Tomorrow’s Headline Story – Alarming Video Shows LAPD Shoot Homeless Man….

Details are very sketchy – however, the story and video is rapidly gaining attention via social media.

A struggle of sorts between LAPD and what appears to be a homeless man. Baton’s flying, and one of the black LAPD officers yell out “he’s going for my gun, he’s going for my gun”, moments later shots ring out. Several observers in the crowd begin to express outrage.

Warning for violence and foul language:

The Daily Caller (Chuck Ross) Has more details HERE.

update-1UPDATE: LA Times Weighs in with THIS STORY:

[…] Jose Gil, 38 , said he saw the man swinging at the police and then heard one of the officers say, “Gun, gun, he’s got my gun!” before police fired multiple shots.

Another witness, who asked not to be identified, said the man punched and kicked the officers and reached for one of their service weapons before the officers fired at least seven times.

an area resident, who identified himself as Booker T. Washington, said police had come by repeatedly to ask Africa to take down his tent. People are allowed to sleep on the streets from 9 p.m to 6 a.m., but they are supposed to remove their tents in the daytime, under a court agreement.

“This man got shot over a tent,” Washington said.  (read more)

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85 Responses to Tomorrow’s Headline Story – Alarming Video Shows LAPD Shoot Homeless Man….

  1. taqiyyologist says:

    If you want to shoot one of them (civilian), just yell “Stop Resisting!” three times.

    Just following training.

    Cops don’t have hand-signs. That’s about the only difference between them and gangs.

    Like

  2. John Galt says:

    “before the officers fired at least seven times.”

    One round from a 12 gauge would be more effective. Then the story would be “before the officers fired a single shot.”

    Liked by 1 person

  3. WTP.com says:

    I hear “get off my gun, get off my gun” followed by ” he has(my) gun, he has a gun”

    Liked by 2 people

    • polk8dot says:

      I listened repeatedly trying to understand fully what’s been said, and here is my take:
      the officer on the ground, on top of the homeless man, the one closest to his head, reaches behind his back with his right hand, seemingly going for his cuffs or zip ties. As his hand comes back, it seems to get snagged on something. A split second later there is the voice yelling ‘I LOST my gun! I LOST my gun!’. The cop in the second position over the homeless guy springs back up as the yelling starts. Then the rest scatter away and the shots ring out, I think fired by the third cop of the ones attempting the subduing.

      I don’t know whether the shooting was justified or not, depending on whether or not the homeless man really got a hold of the gun and became therefore a clear and present danger to the officers. But I just did not see him actually actively trying to get the gun.

      I am always on the side of the police, unless and until it is proven that a miscarriage of justice occurred. But in this case, in light for what it sounded like to me, the ‘I LOST the gun’ thing, I am very apprehensive about the outcome. The situation clearly got out of control very rapidly, when it is just as clear that it didn’t need to.

      Awful, just awful, for ALL concerned.

      Like

      • polk8dot says:

        😲 Sorry about the Boldface. Forgot to turn it off after the quotation. Oops.

        Like

      • chiavarm says:

        I think there needs to be a change in Police protocol when dealing with situations like this. There are several armed Policemen, in this case it is the police that introduce the firearm into the environment. So, in future cases the policemen (in the company of other policemen) that approaches the suspect needs to remove their firearm.

        Like

      • Roy says:

        “The situation clearly got out of control very rapidly, when it is just as clear that it didn’t need to.”

        I agree. It seems the situation was not handled properly, thus increasing the probability of what did result.

        Like

    • B. Rodregas says:

      The first shot is the important one, and a few things stand out to me… the most important is the reactions of the 4 officers directly involved with the suspect at the time of the shot. All four of them appear to jump/react as if they were not expecting it…

      The two officers on the left side of the suspect both appear to be actively involved with both hands at the time of the shot, the one towards the suspects head jumps up and moves back, the one at the suspects left foot appears to jump back, and quickly move away (possibly fleeing from the initial shot being fired in his direction) and appears to draw his gun and return fire.

      The second officer near the suspects feet (who initially responded to the baton guy) in my view is who was deploying the taser, and he also can be clearly seen reaching for his own gun AFTER the initial round was fired. He also appears to return fire after the initial shot looks like it scared the crap out of him.

