Astroturf, Psy-Ops, and The Manipulation of Reality for Purpose….

We were fortunate enough today to find a great presentation by Sharyl Attkisson who explains the subject of “Astroturf to Manipulate Opinion.

In this eye-opening talk, veteran investigative journalist Sharyl Attkisson shows how astroturf, or fake grassroots movements funded by political, corporate, or other special interests very effectively manipulate and distort media messages.

We strongly encourage everyone to watch this video as it sets the stage for a larger issue we have first hand experience with.

While Sharyl limits her discussion to a few pointed examples, we can factually share that an entire industry of social media manipulation exists whose entire purpose is to influence our opinion of any specific issue being highlighted.

There are large numbers of paid entities who work the social media pages to create, manipulate and mold opinion.

In addition, our prior research stories have found mainstream media personalities who are willing participants, often paid for their assistance,  pushing a very specific narrative.  More on that will follow…

mystery man

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This entry was posted in Conspiracy ?, Cultural Marxism, media bias, Notorious Liars, Occupy Type Moonbats, Political correctness/cultural marxism, Professional Idiots, propaganda, Uncategorized, White House Coverup. Bookmark the permalink.

116 Responses to Astroturf, Psy-Ops, and The Manipulation of Reality for Purpose….

  1. beth60497 says:

    wow.. Does this ever ring true…
    “Attacking the person making the claim”… eg… Troll, racist, KKK.. boy have I heard these in past 6 months.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Excellent information. Thanks.

    Anxiously awaiting the “more on that will follow”…….

    Liked by 4 people

  3. Plain Jane says:

    Sounds like a lot of entities have digested and implemented Rules for Radicals.
    Excellent. My grandchildren are tetting the link from me since schools now run counter to the analytical thinking their parents instilled in them.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thank you so much for posting this video. I had no idea how pervasive the astroturf phenomenon was! In fact I had only thought of it in terms of outsiders paid to go to protests and demonstrations.

    Like

  5. manickernel says:

    I have been following Shayrl since her blow-up with the hacking incident, I don’t agree with her 100%, but I do on this issue…and she has the credentials for sure, just starting saying things that went over poorly with her bosses and their controllers.

    Liked by 3 people

  6. auscitizenmom says:

    And, THIS is why I question vaccinations.

    Liked by 4 people

    • stella says:

      No relationship that I can see. The MMR vaccine has been given for more than thirty years with good results, ending the spread of a deadly childhood disease.

      You may want to question new vaccines, such as Gardasil, but I can’t see why you would question MMR or the polio vaccine, or any other that has been around for years, with proven results.

      P.S.: Attkisson has been a believer in the relationship between autism and vaccines for years, so she is hardly an unbiased source of information. By the way, I don’t believe in taking “cholesterol” drugs, unless there is a medical reason for them.

      Like

      • monroe says:

        I question whether the traditional vaccines such as MMR have become contaminated by nanobacteria that science has recently discovered and would entail a cost to decontaminate the production facilities.

        Liked by 1 person

        • stella says:

          What reason do you have to believe that?

          Like

          • monroe says:

            May not be the best citation (http://www.vaccinationnews.org/DailyNews/July2002/AnotherViralVaxDebate13.htm). Would be more than happy to do more intensive research. I am a medical researcher with numerous reputable medical publications. Not anti-vax but have some reservations.

            Liked by 1 person

            • strat4evr says:

              I find this very disturbing and somewhat confusing. Vaccinations against measles has a proven record of success so why is this even a debate?

              Like

              • rkae says:

                Please don’t tell me “the science is settled.”

                “Adverse events reported during post-approval use of Tripeda vaccine” include AUTISM. It’s right there in the FDA literature; the insert that comes with the vaccine.

                Liked by 1 person

                • auscitizenmom says:

                  Some people don’t like to accept what the inserts say.

                  Like

                • stella says:

                  That’s the DPT vaccine, not the MMR vaccine.

