America Turning Into Brazil…

Ahhhh, the world of liberal progressives – from the government that give us: Toilets that don’t flush, Cars that don’t start, detergents that don’t clean, water so hard you have to soften it and light bulbs that don’t illuminate, American Thinker has a great article highlighting how seemingly small regulations are piling up and creating big problems.

uncle-sam-cartoon-pelosi-reid-obama

AMERICAN THINKER – Our dishwasher broke just after Christmas. The timer stopped working, and a new one costs about $100. My wife suggested that since the dishwasher is nineteen years old, we should buy a new one. Up until now it was working very quietly and efficiently, washing and drying a full load in about an hour.

We visited the appliance shop where we had recently purchased a new clothes washing machine a few months earlier. I mentioned to the salesman that our new washer was very slow, taking nearly two hours to finish a large load compared to our old one, which took about 35 minutes. With a bright smile, he explained that that was because of the new federal energy efficiency standards for clothes washers enacted by the Obama administration’s Department of Energy in May 2012.

(I later looked this up on the Energy.gov website, and found that this new regulation was only one of over 40 new onerous energy regulations on products and appliances already enacted, with many more to come, including for Christmas lights. According to the website, these are “sensible steps” that will save consumers “billions on energy bills”. This is a highly suspect claim. When energy consumption decreases, utility companies typically raise the price per kilowatt hour to make up for the loss in revenue.)

And by the way, our salesman interjected, this standard also applies to new dishwashers. They now take as long as three hours to complete the wash and dry cycle. Oh, about your nineteen-year-old dishwasher…don’t expect the new one to last that long. No matter which one you buy, from $250 to $1000, the average expected life of the new washers is five to seven years. If you have your water treated though it might last longer he said to read lots of Best Water Softener Reviews because that technology too, is under the influence of said bill.

At about this time, I started hearing a song in my head. It was “Aquarela do Brazil”, the theme song of Terry Gilliam’s 1985 movie, Brazil. Gilliam’s film is a “dystopian satire” of a totalitarian society where all of the appliances have been designed and built by mindless bureaucrats.  (read more)

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120 Responses to America Turning Into Brazil…

  1. Pingback: America Turning Into Brazil… | RINO Blog Watch

  2. michellc says:

    Unfortunately all of this crap started before Obama. Some of these new regulations on appliances were on the books to go into effect before he was there. They won’t end when he’s out of there either unless Congress and a new President finally says enough is enough and reins in all these ABC agencies.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. waltherppk says:

    America needs a Secretary for Department of Energy who drives a Packard not a Shwinn
    and it needs public officials who are oath keepers and not communist subversives

    Liked by 5 people

  4. Lou says:

    not all regulations are bad. I call BS on this article. regulating the Second Amendment of course is bad, but regulating banks which is now unregulated will turn into another bank bailout. according to the energy.gov website, the newer model machine is more efficient and should save on energy bills, not increase them. Being Jewish ,I grew up around many lobbyists, (you’d be surprised the amount of lobbyists I know that are Jewish) and trust me their job is to convince politicians and the public that regulations are bad, regardless of the “external costs” to society. this regulation sounds sensible.
    http://energy.gov/articles/new-energy-efficiency-standards-residential-clothes-washers-and-dishwashers-save-consumers

    Like

    • I have to disagree. I had an acquaintance who about a new washing machine in 2012 and hated it. The newer, softer, gentler, quieter machine did not get the clothes very clean. You are citing the same claim that was made about the dishwasher, which I doubt for same reasons: working at half power only gives you a job half done.

      Liked by 2 people

      • stella says:

        Part of the problem could be the new (less effective) detergents, also thanks to government regs. You can buy the commercial detergent on the internet. One brand, Bubble Bandit, is available through Amazon.

        ADD: Applies to dishwashing detergent only.

        Liked by 1 person

        • doodahdaze says:

          This is what happened to Venezuela over time. I had a good friend from there 25 years ago and all he did was complain about rules, regulations, and permits. Thinking back his complaints seemed silly, but now we all have the same ones they had 25 years ago. I hope we do not end up suffering the same fate.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Lou says:

          I have not seen the effectiveness drop off in regards to the effectiveness of washers, dryers or dishwashers. My clothes are just as clean and my dishes are just as clean as they were years ago. We still are allowed to adjust our water heaters where the water will be hot enough to clean.

          Like

          • stella says:

            Maybe you don’t mind food particles on your dishes, or spots on your glassware. It isn’t the water temp – it’s the detergent.

            Liked by 1 person

            • sophie1150 says:

              A nice family affair is when mom and dad buy the food and prepare it. The kids wash the dishes and clean the kitchen.

              Liked by 2 people

            • dginga says:

              Water temp can help, however. Our repairman said to be sure to run hot water in the sink before you start the dishwasher to be sure the water going in is hot.

              You can also put a little dish of white vinegar on the top shelf of the dishwasher and it will help the detergent wash off the dishes, getting the glasses cleaner. Unfortunate we have to supplement something as simple as dish detergent, but such are the new regs.

              Like

          • stella says:

            Phosphorus in the form of phosphates suspends particles so they do not stick to dishes and softens water to allow suds to form.

            Now that the content in dishwasher detergent has plummeted to 0.5 percent from as high as 8.7 percent, many consumers are just noticing the change in the wash cycle as they run out of the old product.

