the Trade War?

  1. Be Ge says:

    The middle-earth / middle-country / chongguo is one name of china. The other is tianxia — all under heaven. The Chinese emperor has a mandate of Heaven to rule all-under-heaven — which stretches up to the entire Earth. The smaller version if tianxia is China + Mongol empire, stretching from Japan to Ukraine. Huge ambitions, long history, surrounding barbarians — this is very accurate. Good one from Bill.

    Liked by 1 person

    • cohibadad says:

      I thought it was a good analysis from Bill. China is a strange place. They apparently teach their children in schools that they evolved from a separate line of Homo erectus than the rest of mankind. That is how invested they are in the idea that they are unique, and thus special, compared with everyone else, despite all the evidence to the contrary. The main thing holding the US back is the US, but in the long run, China has major problems in this information age. Centralized economies are several steps behind. Innovation and freedom to explore and profit drive growth. Assuming the US doesn’t destroy itself from within, there is no reason not to think that the US should outpace China, while China competes with other countries for low-end labor/production costs.

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      • Be Ge says:

        Racism/xenophobia is not a very well known feature of East Asian cultures, but it does exist and makes KKK and even fuehrer Adi look childish at times. That said, it is not (as of /me, that is) as large a problem in China as it is, say, in Japan (a really monoethnic construct made 99.6% of Japanese and 0.3% of culturally and blood-wise related Koreans) — because China is not at all that much of a monoethnic monolith. Mao seriously considered an alphabet but developed “simplified chinese” instead and has placed a strong accent on teaching everyone standardized baihua. JIMHO, again, for a good reason. What is referred to as “Chinese Macro-Language” with various dialects as its parts should probably be more accurately referred to as “Group of Chinese Languages” — sort of like “Germanic Languages” or “Scandinavian languages”. Mutual intelligibility is not to be taken for granted, and there are cultural differences as well. Historically, the influence of central government has been sort of like a sine wave. The lower anti-peak of recent times was the second half of the 19th century and the early 20th century — you know, opium wars and stuff. During such periods China is more like “back to the age of three kingdoms” vs a normal state. Right now, we are witnessing a rising part of the sine wave. The empire (the fact that the emperor is changed every 10 years should not fool anyone) is growing stronger. Yet and still it is not at all Stalinist Russia or Hitlerist Germany. As the Chinese like to say — shan gao, huangdi yuan. Mountains (山 shan) can be substituted for heaven/skies tian (天 tian). What it means is mountains|skies are high, and the emperor is far away. In fact, we can witness the turn to the falling part of the sine wave during our very lives.



        皇帝

        (Mountains are high, and the emperor is far away)

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        • Attorney says:

          Exactly! Which is why most Chinese live in relative freedom from their onsane govt. It is getting harder to do that here. Wait until the feds have ALL your electronic medical records.

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      • Attorney says:

        A bit of a sinophile, I follow this topic a lot. My impression of Beijing was that the day to day lives of people are not oppressive in most respects, but if one crosses the govt…still, is that not where we are heading here? I would not be surprised if in ten years we are not just as centralized in terms of economic policy, in fact if not name. And Fod knows we have massive corruption that gets worse daily.

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  2. daddio says:

    With our leadership? Are you serious?

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  3. czarowniczy says:

