More Common Core Crapmatics

Remember, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, together with Tom Donohue of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, are committed to seeing Common Core education standards strictly enforced.  They will be running campaign attack ads against anyone who opposes “Common Core”.

common core

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43 Responses to More Common Core Crapmatics

  1. CrankyinAZ says:

    Love the parent’s reply!!! Perfect!!! My daughter had 1 semester of “CC-like” math in her last school before I pulled her out to start homeschooling. It was the most frustrating semester I ever remember (it was only 4th grade math – and I didn’t understand it.)

    And yes… they (The Media) must have gotten their talking points about Common-Core and pushing it on the LO-Info populace…. Now I can add “Crazy” to the list of things I am…

    http://www.eastvalleytribune.com/columns/east_valley_voices/article_62e3a7d0-abce-11e3-8442-001a4bcf887a.html

    Like

  2. auscitizenmom says:

    McConnell and Donohue need to be given this problem to solve in front of an audience.

    Like

    • The All Real Numbers Symbol says:

      Anyone who supports Common Core needs to be given this problem to solve in front of an audience. Preferably a national news audience, so the low-info voters finally understand the problems with Common Core.

      Like

  3. timmysfriend says:

    I have tried to help my poor grandson with his homework before and it’s completely ridiculous! I’m pretty good with math and I was almost in tears trying to figure it out. He is really struggling with it too so I’m praying we can get them to get rid of it!!

    Like

    • LetJusticePrevail" says:

      I have the exact same problem when I go over my grandson’s homework with him. They encourage “estimating” and “rounding” more than trying to get precise answers, and the mechanics used to actually “solve” problems seem to be overly convoluted and intentionally confusing.

      What’s the point of “math” if you don’t seek an exact answer? Will the manager of a store tell cashiers to just accept any old payment, hoping that the “rounding down” and “rounding up” will average out at the end of the day? Did we get to the moon by just making our “best guess” where it will be when we get there?

      I understand the attraction of having the means to measure performance in a manner to compare one school system to another (to root out schools that consistently produce sub-par students) but what good is “standardized education” if the standards don’t meet the needs of the real world?

      Like

      • sirwin says:

        Please don’t take this as condescending, but we probably DID need to estimate when we went to the moon. Sometimes a system is so complex, a best guess is all we can get out of it.

        There is some higher level math such as the Newton-Raphson algorithm that seeks to estimate a value to within a certain error limit. In those cases, it can easily take hundreds of calculations to reach a value CLOSE to the exact answer. Because of the way that algorithm works, it may never converge on the exact answer, so an estimation is used. I learned that in my bachelor’s electrical engineering curriculum.

        In the idiotic CC problem above, I can see the error that the problem wants you to find, but they are trying to teach students to spot and avoid some arbitrary mistake instead of just teaching the student to subtract correctly.

        Like

        • LetJusticePrevail" says:

          So what’s the proper algorithm to use when calculating how much to give my crack dealer when I buy a “brick”?

          I mean, I don’t want him to bust a cap in my a$$ because he thinks I’m “dissing” him by not offering to pay the right amount.

          Like

          • sirwin says:

            I do not appreciate the sarcasm. I was simply giving an example of when exact values are not found in a mathematical problem.

            Like

            • LetJusticePrevail" says:

              And I was making a tongue-in-cheek reply to underscore the importance of being able to arrive at precise answers at times when precision can be a life-or-death issue, which was the point of my original post. Simply excusing yourself for being condescending does not change the fact that you were condescending in your defense of Common Core.

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              • sirwin says:

                I was not defending Common Core. As an engineer I am well aware that lack of precision on my part can kill people. I was simply trying to point out that sometimes math is not about cut and dry exact answers.

                Like

        • unitron says:

          “In the idiotic CC problem above, I can see the error that the problem wants you to find, but they are trying to teach students to spot and avoid some arbitrary mistake instead of just teaching the student to subtract correctly.”

          I disagree.

          They’re not trying to teach subtraction, they’re trying to teach an understanding of how the number line works.

          Later on, when the student enters an algebra class, they’ll grasp the concept of the x-axis, not to mention the y, and the z, much more quickly and easily.

          Once the number line becomes more intuitive to the student, it’s easier for them to grasp the concept of negative numbers, and to understand that zero, in its own peculiar way, has a value.

          Like

  4. timmysfriend says:

    P.S. I forgot, I wanted to thank everyone again for the prayers and the beautiful poem. I love this site!