            “Low-phosphate dish detergents are a waste of my money,” said Thena Reynolds, a 55-year-old homemaker from Van Zandt County, Tex., who said she ran her dishwasher twice a day for a family of five. Now she has to do a quick wash of the dishes before she puts them in the dishwasher to make sure they come out clean, she said. “If I’m using more water and detergent, is that saving anything?” Ms. Reynolds said. “There has to be a happy medium somewhere.”

            http://www.nytimes.com/2010/09/19/science/earth/19clean.html?_r=0

            Until I found a new detergent, I started adding TSP to my dishwasher. That helps too.

            Liked by 1 person

            • 7delta says:

              Until I found a new detergent, I started adding TSP to my dishwasher. That helps too.

              A friend told me about that and we tried it. Works too, but you have to be sure you get real TSP, not the non-phosphate kind.

              You can also get foreign made clothes detergent (German, I think, for one) with higher phosphate content, but it’s expensive, around 50 bucks a box, IIRC, but the amount used is measured in tablespoons, not cups.

              I don’t think most of the cost-saving, environmentally-friendly regulations actually do either. I don’t have a problem with regulations, per se, I have a problem with stupid, political agenda regulations that serve politically friendly, big-donor entities and are usually aimed at putting smaller competitors out of business. I also have a problem with the political agenda regulations that are about control. Those two categories cover about 99% of all regulations.

              Liked by 1 person

              • lineman says:

                So in other words we would be better off without any then right;)

                Liked by 1 person

              • Really off topic here. But saw Detergent(German). Have friends in town that run a yard and garden have told me they order Flea Collars from Germany for their pets . USA products are expensive and do not work. Pest control is also not effective. Rinse and repeat many times a year. Mouse and rat repellant also useless. Rats and mice. Finally
                got some cats. 99% regulations get you to spend money over and over again that not does not do the job. Sticking to Clorine and pine oil. For the bad stuff throw in some Lysol.

                Liked by 1 person

                • 7delta says:

                  I finally found a flea collar that works and is available here. It’s Serento brand, I think. I got it at Petco. They’re in a locked case because they are quite expensive, but last for 8 months. IIRC, they were around $60-70 each, give or take. I don’t recall the price of the cat collar. I was surprised by how well they work, but after a fight with fleas getting in the rugs that’s been ongoing for several years, I was willing to give it a try. I was easily spending that on large quantities of crappy flea products that would just knock them back for a little while. I also put out the nematodes that eat fleas and flea eggs in the yard, plus other bugs I can live without, but not the good worms, etc. I think I ordered them from Garden’s Alive.

                  Your friend is right that the regular flea collars are worthless. I did get rid of the rats that were so big the cats were scared of them with blocks of rat poison, but like everything else, it’s an ongoing battle when new ones find their way into my garage. Good thing, because I was about ready to use a 12 gauge.

                  Like

            • Dixie Darling says:

              I promise I am not doing a commercial and I don’t own stock in this product. But “Finish” dishwasher detergent which can be found in any grocery store is the best product I’ve ever used. My dishwasher is 18 years old and now, after using Finish, the inside of it looks like a brand new one. For spotless glasses, use Finish Jet-Dry. The products are a little pricey but worth it.

              Like

              • Be Ge says:

                +1. Finish, previously known as Calgonit, all traceable to Calgon, Inc. of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, these days sold by Reckitt Benckiser all around the world — is a nice tablet to put into the dishwasher for dirty cups/plates/etc. Does cost a pretty penny, though.

                Like

          • lineman says:

            I feel sorry for poor Lou…I don’t think he understands that if the new appliances are so great and do just as good as job then why are we “forced” to buy them…

            Like

          • michellc says:

            We get dirty, really dirty, our clothes may have anything from mud and grass to poop and blood on them. We have made our own detergent and stain removers for years. So the only thing that changed was the washing machine, not the water temp or detergent. I sold the darn thing on CL and had my old washing machine fixed and now have 2 used spares sitting in my storage building.
            These new washing machines are junk, pure junk. Folks who don’t need to wash soiled clothes may not notice just how bad they are, but folks like us learned exactly how bad they are. Not only did they not get our clothes clean, my opinion is because of lack of water and the lack of good agitation, but it took double the time to wash a load of clothes. An added problem was the machine smelling and we followed all the instructions to prevent it.
            Our dishwasher is an older one and I never plan on replacing it, however my neighbor just bought a new dishwasher and with her using the same detergent her dishes are no longer clean and she must run them through two or three times to get them clean. She’s looking for a used dishwasher and has quit using her new one and instead is hand washing.

            Like

            • beanpancakes says:

              My new clothes washer insists clothes will become clean only by dampening them. There’s a sensor to tell when the clothes are sufficiently damp. I disagree. My work around is to trick the machine by setting the knobs to bulky items & soak. This way I get a washer full of water first, then I add my detergent and clothes. This is the exact opposite of the instructions, which insist it’s best to add clothes first.

              Like

        • Murse says:

          Pick-up some Trisodium Phosphate at your local hardware store. This will make your clothes cleaner and whiter like they were prior to phosphate being mandated taken out of consumer detergents. That being said, the Chesapeake Bay’s health improved greatly when phosphate was banned. On the other hand, I am not sure if the improvement was as much a function of better agricultural erosion and run-off control than the credited phosphate ban.

          Liked by 1 person

        • I make my own laundry soap. Borax, washing soda, Fels naptha bar soap and lemon juice. Pennies for a load of laundry. There has to be a way to make good dishwasher detergent, too.

          Like

            • Liquid Laundry Soap:
              1/3 bar Fels Naptha Soap (grated)
              1/2 cup Arm and Hammer Washing Soda
              1/2 Cup Borax
              1/2 Cup Lemon Juice

              Grate Fels Naptha into a big pan. Add 6 cups of water and heat until soap melts into the water, stirring.. Add washing soda and borax and stir until dissolved.