                  Like

                • stella says:

                  Here is the complete quote:

                  Adverse events reported during post-approval use of Tripedia vaccine include idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, SIDS, anaphylactic reaction, cellulitis, autism, convulsion/grand mal convulsion, encephalopathy, hypotonia, neuropathy, somnolence and apnea. Events were included in this list because of the seriousness or frequency of reporting. Because these events are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequencies or to establish a causal relationship to components of Tripedia vaccine.

                  Link to insert data:

                  http://www.fda.gov/downloads/BiologicsBloodVaccines/Vaccines/ApprovedProducts/ucm101580.pdf

                  Like

                • stella says:

                  Here’s the insert for the MMR vaccine, if anyone wants to read it:

                  http://www.merck.com/product/usa/pi_circulars/m/mmr_ii/mmr_ii_pi.pdf

                  Like

                • auscitizenmom says:

                  “Local health authorities may recommend measles vaccination of infants between 6 to 12 months of
                  age in outbreak situations. This population may fail to respond to the components of the vaccine. Safety and effectiveness of mumps and rubella vaccine in infants less than 12 months of age have not been established.”

                  Like

                • stella says:

                  That is why they generally don’t vaccinate babies less than 12 months of age. And why these babies are susceptible to infection during an outbreak. The reason why it is important for other children to be vaccinated.

                  Like

                • auscitizenmom says:

                  The only reason I copied it is that sometimes it is recommended by local authorities even though “Safety and effectiveness of mumps and rubella vaccine in infants less than 12 months of age have not been established.” It seems that they just do an ‘Oh, what the he!!. Give it to them anyway.”

                  Liked by 1 person

            • stella says:

              A more recent article about nanobacteria:

              http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-rise-and-fall-of-nanobacteria/?page=4

              Although nanobacteria have now been conclusively shown to be nonliving nanoparticles crystallized from common minerals and other materials in their surroundings, these nanoentities may still play an important role in human health.

              Did you say you are a “medical researcher”? I suggest you read some of the more recent literature.

              Like

              • Clownzilla says:

                Hasn’t Merck been garnering notoriety (lately) for making claims that the research doesn’t back up? They are the slimiest of the pharma slimies. Anyway, the CDC (as well as the provided inserts) has all the the info that people could possibly want to read about adverse reactions to these many, many…too many inoculations.

                Like

                • stella says:

                  What are you talking about re nanobacteria? (which is what I was discussing). If you have any links to articles that expand upon what you are generally alleging, please provide them. Your general opinions are no help in furthering the discussion. There are adverse reactions to someone, somewhere, for any medication. Does that preclude taking any medications at all? For instance, some are allergic to certain antibiotics. If I get a penicillin shot, I may stop breathing. Does that mean that penicillin is a bad drug?

                  Like

        • lovemygirl says:

          My belief is the only place nano bacterium exists is on the conspiracy pages of the internet. There, I used an astroturf technique but forgot to get paid. Seriously though, there is no such thing as a nono bacterium as far as I am aware. I could be wrong but I don’t think I am.

          Liked by 1 person

          • stella says:

            There actually are such things as nanobacteria, but they have been determined to be “non-living nanoparticles”. (See above)

            Like

            • lovemygirl says:

              My interpretation is the tiny particles were given that nickname by someone on the internet because they resembled rod shaped bacterium in a picture from an electron microscope analysis of a meteorite from Mars, but as far as science is concerned, they were just random shapes where a few looked like that, not some serious field of study and certainly not something harmful or living.

              Like

              • stella says:

                Apparently it was taken seriously – but that was ten to fifteen years ago. There was also a bunch of not so serious stuff going on – like anti-vaxxers who blamed nanobacteria for pollution of vaccines, or some such nonsense.

                Like

      • numerzwei says:

        I am much more concerned about the delivery agents v. the vaccine itself. This is similar to someone having allergic reactions to generics and not having them with brand name meds. There is very little regulation put into the “non active” stuff.