    And I do believe we’ve discussed this here for some time now. We (the US) have the problem of dismissing the uncomfortable and those of us who’ve kept Mao and Sun Tzu on our bookshelves for decades have been seen as behind the times. revanchist and racist, people who look at the Asian perception of ‘face’ as outdated.
    China’s army is internally oriented BUT is rapidly developing an outward power-projection mentality. The US gleefully, in the early days of Chinese-US ‘rapprochement’ – sent US military NCOs to China to help turn their military from a mass-wave attack defensive service into one that could be managed on an external battlefield. If you follow Chinese military advancements you’ll notice a solid move towards external power projection in China’s strategy. Their use of dual-use technology (much of it gladly given by us) in their space/attack missile programs, attack/global navigation satellite systems, military/commercial porting for their ships, WMD/biological-medical-chemical programs, again much of the technology developed in the West and sold to the Chinese for dial use use without reservations or control. I don’t hear the MSM going on about the huge Chinese ports being built in Baja and Mexico-main, nor the ports in Latin and South America that will suck up much of the food produced there for Chinese consumption – food that fills the voids caused by Federal agency meddling in our domestic food production programs. And speaking of domestic food production what about the Chinese slowly buying up so much of the US food production capacity – research what percentage of US pork production is now in Chinese hands.
    WWII was won because the US had a huge, efficient, and productive manufacturing infrastructure. We and the Germans had a huge production capacity but we had the ability to destroy the German manufacturing might and we did. The Chinese just bought our out, much easier, cleaner and profitable. The German’s technology in weapons was better than ours – we are still using a lot of their concepts – but in the end it didn’t matter as they couldn’t manufacture and deploy their weapons in any meaningful quantities. In twenty years look at what amount of material and food production will still remain in US hands and how much the Chinese will have bought out.
    I’m looking at the 2qst century as the century of Chinese ascendance to THE world power. They have embraced the US principles, minus democracy, that made us THE world’s greatest power, they will be able to project power by having the production capacities to wage war by attrition just as we did.
    We’re teaching our grandkids English to preserve the culture, Spanish so they can converse on the street and with big box/fast food staff, and Chinese so they can read the instruction sheets in the boxes of stuff they’ll buy from the One True US/Chinese Retail Outlet.

    Liked by 2 people

    • manickernel says:

      T-34 could wipe a Panzer IV’s butt once they got their tactics in order. 🙂 Took ’em awhile since Stalin killed all the officers though.

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      • czarowniczy says:

        Which version(s)? Main problems I see the PkW IVs having were swarm attacks of the backyard-cast T-34s and a huge lack of supplies and replacement parts. Then there is the question of if the Russians actually own the battle of Kursk through superior firepower and tactics of the creative use of a biological weapon. Guess which side I was rooting for?

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        • manickernel says:

          Reading Manstein’s book, according to him they were supposed to get longer 75’s but ordnance nixed it for shorter, cheaper version. There were issues when the Panzer groups finally got the longer gun, but who cares about cornering ability when you are ordered never to turn around?

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          • czarowniczy says:

            Main problem on the Eastern Front, according to my grandfather, was the endless supply of Russians. He;d mention how they’d turn the 88s horizontal and fire into the masses, making holes that would be filled in with the follow-ons. The Reds used ‘troops’ from the far east, prisoners (especially good for clearing Pioneer-laid minefields and obstacles under fire) and political police who’d shoot deserters or malingerers on sight. I had East Front vets tell me about shooting into waves of attacking Reds only to have the unarmed follow-ons pick up the fallens’ weapons and continue the attack – or be shot by the NKVD. Luftwaffe developed a technique for whacking Red tanks (Rudel killed over 500 of them alone) but the 34 was cheap and easy to make and the US and England were whacking the hell out of the German industrial complex. The Russians would throw 5 or ten 34s against one Panzer and all they’d have to do was to pop a tread. Don’t forget the Russian tactics (carried into the fall of the USSR) of massing a mile or more artillery a number of tubes deep along a front and just pounding the daylights out of an area in a rolling barrage for hours on end. Even a close miss by a Russian 152mm could cause a Panzer problems, never mind a direct topside hit from a rain of shells.
            Oldtimers used to tell me that they’d wished the US would have joined the remainder of the Wehrmacht and turned against the Russians (like the Russians turned against us) to quash the Communists once and for all. If only….

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  4. manickernel says:

    I agree with him in broad strokes. He raises some interesting points to consider. Over the next 50 years I see China overcoming most of their obstacles, such as a restriction on individual liberties which stifles entrepreneurship. They do, after all, have the most billionaires around right now.

    The biggest obstacle at the moment is they are good at copying or stealing technology, but lack any innovation of scale. Quality control has been non-existent without intensive outside oversight. This will change. Long term they will solve their structural problems, while ours may be getting worse.

    I also agree, that looking at it objectively, western man could have gone extinct at the time of the pyramids and human civilization would not have even suffered a hiccup.

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    • Be Ge says:

      You totally miss the mindset of the Chinese. He who can make a good copy of a work by a master, is himself a master. They lived like that for almost 5k years, and it did not prevent them from inventing compass, paper or gunpowder. But yes, good copying is a good thing. From their standpoint.

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  5. Wizzum says:

    I think that the first country that embraces Thorium will be the leader, China has a little jump on us there but I don’t doubt that we can make up the difference if we put our minds to it.

    Like

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