Day #32 – The Siege of Kobane (Kobani) – Turkey Finally Allows Passage of Iraqi Kurds To Join Fight For Kobane….

Those who have followed the month long fight for Kobane know what’s really behind the reversal in Turkey’s position. Quite simply the Kurds in Kobane have outfought ISIS, outmatched the jihadists, and outlasted the insufferable pressure from both ISIS and the Islamic State’s ideological ally, Recep Erdogan.

Turkey, a NATO member, could no longer stand in the sunlight of the world’s scrutiny, and the pressure upon Sunni President Erdogan was building. Having just suffered an embarrassing defeat in a bid to gain a U.N. Security Council seat Erdogan reverses position and allows Turkish Kurds to go and defend their sisters and brothers in arms.

ADDITION Turkey Syria

MURSITPINAR, Turkey — Turkey said Monday that it would allow Iraqi Kurdish fighters to cross its border into the besieged Syrian town of Kobane, where Syrian Kurds are battling Islamic State militants.

The opening of a land corridor would be another potential boost for the Kobane defenders following U.S. airdrops of weapons, ammunition and medical supplies to them late Sunday.

But the deal, the subject of intensive U.S. diplomatic talks over the past week, also depends on whether the separate Kurdish groups can resolve their deep differences in the interest of confronting a common enemy.

The tentative nature of the agreement reflected the convoluted history and political calculations of all parties, particularly the Kurds, whose ethnic homeland spreads across Syria, Turkey, Iraq and Iran.

Turkey had opposed delivering weapons to Kobane’s Syrian Kurds because of their affiliations with the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), a group based in southeastern Turkey that has fought Turkish forces since the mid-1980s, seeking greater autonomy. Its leaders have threatened to tear up a recent peace accord with Turkey if Kobane falls.

Turkey and the United States have declared the PKK a terrorist organization, raising additional complications for American policy­makers.

While the United States understands Turkey’s concerns, Secretary of State John F. Kerry said Monday during a visit to Indonesia, “We cannot take our eyes off the prize here. It would be irresponsible of us, as well as morally very difficult, to turn your back on a community fighting ISIL, as hard as it is, at this particular moment.” ISIL is one of several acronyms for the Islamic State. (read more)

kurdish women fighters 2

Kurdish Women Fighters in Kobane 

This entry was posted in Jihad, Military, Obama Research/Discovery, Syria, Terrorist Attacks, Turkey, Uncategorized, White House Coverup. Bookmark the permalink.

35 Responses to Day #32 – The Siege of Kobane (Kobani) – Turkey Finally Allows Passage of Iraqi Kurds To Join Fight For Kobane….

  1. canadacan says:

    The Thin Beige Line always in fashion.
    More guts than a burglar,more pounce per ounce.
    Always hitting above their weight.

    Liked by 3 people

    • canadacan says:

      I am reminded of Paul Newman’s response to Eva Saint Marie in the movie Exodus, when she said that the projected state of Israel could not fight against the overwhelming odds of the Arab population.
      “How many men did you have at Concorde”?
      “I don’t know”.
      “Seventy-seven.”

      Like

      • Col.(R)Ken says:

        Yes 77, by the time the British reached Lexington, about 500, then when the British where fighting there way back through to Boston, about 2000-4000, at the end of the day, over 12000 Americans had responded to the call to arms.

        Like

        • canadacan says:

          Yes Col.Ken
          it shows what a courage can do.It
          attracts attention.

          Liked by 1 person

          • canadacan says:

            I am a true Romantic all I want the Kurds to do is survive.
            I have heard Jewish people make a joke that if you get 12 Jews you get 13 opinions. So maybe this is the case with the Kurds as well.
            .Kobane is a rallying point.
            Nothing is ever easy especially in the Mideast.

            Like

            • canadacan says:

              T.E.Lawrence was continuously frustrated by the inter-tribal fighting in the Middle East.The more things change the more things remain the same.
              The Turks have been an on going problem for centuries.Vlad the Impaler had a wonderful time fighting them.
              (Since we’re getting into Halloween and all that sort of stuff.)

              Like

          • Josh says:

            Courage and G-d – a great combination!

            Like

  2. Aslan's Girl says:

    Praise God. If these Kurds fought so valiantly by themselves, I can only imagine what will happen when more Kurds join in! Go, Peshmerga!! God be with you.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. 1hear2learn says:

    While I’ve been rooting for the US and Turkey to assist in some way, reading the full story in the link provided above about how even the Syrian Kurds have mistrust with Iraqi Kurds wanting to join their fight – let alone the Turkish Kurds designated as a terrorist organization, and listening to Ollie North on Fox last night discussing how Kobane is a somewhat of a distraction from Anbar Province in Iraq, and then also how this action and failure to gain temporary seat on UN security council may push Turkey to have closer ties with Russia instead of the West… well it just highlights what a tangled complicated web the entire middle east is. Are there really any good solutions for the region that can bring stability and peace? I have to admit I once had high hopes when US took Sadam Hussein down that somehow Iraq could lead the way for the region to show neighboring countries that Shea, Sunni, Kurds, and Christians can live in unison with each other (and believe many of civilians in the region could if they had leaders willing to lead them in this direction), but now I have to say the more I learn about the region the more silly I feel for ever believing in that notion.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Pam says:

      Many of us wanted to believe these groups could reconcile their differences. I have to say about myself that I was very naive.