        Liked by 4 people

        • stella says:

          At the moment, I am much more concerned about a measles epidemic. Too many people alive today have never seen one. Vaccines have been so successful, that most have never seen a child with measles.

          Like

        • wanthetruth says:

          I had not heard of reactions (allergic) to generics but I had a bad one! Either to that generic of a Med I had taken for years or of a new prescription of Previcid. Such a mild Med prevacid is they didn’t think it would cause it. I took one dose of each and within a couple of hours knew I wasn’t all right.

          Not life threatening then but was Steven -Johnson Syndrome, which is systemic and I had skin cell reaction (body’s largest organ) over next several months. If I had ingested more I believe it would have been deadly.

          Like

      • JBisch says:

        False. The measles story (and recent vaccination blow-up) in general are examples of exactly what Attkinson is talking about re: astroturfing.

        CDC records show no one has died of measles in the U.S. in the last 12 years but at least 108 have died as a result of adverse effects of the MMR vaccine.

        Further, CDC statistics show measles was rare in the U.S. prior to the vaccination introduction in 1963:

        http://www.wnd.com/2015/02/measles-vaccines-kill-more-than-measles/

        The claim that MMR ended the spread of a deadly childhood disease is false.

        These ideas are introduced to protect and promote vaccine makers and distract from the government re-engineering the population of the country toward third world by dropping the borders.

        Liked by 2 people

        • stella says:

          The stats in the WND article are deaths per 100,000. The graph above is numbers of reported cases. I’ll answer you as I did someone else earlier:

          The fact still remains that many fewer children died over a ten year period = 4 or 5 per year = than died per year over a fifteen year period before vaccination, which was between 400 and 500. Nobody says there is NO risk with vaccination, but the overall situation is immensely improved because of vaccination. I am talking about actual bodies.

          In the decade before 1963 when a vaccine became available, nearly all children got measles by the time they were 15 years of age. It is estimated 3 to 4 million people in the United States were infected each year. Also each year an estimated 400 to 500 people died, 48,000 were hospitalized, and 4,000 suffered encephalitis (swelling of the brain) from measles. http://www.cdc.gov/measles/about/history.html?

          Like

        • stella says:

          And:

          http://jid.oxfordjournals.org/content/189/Supplement_1/S1.long

          Measles Elimination in the United States

          From 1956 to 1960, an average of 450 measles-related deaths were reported each year (∼1 death/ 1000 reported cases), compared with an average of 5300 measles-related deaths during 1912–1916 (26 deaths/ 1000 reported cases) [2]. Nevertheless, in the late 1950s, serious complications due to measles remained frequent and costly. As a result of measles virus infections, an average of 150,000 patients had respiratory complications and 4000 patients had encephalitis each year; the latter was associated with a high risk of neurological sequelae and death. These complications and others resulted in an estimated 48,000 persons with measles being hospitalized every year.

          In other words, if you cut the total number of measles cases to 60 or fewer a year, and the death rate is 1 per thousand cases, it makes sense that there are no deaths from measles in recent years.

          Like

        • Measles was not considered a dangerous/deadly disease when I was a kid. I got it when I was 7 and enjoyed myself for a couple of weeks. Lolled around in bed, got Jello, my mother read stories to me. The only bad thing that happened to me during my QUARANTINE was that I fell off of an easy chair and hit my mouth on the concrete floor as the rest of the family was driving off somewhere. Chipped my two frong teeth – looked ugly for years until numerous dentists finally buzzed off enough enamel to make the teeth look normal. I now have lifetime immunity to measles.

          Like

          • michellc says:

            I think you might not remember just how sick measles made you. I very well remember having the measles after being vaccinated and I very well remember how sick I was. I ran a very high fever, and was miserable, I certainly didn’t enjoy myself.
            I remember my mother freaking out and asking the doctor if I’d go blind. She came from a time with no vaccines and many kids went blind from the measles. The doctor said I had a mild case made that way because of the vaccination.
            I believe in the vaccination even if it obviously doesn’t always work because if what I had was mild case, I certainly would never have wanted my children having a not mild case.