    Like

  5. elvischupacabra says:

    Here is where they are headed:

    Bobby goes to the doctor with a high fever, a stabbing pain in his lower right side and mild nausea. Dr. Hakim discovers that Bobby has an appendicitis and operates. Based on what you know about social justice in medicine working in association with the People’s Committee on Race, Justice and Equality, what should Dr. Hakim do?

    Answer: He should remove Bobby’s inflamed appendix.

    Wrong, you bloated, little white-privileged pig! The inflamed appendix is representative of The Struggle of Oppressed People worldwide against the white male dominated established Capitalist order! It became inflamed because Bobby decadently ate rich foods, which is the medical equivalent of worker oppression. Dr. Hakim should remove part of Bobby’s intestine so that the poor oppressed appendix can grow and flourish, evolving in its own time and culture!

    Like

  6. Abagail says:

    How, exactly, are “lo-fo’s” ever going to complete one math problem correctly? What is Common Core going to do to disparate impact?

    Like

    • LetJusticePrevail" says:

      It seems that the advocates of “social justice” finally realized that certain sectors of our society are completely dysfunctional and will never be able to compete in the real world. Their only remaining alternative was to make it completely impossible for other students to master the skills necessary to survive. Hence, they invented “Common Core”.

      Like

      • auscitizenmom says:

        OMG I think you have it figured out. 😯

        Like

      • QuadGMoto says:

        I think it’s probably worse than that. Since parents will inevitably understand it even less than the students, the students can be told that they’re the smart ones and their parents are “too stupid to understand simple math”. Therefore, the students don’t have to listen to their parents.

        Heck, TV shows oriented towards children have been portraying kids as the intelligent ones and parents as mouth-breathing morons for decades already. (Disney, call your office.) Why not extend that propaganda to the school curriculum?

        Like

    • sundance says:

      Funny you should ask. Common Core Meets Disparate Impact:

      http://weaselzippers.us/180075-fdnys-amazingly-racist-test-questions/

      …..and then you get rid of the SAT test.

      http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/17/living/sat-words-schools/

      Like

      • Abagail says:

        The unintended consequence of Common Core might be willing euthanasia by those subjected to students of it’s system.

        Like

    • yankeeintx says:

      That is the goal. Young kids will get frustrated, start thinking they must be stupid, and have self-esteem issues. This will make them realize that all they will ever be qualified to do is flip burgers. They want to create worker drones, rather than independent critical thinkers.

      Like

  7. And this, my friends, is why we are homeschooling! This is ridiculous and common core is meant to teach to the lowest common denominator. We sure wouldn’t want the slower kids, the more disruptive kids, the troublemakers who have no desire to get an education to feel like they’re not as “good” as the kids who DO want an education, who are not troublemakers and who DO have the ability to excel academically. Trophies for all participants (or in this case, diplomas and college educations for the least deserving!)

    Like

  8. Steve K says:

    I think I smell a meme here…

    Dear Jack,

    Don’t bring a knife to a gun fight. Number lines have their place, but when dealing with three digit numbers it’s time to put on your big-boy pants. Align the numbers vertically and be ready to carry.

    Sincerely,
    A Working Engineer

    Like

    • sirwin says:

      Also, that approach works when you aren’t working in the decimal system. If anyone knows how to add and subtract binary or hexadecimal values using a number line, please show me.

      Like

      • John Denney says:

        First one must know how to count forward and backward in hexadecimal. Forward is:
        0
        1
        2
        3
        4
        5
        6
        7
        8
        9
        a
        b
        c
        d
        e
        f
        10

        Just like in decimal, when a column reaches the highest digit (9 for decimal, f for hex), it rolls over like a 1950’s odometer to zero and a one carries into the column to the left.

        x’1ac’ is one x’100′ plus x’a’ x’10’s plus x’c’ ones, so to do x’400′-x’1ac’, one would start at x’400′ on the number line, move left one x’100′ to x’300′, then move left x’a’ x’10’s to x’260′:

        The left column is the move count; the right column is the new location on the number line:
        1 2f0
        2 2e0
        3 2d0
        4 2c0
        5 2b0
        6 2a0
        7 290
        8 280
        9 270
        a 260
        then move left x’c’ ones to x’254′.
        1 25f
        2 25e
        3 25d
        4 25c
        5 25b
        6 25a
        7 259
        8 258
        9 257
        a 256
        b 255
        c 254

        Like

        • LetJusticePrevail" says:

          Yes, but can you do that with Roman Numerals?