              Remove from heat.

              Pour 4 cups of hot water into container you are going to use for the soap. (I use the big Tidy Cat Kitty Litter pails) – add soap mixture from the stove and stir. Add 1 gallon + 6 cups of water and stir.

              At this point you can add any essential oils to scent it. I also add lemon juice to mine because it helps lift stains. I use about 1/2 cup of lemon juice in this mixture. It will be about the consistency of egg drop soup and look like it has strands of snot in it lolol.

              use 1/4 cup soap per regular size load of laundry.

              I usually make a triple batch to use the whole bar of soap and a triple batch will last a family of four a little over two months. You can also add your own essential oils to make it any scent you would like. I like the smell of the Fels Naptha and lemon so I never add anything.

              Very safe for your pipes, city sewer lines and septic. Gentle on the skin, too. Enjoy!!

              Like

    • stella says:

      Reminds me of the new regulations that eliminated sulfates in dishwashing detergent, resulting in dishes that aren’t clean, and dirty dishwashers. Fortunately, you can still buy commercial automatic dishwashing detergent that does contain sulfates, and – voila – my dishes are clean again! I just do fewer loads per week, saving both water and detergent.

      You can also buy old-style lightbulbs (commercial grade) on line. But they cost three times as much. I hope they last three times as long. I am testing out my first shipment.

      according to the energy.gov website, the newer model machine is more efficient and should save on energy bills, not increase them

      The EPA regulations that are now forcing power companies to phase out power plants will take care of that. Our power company says it will cost about a billion dollars in our state alone in the short term to comply with the new regs. Who do you think will pay for that? Fortunately, we will gain some from the lower costs of natural gas (thank you, fracking!)

      Liked by 2 people

      • stella says:

        I was wrong. Total spending in our state required by new regs. is 15 billion dollars:

        http://www.crainsdetroit.com/article/20140803/NEWS/308039968/a-15b-upgrade-for-utilities-new-epa-rules-stoke-consumers-dte-move

        This is to reduce CO2 emissions – which aren’t a pollutant anyway. I know Lou disagrees with me, but he’s wrong.

        Liked by 6 people

        • doodahdaze says:

          This is the result of politicians wanting to “get things done.” They are always at it. Coming up with new improved laws and bills but never ever undoing the old mess they got done last time. I cringe when I hear the crazed fanatical statists saying they want the government to “get things done.” I want it undone. I will vote for anyone who tries to undo things.

          Liked by 5 people

          • stella says:

            ddd aka howie:

            I couldn’t agree more!!!!!

            Liked by 1 person

          • dekare says:

            HERE HERE….well said. There should be a moratorium on all laws. Say 2 years for a new law, 5 years after that for 4 cycles, and every 25 years after that. If a law is good enough to enact, it is good enough to maintain. That way, lawmakers will be kept busy keeping the good laws on the books, and not have to sit around dreaming up some stupid law that they can put their name on and make their voters think they are doing something for the good of all, when they are not. An idle mind is the devil’s playground. Keep the lawmakers busy. Also, any law not worth keeping, goes away automatically. Same thing for all alphabet agencies as well.

            If it is good enough to create…then let them have to constantly justify keeping it.

            Like

          • lineman says:

            Spot on DDD…I have always said to vote for the one who will give you the least and leave you alone the most…

            Liked by 1 person

        • Plant life absorbs Co2 and emits oxygen. Correct me if I am wrong. All life lives on oxygen, plant life needs Co2. Who is running this farm. Kill the trees and watch life die. Dinosaurs? Anyone?

          Like

      • kinthenorthwest says:

        Oh its the same with Clothes detergent too…They took all the phosphates out. When it started happening my ex brought a few cases of the good detergent…Wish I had been smart enough to had take some with me.

        Like

    • LuscombeFlyer says:

      “but regulating banks which is now unregulated…”

      Are you kidding? Did I just miss the sarcasm? Or are you really telling me that despite thousands of pages of laws and regulations and legions of government auditors, that the banking industry is “unregulated”?

      Liked by 2 people

    • but regulating banks which is now unregulated
      This is why some people shouldn’t be allowed to vote. Anyone who believes this nonsense can be convinced to believe anything.

      Like

    • waynestrick says:

      Using anti-bacterial clothing is a sensible alternative to washing everyday. Undies the exception, ahem. Hemp, merino wool, etc.

      Like

    • yankeeintx says:

      For me, it’s about choice. I am spending my money, and I should have the choice of buying what I want to buy. If I don’t mind buying a washer that might be a little more expensive to operate, or may use more water (which I pay for), then it should be my decision to make. We bought a new “compliance” toilet, that must be flushed 3 times! We had to modify it to make it work efficiently, because obviously the gov’t failed to test their design. We are under drought conditions in Texas, and we use rain barrels and soaker hoses for our foundation, plants, and garden (lawn areas directly around your house must be watered to prevent your foundation from cracking). So if I want to use more water to wash my clothes, dishes or even shower, I’m still saving water in other ways, because it should be my choice.

      Like

    • John Williams says:

      There is NO need for volumes of indecipherable legislation in order to protect the American economy. Simply throw off the current yolk of crony capitalism and allow true capitalism to reign anew. In that case, the large risky entities would have been allowed to fail thereby bankrupting all the owners and shareholders. GM should have been allowed to fail but those precious union votes had to be protected. The economy wouldn’t have been decimated but the liberal left voting bloc sure would have taken a hit.

      Like

  5. partyzantski says:

    A book worth reading on the big picture of what is described here on the geopolitical side is “The Coming Anarchy”, by Robert Kaplan. It is what the future will look increasingly like, +/- a margin.