            You also might want to check to see if you have a lifetime immunity to measles because I was vaccinated and had the measles, yet tests show I’m still not fully immune.

            Like

          • stella says:

            Just because you had a “good” experience with measles does not mean that all children did. Before vaccination began in 1963, 400 to 500 children died every year, 48,000 were hospitalized, and 4,000 had measles encephalitis (some of these kids were permanently brain damaged, some had impaired eyesight as a result). One in ten got ear infections, resulting in deafness for some poor kids.

            The reason why so many kids had bad experiences is because 4-5 million kids per year got the measles. Now, because of vaccination, when a couple of hundred kids get the measles, we call it an epidemic.

            Like

      • jason says:


        I don’t know what if any relationship exists, but have met many autism families who within days of the MMR vaccine had their typically devoloping children suddenly regress and eventually be diagnosed as being on the spectrum.

        Whether vaccines are just a triggering event which would occur regardless, and these children are just more susceptible/prone to developing autism due to other factors (exposure to various chemicals/preservatives not found/used when autism rates where less common).

        But something is definitely causing the suddenly exponential increase in autism and other disorders. It may not be vaccines, but IMHO vaccines appear to be a trigger for many (if not the cause itself). More research is needed and other vaccination protocols could/should be considered.

        Liked by 2 people

        • stella says:

          Here’s another theory. Proliferation of wireless devices and the rise in autism:

          http://autismparenthood.com/2011/08/19/can-cell-phones-cause-autism/

          This study was done at Harvard Medical School: Findings in Autism (ASD) Consistent with Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) and Radiofrequency Radiation (RFR)

          http://www.bioinitiative.org/report/wp-content/uploads/pdfs/sec20_2012_Findings_in_Autism.pdf

          Like

          • jason says:

            Might be a wide variety of contributing factors, but the fact that MMR triggers the onset of symptoms in many causes leads me to believe there’s more of a link than none.

            Like

        • Clownzilla says:

          As with dang near everything, follow the money…

          Liked by 1 person

        • beth60497 says:

          My BFF’s son was babbling mamma, dadda then within hours of getting the MMR, he quit speaking and in 12 years has never uttered another word. She doesn’t necessarily believe that the vaccine itself caused the autism, but more that it exasperated the symptoms. Or maybe the inert ingredients caused his issues.
          I don’t know the answer, but clearly something other then just “better diagnosis” is causing the jump in the autism rates.

          Liked by 1 person

          • jason says:

            Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy is something we’ve tried with our special needs daughter (with great results IMHO) and we’ve met many other families who had children on the spectrum who had very good success. Lots of other alternative therapies out there as well but HBOT is one we feel had the greatest impact on our daughter and some others we know.

            Your BFF may have already looked into and/or tried, but if not, there are definitely things worth checking out. At the HBOT session we were at, one young girl had the same reaction to her MMR shot, could only utter very basic sounds with hardly any words. She was 10? at the time. After HBOT (her mother did other therapies as well, heavy metal chelation was another one she swore by IIRC), she now shows no signs of being on the spectrum and can speak without issue.

            Anyway, as always, any parent should do their DD, but too many have no idea that there are possibilities out there.

            Liked by 1 person

        • michellc says:

          If there is any relationship maybe it has to do with one of the newer vaccines or the combination of vaccines. I still have my kids shot records and have looked at all of them and when they were given the MMR it was the only vaccine given. My youngest son is 22 and he went to school with several kids who were autistic. I don’t know their immunization history. I do know my children were vaccinated at 2 months and 4 months for DTP and polio, 6 months DTP, 12 months MMR and 15 months DTP and Polio with the exception of my younger son who had a few of his shots postponed because he was sick at the time, his MMR for example wasn’t given until 15 months and DTP and Polio given at 18 months. Then before they started school they had another MMR and DTP and Polio, but the MMR was given at a different time than the other two. They also had HepB but they were older when they had them except my youngest who also had HepB shots because the state had started requiring them. My other two were already in school before the requirement.