      Now to hear that the Kurds can’t even get along with each other? I think they need a Coke. Remember this nonsense?

      Liked by 1 person

    • czarowniczy says:

      This is the Mideast – go back and look at how, post-WW I, the ‘Arabs’ who’d managed to get it somewhat together to fight the Ottomans, fell apart over living on the same sand. They are tribal, not nationalistic. The Western press likes to use terms comfortable to the US readers and politicians (see our MD 20/20 discussion for possible reasons why) and we don’t understand tribal, while most have a grasp of nationalism so the press phrases in those terms. The Kurds right now have sort of lumped together for ‘Kurd’ survival but I’m betting that were the ISIS threat gone this afternoon they’d be back to in-fighting by Wednesday lunch.

      Like

      • yankeeintx says:

        My son said the same thing. He said it was a waste of his time training the ANA. He said the minute they turn their backs, the ANA runs off with the new weapons back to their clan/village. The only reason the Afghani’s even fought the Taliban is because the Taliban was messing with their clan. They don’t care what happens to the country as a whole, just what affects their clan.

        Like

        • czarowniczy says:

          True dat, we’re using a nationalist mindset dealing with a clan based culture, trying to drive nails into a board with a wrench. Hmong used to run off and hide all of the weapons and ammo they could because they knew the US, just as the French had, would leave them to the mercies of the Vietnamese who hated them once we were done with them. NV, who by that time, found the perfect way for nationalists to deal with a clan-based culture – they killed them off or drove them out of the country.

          Like

      • polk8dot says:

        ‘They are tribal, not nationalistic.’
        I really wish someone would have explained this to our media and politicians. I wish even more that they had paid attention….

        Like

        • czarowniczy says:

          I took my history classes while I lived in Germany so we had an international history view while the US generally teaches that all history is US-centric. The Europeans are responsible for the ‘states’ that exist in the Mideast today, they went in and created them for their own purposes using a European nationalist paradigm and ignoring centuries-old ethnic/tribal identifications. The ‘modern’ residents may have internalized some of the nationalistic identity but many still think along far older traditional lines. Look at modern Turkey’s borders and then back when it was the center of the Ottoman Empire – the Turks didn’t choose their modern borders, the Europeans did. And what about those Kurds????

          Like

    • Josh says:

      “… it just highlights what a tangled complicated web the entire middle east is. Are there really any good solutions for the region that can bring stability and peace?” Since the beginning of time (almost literally) the middle east has been in turmoil. This turmoil is greater than any of us or even all of us. This turmoil is between the greatest powers.

      Like

  4. Paul H. Lemmen says:

    Reblogged this on A Conservative Christian Man.

    Like

  5. justfactsplz says:

    Hopefully the Kurds can set their differences aside and band together to defeat this common enemy. I think the extra help coming from new ammunition and fighters will do much for their emotional and mental state and recharge their resolve to win. All of them must concentrate on the end result, defeating ISIS.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. czarowniczy says:

    Letting Kurd forces from areas the Turks are trying to limit Kurd presence in travel through Turkey to areas where ISIS is killing them works for the Turks. ISIS isn’t decimating them but every little bit helps and it lessen Kurdish resistance in those areas the Turks are still pushing the Kurds out of (you know, those areas the US/European press is largely ignoring right now). Turks have a slight propaganda win, though one wonders how much it will weigh against the public’s understanding that, until now, the Turks have been hand-in-hand with ISIS in killing the Korbane Kurds – or maybe not (“Hey! Stella! Who’s on The Voice tonight?”).
    Again, we’re NOT getting timetables on Kurdish troop transit levels nor the amounts of supplies the Turks are going to let through. If the levels are not sufficient all this will do is prolong this little international power show allowing Turkey to keep the media pressure up on the West for concessions. Oh yeah, and more Kurdish fighters to be killed. Sounds like a Turkish delight to me.
    I still see this as a win-win for Turkey. Anyone who takes the initiative to kill Kurds openly and in larger numbers than the Turks could do without getting heat from the US and NATO – win in Turkey’s court. The EU (Germany in particular) have promised the Turks EU membership for decades but still have not let them in. Neither the US nor EU/NATO want to get involved in yet another Mideast land war and need a proxy with Turkey being the only viable option – win for Turkey. The NATO folks need Turkey on NATO’s side to act as the cork in the Bosporus bottle as they cannot do it themselves, now Russia’s in the game to lure Turkey into their sway by giving them goodies the EU promised but never delivered – win for Turkey. Turkey gets to play the various sides against each other and strictly to Turkey’s benefit with really no negative consequences as both sides want to take Turkey to the prom – Turkey win.
    The big one, to me, is that Turkey may well get to go into Syria, the real prize, secure Turkish southern border areas and get control of Aleppo Governorate. That would allow Turkey to toss out the Alawite regime and replace it with a Sunni one more to their liking. Turkey gets one of its old areas back, most populous one in Syria, and (coincidentally) one that the Russians have a strong presence in. I’m not sure if the West will be happy with Turkey looking to get back some of its old territory in Iraq – an area that has Kurds on top of it and lots of oil under it – but then Russia might be OK with that.
    The Turks have a very large and well-trained standing military, the only ones manpower-wise whom I say could take them on would be the Egyptians but that ain’t gonna happen. If they wanted they could go after ISIS and squash it in short order, they are that big and that good; but Turkey sees its first chance in decades to leverage this mess to its advantage and it’s not about to let it slip away. We, and I believe the Russians, want to see Turkey as THE regional power – so does Turkey – with the major question being ‘whose camp will she be in’? A bunch of dead pawns is just part of the gaming stakes, happens all of the time everywhere, just the numbers and levels of press exposure differ.