    The ever increasing regs will actually hasten the disintegration of the post Westphalian nation state as we know it. The Brazil reference is more apt than one might imagine at first glance…. stark wealth gaps, fortified suburbs, private military companies providing security. We see glimpses of that now, it will only intensify in time.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Paul H. Lemmen says:

    Reblogged this on A Conservative Christian Man.

    Like

  7. doodahdaze says:

    I was fortunate enough to find a range without any computers or electronics in it. An Amana. All it has are burners and a simple oven and dials to set the temp. I love it. I had to get a modern outboard motor for my boat and it is a pain in the butt with all the sensors and computer nonsense.

    Liked by 3 people

    • stella says:

      I have an old washing machine and dryer, and will keep it going as long as I can. I’m not saying that all new development is bad (far from it; I’m not a Luddite), but change driven by bureaucrats isn’t innovation.

      Liked by 4 people

      • JT says:

        I think the article is exaggerated about appliances. I bought a new washing machine last year and it finishes a load in about 40-45 minutes. No issues with it so far and I have a toddler that loves to get messy. No problems getting out stains, at least no more than when I had an old washing machine, and it’s not a high end machine. It’s the top loader model right above the most basic one. Only annoying thing about it is that it’s louder than my previous washing machine and the lid locks when it’s washing so if you want to add clothes you have to pause the cycle to unlock the lid. My dishwasher isn’t very old either and it’s doesn’t take three hours. Maybe 45 minutes to an hour tops for a normal wash cycle.

        Like

        • stella says:

          I think the discussion was about dishwashers. Pertinent to that:

          Speaking of cycle length, you may notice cycles are almost twice as long as the cycles of dishwashers ten years ago. In an effort to meet federal energy and water conservation guidelines, less dishwashing water is used at lower temperatures. Older models will use 12 to 13 gallons of pressurized water, blasting away dirt and debris. Today you can use as little as four gallons per load. The consequence is a significantly longer cleaning cycleÉway longer. Normal cycles can run for two hours. If this is an irritant, look for machines with special cycles of 50 minutes, such as the Frigidaire Speed Clean models.

          http://www.abbysguide.com/dishwasher/guide/operating-tips.html

          Liked by 1 person

        • stella says:

          You said you have a top load washer. They are always faster than a front loader, which many people are buying these days.

          http://homeguides.sfgate.com/compare-cycle-times-frontload-topload-washers-65132.html

          Like

        • michellc says:

          My old one finishes a load in 30 minutes tops and our clothes come out clean.

          Like

          • michellc says:

            I second Yankee though, if some people want the new efficient appliances they should have that choice, if I want to be able to buy a new appliance that works like the old ones, I should have that choice. I don’t need or want the government dictating what I can buy and they never stop, now they don’t want me using my old wood stove, but they will have to forcefully remove it before I give it up.

            Like

      • dekare says:

        I will use that slogan….”Change driven by bureaucracy is NOT innovation”…

        Liked by 4 people

      • lineman says:

        This right here…+1000…I wish more people could understand that simple quote right there…Way to go Stella…

        Liked by 2 people

    • DDD I am salivating over your Amana. We have a high dollar range with computer and I address it with fear when I have do more on it than make a biscuit. Computerized twit fancy stove. Just want to make a biscuit and cornbread. That’s Okay, have a little toaster oven that can do, and even roast meat. Has dials and every thing and is just my size. Big honker in kitchen that is totally useless. Toaster oven in kitchen and gas BBQ on patio. Know where I will be this Spring and Summer.

      Like

  8. Kristin says:

    Seriously? There are plenty of legit things to blame on the president.. You are reaching here. The quality of appliances has been declining rapidly from a time before Obamas presidency. I blame it on using ten year olds in asian countries to do all the work. Not an efficiency regulation. Cmon.

    Like

    • stella says:

      Take the wider view, if I may make a suggestion. The problem isn’t appliances, per se, it is government bureaucrats mandating changes for industries that most of them have very little knowledge about.

      Liked by 4 people

      • lineman says:

        Can I have another please…You are on fire today;)….

        Liked by 1 person

      • 7delta says:

        that most of them have very little knowledge about.

        I would go so far as to say for industries and products that most of them have never even turned on or know how to use.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Dixie Darling says:

        Yes Stella….the wider view. Kristin apparently didn’t finish reading the article on The American Thinker. 21,000 regulations have been enacted under Obama with 2,375 more so far with only 4 days into the new year, planned for 2015.

        Liked by 1 person

      • rashomon says:

        “…it is government bureaucrats mandating changes for industries that most of them have very little knowledge about.”

        Such as healthcare, perhaps? Those idiotic Congresscritters who passed Obamacare have NO idea of the intricacies facing the average practitioner. “Experts” Zeke Emanuel, who is one of the coldest people I ever seen interviewed, and economist Jon Gruber are particularly to blame.

        I wish I’d taped an interview that ran last week with an internist who was infuriated over the results she was getting with Obamacare/Medicare. Apparently, her patients are mostly from immigrant populations and quite diverse ethnically, causing some communications and cultural problems that require more time to make certain they understand their healthcare problems and treatment. At the rates now paid by Medicare, which apparently more and more sets the norm for payment by private insurance companies, she has had to double her working hours just to pay her costs-of-doing-business and maintain her salary, which has not changed in five years.

        And she predicts it will get worse. In a few years, all doctors will work for hospitals where their every action will be supervised and questioned by administrators only concerned with the regulatory and business side. When you reach 75, only palliative procedures (pain pills) and hospice care will be available — even for people whose family genetics suggest a life span far into their 90s. Already many of the drugs on the formularies have been changed to generics, which might have different reactions in some patients.