          My kids all had doctors who did not want to give kids immunizations when they were ill and did not want to give the MMR at the same time as the DTP and polio. Although I’m pro-vaccine, I do believe the CDC recommended schedule is too many vaccines.

          I guess though we can all do what I saw on the news the other night that some idiot parents were doing and host measle parties so all the kids can get measles at the same time.

          Like

          • jason says:

            I’m not sure what it may be, our family decided to have them split up and space out their vaccinations instead of having multiple given at the same time. Also request thimerisol free any chance we have, not sure why even if the mercury compound isn’t the same as that which is known to cause serious issues, that the medical industry would continue to use it.

            I/we are firm believers in vaccinating, but also firmly believe that too often medical decisions are made based on what’s convenient and/or cost effective as opposed to what may be in the best interests of the patient.

            Liked by 1 person

      • I had a feeling this OP would bring out this kind of response from the same anti-vaxxers we were getting on the other threads. Good on you, Stella. Keep up the great work!!

        Like

    • Apollo says:

      That… doesn’t follow.

      (Thank you as always, Stella, for your voice of Treehouse Reason! Nothing like it.)

      Like

  7. taqiyyologist says:

    About CFR

    The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an independent, nonpartisan membership organization, think tank, and publisher. CFR members, including Brian Williams, Fareed Zakaria, Angelina Jolie, Chuck Hagel, and Erin Burnett, explain why the Council on Foreign Relations is an indispensable resource in a complex world.

    From:

    http://www.cfr.org/about/

    Screenshots, please.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. stella says:

    I think Sharyl is, for the most part, a responsible journalist, but she is just a human being like the rest of us. Remember that it is not always true that the enemy of our enemy is our friend – if you know what I mean.

    And sometimes a “nut” and a “quack” is just that – a nut and a quack.

    ADD: Do I believe what she says? Yes, I do. That doesn’t mean that everything you read and see is a lie. It also doesn’t mean that everyone who purports to be fighting against “the powers that be” is right. Do your best to analyze what you see and read, in context with what you know, and make decisions from there.

    Liked by 6 people

    • doodahdaze says:

      Look. These are the LSD Flower Children in charge. Remember them putting Flowers in the gun barrels. Same thing. It will only work if we dose the Muzz water supply with Purple Haze.

      Liked by 2 people

    • 7delta says:

      It also doesn’t mean that everyone who purports to be fighting against “the powers that be” is right.

      Or isn’t actually fighting the same PTB you are, even though they may claim to be aiming at a mutual target. In reality, you and your view may be their target and they’re leading you away from the target they’re protecting to distract, discredit and discourage you.

      Like Van Jones said, “Call everything a conspiracy, even if it’s true.” This group of little birdies drop seeds, fairly elaborate ones sometimes, to start conspiracy theories where there isn’t one for the same reasons as above: distract, discredit and discourage. They want you to believe that resistance is futile and that you wear a tinfoil hat, so no one will believe you anyway. You have no hope, or at least do something so monumentally stupid you discredit everybody and their brother who may even think about agreeing with you about anything from your favorite coffee to politics.

      Do your best to analyze what you see and read, in context with what you know, and make decisions from there.

      What she said.

      Like

      • doodahdaze says:

        The main thing is the congress and legislature. They spend the money and write the laws. Then the Executive branch gets it and expands it within the agencies that Congress has TO’D to the Executive. Then the courts try to figger it all out. The CFR expands exponentially. So, we have a problem. People do not know how it all works.