      The only one I’m not sure of is the officer with his back to us. He also MAY have been deploying the taser, but when the Taser is heard he still appears to be struggling with both hands. He does have his hands free for a second, then the view is blocked, but after the first shot he appear as if he’s trying to roll back on his feet as if he’s trying to get back, also seeming as if he was in shock from the initial shot. He too appears to reach for his gun while backing away from the initial shot… but I just can’t tell.

      If one of them is guilty of anything, in my opinion this is the only one I could possibly see an argument for, not because I think I see him do something, but I just can’t see what he is doing, where the other three officers I see them react in fear/surprise (just as anyone would) when they hear the initial shot.

      Hopefully there is better footage.

      Like

  4. lovemygirl says:

    I can’t tell if he had the cop’s gun or not from that video. There has to be a better way of handling unruly people resisting arrest that doesn’t put the cops/public at risk though. I’ve seen creative less than lethal weapons including nets that may need to become more common when time allows. Here backup was called and time was not critical.

    Like

    • yakmaster2 says:

      From about 24 secs in it looks as if the homeless man on the ground reaches out with his right arm. I can hear an officer say something about “my gun”. The homeless man’s arm goes out a second time. Very shortly after that shots can be heard.
      I think the homeless man may have been holding the officer’s gun when he pointed his right arm outward the second time.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Kitty Smith says:

        I can’t tell for sure if dead guy had a good grip on the cop’s gun for sure, but basically that’s the way I saw it, too.

        If that’s the case, it would appear that thugs learned nothing from the Gentle Giant case. Go for a cop’s gun while resisting or anytime, you’re dead.

        But we’re a long way out from getting accurate details about exactly what transpired. Much more will come out, and it would be wise if they do it quickly. The natives are restless. They keep trolling for a “Gotcha” with the cops and anybody who shoots a black in self-defense, no matter what they’ve done. I think Holder is after police firearms. I think he wants to disarm them. Lynch will carry on in his footsteps. Blacks inherently react with violence as a first measure to any stress or confrontation, and they nearly always lose. Can’t have that going on.

        The guy yelling “mxxxxx fxxxxx” about a hundred times while claiming that the cops just shot the guy down, is probably already calling Crump and Holder.

        Liked by 2 people

        • stormtigerzx says:

          Yeap seems that Ferguson dying embers had cooled some, aside from #Black-lives / Lunch Crowd… this should throw some fuel on the fire to fan the flames for Al Shaprten, to rev up his race-baiting meal ticket again.

          Like

    • lovemygirl says:

      With no WP edit I’ll just correct myself a bit. Apparently the guy shot was actively engaged in a physical fight with someone in his tent so time was not a luxury the cops had.

      Liked by 1 person

    • polk8dot says:

      ‘There has to be a better way of handling unruly people resisting arrest..’

      There is. It’s called MACE or Pepper Spray. This altercation actually could be used as a teaching tool to illustrate the perfect occasion to use either. What a shame.

      Like

      • 1American1st says:

        Another story reports that the police tazed him but it was ineffective.

        Like

      • lovelyd24 says:

        I read or heard that the tent owner was tazed. Mace or pepper spray is a bit of a luxury, once there is a physical altercation with a volatile person, this was a close physical altercation, the police, add the second guy who picked up a police baton and engaged himself in the altercation and you have a situation that can turn deadly for the officers very quickly.

        IF the tent owner got a hold of one of the officer guns, well then that is the end of that.

        I don’t know if this is justified shooting, officers on the street in a volatile situation do not have the luxury of waiting about to see if a violent situation is going to simply diffuse especially if the tent owner ended up with a gun or even if an officer’s gun got knocked out of his hand in the scuffle, these decisions are made in the blink of an eye.

        Stop resisting arrest, stop taking drugs that make your body chemistry override being tazed, stop endangering the lives of officers, and you won’t get shot.

        Liked by 1 person

      • oldiadguy says:

        Pepper spray (OC spray (from “oleoresin capsicum”), Does not work as well as advertised. Further, it has been my experience that OC does is not very effective against emotionally disturbed persons. Why I don’t know.

        I had one experience where we had a EDP (emotionally disturbed person) who had been cutting himself. With the help of his parents, we had disarmed him and convinced him to go to the hospital, when he went off. He charged towards the kitchen where there was a knife rack. Myself and another officer had grabbed him but he dragged us towards the door and almost knocked over the officer who had been blocking the door to the kitchen.