        This “Brazilian-style government” goes far beyond dishwashers, toilets and light bulbs. It hits the very core of what made the U.S. medical system attract high flyers from around the world.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Burnt Toast says:

          “When you reach 75, only palliative procedures (pain pills) and hospice care will be available….

          Obama already said granny wil be getting a pill because it is cheaper than fixing the problem.

          Like

    • Don’t think I mentioned Obama while speaking of the failure of $10,000 dollars worth of failed appliances. The government regulations for appliances has reduced their ability to perform adequately and hold up over the years. The parts and repair of appliances are 40%-50% of original costs. Costs of repair some years ago were more affordable. Asian Ten year olds do not make law in USA your government does. It is called GREEN and stimulating the economy. Buy, Buy, Throw Away, Throw Away.

      Like

      • yankeeintx says:

        Part of that problem is we have become a throw away society. If it breaks, throw it away. I have found more than one vacuum on the curb, that only needed a new belt. The one cobbler in my home town just shut down shop after the family had been in business for 87 years. Nobody has shoes resoled anymore, they just throw them away.
        I won’t just blame government regulations because company profits have gotten in the way too. Using cheaper parts increases their profits.

        Like

        • michellc says:

          The sad thing is most people don’t even wear them long enough to wear out the sole before they throw them away.
          My DH hates that we have nobody to resole boots anymore, he used to could make a pair of boots last for years by resoling them, but the guy who did it died and his son who was taught how said he couldn’t make a living doing it when he got two pairs of boots a week max to resole. The little business had been in the same place for decades, his son was the third generation.

          Liked by 1 person

  9. Taylor says:

    This was a great article to open first thing this morning. Made me lol about the salesman. And the bewilderment of the purchaser.
    My “dishwasher” only breaks down when ‘I’m’ too lazy to get them done. As my laundry is mostly a bucket that holds water, that only breaks when the water is too cold on the hands…

    I’ve been looking for a small home the past 6 months. It seems to have become a staple in modern homes, dishwasher, microwave, HVAC. and on and on. Yet the first thing I did when I bought the home I am in, was toss them all out and try to fill the gaping holes.
    I was furious with ‘remote’ televisions back when I had one too. I never asked companies to make my world so convenient as all I had to do was sit on my butt all day. I miss the ‘old days’.

    Like

    • lineman says:

      I don’t think you quite understand the purpose of innovation… Its so the mundane task’s can be completed without much effort so you can focus on things to better yourself and in turn those around you…

      Like

      • Taylor says:

        Thank you for your comment. With all due respect, I beg to differ. Look around. I think the average family has gone to hell in a handbasket. With the advance of modern appliances for ‘more comfortable living’, families have also grown farther and farther apart each generation.
        I’ll take the life saving improvements in a heartbeat. I believe … no matter, each their own. I also home schooled my children and raised my boys to recognize the difference of gender roles. Shameful.
        We agree to different points of view. Cheers.

        Like

        • lineman says:

          I think blaming the wrong thing for families further apart…Its the lack of values, morals, character, and all the rest of those things that come with leading a Godly life that has broken apart the family…I have all the modern appliances and my family is doing just fine…Appliances give you more time…If your a good person you will have more time to do good things if your a bad person then you will have more time to do bad things…Simple…

          Liked by 1 person

  10. czarowniczy says:

    We not only have a problem with a government that believes it must control its bosses (us for those who’ve forgotten) while it gorges at the public trough but generally agrees across party lines that while it can’t do crap about our big problems it can simulate action by passing yet more unneeded laws and regulations.
    I believe that the conditions which made this country a standout in world economic history are still here. They are buried under the detritus of regulation, taxation and special interests legislation by generations of Congressjerks, most of whom never got dirt under their fingernails once in their lives. They are mostly book-learned with an academics uninformed yet scornful view of people who sweat while they work. When was the last time Reid or Pelosi had to personally unclog a drain, fix a broken garage door or unclog a lawnmower’s carb that became clogged through the use of the ethanol gasoline they mandated? Let’s get more basic – when was the last time they actually produced a tangible and useful product at the end of the day’s work, one you could hold in your hands and fix a problem or fill a need with? That’s beneath them, they are big giant heads whose function is to lead the mouthbreathing herds of the Great Unwashed into a newer and brighter era they won’t be able to understand but will be better off in.
    We recently bought a bottom-of-the-line name-brand washer to take care of farm clothes, nothing fancy – three wash settings and some water temp choices. First time we threw the jeans and bibs in and turned it on the ‘large’ level of water was about a quarter cup of spit sized. A call to the dealer informed us that teh new Fed regulation limited the amount and temperature of water a washing machine could use BUT suggested (wink wink) that a call to the serviceman would be helpful. Sho nuff, serviceman shows up, twiddles something in back and – poof – machine now fills to useable levels. There’s that American ingenuity overcoming regulations written by chairborne rangers in teh Beltway who use dry cleaners.
    I might also point out that if we look at the astounding success of the various drug ‘cartels’/gangs in the US (Sinaloa, MS-13, just to mention two) we can see that the US is still the world’s mots viable, successful and richest garden for any commercial activity. Just look at how they’ve managed to promote and increase the yearly sales of their products here despite a huge and ongoing (cough,cough) War on Drugs. Look at the elected and appointed public officials they own from the city to national levels, how despite the vigilance of the most technologically superior spy infrastructure in the world they continue to prosper and grow. That’s Americanism!!!!
    Think we can get the unions like Teamsters and UAW to take over the drug trade here and do to it what they did to American industry?