        Like

        • 7delta says:

          I was responding more generally to Stella’s comment about everything not being a conspiracy and our responsibility to do our best to discern truth out of the maze of lies. My point was that conspiracies are a business unto themselves to distract people from looking at the real and obvious ones going on. While people are yelling false flag over everything single thing that happens, events really are being manufactured and manipulated, like guns are being run all over the place to our enemies. Then when the real conspiracies are uncovered, the general public is conspiracy weary, see it as tinfoil hat territory, thereby hesitant to accept someone conspired to do something so heinous.

          No event in human history has ever transpired that someone didn’t conspire to make it happen. We have laws against conspiratorial criminal acts. They exist. So yeah, I believe in conspiracies, just not all of them.

          There are multiple layers and strategies involved, so you’re right that knowing how the system works and how it’s supposed to helps sort through all the mess. Off the top of my head, I have nothing good to say about the CFR, except maybe they have nice stationary. I’m not paranoid either. I’m realistically cynical and don’t trust any of them as far as I can spit.

          Like

  9. doodahdaze says:

    Success is when it is all lies and over 1/2 of the voters believe it. Eurika!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. nyetneetot says:

    “While Sharyl limits her discussion to a few pointed examples, we can factually share that an entire industry of social media manipulation exists whose entire purpose is to influence our opinion of any specific issue being highlighted.”
    ….

    It’s been going on for a long time with anything and everything being sold to the public. Propaganda or “Public Relations” is used to guide us into making the “right” choices.

    “The milk chocolate melts in your mouth, not in your hand.” created in 1954, was a personally proven falsehood.

    Liked by 3 people

  11. rashomon says:

    Ah, Edward Bernays rears his ugly head again.

    http://www.historyisaweapon.com/defcon1/bernprop.html

    “No one is as hopelessly enslaved as the person who thinks he is free.”
    —Goethe

    Liked by 1 person

  12. doodahdaze says:

    If you were an American ally how comfortable would you be right about now. The Funk Soul Brothers are in charge. Fatboy Slim is in the White Hut.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. labrat says:

    I have seen a noticeable uptick in manipulation of comment moderation on some popular sites. I have often had well reasoned, factual and concise “conservative” comments of mine go poof! while looney rants making “conservatives” look like whack jobs remain intact. Many of the “whacky” comments are so stereotypical of the left’s vision of what conservatives think, I’m pretty sure that if these sites don’t get real ones – they fake outrageous phony ones. May be my own bias but I just haven’t seen this on the same scale on the “right”.

    Like

  14. doodahdaze says:

    You have to know. This is all to get to third world Psychedelica. The Holy Grail. Of mind altered old Hippies and revolutionary Weathermen. The Beest is still trying to maintain…as we used to say. Miami for example. They don’t care about a balanced budget. Far from it. Send in Fatboy.

    Like

  15. doodahdaze says:

    The kid’s are on it.

    Like

  16. doodahdaze says:

    Look at the headline. Psy-Ops. This is not a conspiracy theory. It is a Psy-Op. Then there is Fatboy Slim. The white kid’s don’t like it.

    Like

    • Yes, doodah – also religious ecstasy. They don’t get churching at home, so they look for it elsewhere. I realized this at my first rock concert as a 40+ year old mother of three. Quite an eye-opener. Three Dog Night. Portland.

      Like

  17. Betty says:

    When the Tea Party was new, Nancy Pelosi said it was’t real – just Astroturf paid for by Dick Army (who ever that is). I had been to the first rally MN and I saw old people, young people, young families so she didn’t fool me. So instead of believing her I wondered why she would think/say that and then realized it was because that’s what they do and so she couldn’t even imagine an honest grass root movement.

    Liked by 3 people

  18. doodahdaze says:

    Now. The prog base thinks they are living in a Police State. Even though the prog’s run the show. This is the sign of the total lunacy they espouse.

    Liked by 3 people

  19. cohibadad says:

    I liked it. Astroturfing is a devious method. Not everything is a conspiracy and most things aren’t exactly black and white, but when money is involved, don’t underestimate the determination of those who profit. Knowledge is a good thing, but making educated choices is becoming harder and harder.

    Liked by 2 people

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