        We put out an aid call. Since we were now in the kitchen and the three of us were having little success in controlling the subject, I sprayed OC in his face almost point blank. The OC did slow him up a little and impaired his vision allowing us to direct him out of the kitchen. It should be noted that the OC effected myself and the other two officers, making it hard for us to breathe and our vision was impaired.

        It wasn’t until numerous other officers arrived that we were able to take him to the ground and handcuff him.

        It is not like television. It has been my experience, that EDP’s and folks on drugs such as PCP are incredibly strong and are almost immune to pain. No one wants to hurt them, nor do they wish to get hurt themselves. Unfortunately, in the real world, people (officers and suspects) often get injured in these situations. Sometimes it just can’t be helped.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Roy says:

          “Pepper spray (OC spray (from “oleoresin capsicum”), Does not work as well as advertised.”

          Furthermore, the use of spray is SO iffy in regard to control of spray due to factors like wind. I don’t understand why the streaming type isn’t used instead.

          Like

      • lovemygirl says:

        One thing I learned front Ferguson is you can’t use mace in an enclosed space or close quarters because it will affect the cop too. I heard a Tazer on the tape so it appears they did try that but pop etc renders them useless against some beligerants.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Dr. Bogus Pachysandra says:

      He was first shot with a stun gun. Didn’t seem to have much effect! I’ll also wait for more evidence from the body camera and the autopsy results. Fighting with cops is a dumb thing to do. They were called to the scene because he was fighting with someone else in his tent. I need more facts!

      Like

  5. wondering999 says:

    L.A. Times link: http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-police-fatally-shoot-homeless-man-20150301-story.html
    The L.A. Times article suggests that the homeless man (the man who was shot, “Africa”) had been released from a mental facility a few months ago, and was fighting with another man before he began fighting with the police. Awful situation for everyone involved, and praying that no riot ensues with innocent bystander victims.

    Liked by 1 person

    • John Galt says:

      “People are allowed to sleep on the streets from 9 p.m to 6 a.m., but they are supposed to remove their tents in the daytime, under a court agreement.”

      The vast majority of these people are alcoholics, drug addicts, mentally ill or some combination of the foregoing. Only an imbecile would expect them to abide by that agreement.

      Liked by 4 people

    • lovemygirl says:

      The fact he was actively engaged in a brawl explains why the cops acted so quickly with force. There always seems to be more than we’re told initially.

      Liked by 7 people

  6. yakmaster2 says:

    Mr. Booker T. Washington can undoubtedly be trusted as an impartial witness/commentator on this police shooting.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. striket1977 says:

    If you don’t want to get shot, don’t resist arrest. I’m sorry but when he began to physically fight with the cops he put himself in a dangerous position.

    Liked by 7 people

    • realitycheck says:

      “If you don’t want to get shot, don’t resist arrest.”

      +1000

      Liked by 1 person

    • JenNJ says:

      I usually agree with that sentiment. However, when dealing with someone who is mentally disturbed / disabled – it’s a whole other ball game. There was an incident where I live a few years ago. A woman in town lives with her 21 year old son. The son is 6 foot 220 pounds, and is mentally disabled. One night, he was very sick and the mother could not get him to go with her to his doctor so she called an ambulance. The police arrived before the ambulance. The cop tried to force the son out of the house. The son was terrified and panicked, and began resisting. Long story short, several cops beat this poor guy senseless And bloody – while the mother and neighbors screamed at them to stop.

      I usually take the cops side, and recognize the split second decisions they make in dangerous situations. But dealing with someone mentally iIl is different. There’s a bit of a difference between resisting a cop and reaching for the cops gun. I don’t think anyone deserves to be shot multiple times for resisting. There has to be a better way to handle these situatiions, tasers or otherwise.

      Like

      • tig's mom says:

        I’m sure the DOJ will get involved. In my town, they now require a mental health professional to get involved if time allows. All officers must go thru training to handle MH situations with kid gloves. Mixed results, but fewer multi million dollar payouts.