    Liked by 3 people

  11. dekare says:

    We went from the country that invented all the useful things needed to make life easier to this over-regulated conglomeration disaster where nothing works right or as intended, all in the name of mother gaia.

    Whenever I buy any new faucet or shower head, the first thing I have to do is drill out or remove all of the water restriction crap installed in them. My toilets had to have the water level “bowl” in the tank cut out, and now washer machines that don’t fill and dishwashers that don’t wash dishes, and detergents that don’t deter shit. I stick to the saying above, “Change brought about by bureaucracy is NOT innovation”. If something is so great, it does NOT need to be forced upon us. If something is better than it will sell itself and all will clamor to buy it. The govt is long past being able to change itself…sadly. The soap box has proved worthless, and the ballot box is not looking too good as of late either. The last option is just not workable at this point at least, so it looks like we will all be stuck just “taking our medicine”. This is but a small taste of what is to come. This is a minor minor version of what those under stalin or hitler had to endure. After all, when those men came to power, it was not taken, it was granted to them by THE PEOPLE, in the name of making life better. By the time they saw what “BETTER” meant, it was too late, and they could not reverse course. Just like when the south wanted to secede when they saw that they were getting a raw deal. Suddenly, they found they were not free to leave. I see this as something no better than our own “Berlin Wall” where the south, believing they would be allowed to govern themselves from state to state as they saw fit, was now being told differently. The federal govt changed the rules of the contract, and when the southern states claimed to not like the change in terms, they were told too bad, you will like them, you will stay or you will face the wrath of your federal govt. They did…and they lost, and had to swallow that large pill forced on them by the govt. We The People are going under the same way. We WILL BE TOLD BY OUR BETTERS IN THE FEDERAL GOVT how to live, eat, wash, dry, shower, medical care, child care, fuel usage, brightness of lights, and it will NEVER GET BETTER. These will be the good old days in twenty years. They will say in 2050 how free we were today…I guarantee it.

    America will runs it course, and eventually, like all other great nations, will slip into mediocrity and eventually fall. I just don’t see any bright shining lights on any hills anymore. The experiment was good while it lasted….but in the end…as predicted, failed under its own weight. And we let it happen. One regulation at a time. The death of a thousand pinholes.

    Like

    • Attorney says:

      One shining light is people like us.

      Like

      • lineman says:

        Yea but we are so spread out we will never be truly effective to steer this ship back on the right course…I have asked people before and have never really got an answer that is satisfactory… The question was was there any time in Nazi Germany that if the Jews stood up as a people that they could of changed their outcome…

        Like

        • dekare says:

          …and your example is spot on to what I am saying. Like the jews under hitler, we are not able to stop what is happening. When I was a teenager first learning about what hitler did, I would say to myself, why did the jews let this happen? Why did they not stand up and say no, and fight back.

          Well, I have my answer. They could no more do anything to stop what was happening to them, than we can stop obama, the federal govt, the EPA, the IRS, the Dept of Education, and all the other govt agencies that wish to tell us what to do and how to live. This is what it is like to lose your freedom….this is what it is like to be taken over by a dictator. We see the train coming, but we can’t get off the tracks.

          Like

          • lineman says:

            Oh but we can stop it…It would just take courage and the willingness to band together…Think of just a town of let’s say ten thousand people saying no…That would spark a fire that would light peoples minds and start them on a path toward freedom…I will not give up hope that we can regain liberty…If we don’t and things go to hell in a handbasket then at least we can say we tried…CTH should do an article about building a Freedom community and what it should have in it that would make it be a sirens song for liberty seekers…

            Like

  12. Attorney says:

    Where is the GOP with this?

    Apparently adding even more regulations. No Child Left Behind. Common Core. Prescription Drug Bill.

    I just had a scare where it appeared we might have to file a 1099 for our 19 YOA babysitter around the corner. Turns out her income was not over the limit, and so we did not need to do so, but she has a kid and needs the money.

    Can you imagine that the IRS would even care about such a thing?????

    Regulation nightmare.

    Like

    • kinthenorthwest says:

      I have the feeling that my worse fear is about to come true…I truly fear that the GOP will be a lot of the same with just a different name. Instead of the DNC messing up America, it will be the GOP…
      Just look at how the Good Ole GOPers slander the new guys like Cruz, Trey, Scott, and others who are truly trying to get America on the right track.

      Liked by 3 people

      • You are dead on here kinthenorthwest. I lost all hope in the GOP when they nominated Romney. I held my nose with McCain, but Romney was the last straw. Now they are floating Jeb Bush. One can only conclude that they have either learned nothing, are not listening to their base, or trying to destroy the party on purpose.

        The GOP and the DNC are about one in the same, steam rolling towards the same Communist goal. They just seem to package and market differently how they are headin there.

        The in-fighting in the GOP is by design, too. The old power brokers vs. the somewhat more freedom minded “youngsters” (Rand Paul?), it makes the party look weak and a shambles.

        Liked by 1 person

        • kinthenorthwest says:

          Ok if it has to be the Good Ole Boys Hucklebee or Rick Santorum cause after meeting Santorum in person I trust that he is the Real deal. Santorum should have been Romney’s pick for VP.
          However Jeb, Christie, Romney and the rest need to be go jump in the sewer…
          Would love to see Trey, Scott, Carson, West or some of the new blood out there run…
          I like Cruz but I left him out. I just believe whatever the arguments Cruz’s Canadian BC will end up being too much of a diversion. If you want to argue his mother was American, so was Obama’s mother; and that is only the beginning of all the arguments out there.
          The biggest problem for anyone running will be their monetary and moral conduct. The Dems will try and fry anyone running on the GOP whether it is true or not; or even if their own people are guilty of the same moral wrongdoings.