          Like

        • sirwin says:

          I didn’t think that all the way through…

          Obviously hex, binary, and octal can be represented on a number line. I was just trying to point out how trivial and time consuming it is to add in those number systems using a number line.

          Like

          • John Denney says:

            I think the number line isn’t meant to be used in actual practice, but is meant to give an understanding of the underlying principles.

            Similarly, I used a chess board to explain multiplication to my 4 year old.

            “A part of the chess board that is two squares wide and three squares long is six squares. You can see, too, that a part of the chess board that is three squares wide and two squares long is also six squares. Two squares three times is the same as three squares two times. However, the way it’s commonly said is ‘two times three is six’ and ‘three times two is six'”

            He’s 18 now, and was all excited last night to show me what he learned about double integrals yesterday in Calc II at the local college.

            Like

  9. John Denney says:

    Dear Jack,
    316 is three hundreds, one ten, and six ones.
    You were correct to move left on the number line by three hundreds and six ones, but you neglected to also move left by one ten.
    Helpfully yours,
    Mr. Denney

    “The beginning of wisdom is: Acquire wisdom;
    And with all your acquiring, get understanding.” – Proverbs 4:7

    Like

    • triper57 says:

      You failed the test. He moved six tens on the number line not six ones. Have no idea how he came up with 121, did not show his work. The number line has no relation to either the right answer or the wrong answer.

      Like

      • John Denney says:

        No, he moved six ones. Jack showed his work: the three big humps, the six little humps, and the typewritten numbers underneath. “Frustrated Parent” wrote the “57, 67, 77, 87, 97, 107” under the six humps. The six little humps correspond to the “6” in “316”; “Frustrated Parent” somehow thought they were six tens, instead of six ones.

        So what Jack did by leaving out the one ten is 427-306, which is 121, which is his answer.

        Like

  10. John Denney says:

    Dear Jack,

    316 is three hundreds, one ten, and six ones. You were correct to move left on the number line from 427 by three hundreds and six ones, but you neglected to move left by the one ten.

    Helpfully yours,
    Mr. Denney

    Like

    • John Denney says:

      Sorry for the double post. Thought I had messed up somehow because I didn’t see what I thought I had posted. Guess it was stuck in moderation.
      Was it the verse? My second posted immediately.
      ————————-
      No, it was not the verse. Bible verses are welcome here. Sometimes weird stuff happens – sorry! –Admin

      Like

  11. LetJusticePrevail" says:

    Dear Jack:

    Face it kid, you’re screwed. No matter how hard you work, or how much you try to learn, we will be there to make sure you only have mediocre skills when you graduate high school.

    Sure you’ll have a 50/50 chance of getting into college, if we don’t give your spot to someone who might suffer from “disparate impact” and if your parents can afford to send you (sorry but the gov’t will have spent all their tax dollars sending Juan, Jamal, La-a, and Rosita to college).

    Even if you manage to graduate, despite these financial obstacles we have placed in your path, one of our well-placed liberal professors will probably have convinced you to major in 14th century French literature (or something equally inane) and you will have no hope of ever gaining productive employment.

    But let’s say that you’re one in a million, and you do manage to “beat the system” and actually land a decent job. We’ll just tax you to death and redistribute your earnings to fund a gun buy-back program in East St Louis, an abortion clinic in NYC,and the building of a new Mosque somewhere in the heartland of America. So why bother? Just shut up, do what your teacher tells you, and remember to vote “Democrat” when the time comes.

    From DC with Love,
    “Uncle Sugar”

    Like

    • LetJusticePrevail" says:

      That’s the exact kind of crap my grandson brings home. Makes me so mad I want to go to his school and slap the taste right out of his teacher’s mouth. Or at least ask her what she thinks about all this new garbage.

      Like

  12. Dave says:

    Common core is the last desperate effort by the leftwing education bureaucrats to help conceal the fact that Black students cannot keep up with humans.
    “Hey, let’s make math impossible, murky & subjective so nobody can pass, then we’ll all look alike!!”

    Like

  13. Pingback: My Article Read (3-20-2014) | My Daily Musing

  14. unitron says:

    I don’t know anything about Common Core.

    Once I was able to mentally filter out “Frustrated Parent’s” work from “Jack’s”, I could see where Jack made the error.

    But what I could immediately see was that this wasn’t designed to teach or test subtraction, or even to come up with an answer of 111, it was all about understanding how the number line works, so sticking a -316 under a 417 is actually irrelevant.

    Maybe if they’d called it “the X axis” instead of “the number line”, Mr/Ms EE would have understood what was actually going on.

    Like

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