        Liked by 1 person

      • beth60497 says:

        I have a mentally ill sister and attended a class offered by NAMI (National Alliance for Mental Illness). They recommend that if your family member has potential of physical/violent confrontation, you should reach out to your local police department in advance of any incident so they have a record of the person’s condition on file. I know in large cities, it’s not always going to be effective, but in smaller communities,(read community policing), the LEO would then know in advance what they may be encountering. I don’t have my notebook with me, but here in MO there is training that is required for at least some of the officers on each force to have to learn how to deal with mentally ill. NAMI suggested that if we have to call, be sure to request that the responding officer be certified with that. However, making sure information is properly relayed from caller to dispatcher to responding officers seems to be an issue.
        Having said this… I think, and this is my non-PC comment, even though most (almost all?) mentally ill people are NOT violent, we, as a society, have to come up with better systems of dealing with that small number that are. Dumping them back onto the streets as homeless should not be an option

        Liked by 4 people

        • chopp5 says:

          Sometimes people choose to be homeless. I had a client who received quite a bit of money monthly and could afford a room/apt. He told me he would rather live on the street and use his money for drugs. He was also schizophrenic. Got busted for selling some crack and because of his prior record, he went to prison. He was a nice guy with a lot of problems. Hard not to feel sorry for him. He also called Pershing Square home.

          Like

        • wondering999 says:

          Wonder what NAMI has to say about this confrontation. Thanks for bringing out their suggestion to contact police ahead of time in case of problems, so they’ll know what to do. I had never heard the recommendation you described.
          I have heard stories from people who had mentally ill parents, stories that are astonishing (but because I know the people who told me, I believe their accounts).
          Most recently I heard from someone whose relative was stabbed in the neck by his mother, back in the 1970s. The mother had carefully laid out plans to kill both of her kids because “they looked like her”. She was irrational. After the attempted murder, the mom was institutionalized for a few months, and both mother and son were RETURNED HOME to live with each other as if nothing had happened. No one wanted to talk about the situation because mental illness, “being crazy” was so shameful.
          It would be so much better if churches and civic organizations went on educational campaigns to help naive persons to recognize mental illness where it exists (and it’s very common). If people stay silent about the problem because they feel ashamed or because no one will help effectively, more people will get killed when it didn’t have to happen.

          Liked by 1 person

    • polk8dot says:

      Forgive my off topic question, but is that a Mastiff puppy? Pure adorableness. 💓

      Liked by 1 person

    • auscitizenmom says:

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Early on, in cases like this, it’s hard to know which gang to root for.

    Like

    • lovelyd24 says:

      I find it offensive that you refer to police officers as a “gang” to be held in suspicion, that is exactly the mentality that allowed the “Hands up don’t shoot” mentality to snowball to the point where two officers sitting in their cruiser were shot dead just for being police officers.

      Most cops are good decent people trying to make society a safer place,

      Liked by 3 people

    • lovemygirl says:

      Remember many of us have family members that are honorable officers.

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Lou says:

    I hear a lot of privileged folks using profanity calling another officer a sellout, after a man was swinging wildly at a cop.

    Liked by 3 people

  10. BitterC says:

    Been studying this over on NTA. There were 5 shots fired. Some believe Africa fired the first one from a cops gun. That would make better sense of this.

    We really need to look at our mental health system. Just think what could have been done with the fortune spent on a cra[[y website.

    Liked by 2 people

    • dekarea says:

      We had lots of mental health facilities. They were call insane asylums way back when. Some libs got together and said that sickos, psychos, lunatics, and all other sorts of dangerous unsocial and unwanted people should not be made to stay in places and their rights were being violated. So, they sued, and got all of them facilities shut down. Of course, the next logical step is, the nutjobs are all released and allowed to exist among us “normal” folk. Well, this is what happens.

      I am siding with no one on this particular situation as of yet. I am law enforcement, and have been in some serious Charlie Foxtrot situations myself and understand that I was not there and so, will give some benefit of doubt to the cops at this time, until the truth comes out, as the video does not show the details of what really happened.

      However, from a citizen point of view, and from the recent accusations of cops killing blacks, this does NOT look good at all. I would like to ask why the cops had their guns drawn at all, thus allowing this guy the opportunity to grab at one. When you got that many cops, you have lots of manpower. I also heard tazers at work, and so, it would seem to be, at first blush, that there was plenty of men and tazer to take down any threats necessary without the introduction of a gun into the mess. But again, I WAS NOT THERE.

      Seems like if this nonsense keeps happening, America is going to be involved in a real big game of cowboys and homeboys real soon. Scary shit.

      Liked by 4 people

    • sundance says:

      Amen on the mental health system revisit. It really is time to go back to the concept of institutional care for many of these people…. failure to do so is just filling our prison systems with a group of people they are not equipped to deal with.