          Like

          • What do you make of Rand Paul?

            Like

            • kinthenorthwest says:

              Not really sure about him either—a bit too much flip flopping in the last year. Better than Jeb or Christie though.
              I really don’t want another election that I hold my nose and am voting for the least of the worse of two evils.
              I would really love to see an election that I would shout from all the rooftops that ???? candidate is the Greatest. Haven’t done that since Ross Perot..

              Liked by 1 person

          • yankeeintx says:

            I am waiting to see who will announce, but Cruz is looking good to me.

            Liked by 1 person

            • dekare says:

              I agree with you on Ted Cruz, and would gladly vote early and often for him if he runs for president. Even a few other names thrown around above would make me a happy voter. But also as mentioned above, I am SICK AND TIRED of holding my nose while pulling the ballot lever. If they run jeb, romney, or christie (who I used to like until he showed his true self), I will simply stay home and no longer care. If my country is going to be trashed, I would rather it be done by my enemy, the dems/libs/progs/commies than by my own GOP party. If the GOP destroys us, and I complain, all I will hear is that it was “my people” that did this…not the libs.

              I am sure I am not alone here. So whoever is in charge of the choosing of who to nominate for the GOP party, I hope they are reading this, as I WILL STAY HOME. This last election was a gift. If it gets thrown in my face, I am done.

              Like

            • kinthenorthwest says:

              Problem with Cruz is that his Canadian Birth will end up being used and become a diversion from the real issues.

              Like

              • yankeeintx says:

                I don’t see it as being a problem at all. The only ones that are even mentioning it are those that believe the liberal talking points.

                Like

                • kinthenorthwest says:

                  You are partly right about it being a liberal talking point.
                  The reason they are going to use it is due to all the money Obama had to spend to try and prove he was born in America.Obama spend 100s of Millions in many courts. Too many liberals are already saying you can’t have it both ways.
                  Like I said no matter how you argue the issue it will end up be a diversion away from the real issues.

                  Like

                • yankeeintx says:

                  Obama spend millions sealing his records, but he didn’t have to worry about proving he was eligible, Nancy Pelosi took care of that for him.
                  People may make an attempt to argue the point, but it will go nowhere.

                  Like

        • dekare says:

          I am starting to think that the communists have secret spys pretending to be DNC and GOP, and say whatever they need to get into power, and then once we vote them in, do whatever they need, to take America down, and turn us into socialists…all with the help of the ignorant voter.

          Like

    • Where is the GOP with this?

      You mean the GOP that gave us the light bulb ban?

      Like

      • “Where is the GOP with this” “You mean the GOP that gave us the light bulb ban?”

        Yes and yes. Seemed such a small thing. To change a light bulb to a different light bulb. It actually turned into a nightmare. New light bulb was by government definition and regulations a HAZMAT. Requiring special disposal.

        Almost same as OBAM CARE. Good thought worth the votes? A Nightmare. Everyone in WashDC needs to pack a bag and go home and stay. Not much for Demos but Rhinos gotta go!

        Liked by 2 people

      • 7delta says:

        Yep, Steve. That’s the one. Just makes the point about principles over party and that the parties are merely two roads to the same destination. The current resident of the WH just has the peddle to the metal to get as far as he can before everything comes crashing down and all those little progressive laws and regulations will be quite useful.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. ouroborosredux says:

    We’re all in it together.

    Like

  14. Dr. Bogus Pachysandra says:

    For commodes;
    If you have a ball in the tank, replace your fill valve with a Fluidmaster. Then replace the fill tube. That’s the tube in the center that has the “flapper” valve on the bottom. You have to remove the tank to do this, but it’s not that big of a deal. Go to the big box, or a plumbing supply, and find a taller fill tube. I think the one I used was from a “French Country Style” toilet, which has a tall but narrow tank.. I added almost 3 inches of water to my tank. Flushes great! Or,,,, find an old Ferguson, like Al’s!

    Like

  15. And to make things worse, these longer “cycles” make our day to day lives less productive. Now, instead of being able to count on doing a couple of loads of laundry in the evening (think school uniforms, bed sheets, towels, etc.) working Moms get to stay up later and rise earlier to complete the tasks. Instead of the dishwasher completing its cycle before bedtime, we now get to get up a little earlier to unload it in the morning. That loss of an hour or so is detrimental to family life and energy at the end of the day.

    The inferior light is causing a much more rapid decrease in my vision, too. I’m finding I need stronger and stronger glasses to read with as I struggle with poor lighting. And this is just one problem from one regulation.

    Oh, the magnanimity of our government looking out for our well-being. I, for one, would love to offer a great big smackeroo to the lips of those insipid idiots who will not leave us alone and free to make decisions on which products succeed and which fail (the basis of a free-market society.) And I don’t mean mouth to mouth smackeroo, either.