    Like

  7. czarowniczy says:

    Reports are that Turkey, though promising to allow Pesh transit through Turkish territory to besieged Kobane, still has not had any pass through. the ISIS folks, not waiting to see if Turkey and the West will actually do something, has launched a new attack designed to seal the Turkish border area off to prevent any Pesh reinforcements from getting through to Kobane. I don’t see Turkey going out and smashing a corridor through ISIS to allow the Pesh access to Kobane so let’s see how this plays out.
    Looks like a sticking point is which country (Syria or Iraq) will be the straw dog. The US is saying that while it will assist the Kurds at Kobane our first priority is still the Iraqi lands (geez, think the oil reserves have anything to do with that?). Iraqi Kurdish officials are saying they will only send Syrian Kurds to assist the Kobane fighters, apparently they want to keep their guys at home for obvious reasons. US is saying it used 3 C-130s Monday (no word on which mod, how much they carried or how many sorties they made) to resupply the Kobane forces – now word on what/how much the dropped or how much of it fell into ISIS hands or failed to reach Kurdish forces(a problem with airdrops).
    Where are the Pesh reinforcements and will Turkey place roadblocks to their transit into Kobane? Where will the Pesh cross and how far will they have to go to get to Kobane? Will the Pesh have effective air support/ Will the US keep up an air resupply adequate to meet defensive tempo needs? At what point will Turkey feel the deaths of the Kurds and its personal needs/concessions it’s trying to drag out of the Wrest have been met and drop the hammer on ISIS? Stay tuned, sports fans.

    Like

  8. John Denney says:

    ” Erdogan reverses position and allows Turkish Kurds to go and defend their sisters and brothers in arms.”

    The article says Iraqi Kurds, not Turkish Kurds.

    Liked by 1 person

    • LetJusticePrevail" says:

      I caught that, too. From what I’ve been able to determine, the only assistance that is being sent comes from the Iraqi Kurds, and not from Turkey. I’m thinking that part of this is to avoid another embarrassing moment for Obama if/when the press reports that the PPK is somehow involved, but was already deemed as a terror organization by the administration. After all, he’s already been outted for supporting the IS, so he has to tread very carefully here.

      As an aside, notice how the PPK is designated as a terror organization, but the folks who toppled Muammar Gaddafi were not? Makes you wonder just how these folks make that determination, doesn’t it?

      Like

  9. mazziflol says:

    ISIS Says Thank you USA for the Weapons:

    Like

    • LetJusticePrevail" says:

      IS Fighters Seize Weapons Cache Meant for Kurds

      But the lost weapons drop was more an embarrassment than a great strategic loss. The Islamic State militants already possess millions of dollars-worth of U.S. weaponry that they captured from fleeing Iraqi soldiers when the group seized swaths of Iraq in a sudden sweep in June.

      I guess that it’s too much to hope that this errant pallet was “salted” with GPS trackers, faulty weapons, or munitions that are designed to blow up in the hands of IS. THAT would have involved a level of planning that seems beyond the capabilities of our current “leaders”.

      http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/syrian-airstrikes-kill-town-jordan-26339991

      Like

    • Josh says:

      I have a hard time believing this was an “oops”.

      Like

    • MitziKB says:

      But I thought Rear Adm. John Kirby said one bundle missed their target and we destroyed that bundle? So did more than one bundle miss the target, or did our efforts to destroy the one errant bundle fail? Guess it really doesn’t matter except for providing false information to begin with… or are we supplying both sides and IS screwed up by letting out the secret? My guess is not many folks in US really give a hoot either way unfortunately.

      Like

    • MitziKB says:

      But I thought Rear Adm. John Kirby said one bundle missed their target and we destroyed that bundle? So did more than one bundle miss the target, or did our efforts to destroy the one errant bundle fail? Guess it really doesn’t matter except for providing false information to begin with… or are we supplying both sides and IS screwed up by letting out the secret? My guess is not many folks in US really give a hoot either way unfortunately.

      Like

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