      Liked by 10 people

      • MaryfromMarin says:

        Or worse, just leaving them out on the streets to fend for themselves. If they can.

        Liked by 4 people

      • angie says:

        Sundance, you are so right. We’ve dealt with a couple of mentally ill people in my family. One was an uncle- my mother’s brother. On one of his “outs” from the hospital, he took 2 of my brothers at knife point and made them drive around for hours. My,parents were not home at the time. I was able to talk my way out for my son and I by saying we were going to my grandparent’s house for dinner. My uncle was so crazy that he didn’t notice I was in my pjs. When I went back to my parent’s house- my uncle and brothers were gone. I got my dad’s pistol and sat on the sofa. If he had walked through the door, I would have shot him. My brothers finally got home about 3 hours later. Uncle went back to the hospital for 72 hours.
        Mom and Dad should have pressed charges but unfortunately, my Mom is kind of nuts too and didn’t want this to make the family “look bad”. My attitude was ” Who gives a
        s_ _ t? This crazy could have killed your sons.” When my uncle died last year, I was relieved and sad to say, happy.
        Point is, if the US allowed sick people to stay in the hospital for extended periods, my brothers may never have been taken. IMO, if someone who is sick goes into the hospital and is put on meds, they need to continue to take their meds when they are discharged. If they refuse, then they go back to the hospital. A lot of these people are terribly dangerous.

        Liked by 3 people

      • JohnP says:

        Liberals spent 40 years demonizing institutional care for the mentally ill, they got a lot of help from Hollywood. It’s one of their proud “success” stories. They will never admit it’s a dismal failure.

        Liked by 4 people

        • 180daysofkindergarten says:

          In my small community the mentally ill are housed in an apartment complex in the middle of an enormous planned community. It was in the agreement to allow the developer to develop the enormous piece of land. The land was the place in which a large institution was located and since demolished. Anyway, the residents of this large planned community have no idea the mentally ill are there. It really is a disaster waiting to happen. File under liberal success stories waiting to blow.

          Liked by 1 person

      • oldiadguy says:

        You are so very correct. I was a young officer when this trend took place. I could not tell you how many EDP’s we found dead that first winter, far more than I care to remember. They were in doorways, under loading docks and in vacant buildings. We found them everywhere, it was a bad time.

        Back in “olden times,” beat coppers would flop (book) the homeless or EDP’s for vagrancy or some other flimsy charge to get them out of the frigid weather, into a warm cell where the would get some real food and coffee before being released.

        The true insanity was thinking that persons who could not take care of themselves would magically remember to take their medications and behave like a “normal person.”

        Liked by 4 people

        • Anubis says:

          Even worse out taxes are paying to 3rd world savage moslems to be brought into the US as refugees and even given classes on how to use toilets, while there are homeless veterans out there that could use all the benefits thrown at them.

          Like

      • wondering999 says:

        Yes and yes. We have recently had very severe weather with closed/iced/downed-tree roads and power outages.
        Some of the mentally ill (and otherwise handicapped) people who are taken care of through agencies were “stuck” in apartments that were not accessible because of icy roads — along with their caregivers, who cannot legally leave until another staff member comes to replace them. I talked with one woman who spent FIVE DAYS taking care of someone without relief. Imagine doing this with someone who is insomniac and dangerous/delusional, who poses a risk if you fall asleep.
        The old institutions had a reputation for being plagued by sexual and other physical abuse, but it doesn’t have to be that way. There is a level of safety for the caregivers as well as clients/patients if they are housed in a building that has safeguards and there are extra people to back up staff who need to take a break/go to the bathroom/have a smoke, whatever.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. bob e says:

    looks to me as if there is lots of room for 10 million illegal dreamers

    Liked by 1 person

  12. labrat says:

    Anyone who thinks mental health services is the answer here knows nothing about mental health services. In general – they haven’t got any better answers. Try to get “help”, go ahead and good luck finding any “help” that’s actually effective.

    If cops have to make mental health assessments when engaged in physical threats on the street, we’ll have a lot more dead cops. They can only assess the threat to their well being in the very now reality of the moment. They are trained to go home to their families at the end of their shift.

    Liked by 5 people

    • oldiadguy says:

      “If cops have to make mental health assessments when engaged in physical threats on the street, we’ll have a lot more dead cops. They can only assess the threat to their well being in the very now reality of the moment.”