    Like

    • lineman says:

      Amen sister… People need to understand that it’s the entrenched bureaucracy that is killing productivity and us…Doesn’t matter who the president is until we get rid of the bureaucrats nothing will change for the better…

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Be Ge says:

    As much as I hate people like Commie Commissaries and their 21st century brothers in spirit the EU/EC commissaries and other forms of left-skewed bureaucracy — I will probably have to agree with Lou on the particular issue of phosphates. First, the problem.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algal_bloom

    is the problem. Many algae species are plain toxic. Good luck eating fish or shrimp that fed on smaller creatures that ate those algae. When talking about algal blooms, it should be mentioned some other not-so-friendly-to-humans organisms lead an affluent lifestyle in the same environment that is good for the above-mentioned algae — like Pseudomonas aeruginosa _. Per se, it is easy to observe and prove certain phosphates make certain algae grow faster and better — and unlike the man-caused global warming hoax — this is real stuff in that it is observable by someone with enough brains and basic equipment found in a high school science lab (ok, + some stuff freely sold / delivered over the internet components). There are two sources large bodies of water — like, portions of lake Erie or parts of Gulf of Mexico — to become excessively rich in phosphates. #1 are phosphate-containing fertilizers. Rain would wash some of ’em from the field above the lake / river straight into the said lake or river. #2 are detergents of all sorts, industrial and household. A phosphate molecule is very unlike a complex organic molecule or a heavy metal ion in that there does not exist an easy / cheap way to filter it out of the solution. Boiling (an easy way) the water and condensing it back does help, unless, of course, you count in the energy requirements — 4200 Joules of energy per kg to heat up 1C/1K, and 2256000 Joules per kg to evaporate said water (some of this energy can be recuperated upon condensation, but not a whole lot of it).

    I can tell tons of similar stories. Like, on evils estrogen-containing birth-control pills. Or, on evils of corn-derived alcohol used as a fuel — vanity of vanities and vexation of spirit, as said by a son of David, a speaker of words to a Jewish qahal (loosely translated into Greek as εκκλησια / eklesia / or church) aka Qohelet aka Ecclesiastes. Simply put, not only is corn ετηανολ cycle a CO2– failure because of sheer amount of fossil fuel burnt during corn production — it is also energy-deficient and exists due to external energy input paid with our money.

    While you definitely cannot and should not put the government in charge of fixing each and every injustice (and life is not at all perfectly just) and imbalance out there — believe you me, limiting phosphate flow into the rivers and seas is not the worst thing the government has done thus far. Also, if I understand correctly, it is not even a federally-originated decision — it was initiated by 15 or so states with big rivers/lakes/coastal lines and some exposure to algae blooms and red tides.
    Per se, nihil verum est, nisi in hoc instanti.

    Like

    • Be Ge says:

      That said, some of us living in areas with less soft water that is richer on magnesium and calcium cations — will have to pay more for their detergent or will have to go through the discomfort of preparing phosphate-doused salt or something of the kind for their dishwashers by themselves — as there is no direct (cheap, that is) replacement for phosphates in dishwasher tablets given the “hard” tap water. I guess those people are up to some compensation of some kind — with our legal system, it is still a distinct possibility. Class action lawsuit for direct and indirect (mein Gott, I have to mix that goddarn salt myself — that is an immense suffering akin to those of Obama sons when a rayciss prosecutor sings “Dixie”) damages and moral suffering can be on option here.

      On the other hand, people living around the lakes, rivers and seas could probably sue were there no phosphate limitation in place — for suffering and losses related to the algae blooms. I guess the two lawsuits would meet in a court of law. I’d love to see a ruling 🙂

      Like

  17. doodahdaze says:

    Ahh dunno. It is 80 out tonite. Jeb and Hildebeast will be de candidates and it won’t make a dime of diff. I think it is time to work on my golf game and let the world go by until the next big hoax we have to debunk.

    Like

    • dekare says:

      me thinks you right. I thought we had a little spat about 240 years ago over being ruled by a dynasty. Seems like we are back where we started…only without the help and benefit of Washington, Adams, Jefferson, Franklin and their friends.

      Like

  18. labrat says:

    A woman from Los Angeles who was a tree hugging, liberal Democrat and an anti-hunter purchased a piece of timberland near Colville, WA . There was a large tree on one of the highest points in the tract. She wanted a good view of the natural splendor of her land so she started to climb the big tree.

    As she neared the top she encountered a spotted owl that attacked her. In her haste to escape, the woman slid down the tree to the ground and got many splinters in her crotch.

    In considerable pain, she hurried to a local ER to see a doctor. She told him she was an environmentalist, a Democrat, and an anti-hunter and how she came to get all the splinters. The doctor listened to her story with great patience and then told her to go wait in the examining room and he would see if he could help her.

    She sat and waited three hours before the doctor re-appeared.The angry woman demanded, “What took you so long?”

    He smiled and then told her, “Well, I had to get permits from the Environmental Protection Agency, the Forest Service, and the Bureau of Land Management before I could remove old-growth timber from a ‘recreational area’ so close to a Waste Treatment Facility.

    And I’m sorry, but due to Obama-Care they turned you down.

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Bill says:

    Wait until you need Air Conditioning repairs as this article states. This area also has been regulated with higher energy efficiencies requirements. Also, in Nov 2014 the EPA set the final date for phase out of R22 which is the freon used in older units to be Jan 1, 2020. This phase out process will include reduced supply each year until this end. This means that you’re now better off replacing your old equipment instead of repair in many major repair cases.

    Who can afford to live in this world anymore?

    Like

  20. Burnt Toast says:

    As noted above, the regs are sapping the economic life of this country and have been shown to have a greater financial impact than all taxes combined. Not much anyone can do to get rid of the regs, just as lawmakers are gonna make law, regulators gonna regulate, it is what they do.

    Good thing is that most regs apply to the huddled masses of middle class as they are the sheepish ones with the money to buy everything at retail stores. But you still fix your own toilets, shower heads, etc. Make your own soap for clothes and dishes – real TSP, added 10% by weight will get detergent that actually works, citric acid also works good for mineral deposits (lemmy shone, finish, etc.) or you can add canner’s citric acid or get your own soap making good from
    soapgoods dot com
    (I haven’t tried them yet, but getting a 2000# sack of TSP looks tempting…

    Like

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