      ^^^^^^^This^^^^^^

      Like

  13. doodahdaze says:

    I think he go the cops gun during the fight.

    Like

  14. francismuldoon says:

    One can not just grab a cops gun from its holster. Cope in most jurisdictions are required to use what is known as a triple retention holster such as this. https://www.copsplus.com/prodnum2515.php
    What that means is that three separate motions are required to draw the weapon or it remains firmly locked in the holster. These are designed specifically for situations where an offender tries to grab the cops gun…it will not come out if simply grabbed and pulled.

    Like

    • oldiadguy says:

      “What that means is that three separate motions are required to draw the weapon or it remains firmly locked in the holster.”

      From your link: “The XXXXXXXXXX duty holster positively locks the gun to make snatching extremely difficult from any angle. Yet this triple retention holster is released with a swift, simple motion, and the officer can draw the gun cleanly without the need to release any complicated system of snaps and straps.”

      Most retention holsters have a release lever that allows the weapon to be drawn. It is usually involves one smooth motion. Press the release while drawing the weapon.

      “These are designed specifically for situations where an offender tries to grab the cops gun…it will not come out if simply grabbed and pulled.”

      You correct here to a degree. The holsters are designed to protect against a quick grab, usually from the rear or side. My old PD were issued rather expensive retention holsters, first for revolvers and later for automatics. We had occasions were the suspects ripped the holster from the officer’s belt and on one occasion, rip the holster open. (The manufacturers worked with us to improve their holsters after these incidents.) Retention holsters are good, but they can be defeated with strength, knowledge or luck.

      I am not trying to hard on you, just trying to correct some misinformation that you had received. 🙂

      Like

      • oldiadguy says:

        Watch the tall black officer at the beginning of the video. It appears that he has dropped/threw down his PR24, drawn his weapon (pistol) and is now trying to return it to his holster. It is possible that he did not secure it properly, allowing the suspect to gain control over it.

        FWIW After blowing up the video and running it in slow motion, I’m starting to have some concerns relative to the aforementioned officer.

        Like

        • pattyloo says:

          i am trying to see what you point out, but not sure which officer you are talking about. they all look tall to me. what is a PR24 – is that the baton? Can you give me a time frame in the video of what you’re seeing? thanks.

          Like

          • oldiadguy says:

            It is in the first five seconds. The black officer is on the right of the scene and has a PR24 baton in his left hand and what looks like his pistol with a light attached in his right hand. The black officer drops his baton to the ground and the attempts to holster his pistol before he joins in the fight with the suspect.

            In the background, there is a second officer (white) that also has what appears to be a Taser in his right hand. At about the three second mark, the object the white officer was holding is now on the ground near his left foot after apparently dropping it.

            At the twelve second make you will a second white officer holding a Taser while two more white officers secure the black female in the foreground.

            Like

  15. Lee says:

    I cannot make out the exact words – “lost my gun, he’s got the gun?” – I don’t know. But, you can clearly see from the video – he’s ready to fight to the end – from the way he’s swinging at the officers before he goes down. And the other assailant that picks up the baton ready to swing – distracts all of them from their main issue – as well as, all the yelling and swearing from the other bystanders…who in the past are just as likely to join in to beat an officer….should all be held accountable.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. francismuldoon says:

    If that offender actually did manage to disarm the cop, I would think the cop should come under severe scrutiny for his inability to control the situation. Cops are trained in hand to hand and how to effectively control a person physically.

    His inability to control the situation cost an innocent man his life and I question that he should be allowed to remain in law enforcement and whether there are sufficient grounds for a lawsuit..

    Like

    • bill says:

      Hasty, hasty.

      Like

    • John Galt says:

      “His inability to control the situation cost an innocent man his life”

      Cops are not MMA fighters. The cop should receive a medal for protecting fellow officers by killing a dangerous violent thug. The only police conduct problem was that lots of cops responded, but nobody brought a rifle or shotgun. All those responsible for abrogation of vagrancy and loitering laws by allowing thugs, vagrants, alcoholics, drug addicts and the mentally ill to set up camp on public sidewalks should be fired.

      Liked by 2 people

    • lovelyd24 says:

      There was not an innocent man in this situation, There was a perpetrator.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. mcfyre2012 says:

    It doesn’t matter if it was justified. The video will make its rounds on “Worldstar” and fuel the BGI (even if black cops are involved).

    Like

  18. mazziflol says:

    Hmmm, maybe a new ‘Mike Brown Law’ will come into effect making it legal to grab an officer’s gun. After that happens, I suppose people could legitimately be in shock when someone who does, gets shot. Until then, expect the Mike Brown Effect to be as it is.

    Like

  19. TKim says:

    He may become the new cause célèbre, feted by very rich liberals who–if he had tapped on their luxury car window to ask for a dollar– would have sped away. Or had their armed bodyguard/driver do the same.

    Like many homeless people he may have turned his back on his family. Or they may have turned their backs on him. But either way we may soon know their names, their stories, and hear this man’s death is an indictment of “the system.” But not the monetary system. Pass the donation can.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. pattyloo says:

    i do not like people living on the streets. there are enough shelters for these people, and they should be scooped up and brought to a shelter. i’ve heard the reason many don’t go to a warm shelter is because the shelters don’t allow them in, if they are intoxicated or strung out on drugs. maybe there needs to be a different type of shelter for those people so they don’t pose a safety issue for others who really want to use the shelter.

    leaving them out on the streets to live makes it unsafe for people just trying to get to work or walk their dog. in chicago, many of these people stay under highway viaducts. this provides shelter from rain & snow, and it’s pretty dark so they can sleep during the day there. however, it makes those viaducts a scary place for other citizens just wanting to walk or bike through. not to mention that there is often feces smell in those places.

    Like

    • wondering999 says:

      Our community is relatively decent in taking care of the homeless, but I hear about another problem with the “official” shelters — they are infested with bedbugs.

      Like

      • wondering999 says:

        AND, a favorite place for people without homes to congregate is in the public libraries. This is problematic. I love browsing in the library, and so does an autistic kid who I look after on some weekend days. However… I’m afraid to sit down. No want the bedbugs…

        Like

    • wondering999 says:

      Also, it isn’t just the smell of the feces that is problematic. Many of the homeless have chronic diseases such as hepatitis/AIDS etc. You really don’t want to step in that feces, or accidentally handle it without protective gear.

      Like

  21. not surprised says:

    ” All those responsible for abrogation of vagrancy and loitering laws by allowing thugs, vagrants, alcoholics, drug addicts and the mentally ill to set up camp on public sidewalks should be fired.”

    Yup !

    Like

  22. Dr. Bogus Pachysandra says:

    Anybody got studio equipment to try and clean up the audio? I called my buddy, but he’s recording clients now and cannot spare the time.

    Like

  23. Roy says:

    The video isn’t clear enough to make a reasonable call. Immediate witness statements allude to belligerent and aggressive behavior from the homeless man, which leads to the question:

    Just how many trained police officers does it take to subdue ONE man?
    They’re equipped with batons, mace, tasers, and firearms, yet the firearm seems to be their tool of choice.

    Now, to be fair, many homeless are certifiably mentally ill and unable, possibly versus unwilling, to comply with instruction. That, and if he was a VA treated veteran, he’s probably on psychotropic drugs that cause a myriad of mental symptoms themselves. Police are truly placed in bad situations when they are forced to deal with mentally ill street people who should be in facilities.

    IF the police officers gun was compromised or in the hands of the homeless man, then the use of force was justified.
    IF not, then Ferguson sequel 2,3, & 4 are about to begin.
    IF the homeless man was not mentally ill, then add this case to the rapidly growing list of those of people whose outcome is totally determined by their refusal to cooperate with police in a civil manner.

    However, if he’s black, and I presume the nickname “Africa” wasn’t given to a Swede, then facts and the truth are out the window. No matter who is at blame, or if it’s shared, this is going to turn into a catastrophe. BO’s dream of martial law grows closer.

    Like

  24. lovelyd24 says:

    It appears to me that about the 24 second mark that an officer is yelling “put down the gun” .

    Like

  25. MouseTheLuckyDog says:

    What is interesting, the guy recording at one point says something like “the guy didn’t have a gun pr nothing”.

    Like

  26. ouroborosredux says:

    The Takeaway: When stopped by the cops, dont swing on them.. and especially dont grab their guns.. or at their guns.. or near their guns.. Wow, same takeaway as the last one.. Who could have seen that coming?

    Liked by 1 person

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